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From: Paul Keltjens :      PAK-at-eo.ine.philips.nl
Date: Mon, 2 Jan 1995 14:23:26 GMT
Subject: Semiconductor application support position at Philips Electron O

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Philips Electron Optics

invites applicators for the position of

Application Support Engineer


an exiting new position created for our major expansion in the micro-electronics
industry.

If you have
- Experience in defect review/yield improvement,
- Background in lithography and CD measurement,
- The ability to communicate, train, and assist users of equipment, and work in
a fledging highly motivated group,
- An enquiry mind with imagination and the drive to see your ideas
implemented,
- PhD in a related area, or equivalent experience,
- Preferably experience with scanning electron microscopy,
- And you would like to have your home base in the Netherlands,

then please send your C.V. without delay to the undersigned.


Renumeration and conditions of employment are attractive for the right person.

Mr. J. Jackman
Philips Electron Optics
Building AAE-1
P.O. Box 218
5600 MD Eindhoven
The Netherlands
Tel. +31 40 766548
Fax. +31 40 766164
E-mail: jjn-at-eo.ine.philips.nl





From: MCMOULDK-at-usthk.ust.hk
Date: 03 Jan 1995 11:54:41 +0800
Subject: SUTW windows for EDX

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Greetings and Happy New Year,

Last year we had a failure of our SUTW (super ultra thin window) on our TEM
EDS detector. This is our second failure of a SUTW, although not on the same
machine (a SEM) and not from the same manufacture. After talking to several
people, it has become apparent that the reliability of the SUTW is not very
good, although manufactures claim otherwise.

I am curious what other users experiences with SUTW windows are. In
particular what are the typical down times when a failure occurs, do you
take any special precautions or modify your operation procedure, would you
put a SUTW (instead of a standard window or turret detector) on an SEM for
instant which is vented frequently using nitrogen?
What was the reason for the failure?



Keith Moulding.

MCPC,
HKUST,
Hong Kong.




From: MR RHM CROSS :      EURC-at-giraffe.ru.ac.za
Date: Tue, 3 Jan 1995 08:18:14 GMT+0200
Subject: safety issue - eyes

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Does anyone have information on eye damage resulting from long-term
use of electron microscopes?

Robin Cross





From: Lehtinen Pirjo :      plehtine-at-butler.cc.tut.fi
Date: Tue, 3 Jan 1995 09:11:10 +0200 (EET)
Subject: STM/AFM

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Does anyone have experience on P4 SPM MDT scanning tunneling microscopes
and atomic force microscopes? These devices are produced by someone at an
institute that used to be a part of Russian Academy of Sciences.


mail me or this listserver if you have ever heard about them, and i'll be
grateful!

plehtine-at-butler.cc.tut.fi






From: Luc Analbers :      L.J.S.Analbers-at-med.ruu.nl
Date: Tue, 03 Jan 1995 08:38:49 +0100
Subject: PBS

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Hello everyone and a happy new year!

Can anyone tell me wich concentration PBS should be used in immune-incubations
for LM and EM?
We got a little bit confused because some books mention to use a 0.1M PBS
solution, and some mention to use 0.01M PBS.
I can imagine that using a ten-fold solution can give problems.
Wich concentration is the best (immuno-fluorescence LM and immuno-EM)?

Please let me know !
Thanks

Luc Analbers

***************************************************************************
* Luc Analbers * E-mail: Analbers-at-med.ruu.nl *
***************************************************************************
* Utrecht University * LLL *
* Medical Faculty * LLL *
* Dept. Medical Physiology & * LLL A *
* Sportsmedicine * LLL AA AA *
* PO-box 80043 * LLL AA AA *
* Zip: 3508 TA * LLLLLAAALLLAAALLL *
* Utrecht The Netherlands * LLLLLAAALLLAAALLLL *
* Tel: 030 - 538911 * AAA AAA *
* Fax: 030 - 539036 * AAA AAA *
***************************************************************************




From: R100186-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Jan 1995 12:45:56 -0500
Subject: unsubscribe

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Please cancel my subscribtion.
r100186




From: mmace-at-tiac.net (mmace)
Date: Tue, 3 Jan 1995 18:46:33 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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Message-Id: {m0rPEIw-00010YC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

subscribe microscopy





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu
Date: Tue, 3 Jan 1995 17:25:00 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Glut binding to polysaccharides

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Aloha!
What is known about the interaction between glutaraldehyde and
polysaccharides? Does glut bind to polysaccharides in a way that would
cause fluorescence (beyond that which binds to the small amount of
protein that is present in the sample)? From what I understand, it is
known how it binds to protein and that it binds to glycogen, but that
it doesn't fix soluble polysaccharides, is that right? Could anyone help
us out with the chemistry beyond that? Thanks in advance!

And a Happy New Year to you all!

Tina Weatherby Carvalho
Biological EM Facility
University of Hawaii





From: MARTIN SAUNDERS :      ms-at-siva.bris.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 04 Jan 1995 11:01:41 GMT
Subject: Post doc position at Bristol

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Dear all,

I have been asked to post this by the head of my research group (John
Steeds). He would be grateful if you could pass it on to anyone who
might be interested.

Any replies should go direct to him at J.W.Steeds-at-bristol.ac.uk

Happy New Year to you all,

Martin Saunders.

***************************************************************************

POST DOCTORAL RESEARCH POST


DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS,
UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL,
UK.


A post doctoral research assistantship is available for research on the
microstructure and processing of unique metastable Ti-Mg alloys produced by
vapour mixing and condensation. The material is made at the Defence
Research Agency (Farnborough, UK) and close collaboration will be required
with research workers at this Research Agency.

In the as-deposited state, the material is a porous, supersaturated solid
solution with a nanoscale microstructure. The research will involve hot
vacuum pressing and thermal treatments to eliminate porosity and obtain an
optimum dispersed phase microstructure.

The hot working will be carried out in the Mechanical Engineering
Department in an Instron servo controlled press equipped with a high vacuum
chamber. The microstructural studies will require the use of high spatial
resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated analytical
techniques in the Physics Department. Some hardness and mechanical testing
will be carried out in collaboration with DRA (Farnborough) to relate the
microstructure to the mechanical properties.

The person to be appointed should be able to provide evidence of proven
ability at relating microstructure, processing and properties in these
novel alloys whilst working in an interdisciplinary team as well as
considerable experience of advanced transmission electron microscopy
techniques.

For more information please contact Professor J.W. Steeds by e-mail at

J.W.Steeds-at-bristol.ac.uk




From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Jan 1995 10:18:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Glut binding to polysaccharides

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Tina,

I do not know about glut/polysaccharides interactions, but glut by itself
does fluroses(sp) at the same (or close to) wavelength as FITC.

Good Luck,

Ed Calomeni




From: Jaime Dant :      jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 11:25:32 -0600
Subject: Bubbles in formvar coated grids

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Quick question!
I am getting small bubbles in my formvar ciated grids. How do I get rid of
these bubbles? I am not overtly introducing moisture onto my glass slides
am I am using EM Sciences prepared 0.25% formvar from a new bottle!!!

I don't want to make a project out of this, so input is appreciated.

Thank you for your time.

Jaime A. Dant
jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu

Sorry about the typo, thats formvar coated grids.




From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 13:46:08 -0500
Subject: Bubbles in Formvar

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Hello Jaime and all,
In the way of a suggestion, you might try a new source for your formvar
solution. I had the same problem after about 20 years of coating girds with
no problem. It turned out the powder (I make my own solution) I was getting
was contaminated with water. I found this out when I called the supplier
and asked for a bottle from a new lot and all they had was that one lot. So
I ordered from a new source and the problem was resolved. It, of course,
took about 2 months of hair pulling and gnashing of teeth to work through
all this. I hope you can resolve your problem more easily.

Sandra Zane
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 09:52:46 -1000 (HST)
Subject: clarification of glut-polysacc. query

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Let me clarify my question on the interaction between glutaraldehyde and
polysaccharides, and the fluorescence with confocal microscopy---

As I understand it, the people who asked me about this are actually
rather happy that their specimen (whatever it is) is fluorescing so well
and giving great photos. But they would like to be able to explain it.
I gather they think they don't have all that much protein in their sample
and so would like to explain it away by glut binding to polysaccharides.
Is this plausible? Or can someone come up with another explanation?

Thanks, again, for musing on this!

It's 79 F, clear, sunny, and the surf is up. Happy New Year!

Tina Weatherby Carvalho
Biological EM Facility
University of Hawaii





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Jan 1995 14:59:18 EST
Subject: safety issue - eyes

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Dear Robin,
There is unlikely to be damage to the eye due either to EM use per se
or to radiation--in the first place, eye tissue is not fast-growing like in-
testinal epithelium, and in the second place, the radiation levels should be
low. At our HVEM, for example, there is { 0.25 mr/hr (usually { { 0.25 mr/hr),
and the column is monitored and interlocked to shut off the beam if the level
exceeds 0.75 mr/hr at any of three positions. The most serious eye safety
problem, IMHO, is exposure to the chemicals used in specimen preparation.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-QuickMail.Yale.edu
Date: 4 Jan 1995 16:57:08 -0500
Subject: Glut-polysacc.

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Tina,
It sounds like you are fixing plant tissue, which often is autofluorescent.
An easy way to check, of course, is to look at unfixed tissue.
As this is the main point of your question it seems pointless to go too deeply
into gluteraldehyde chemistry. If you are interested, though, I will put you
in contact with an expert ( he wouldn't forgive me for making his name too
public).
Gluteraldehyde reacts very rapidly with amines to form numerous products. The
well known reactions are with primary amines but sulfhydral groups from
cysteine and imidazole side chains of histidine also help in the cross-linking
process. Theoretically, primary amino groups on amino lipids should also
react with gluteraldehyde.
As far as I understand it, there is little chance of gluteraldehyde
cross-linking carbohydrates. That they are retained in fixed material is
probably due to the cross-linking of nearby proteins which hold them in place.
The best visual demonstration I saw was the addition of gluteraldehyde to
homogenates of different tissues that were stirring in beakers. Liver and
striated muscle gelled the instant gluteraldehyde was added. Brain gelled
after a couple of hours and apple leaves were still stirring when we returned
the next day!
Hope this is of help to you.
If it makes you feel better, in New Haven it is dark before 5 pm, there is a
light dusting of snow on the ground and it is cold (below zero).
What's it like in the Twin Cities anyone?








From: _ _ _ _ _ MARK W. LUND _ _ _ _ _ :      LUNDM-at-PHYSC1.BYU.EDU
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 18:09 MST
Subject: SUTW window failures

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The subject of ultra thin window failures is one of extreme interest to me,
since MOXTEK is the largest supplier of these windows. I am afraid that
an informal survey on the Net will give warped data, since usually only
those that have problems respond. We have supplied over 5000 ultra thin
windows. We have a very good idea of failure rates over the first year,
which is our warantee period to the EDX manufacturer. We also have some
visability beyond that, because we often do failure analysis on windows
for EDX manufactures as a service.

The data vary due to the fact that some microscopes are harder on windows
than others. The most common failure in the field is due to particles
striking the window during venting. The second most common failure is
touching the window with fingers, stages, samples. etc. Very rarely
does the window fail in such a manner as to be traced to defects in the
manufacture. All this being said we have data showing over 7 years
mean time before failure from one EDX manufacturer, and a total of 5%
returns over the history of SUTW shipments from another manufacturer.

I would love to get anecdotal information from people that have had
problems with x-ray windows to help us in making the window more reliable.
These windows are by very nature extremely fragile. Only by the
most careful manufacture, testing, and installation could the high
reliability of these windows have been reached.

regards

Mark W. Lund
MOXTEK, Inc.
Orem UT




From: Gardnerjs-at-yvax.byu.edu (gardnerjs)
Date: Wed, 04 Jan 1995 18:40:08 -0700 (MST)
Subject: TEM - Bone Decalcification

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Hi everyone:

We are beginning a new project with bone tissue. Samples are being
prepared for TEM and we have a couple of procedures for decalcification.
We have not found any procedures for detecting the endpoint of the decal.
process.

I would grateful for any assistance regarding decal. endpoint detection and
additional decal. procedures.

Thanks for your help,

John

John S. Gardner
Microscopy Lab
128 WIDB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602

Phone: 801-378-2202






From: echernof-at-ucs.indiana.edu (Chernoff)
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 21:37:58 -0500
Subject: AFM: paper laminate, chemical contrast

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Some time ago, Dr. Lisa Detter-Hoskin asked about edge wick
experiments on a paper laminate material. She invited "any other
thoughts about evaluating the morphology".

We have found that Scanning Probe/Atomic Force Microscopy yields
interesting information about the surface structure of wood (and
many other) fibers.
Recently in our laboratory we have begun to supplement the
topographic information of AFM by developing methodology for point
chemical analysis. In fact, one of our early successes was in
distinguishing lignin from cellulose on wood pulp fibers.

If this type of information interests you, please contact me.

DON CHERNOFF 317-251-1364
ADVANCED SURFACE MICROSCOPY FAX: 317-254-8690
6009 KNYGHTON RD. E-MAIL: echernof-at-ucs.indiana.edu
INDIANAPOLIS IN 46220 Toll free: 800-374-8557
ASM is an independent analytical service and contract research laboratory.





From: echernof-at-ucs.indiana.edu (Chernoff)
Date: Wed, 4 Jan 1995 21:36:29 -0500
Subject: AFM: NanoScope III height formula

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Gernot Fuchs asked about the NanoScope III height formula, in order
to scale bitmap data for display by the NS3.
I have studied the NS3 data format in detail, in order to create a
software package called "GP3 - Enhancement Software for NanoScope
III" (by the way, this software is available for sale).

Here are some specific answers to Fuchs' questions:
-The factor (Zmax * 2) is used because Zmax = 220V in the data file
parameter list, but the total Z range of the piezo is 440V.
-Fuchs may have neglected an important parameter from the "image
list". In version 2 software, this is "\Z scale". In version 3
software, this is "\Z scale height". It is necessary to supply an
appropriate value for this parameter in the file header in order for
NS3 to display the data correctly. Some experimentation might be
necessary to select the correct value for Fuchs' purpose--I only
considered this problem going in the opposite direction.

DON CHERNOFF 317-251-1364
ADVANCED SURFACE MICROSCOPY FAX: 317-254-8690
6009 KNYGHTON RD. E-MAIL: echernof-at-ucs.indiana.edu
INDIANAPOLIS IN 46220 Toll free: 800-374-8557
ASM is an independent analytical service and contract research laboratory.





From: Hans.Ekwall-at-ah.slu.se (Hasse Ekwall)
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 10:20:34 +0100
Subject: Polychromatic stains for epoxy sections - muscle fibers

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We are trying to classify muscle fibers on semithin sections embedded in
Agar 100 for further analyze in the electron microscope. Normally one uses
toulidine blue as staining but we would like to classify the fibers of
different (type IIA, IIB, I,... etc) at the light microscopic level to be
able to cut out the right fiber for EM.
Is there a staining method for epoxy sections that is useful for this purpose?
There is some polychromatic stains but I cant recall the reference.
Anyone having any ideas?


SWEDISH UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Hans Ekwall
Dept. Anatomy & Histology
Box 7011, S-750 07 Uppsala, SWEDEN

E-mail Hans.Ekwall-at-ah.slu.se
Voice: +46 18 672141 Telefax: +46 18 672852






From: STUTZ-at-ENH.NIST.GOV
Date: Thu, 05 Jan 1995 07:31:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject:

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subscribe




From: COOK-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 9:12:08 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Liquid helium stages for TEM

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We are contemplating the purchase of a liuid helium cooling stage for
a TEM with a side-entry goniometer. What companies besides Oxford Instruments
and Gatan manufacture LHe stages? Would those of you who use such stages
please give me your opinions about your equipment? Specifically, what are the
lowest temperatures reached routinely, and what is the degree of difficulty in
using the equipment?

Russell Cook
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, IL 60439
(708)252-7194




From: loewe-at-uni-bonn.de (Andreas Loewe)
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 1994 13:53:25 +0100
Subject: Who is working on amorphous inorganic states?

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X-Sender: UNC900-at-ibm.rhrz.uni-bonn.de
Message-Id: {v01510100ab08bc2a09fa-at-[131.220.128.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi all!

Does anybody know about a newsgroup or a list dealing with amorphous
inorganic states???
Or is anybody involved by himself/herself???

Any comments highly welcomed!!!!

Nicole Wartner






From: Jean-Luc Rouviere :      rouvier-at-drfmc.ceng.cea.fr
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 16:12:07 --100
Subject: Who is working on amorphous inorganic states?

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Hi everyone,

I am about to buy a dye sublimation printer and hesitate between the 3 following products.
1) Tektronix 440 (that has replaced phaser IISDX)
2) Kodak XLS8600 (that has replaced the kodak color Ease)
3) Codonics NP1600 (based on the kodak XLS8600)
Our electron microscopy images are all made of grey levels and I would like to use the new monochrome ribbons that are cheaper than the coloured one.
More precisely, my idea would be to work with monochrome ribbons most of the times and from time to time to use coloured ribbons.
* The Tektronix seems too be well adapted to do this because it has a special ribbon tray.
However, its black ribbons make green-grey pictures
* The Kodak monochrome ribbon gives more grey pictures, but the exchange of the ribbon could be more precarious as there is no special ribbon tray.
* Codonics will sell the monochrome ribbons in France only in April ? (Although the kodak monochrome ribbons that should be the same are already available ?)

Has anyone any comments or experience on that ?
Has anyone found problem running one of the three previous printers (especially the Codonics with its special image conversion software) ?

Thank you in advance





From: Fermin, Cesar :      Fermin.Cesar-at-tmc.tulane.edu
Date: 05 Jan 1995 11:58:47 -0600
Subject: Processor & grid stainer cheap

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We want to sell,l and will let go as pair to best offer a 1) TEM Lynx (Leica)
Tissue Processor and a 2) Grid Leica Ultra Stainer. If interested, and your
offer is serious (that is not a couple hundred bucks) I will compile offers for
a week and then contact the winner and runner up. Both items were purchased
new in 1990 for about $15,000 and were hardly used, mainly because the work
load is not sifficien and when use we end up wasting solutions. I will include
some solutions with instruments.

Please respond directly to me {Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu} , NOT to the user list.

************************************************************
*Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D \|*|/ Fax (504) 587-7389 *
*Tulane Medical School /|*|\ Answ. Mach.(504) 584-2618 *
*Pathology/SL79 \|*|/ Secretary (504) 584-2436 *
*New Orleans, La 70 112 /|*|\ Lab (504) 5841 *
*Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu -} Director of Morphological Services*
************************************************************




From: hmeekes-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Herman Meekes)
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 11:13:45 -0600
Subject: Re: Polychromatic stains for epoxy sections - muscle fibers

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On January 5 1995 Hans Ekwall wrote:

} We are trying to classify muscle fibers on semithin sections embedded in
} Agar 100 for further analyze in the electron microscope. Normally one uses
} toulidine blue as staining but we would like to classify the fibers of
} different (type IIA, IIB, I,... etc) at the light microscopic level to be
} able to cut out the right fiber for EM.
} Is there a staining method for epoxy sections that is useful for this purpose?
} There is some polychromatic stains but I cant recall the reference.
} Anyone having any ideas?
}
}
} SWEDISH UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
} Hans Ekwall
} Dept. Anatomy & Histology
} Box 7011, S-750 07 Uppsala, SWEDEN
}
} E-mail Hans.Ekwall-at-ah.slu.se
} Voice: +46 18 672141 Telefax: +46 18 672852
}


A relatively simple and fast procedure for polychromatic staining of epoxy
sections has been published by J.Tolivia et al in Histochemistry 101:
51-55. I have not used it myself. Ask me for details if this reference is
not readily available to you.

Greetings!


Herman Meekes
Biological Sciences ______________ ______________
University of Missouri ---__ \ / __---
109 Tucker Hall ------__\---/__------
Columbia, MO. 65211 \( )/
Tel: 314-882-0171 V
Fax: 314-882-0123 / \
e-mail: hmeekes-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu /___\








From: Chris Frethem (CBN) :      frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 10:49:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Glut-polysacc.

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I can't contribute to the glut-polysacc. discussion, but since you asked
for a weather report... a very mild winter here so far, but went skating
last night under the stars; temp -6 F, wind chill below -20. Cold nose,
cold toes, but had the ice all to myself. Warm breezes are nice, but
Winter's great too. Need more snow, though. Thanks for the review of glut
reactivity.



=======================================================================
Chris Frethem (612)624-4652 (voice)
Cell Biology & Neuroanatomy (612)624-8118 (FAX)
U of MN, Minneapolis e-mail: frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu



On 4 Jan 1995, Paul Webster wrote:

} Tina,
} It sounds like you are fixing plant tissue, which often is autofluorescent.
} An easy way to check, of course, is to look at unfixed tissue.
} As this is the main point of your question it seems pointless to go too deeply
} into gluteraldehyde chemistry. If you are interested, though, I will put you
} in contact with an expert ( he wouldn't forgive me for making his name too
} public).
} Gluteraldehyde reacts very rapidly with amines to form numerous products. The
} well known reactions are with primary amines but sulfhydral groups from
} cysteine and imidazole side chains of histidine also help in the cross-linking
} process. Theoretically, primary amino groups on amino lipids should also
} react with gluteraldehyde.
} As far as I understand it, there is little chance of gluteraldehyde
} cross-linking carbohydrates. That they are retained in fixed material is
} probably due to the cross-linking of nearby proteins which hold them in place.
} The best visual demonstration I saw was the addition of gluteraldehyde to
} homogenates of different tissues that were stirring in beakers. Liver and
} striated muscle gelled the instant gluteraldehyde was added. Brain gelled
} after a couple of hours and apple leaves were still stirring when we returned
} the next day!
} Hope this is of help to you.
} If it makes you feel better, in New Haven it is dark before 5 pm, there is a
} light dusting of snow on the ground and it is cold (below zero).
} What's it like in the Twin Cities anyone?
}
}
}
}
}




From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 14:50:38 -0600
Subject: TEM of hair

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Hair is a difficult tissue to infiltrate and embed. We've been using an
extended infiltration protocol with Embed 812. Cutting thicker than usual
sections (150 nm) gives marginal results. Has anyone worked with various hair
samples lately? We're looking for better infiltration and less wrinkling of the
cortex and medulary areas. We'd also like to get TEM pictures of whole cross
and longitudinal sections. Any ideas???

--

Darryl Krueger
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Jan 1995 13:34:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Bubbles in formvar coated grids

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Jamie-
0.25% may be a little thin, I am used to using 0.75% formvar
just my 2 cents
-Mike

On Wed, 4 Jan 1995, Jaime Dant wrote:

}
}
}
} 
}
} Quick question!
} I am getting small bubbles in my formvar ciated grids. How do I get rid of
} these bubbles? I am not overtly introducing moisture onto my glass slides
} am I am using EM Sciences prepared 0.25% formvar from a new bottle!!!
}
} I don't want to make a project out of this, so input is appreciated.
}
} Thank you for your time.
}
} Jaime A. Dant
} jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu
}
} Sorry about the typo, thats formvar coated grids.
}




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 05 Jan 1995 16:54:04 EST
Subject: RE: safety issue - eyes

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John Mardinly writes:


Just because eye tissue is not fast growing, and there is no exaggerated risk
of tumors, don't neglect the possibility of cataracts. The susceptibility
varies with individuals, but radiation is a definite risk factor.
--John Mardinly
Intel Materials Tech.
Dear John,
It is true that radiation can be a risk factor, and it should be mon-
itored for an EM instrument. In our case, with { 0.25 mr/hr, a full shift's
use of the HVEM (assuming that the beam is only on 50% of the time) will de-
liver { 1 mr. Over the course of a year, this adds up to { 500 mr, the limit
for non-radiation-workers. If other EM's produce as little radiation as the
HVEM, the exposures will also be below the allowed limit. Of course, expos-
ure to any radiation should be kept to "as low as reasonably achievable", in
the words of the NCRP. I would still guess that there are many other sources
of eye damage more significant than radiation exposure from an EM.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-QuickMail.Yale.edu
Date: 5 Jan 1995 17:08:40 -0500
Subject: Shark-TEM

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Message-ID: {n1422796673.73692-at-QuickMail.Yale.edu}

Fixing shark tissue shouldn't be too difficult should it? I used 4%
formaldehyde (from paraformaldehyde, in 100 mM PO4 buffer, pH 7.4) which
works well for MDCK cells but swelled up the shark cells. My guess is the
osmolarity is too low and needs to be closer to 1000mOm. Does anyone have any
advice and/or recipes?
I use this fixative to prepare cells for cryosection immunocytochemistry so
that I can do light and electron microscopy on the same tissue pieces (yes 4%
FA for EM doe work). I have no objection to using gluteraldehyde, acrolein or
any other legal substance if it works.

Thank you to all who responded to the weather question.
Brief summary:
Colder than here in Minneapolis and Madison (wind chill -20F, quelle
surprise).
Wonderful in Sidney, Australia (how is the surf?),
and only two more weeks before they get to see the sun again in Tromso,
Norway.
Thanks in advance,
Paul Webster,
Yale School of Medicine.





From: SALLY STOWE :      STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 11:23:40 EST10
Subject: Quartz crystals for Balzers thickness monitor

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We have a Balzers freeze-fracture 301, not exactly the latest model
but working very well, and have struck a problem with the supply of
crystals for the thickness monitor, which is the model QSK 113.
Balzers evidently no longer supply them -- has anyone else had this
problem and found another source?

Thanks,
Sally
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sally Stowe Australian National Univ.
Facility Coordinator Canberra, AUSTRALIA
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit Ph 61 6 249 2743
RSBS, Box 475
Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au FAX 61 6 249 4891

------------------------------------- --------------------------------
-





From: RETEP-at-anat.uct.ac.za
Date: 6 Jan 95 09:56:38 SAST-2
Subject: Re: Hair

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950106095638.480-at-anat.uct.ac.za}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

New Year greetings to everyone,

Weather in Cape Town Hot and windy typical for this time of year. For
the surfers out there SURF IS UP.

Getting to the query regarding Hair.

We routinely look at hair samples (albino and normal). We use a
standard Spurr resin which gives quite a good result. I do extend
the infiltration time by not putting in accelerator and allowing the
resin to infiltrate overnight at 40 degrees C. I have also obtained
reasonable results with Molleneur's Epon / Araldite mixture slightly
modified with the same extended time in the oven for the initial
infiltration. Infiltration with the accelerator is also as long as
possible at 40 degrees before embedding when using the Epon /
Araldite mix.

Using this method I can get good cross and longtitudinal sections.

Hope you have some success with these.

Peter
_______________________________________________________________


-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
-at- -at-
-at- Peter D. G. Richards -at-
-at- Dept Anatomy and Cell Biology -at-
-at- UCT Medical School -at-
-at- Observatory -at-
-at- 7925 -at-
-at- RSA -at-
-at- Tel: 021-406 6285. -at-
-at- Internet: retep-at-anat.uct.ac.za -at-
-at- -at-
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-




From: STUTZ-at-ENH.NIST.GOV
Date: Fri, 06 Jan 1995 08:41:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Needed! Beam-stable embedding material for SEM

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I am working on imaging polished cross sections of portland cement particles
by BE and XR imaging in the SEM. The cement powder is mixed with a resin
(L.R. White) and the resin is cured. Cement particles are typically finer
than 100 microns. As about half of the polished section is resin I am
having difficulty with the operating conditions necessary (12kV, 5nA) burning
the resin. Does anyone have suggestions for a better embedding medium? The
ideal material would be stable under the beam, not allow plucking of fine
particles during polishing, be fairly hard, and not be hazardous to handle
or for disposal. Thank you in advance for your suggestions.




From: zhang :      zhang-at-macgw1.crd.ge.com
Date: 6 Jan 1995 08:42:41 U
Subject: subscribe

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Message-Id: {n1422740675.42601-at-macgw1.crd.ge.com}

subscribe microscopy




From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 11:06:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: Quartz crystals for Balzers thickness monitor

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

In message Fri, 6 Jan 1995 06:23:40 -0500,
"SALLY STOWE" {STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au} writes:

} We have a Balzers freeze-fracture 301, not exactly the latest model
} but working very well, and have struck a problem with the supply of
} crystals for the thickness monitor, which is the model QSK 113.
} Balzers evidently no longer supply them -- has anyone else had this
} problem and found another source?
}
} Thanks,
} Sally
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} Sally Stowe Australian National Univ.
} Facility Coordinator Canberra, AUSTRALIA
} ANU Electron Microscopy Unit Ph 61 6 249 2743
} RSBS, Box 475
} Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au FAX 61 6 249 4891
}
} ------------------------------------- --------------------------------
} -
}
***************

I have even an even older Balzers BA360 that I use for teaching. If you
have not thrown away the used quartz crystals that had stopped functioning due
to heavy deposition of platinum/carbon on them, you can remove the deposits
by carefully "rubbing" them out with an unused pencil eraser (the one on
the back of pencils work fine) and reuse them!

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 09:19:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Needed! Beam-stable embedding material for SEM

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You might try Streuers "EPOFIX" resin, it is avail. through most EM
vendors, it cures very hard, and is recomended for non-biological materials.
-Mike


On Fri, 6 Jan 1995 STUTZ-at-ENH.NIST.GOV wrote:

} I am working on imaging polished cross sections of portland cement particles
} by BE and XR imaging in the SEM. The cement powder is mixed with a resin
} (L.R. White) and the resin is cured. Cement particles are typically finer
} than 100 microns. As about half of the polished section is resin I am
} having difficulty with the operating conditions necessary (12kV, 5nA) burning
} the resin. Does anyone have suggestions for a better embedding medium? The
} ideal material would be stable under the beam, not allow plucking of fine
} particles during polishing, be fairly hard, and not be hazardous to handle
} or for disposal. Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
}




From: STUTZ
Date: Friday, January 06, 1995 08:41AM
Subject: Needed! Beam-stable embedding material for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am working on imaging polished cross sections of portland cement particles
by BE and XR imaging in the SEM. The cement powder is mixed with a resin
(L.R. White) and the resin is cured. Cement particles are typically finer
than 100 microns. As about half of the polished section is resin I am
having difficulty with the operating conditions necessary (12kV, 5nA)
burning
the resin. Does anyone have suggestions for a better embedding medium? The
ideal material would be stable under the beam, not allow plucking of fine
particles during polishing, be fairly hard, and not be hazardous to handle
or for disposal. Thank you in advance for your suggestions.




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 06 Jan 95 16:48:51 EST
Subject: Needed! Beam-stable embedding material for SEM

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We have several materials that are used extensively in SEM appliactions that you
may want to consider:

EpoxiMet - Epoxy
AcryliMet - Acrylic
PolyMet - Polyester

These vary in hardness, cure rate, clarity etc. so you can select the one that
best fits your needs. If you provide your name and mailing address, I'll be
please to send you specifications on these materials along with prices. I'll
also send information on our other materials for cutting, grinding, polishing
etc for metallography and electron microscopy.

Thank you!

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 714-492-2600
800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: _ _ _ _ _ MARK W. LUND _ _ _ _ _ :      LUNDM-at-PHYSC1.BYU.EDU
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 16:48 MST
Subject: SUTW window failures--correction

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In my previous post I mentioned that we have supplied over 5000 ultra
thin windows. This should have been 'over 4000 ultra thin windows.'
It just seems like like a lot more....:)
With my integrity back intact,
Mark Lund
MOXTEK, Inc
Orem UT




From: HAHNP-at-JEFLIN.TJU.EDU
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 21:12:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: dye-sub printer evaulation

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} I am about to buy a dye sublimation printer and hesitate between the 3
following} products.
} 1) Tektronix 440 (that has replaced phaser IISDX)
} 2) Kodak XLS8600 (that has replaced the kodak color Ease)
} 3) Codonics NP1600 (based on the kodak XLS8600)

We did a month long evaluation of several dye-sub printers for our facility,
and finally received shipment of the Seiko ColorpointPSF dye-sub last week.
Our original budget was in the $7,000 range, however, once the ethernet
option, memory, extral printer trays, etc were factored in, the printer camein
at just over $9,000.

For our evaluation we had color confocal images as well as b&w scanned gels.
We sent out the files to the various resellers for sample prints. To do an
apples to apples comparison. Incidentally, Codonics was the only
organization with an ablitiy to ftp image files, however, their connection
appeared to be a SLIP connection requiring a tremendous amount of patience
when ftp ing.

We received samples from all three manufactures as well as Seiko. Now, we
do know from previous postings that the quality of the printer driver often
determines the quality of the hardcopy prints. There are a tremendous
number of settings when printing to the dye-sub including, linear inks,
color ramps, etc, things catering more to the pubishing industry. However, as
we did not have the time to get into all that, we just took whatever each
manufacture printed at face value. The bulk of our printing needs are gels and
images from a phosphorimager.

The interesting thing is that although the Codonics was the pricier printer
with rave reviews from almost everyone, we found the Seiko noticeably better
for color. For b&w, the Seiko exhibited truely dark blacks. Tecktronix &
Condonics prints had either a brownish or greenish tint. The Seiko also has
the added advantage of printing on cheaper thermal paper. In evaluating
dye-sub to purchase try to get sample prints of your own image files. Codonics
sells their printer exclusively while the other manufacturers use resellers.

Feel free to email me questions directly regarding our dye-sub pruchase. There
is a reseller based in New York who was tremendously helpful in obtaining the
various sample prints. Our core facility is seriously considering the purchase
of another dye-sub, the Itochu Pictograph, the Cadillac (or Lexus) of dye-subs.



._____________________
| Peter J. Hahn
| -------------
| Thomas Jefferson University
Jefferson Cancer Institute Confocal Facility
JCI-BLSB-915
233 South 10th Street
Philadelphia, PA. 19107
tel : 215-955-4770 |
fax : 215-923-1098 |
hahnp-at-jeflin.tju.edu |
-------------+-----------------+----+------+





From: MCMOULDK-at-usthk.ust.hk
Date: 07 Jan 1995 11:30:37 +0800
Subject: WORKSHOP IN BEAUTIFUL HONG KONG

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**************************************************************************


WORKSHOP ON ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF MATERIALS
(organizers: Gareth Thomas & David Barber)

A workshop on Electron Microscopy will be held at the Hong Kong University of
Science and Technology between the 19th and 25th of February 1995.
The aim is to present the principles of scanning and transmission microscopy,
diffraction and microanalysis, specimen preparation and applications.
In addition to lectures there will be daily lab sessions on microscopy,
analytical methods and specimen preparation techniques.

The HKUST e.m. facility is part of a new well-equipped research centre, with
several scanning and transmission microscopes from Philips and JEOL available
for demonstration and hands-on use. The workshop is being supported by many
of the major manufactures including JEOL, Philips, Gatan, Oxford Instruments,
and South Bay Technology. Various ancillary pieces of equipment will be
for use by the participants and specialists from the companies will be
on hand to discuss any problems.

In addition, once the week of lectures and hands-on practice is finished,
you can relax with a free trip in a motorised Chinese Junk around beautiful
Hong Kong!

As the Workshop is limited in numbers, please be prompt in applying.

For further information and registration, please contact:

Miss Alice Yuen,
HKUST RandD Corporation Ltd,
The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon,
Hong Kong.

Telephone: (852) 2-358-7916, (852) 2-358-7917
Fax: (852) 2-358-2759, (852) 2-358-1493
E-mail: TTALICE-at-usthk.ust.hk


************************************************************************




From: Dr. R. Beanland :      beanland-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 09:38:34 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: TEM Epoxies

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Hello Netters,
Since there is a discussion on epoxy for SEM, I thought I'd
broaden the discussion a bit. Are there any epoxies available for making
TEM cross-sections (from semiconductor materials in this case) that cure
quickly and are stable during ion milling and under the electron beam?
I currently use 'Devcon' - a 5 minute epoxy - but it tends to evaporate
under the ion beam and isn't particularly stable in the electron beam. The
best glue I've ever used is good old Araldite, which you can buy at any
hardware store, but takes a long time to cure. Araldite 'rapid' seems to
have the same problems as Devcon. What else is available?


Richard Beanland
Dept. of Mat. Sci. and Eng.
University of Liverpool,
P.O. Box 147,
Liverpool L69 3BX
England.




From: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu (Steve Barlow)
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 10:27:51 -0800
Subject: nerve fiber em stains

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One of my researchers wants to identify nerve fibers in whole mounts of
Drosophila muscle preparations. Any suggestions for selectively labeling
nerves? References from the 1980s use cobalt filling and/or silver
nitrate, but note that muscle fiber will also take up the stain.

We would like to use both TEM and SEM. Backscatter mode for silver
impregnated nerves looked interesting, but not if both nerve and insect
muscle take up the label.

suggestions in this regard would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

steve

----------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
San Diego CA 92182-0057
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu





From: mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu (Michael Dunlap)
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 11:33:45 -0800
Subject: SEM of bone

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Message-Id: {m0rROpQ-00011LC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

Happy New Year to all -

We are beginning a project where we will be looking at the structure of
different regions of several bones that are subject to stress fractures.
We are planning to bleach the samples to remove the soft tissue and then
use acetone to remove any fat. We were wondering if it is necessary to
Critical Point Dry the samples or just allow air drying. Are there any
known changes that occur in bone material when allowed to air dry? In
addition, is fixation necessary when looking at just bone? I would
appreciate any comments. Thanks

Mike


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Michael Dunlap | lab (916) 752-0284 |
| Facility For Advanced Instrumentation | fax (510) 422-2282 |
| University of California | mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu |
| Davis CA, 95616 | |
===========================================================================






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 11:58:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM - Bone Decalcification

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-homer07.u.washington.edu

There are several tests, which I found in the book: "The
Preparation of Decalcified Sections" by Edward B. Brain, pub. by Charles C.
Thomas, 1966. Precipitation with calcium oxalate and calcein
fluorescence seem to be the best alternatives to pin pricking or
X-ray. Techniques for oxalate and calcein appear in pp. 138-141. I use
oxalate pptn.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu


On Wed, 4 Jan 1995, gardnerjs wrote:

} Hi everyone:
}
} We are beginning a new project with bone tissue. Samples are being
} prepared for TEM and we have a couple of procedures for decalcification.
} We have not found any procedures for detecting the endpoint of the decal.
} process.
}
} I would grateful for any assistance regarding decal. endpoint detection and
} additional decal. procedures.
}
} Thanks for your help,
}
} John
}
} John S. Gardner
} Microscopy Lab
} 128 WIDB
} Brigham Young University
} Provo, UT 84602
}
} Phone: 801-378-2202
}
}
}




From: mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu (Michael Dunlap)
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 13:34:27 -0800
Subject: SEM of bone

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Happy New Year to all -

We are beginning a project where we will be looking at the structure of
different regions of several bones that are subject to stress fractures.
We are planning to bleach the samples to remove the soft tissue and then
use acetone to remove any fat. We were wondering if it is necessary to
Critical Point Dry the samples or just allow air drying. Are there any
known changes that occur in bone material when allowed to air dry? In
addition, is fixation necessary when looking at just bone? I would
appreciate any comments. Thanks

Mike

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Michael Dunlap | lab (916) 752-0284 |
| Facility For Advanced Instrumentation | fax (510) 422-2282 |
| University of California | mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu |
| Davis CA, 95616 | |
===========================================================================






From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 14:28:01 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: nerve fiber em stains

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See the many fluorescent markers for neurons made by Molecular Probes,
Eugene, Oregon. They have a free very informative voluminous catalog and
reference guide to all their hundreds of fluorescent probes.

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830


On Mon, 9 Jan 1995, Steve Barlow wrote:

} One of my researchers wants to identify nerve fibers in whole mounts of
} Drosophila muscle preparations. Any suggestions for selectively labeling
} nerves? References from the 1980s use cobalt filling and/or silver
} nitrate, but note that muscle fiber will also take up the stain.
}
} We would like to use both TEM and SEM. Backscatter mode for silver
} impregnated nerves looked interesting, but not if both nerve and insect
} muscle take up the label.
}
} suggestions in this regard would be appreciated. Thanks in advance
}
} steve
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Steven Barlow
} EM Facility/Biology Dept.
} San Diego State University
} San Diego CA 92182-0057
} phone: (619) 594-4523
} fax: (619) 594-5676
} email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
}






From: Alan Pooley :      pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 17:22:57 -0500
Subject: film recorder for sem & betamax images

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I know others were discussing this but I have not kept up:
What do people consider to be the best but not hugely expensive film
recorder for recording digital images to 4 * 5 film at about 2000 lines
resolution?
Details: we want to make digital composite images of up to 16 objects
(bivalve shells) each digitally recorded on an ETEC SEM at about 2000 line
original resolution (we do not yet have this digitizer, wanting to get the
recorder specifications determined first, we are aiming toward the 4PI
company, any experience with them)
We also want to print color images, (probably to 35 mm film?) from beta max 3/4 inch tape (we do not yet have the beta tape reader but think we have a knowledgeable source (any recommendations welcome) We want the very highest resolution
for both color and spatial detail but realize that beta is only about 700
lines original (recorded on beta tape from 3 chip high resolution
cameras)
We make the b/w composite SEM images by enlarging 4 * 5 negatives to the
correct size, cutting out the images, pasting to black background special
paper, make a tmax or plus x 4 * 5 photographic negative, also photograph
text letraset independanly, combine the negative and make prints in the darkroom, no digital component.
We want to get rid of all the darkreoom except the final prints from a
negative (we need multiple copies) and also to be able to do the color
images from a beta tape through a macintosh via photoshop (we have photoshop
and a mac that probably does not have enough memory, we plan to upgrade
when we know what input and output requirements are needed.
Sorry abou the length but any help would be appreciated. The old
XL 7000 kodak film recorder was recommended by a user but is no longer mad
I like the Harris b/w dry silver printer but we need negatives to make
multiple copies and it does not do color AND? it may not be high enough
resolution for the composite pictures? any comments?
If I get good returns of info, I will post a summary to the group.
Alan Pooley Marine Science SEM lab rutgers univ 908 932 8959 x 225
pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu





From: {JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.intel.com}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-9-95 4:13pm
Subject: RE:EPOXIES

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Message-Id: {9501100024.AA15042-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: EPOXIES
Orig-Author: {"John Mardinly, 5-2346, Page 322-6490, SC2-24" {JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.intel.com} }:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Another epoxy that is excellent and particularly suited for rough surfaces is
Varian Torr-Seal. The stuff is made to patch high vacuum systems that will be
baked up to 250C. It is strong and extremely resistant to beam damage.

John Mardinly
Intel Materials Technolo





From: {beanland-at-liverpool.ac.uk}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-9-95 7:59am
Subject: TEM Epoxies

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Message-Id: {9501100023.AA15025-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: TEM Epoxies
Orig-Author: {"Dr. R. Beanland" {beanland-at-liverpool.ac.uk} }:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Hello Netters,
Since there is a discussion on epoxy for SEM, I thought I'd
broaden the discussion a bit. Are there any epoxies available for making
TEM cross-sections (from semiconductor materials in this case) that cure
quickly and are stable during ion milling and under the electron beam?
I currently use 'Devcon' - a 5 minute epoxy - but it tends to evaporate
under the ion beam and isn't particularly stable in the electron beam. The
best glue I've ever used is good old Araldite, which you can buy at any
hardware store, but takes a long time to cure. Araldite 'rapid' seems to
have the same problems as Devcon. What else is available?


Richard Beanland
Dept. of Mat. Sci. and Eng.
University of Liverpool,
P.O. Box 147,
Liverpool L69 3BX
Englan








From: Romuald Wroblewski onkpat :      Romuald.Wroblewski-at-onkpat.ki.se
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 13:09:26 +0200 (METDST)
Subject: PTA-stain for EM

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Happy New Year

I am intending to stain epoxy sections of kidney biopsies for
electron microscopy and am in need of a good receipe for a PTA staining
method.

-------------------------
Romuald Wroblewski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Pathology
Karolinska Institute
voice/fax:+46-8-7293597
-------------------------





From: watkinv :      watkinv-at-macgw1.crd.ge.com
Date: 10 Jan 1995 08:35:12 U
Subject:

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Subscribe Microscopy




From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=romwro(a)ki.se :      romwro-at-ki.se
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 08:16:56 -0600
Subject: PTA-stain for EM

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I am intending to stain epoxy sections of kidney biopsies for
electron microscopy and am in need of a good receipe for a PTA staining
method.

-------------------------
Romuald Wroblewski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Pathology
Karolinska Institute
voice/fax:+46-8-7293597
-------------------------





From: watkinv :      watkinv-at-macgw1.crd.ge.com
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 10:34:46 -0600
Subject: Bone prep for SEM

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 10 Jan 95 12:24:13 EST
Subject: Epoxies-where to purchase

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To all of thise interested in where to buy Epotek 353 ND:

You can get Epotek 353 ND from:

Epoxy Technology
14 Fortune Drive
Billerica, MA 01821

TEL 800-227-2201
FAX: 508-663-9782

You can also buy it from us in smaller quantities - albeit a higher price!

P/N 0714-010 price: $50/8 oz kit

The only advantage in buying from us is that you can combine it with your other
supply orders and we also can ship it to you the same day. Otherwise, you can
get a lot more for your money buying it direct from Epoxy Technology.

I hope this helps!

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: ROBERT K. NAUMAN :      RKN001-at-DENTAL3.AB.UMD.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 14:57:58 EST
Subject: Source for Xenon lamps

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Can anyone provide me with a source for a new 450 Watt Xenon Lamp?
Thanks!




Bob Nauman
Department of Microbiology
Univ. MD Dental School
Baltimore, MD 21201




From: lporter-at-goodyear.com (LE Porter)
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 12:41:34 -0500
Subject: Microscopy lab plans

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Message-Id: {m0rRnA6-00011oC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

We are finalizing plans for a new central microscopy laboratory. In part,
these plans are modeled after those furnished by R A Harris (University of
California, Davis) where areas are compartmentalized i.e. cryo microtoming
in separate room, etc). For general health reasons we have restricted
solvent usage to one room within and isolated from this larger room. We
are experiencing some resistance to this concept. Can any of you lend some
support to this concept? Or tell us why it is not a good idea. Please
contact me via email, fax or phone with your welcome comments. As ever,
thanks in advance for your comments.

L E Porter Phone (216) 796-1620
Head of Microscopy Fax (216) 796-3304
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company EMail LPORTER-at-GOODYEAR.COM
Dept 415A
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
USA







From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 12:52:29 -0600
Subject: Epoxies-where to purchase

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You can get Epotek 353 ND from:

Epoxy Technology
14 Fortune Drive
Billerica, MA 01821

TEL 800-227-2201
FAX: 508-663-9782

You can also buy it from us in smaller quantities - albeit a higher price!

P/N 0714-010 price: $50/8 oz kit

The only advantage in buying from us is that you can combine it with your othe
r
supply orders and we also can ship it to you the same day. Otherwise, you can
get a lot more for your money buying it direct from Epoxy Technology.

I hope this helps!

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: Heuer Jim P. :      HeuerJ-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 13:20:58 -0600
Subject: Resins for XTEM

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I think I'm jumping into the middle of a conversation, but here are my two
cents. I've used Torr-Seal for making cross sections in the past and had
reasonably good luck. It takes about 24 hrs. to cure and stands up well in
the ion mill; I, however, am not sure about the particle issue mentioned.
My sample was well characterized before XTEM.

I still like LR White Hard Grade resin for microtoming particulate material
and free standing optical thin films for XTEM. My samples are typically
ceramics and metals. LR White is stable in the electron beam assuming it is
C-coated and can be cured very quickly with an accelerator or in an oven.
Must be mindful of potential brittleness.

Jim Heuer
GE
(510) 862-4501
heuerj-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com





From: Heuer Jim P. :      HeuerJ-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 13:26:10 -0600
Subject: Resins for XTEM

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I think I'm jumping into the middle of a conversation, but here are my two
cents. I've used Torr-Seal for making cross sections in the past and had
reasonably good luck. It takes about 24 hrs. to cure and stands up well in
the ion mill; I, however, am not sure about the particle issue mentioned.
My sample was well characterized before XTEM.

I still like LR White Hard Grade resin for microtoming particulate material
and free standing optical thin films for XTEM. My samples are typically
ceramics and metals. LR White is stable in the electron beam assuming it is
C-coated and can be cured very quickly with an accelerator or in an oven.
Must be mindful of potential brittleness.

Jim Heuer
GE
(510) 862-4501
heuerj-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com





From: Daniel L. Callahan :      dlc-at-owlnet.rice.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 15:20:11 -0600 (CST)
Subject: cross-sectioning

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We are interested in cross-sectioning devices on silicon with a thin
layer of polyimide. This is primarily for optical or SEM imaging, not
TEM. The polyimide layer is on the order of 10 micrometers thick (and
possibly an order of magnitude higher). My limited microtomy experience
has been that cleaving the polymer introduces substantial dimensional
distortion. Does anyone have a good idea for this? We are considering
trying a "standard" mechanical polish but have serious reservations
because of the polymer. We also know it can be done, having seen good
pictures (lacking, of course, specimen prep information).

Any suggestions will be welcome.

Daniel L. Callahan
Department of Mechanical Engg. and Materials Science
Rice University
dlc-at-owlnet.rice.edu




From: j.chalcrof :      chalcrof-at-alf.biochem.mpg.de
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 18:07:17 +0100 (GMT)
Subject: Re: PTA-stain for EM

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}
} Happy New Year
}
} I am intending to stain epoxy sections of kidney biopsies for
} electron microscopy and am in need of a good receipe for a PTA staining
} method.
}
} -------------------------
} Romuald Wroblewski, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor
} Department of Pathology
} Karolinska Institute
} voice/fax:+46-8-7293597
} -------------------------
}
}
Hi Romuald,
I think you should try a modification of Stempak & Ward 's (1964)
receipt which involves a methanolic solution of Uranyl Acetate.
Just replace the UA by PTA and carefully follow their method, which
is described in J. Cell Biol. 22 pp. 697-701. I have used this with
success for staining proteinaceous structures embedded in Araldite.
It cannot be used for material fixed in Permanganate, but this should
not affect many people nowadays! Hope you have success with it.
Jim Chalcroft





From: Daniel Possin :      oemlab-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 17:05:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Microscopy lab plans

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Oops -

I just realized that you have a materials microscopy lab. Sorry - I know
some of my ideas and experience is not applicable. Hope some of it
is.

Good luck with the new lab.

Dan

On Tue, 10 Jan 1995, LE Porter wrote:

} We are finalizing plans for a new central microscopy laboratory. In part,
} these plans are modeled after those furnished by R A Harris (University of
} California, Davis) where areas are compartmentalized i.e. cryo microtoming
} in separate room, etc). For general health reasons we have restricted
} solvent usage to one room within and isolated from this larger room. We
} are experiencing some resistance to this concept. Can any of you lend some
} support to this concept? Or tell us why it is not a good idea. Please
} contact me via email, fax or phone with your welcome comments. As ever,
} thanks in advance for your comments.
}
} L E Porter Phone (216) 796-1620
} Head of Microscopy Fax (216) 796-3304
} The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company EMail LPORTER-at-GOODYEAR.COM
} Dept 415A
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} USA
}
}
}
}




From: tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 16:12:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Source for Xenon lamps

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On Tue, 10 Jan 1995, ROBERT K. NAUMAN wrote:
} Can anyone provide me with a source for a new 450 Watt Xenon Lamp?
} Thanks!
} Bob Nauman
} Baltimore, MD 21201

May contact Ralph Maxwell in Massachusetts -at- (508) 692-4973. He operates
a company called Remtron that we used to retrofit our old B&L Research I
Metallograph from carbon arc to Xenon. He sells the OSRAM XBO 450W OFR
for about $480 per bulb. If this is not the correct type you need, I'm
sure that he can help ya find the exact type. Also, if memory serves me,
(haa haa!) I think OSRAM may have a facility in New York or somewhere in
the east; altho' the bulbs I have are German-made.

Hope this is of help,
-Rob
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
| tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''




From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=jerry(a)biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 11:10:30 -0600
Subject: Bone prep for SEM

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necessary to know what kind of examination is to be done. We have examined
bone and tooth here at our facility at the U. of P. dental research
department and for quick examination of both these mineralized tissues
air-drying has been sufficient. However, we also first examine samples at
10x to 100x in a dissecting microscope while fresh from the source for
micro-fractures to determine if any small cracks we may see in the SEM have
been caused by the drying method or were there at the beginning. To
minimize crystal metamorphosis, the mineral sample is immersed in LN2 and
lyophilized. For a moderately rigorous drying procedure, we do a slow dry
out of Freon 113 and omit critical point drying. This is done by treating
the mineral as any soft tissue--Karnovsky's fixative, followed by an ethanol
drying series and, after two exchanges in 100% ethanol, samples are immersed
in Freon 113. The container with the bone and freon (usually the bottom of a
30 mm petri dish) is covered with parafilm with a few needle holes in it and
allowed to air-dry (a few hours).
An excellent reference is "Methods of Calcified Tissue Preparation"
Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York, NY
10017. Particularly, Chapter 7 by Alan Boyde.

Good Luck,
Jerry Harrison






From: Daniel Possin :      oemlab-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 1995 16:51:23 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Microscopy lab plans

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X-Sender: oemlab-at-stein2.u.washington.edu

Hi -

I have no knowledge of the design plans you mention, but I assume that the
solvent usage room has special ventilation and/or hood space. I would
also assume that all the tissue embedding, grid preparation, slide
staining, solution preparation, and tissue fixation (implying the presence
of transmission and dissecting light microscopes) would be done in this
room. If so, the only objection I can think of would involve the
occasional use of small amounts of solvent (ethanol, acetone and xylene)
needed for equipment cleaning, slide coverslipping, and possibly section
mounting in the microtomy area. The necessary amounts of these things
would be very small and it is doubtful that their presence and use in the
microtomy room would constitute a hazard. If a large number of slides
need to be coverslipping at one time, it is, of course, necessary to do it
in a highly ventilated environment - but coverslipping an occasional
individual slide shouldn't require the inconvenience of moving to another
room.

If you plan to separate working with tissues (fixed or otherwise) to
another room, you may generate many inconveniences unless small amounts
of certain chemicals (primarily fixatives, eg. aldehydes) are allowed.

I have worked as a microscopy technologist for approximately 17 years in a
number of settings. I am aware of the safety issues but, also know that
if you place unrealistic restraints on people, they will find a way around
them sooner ar later. The best solutions seem to me to usually involve a
certain amount of compromise.

Dan

On Tue, 10 Jan 1995, LE Porter wrote:

} We are finalizing plans for a new central microscopy laboratory. In part,
} these plans are modeled after those furnished by R A Harris (University of
} California, Davis) where areas are compartmentalized i.e. cryo microtoming
} in separate room, etc). For general health reasons we have restricted
} solvent usage to one room within and isolated from this larger room. We
} are experiencing some resistance to this concept. Can any of you lend some
} support to this concept? Or tell us why it is not a good idea. Please
} contact me via email, fax or phone with your welcome comments. As ever,
} thanks in advance for your comments.
}
} L E Porter Phone (216) 796-1620
} Head of Microscopy Fax (216) 796-3304
} The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company EMail LPORTER-at-GOODYEAR.COM
} Dept 415A
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} USA
}
}
}
}




From: Richard E. Edelmann :      REDELMAN-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 08:52:57 +1100
Subject: Re: Source for Xenon lamps

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WARNING !!!!!

If you are using a Nikon power supply, Nikon recommends that you
DO NOT USE Osram bulbs. For some reason it drastically shortens the
life of the power supply (i.e. shorter than the life of the bulb!).
In our case our Nikon supplier suggested Ushio bulbs.

We specifically have a 75 watts system and the same may not be
true of the 450 watt systems but you may want to find this
information out before you fry your power supply.

(I have nothing against Osram, I regularly use Osram bulbs for
many other applications)



Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Marshall University - School of Medicine
Huntington, West Virginia




From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 08:22:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Microscopy lab plans

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keeping the solvents "restricted" to the prep lab is a good idea, however
in reality it is sometimes necessary to us solvents (chloroform, acetone,
ethanol) in thet microtomy or microscope labs.
-Mike




From: John M Hudak :      hudakjm-at-mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 13:38:54 +0001 (EST)
Subject: re: where to buy freon 113

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You might try: Miller-Stephenson Chemical Co. Inc.
George Washington Highway
Danbury, Connecticut 06810
203-743-4447

____________________________________________________________________
John Hudak hudakjm-at-mcmaster.ca
I.M.R. - Electron Optics
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada






From: Duke, Steve :      DUKE-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 13:48:08 -0600
Subject: Tracor Northern NS-880

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Microscopy Users:

Is anyone knowledgeable about Tracor Northern NS-880 EDS x-ray analysis =
system? Specific question: How do you boot from the tape drive when the =
system has had a floppy drive but it is missing?

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Dr. N.K. Smith




From: Ostertag Tom :      ostertag_tom-at-mn15-gw.mavd.honeywell.com
Date: 11 Jan 1995 10:59:06 U
Subject: Freon 113

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Vincent writes:

} Does anyone know where to buy freon 113 in gal. size? Our freon pump
} cooling the Cameca MBX probe needs periodic refill.
}
} Thanks in advance!
}
} Vincent
}
} PS. I really doubt that the heavy molecules like freon 113 can fly
} high to the ozone layer. Most likely they "sink" to the ground level
} and help fighting the ozone created by industrials and autos(?).

Heuer Jim P. writes:

} Try "Fluorinert" Electronic Liquid (FC-77) from 3M Co. (213) 726 6361.
} About $300 for 11 lbs. (3/4 gal.)

I'd suggest a different 3M material, SF-2, which is used as a blanket material
for vapor phase soldering. It might be a better replacement, but that all
depends on what you mean by a Freon pump. Is the material used as a heat
transfer medium or is it evaporated? If the material is used in a closed
system, the FC-77 would be an adequate choice.

Tom Ostertag
ostertag_tom-at-mn15-gw.mavd.honeywell.com





From: tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tom Phillips)
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 12:33:12 -0600
Subject: Sticky secondary antibodies

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We have a user with a nasty problem that we haven't been able to dent.
They are trying to do some immunocytochemistry on HeLa cells growing on
glass coverslips. They fix in either acetone or 2% paraformaldehyde. The
paraformaldehyde fixed monolayers are subsequently permeabilized with
acetone, triton x-100 or saponin (problem is the same regardless). At this
point there is no autofluorescence at any wavelength. When they incubate
the cells in a high quality donkey anti-mouse IgG coupled to Cy5 (Jackson)
there is a very high level on non-specific adhesion. We have tried the
following blocking agents: normal Donkey serum, BSA, gelatin, non-fat dry
milk, or all of the above simultaneously. Pretreating the sections with the
blocking agents has no effect. Using other anti-mouse antibodies coupled
to FITC or rhodamine or a Goat anti-rabbit serum give the same problem.
I should point out we routinely use these antibodies in my own laboratory
following the same protocols and do not get any background binding. We get
the same result when we personally run up the cells so we can't blame it on
the technician. Is there something weird about HeLa cells or something
else I am missing? Do HeLa cells have IgG receptors? Your helpful advice
will be gratefully received.




Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(314)-882-4712 (voice)
(314)-882-0123 (fax)






From: long-at-macro.mse.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 18:35:03 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

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From: long-at-macro.mse.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 18:35:49 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe




From: Lixin Wang :      lxwang-at-meceng.coe.neu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 1995 20:17:50 -0500
Subject: SIGN OFF

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Please move my address from this mail list. Thanks.




From: samso-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 09:19:51 EST
Subject: subscribe

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From: KINGSLAND, Arlene :      KINGSLAND-at-paprican.ca
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 09:47:03 EST5EDT
Subject: PERSONAL RESEARCH REQUEST

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950112094703.320-at-pap386.paprican.ca}

Fellow Researchers,
If anyone knows of research being done on bowel disorders I have
a sick daughter and her doctors are at the brain-storming stage after
a year of exploring.
This is a personal request, please contact me through my E-Mail
address.
I appreciate any help at this point. Thnaks.


Arlene Kingsland
KINGSLAND-at-paprican.ca




From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 10:13:24 +0800PST
Subject: lm-sticky secondary antibodies

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Someone here in our lab also uses HeLa cells, and stains tehm for
coxsackie virus using monocloanl antibodies. He has not had any
problems with sticky secondaries. He did say that HeLa cells can
possess/express Fc receptors. These might be isotype specific
depending on the "strain" of HeLa cells you have.
Otherwise can't think of any other reason, but what concentration of
blocking agents did you try?

Mark Elliott
Pulmonary Research Lab
UBC
Vancouver Canada




From: jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu (James V. Jester)
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 15:46:55 -0600
Subject: Sticky Secondary Antibody

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Are you using Fab fragments for your secondary antibodies? Generally,
if we have problems it is because we are using the whole antibody. Also
going to affinity purified or the highest specificity we can obtain
usually gives the best results. The addition of serum (ie goat serum
for goat anti-mouse IgG) throughout the incubation is also helpful.

_____________________________________________________________________
| | |
| James V. Jester | Dept Ophthalmology |
| jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu | UT Southwestern Medical Center |
| TEL (214)648-7215 | 5323 Harry Hines Blvd |
| FAX (214)648-2382 | Dallas, TX 75235-9057 |
|__________________________________|__________________________________|





From: Duke, Steve :      DUKE-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 1995 16:30:54 -0600
Subject: Missing Person

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Dear Microscopy Users:

Does anyone know the name and contact information for a person at UC =
Irvine who had three Tracor Northern NS-880 x-ray analysis systems? This =
is as per John Liska, formerly with Tracor Northern--Noran. Information =
is greatly appreciated,,,Dr. N.K.R. Smith




From: jingli-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 1995 10:59:40 +0000
Subject: advice

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Sender: jingli-at-vax.ox.ac.uk

Sir: Could you send me information on job openings in microscopy to me.





From: STANSMAN-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 1995 07:24:26 -0500
Subject: Re: Source for Xenon lamps

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Hi,


In regards to the response concerning xenon bulbs, I'd like toprovide the
following information.

Nikon's 75 watt xenon power supply is usually shipped with Osram 75 watt arc
lamps and that is the recommended supplier, although technically there is no
difference between Osram and Ushio.

Nikon's 100 watt xenon power supply sold outside the USA is shipped with
Ushio 100 watt xenon arc lamps. I believe only ushio manufactures this type
of 100 watt arc lamp.

In Nikon's 100 watt mercury power supply either Osram or Ushio 100 watt
mercury arc lamps of the same specification are usable and performance is the
same.

450 watt xenon bulbs were typically used in Microprojectors used to project
microscope slide images on to a projection screen for use in teaching, CCTV
has now replaced this technique.

Regards,


Stan Schwartz
Manager, Biomedical Instruments
Nikon Inc. Instrument Group
1300 Walt Whitman Rd.
Melville, NY 11747
516-547-8529 Fax 516-547-0306
E-mail NIKONBIO-at-aol.com





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 1995 13:07:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Backing Up Images

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Keith

We use CD ROM for archival image/data storage.
CD Writer's have come down in price quite abit lately.
What I originally paid $5K for is now available for
~$2K and the unit is twice as fast. You may want
to seriously look into these instead of tape.
Blank CD's cost ~$15 and hold ~650Mbytes.

There are several vendors on the market. I am
currently using Pinnacle Micro, but there are
at least 2 other manufacturers out there.

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL




From: ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L. D. Marks)
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 1995 15:35:55 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral Position

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microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov, rmglaeser-at-lbl.bitnet

Postdoctoral Position using HREM/Surface Science

A postdoctoral position is available (immediately) exploiting
the unique capabilities of a UHV-HREM (2 Angstroms and 6x10-11
torr) at Northwestern. Connected to this instrument are a number
of analytical (XPS, Auger, SEM) and a GaAs deposition chamber.
The position would involve working on projects involving GaAs
deposition, as well as number of other projects involving small
particles and metal-semiconductor surfaces.

Experience with TEM (HREM preferred) plus surface science
techniques are important.

Send C.V. plus other material to:

L. D. Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208
ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu




From: jacobb-at-ux5.lbl.gov
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 1995 13:37:31 -0800
Subject: Query: indexing micrograph files digitally

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Message-Id: {199501142129.NAA17584-at-ux5.lbl.gov}

We want to set up a computer-based index to our EM lab negative files.
This is a request for your experiences and recommendations of software.
We would like to store and be able to search thumbnail views of each
image as well as assignable fields and keywords. The images themselves
will be kept as negatives, positives, slides and other formats as separate
files. Commercial packages which manage images themselves are reported to
suffer in searching speed, power and reliablity (A.Abernathy, "Managing
your media", MacUser Sept. 1993, Pp. 190-206). Perhaps a database program
that allows thumbnails to be imported would be best.
Your comments invited.

jacob
Jacob Bastacky, MD
1-116
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-lbl.gov
University of California Phone: (510) 486-4606
Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750





From: Daniel Luchtel :      dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 1995 13:44:06 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Backing Up Images

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X-Sender: dluchtel-at-homer22.u.washington.edu

I for one would greatly appreciate the names of the other two companies
(with telephone numbers if possible). Also, what is your opinion and
experience with the Pinnacle Micro? Any recommendatins?

On Fri, 13 Jan 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} Keith
}
} We use CD ROM for archival image/data storage.
} CD Writer's have come down in price quite abit lately.
} What I originally paid $5K for is now available for
} ~$2K and the unit is twice as fast. You may want
} to seriously look into these instead of tape.
} Blank CD's cost ~$15 and hold ~650Mbytes.
}
} There are several vendors on the market. I am
} currently using Pinnacle Micro, but there are
} at least 2 other manufacturers out there.
}
} Nestor Zaluzec
} ANL
}




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 1995 17:41:58 -0600 (CST)
Subject: CD Rom Backups-Multiple Writes

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Multiple Write sessions on a single CD-ROM have been
possible for several years. The problem is that many
inexpensive CD ROM readers donot support Multi-session
formated disks. So if you intend to send/give the data to
someone with a standard format CD reader (i.e. the
run-of-the-mill ~$200-300 variety) you will have to
cut them a new disk. This generally is not a problem
assuming that you already have the CD writer.

Since the whole reason for a visitor to come to a
user facility is to do an experiment and leave with the
data I see no conflict with not "filling" up the disk.
For example if you are in a user facility and a visitor
comes to do some experiments collecting a few hundred
Mbytes of data, then writing a single CD with just that
few 100Mb on it is usually more effective than writing tens of
floppies or several Syquests. The logic to a CD vs a
removable/rewritable media (Syquest,MO, etc..) is that
everyone can generally afford to buy a $200 CD reader
but not everyone can afford to buy a ~$900 MO reader.
This way a "user-facility" can support many type of users
and they do not all have to go out and buy expensive
drives. On the flip side if the user and the facility
both have compatible media then using that media is
reasonable (since I happen to have lots of different
drives and media I can accomodate most users)

For local storage issues, the approach I tend to take
is to have a local disk server (2.5 Gb partitioned into 3-650 MB
segements plus a scratch disk) which is used to
temporairly store data . When a disk partition is full
then it is written to CD (usually 2 copies) and then cleared.
If an individual user wants to archive things this
procedure can be also used. In this case, we
download his/her data overnight to an empty partition
and then write the data and give the user back the
finished CD. Then wipe the partition for the next user.

Generally I tend to avoid multi-session CD's, but have
used them on occassion. You just have to carefully label
the disk. Also when you mount a multi-session CD you get
alot of "virtual" disk icons mounted on your desktop. One
per CD session. So if you get into the habit of writing small
partitions to your CD then you will find lots of icons
cluttering up your desktop. My real desk is bad enough
so I try to avoid the problem propagating to the
screen of my workstation.

Hope this proves useful...

Nestor

---------------------
P.S.
Someone asked for information on phone numbers for
manufacturers of CD writers I pulled this out of MacWorld
Magazine.

Pinnacle Micro RCD-1000 CD writer: 800-553-7070

Most CD writer's are sold direct by the manufacturer
I don't recall seeing very many advertised in the
mail-order catalogs. So you may have to do some hunting.
I'm positive that there are at least 2 other manufacturers
out there of ~$2K writers. I seem to recall Sony
and Chinon, but don't take that as Gospel.

BTW for the record
I have no financial interest in Pinnacle Micro Systems.





From: jingli-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 10:50:13 +0000
Subject: Job Openings in Electron Microscopy"

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Sender: jingli-at-vax.ox.ac.uk

Dear Sir: Could you send me job openings in electron microscopy. Thanks.J,Li





From: Katherine.S.Connolly-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Katherine S. Connolly)
Date: 16 Jan 95 09:22:45 EST
Subject: TEM-indexing micrograph files

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Message-id: {10690969-at-dancer.Dartmouth.EDU}

I use Claris Works database to maintain my records and include film numbers for
each record or subject. Any search for an image is slowed by division into
years but I have done retreivals rapidly by using one criterion for search.
Good Luck--
Kate Connolly




From: swatkins-at-pitt.edu (Simon Watkins)
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 09:22:57 -0500
Subject: CD rom archiving

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Like Nestor: We have stopped using tape completely,(anyone want a Jetstore
5000!) having found that we actually needed our backup on occasion. We are
using the Pinnacle RCD1000 currently, it cost -at-$2000 to go in a pc, this
included an Adaptec SCSI board. Generally we generate about 1 Gig/mo of
images from a variety of platforms, Confocal, EM, and LM. However I would
like to make a few comments on the viability of CD's as a principle storage
media

1: They are an absolute boon in a multiuser environment. We give users a CD
and they are gone forever, we do not have to coddle their data for the next
20 years or try and find it on a tape It doesn't matter what platform they
use,(PC/MAC/SGI) the CD works. However this is tempered by two problems.
a: The recordable CD's are not as robust as ones made by commercial
presses and do not like being scratched.
b: The namespace of the platform chosen is important. For example
we use SGI's to analyse all our confocal data however the data may be stored
on a Novell server and accessed through NFS. When the data is archived to
CD, only the DOS name space is recorded, which means that some of the UNIX
names get truncated to 8 letters and then become useless

2:Cd's are geat if you have 650meg to back up. One of the biggest problems
we faced when we started using CD's was how to organize the data. By
project? by date etc. The problem is that unlike a tape or disk where you
can keep adding on forever with a CD you loose a lot of space when the disk
is multisessioned. Effectively the FAT takes up 20MEG and every time you add
something to the disk in a new recording session you have to rewrite the
FAT.... To get round this problem as we ideally we would like to make single
user archives we have a large online resevoir of space (13MEG) and use
650MEG Flop-opticals as an intermediate storage device.

3:You need to buy a 1 Gig drive along with the CD. It is possible to make a
CD with a virtual image which then pulls all the data from the vaious
directories and drives etc. However this is dangerous... A much better
solution is to plant a decent sized hard drive in the machine you will be
archiving and make a single, large ISO compliant file which is written
directly to the disk.

4:When recording you cannot expect the pc to do anything else. This includes
running a screen saver. I estimate that the happy Xmas Screen saver we had
this year cost us about 5 CD's.

5:It is worth thinking about a Juke box player to go with it. We are using
a Pioneed 604X Takes 6 disk cassettes, costs about $1000. Trouble is that
if you want to use it over a net then you must buy multidisk support
software/hardware. Microtest make either diskport (a hardware soln) or
diskserve (a software soln). Either work well.

Generally we are extremely happy with this media, We have Flop-opticals, DAT
and non-DAT backup devices. CD's are really the only way to go though they
are cheap ($15/650meg) relatively fast and perhaps most importantly now that
almost all PC's have CD players in them, distributable!


----------------------------------------------------
Simon Watkins Ph.D
Director Structural Biology Imaging Center
Scaife 840
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261

Tel:412:648-3051
Fax:412:648-1441
----------------------------------------------------





From: swatkins-at-pitt.edu (Simon Watkins)
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 09:26:58 -0500
Subject: Re: Query: indexing micrograph files digitally

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} We want to set up a computer-based index to our EM lab negative files.
} This is a request for your experiences and recommendations of software.
} We would like to store and be able to search thumbnail views of each
} image as well as assignable fields and keywords. The images themselves
} will be kept as negatives, positives, slides and other formats as separate
} files. Commercial packages which manage images themselves are reported to
} suffer in searching speed, power and reliablity (A.Abernathy, "Managing
} your media", MacUser Sept. 1993, Pp. 190-206). Perhaps a database program
} that allows thumbnails to be imported would be best.
} Your comments invited.

The new version of HiJack Pro solves many of these problems in a cost
effective ($90) fashion. It works differently to the earlier version and
keeps a central database of images which can be accessed very rapidly. It
works accross servers, allows multiple indexes, does thumbnails, and updates
itself automatically, comes with a montaging and editing program. We love it


----------------------------------------------------
Simon Watkins Ph.D
Director Structural Biology Imaging Center
Scaife 840
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261

Tel:412:648-3051
Fax:412:648-1441
----------------------------------------------------





From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 09:47:37 PDT
Subject: CD-ROM referances

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Hi,
I am currently looking into switching to digital image archiving and
have found two referances which may be of assistance to others in
the same position:

- There is a review of cd-rom drives in "PC Computing", Nov., 1994.
This supplies name and phone number for several manufacturers as
well.
- Kodak offers a CD-ROM drive guide which lists CD-ROM drives,
controller cards and device driver software combinations which are
compatabile with Kodak Photo CD. Not all combinations are equal. I
have publication DCI-249 dated 8/94 which lists combinations for PC
and Mac. I don't know what is available for Unix.

Hope this is helpful.
Laurie

______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: JOY-at-utkvx.utk.edu (DAVID JOY)
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 1995 14:00:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 14th International Congress IXCOM

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14th International Congress on X-ray Optics and Microanalysis
August 29 - Spetember 2nd 1995
GuangZhou, CHina

This congress will be held, 39 years after the first UK congress, in GuangZhou,
a city only two hours by train from Hong Kong. The program will include the
following topics: X-ray Optics, Sources and Microscopy; X-ray Photoelectron
Spectroscopy; Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM); Scanning Electron
Microscopy; Electron Probe Microanalysis; Auger Electron Microscopy; Ion
Probe and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy; Laser Probe; Scanning Probe
Microscopies
(STM, AFM); and Confocal Microscopy.

Contributed papers prepared in 2 or 4 camera ready pages with text and figures
inside a frame of 144mmx210mm will be published in Proceedings available to
each participant at the Congress. A comprehensive Trade Exhibition will also
be scheduled.

The deadline for contributed papers is April 30th, 1995, and the early
registration fee, thru June 30th, is US$350. The accomodation rate (including
three meals) in a three star hotel is US $50-85 per day. The organizing
committee will provide arriving participants with transportation from
GuangZhou International Airport and the railroad station on Aug.29th.

Second circulars, registration forms and contributed paper format are now
available from

Secretariat of 14th IXCOM, Foreign Affairs Division, Guang Zhou Branch,
CAS, 100 Xioanlie Road, C.GuangZhou 510070, CHina.
Tel + 8620 777 5213 Fax +8620 777 5791






From: Parry, Althea :      ParryA-at-agresearch.cri.nz
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 09:53 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: unsubscribe

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From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 08:40:02 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: CD ROMS

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950117084002.352-at-FS-IAM-1.JRC.NL}

On the subject of CD ROMS writers, I looked through a British
computer magazine and found advertisments for a few manufacturers,
of the ones likely to be available in the US try Philips (UK price
~$3000) or Yamaha who manufacture a quad-speed writer (~$5000).
However prices in the UK tend to be much higher than in the US, so
they could be considerably less over there. I hope this is of use to
somebody!

Doug Arrell
+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 10:57:45 -0500
Subject: Optical properties of FeCl3 (PLM)

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I am in need of optical crystallographic properties for FeCl3 and
FeCl3 - nH20. Winchell's Optical Properties of Artificial Minerals has the
+2 valence state of iron, but not the +3 state.


Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks............


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 11:43:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Post Doc Opening

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From: mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu (Michael Dunlap)
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 1995 11:57:05 -0800
Subject: Re: CD-ROM referances

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Hello -

The June 94' issue of MacUser has a good article on CD-ROM writers listing
a number of different companys and MacUser's ideas on the pros and cons of
each.
Included is MacUser's commemnts on different software that is available for
the writers. I beileve PC Week had a simular article.

Mike

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Michael Dunlap | lab (916) 752-0284 |
| Facility For Advanced Instrumentation | fax (510) 422-2282 |
| University of California | mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu |
| Davis CA, 95616 | |
===========================================================================






From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 16 Jan 1995 16:51:09 -0400
Subject: Computer: New files on...

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Message-ID: {n1421759759.17687-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time: 4:39
PM

Date:1/16/95
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html NC EMAL

Three software packages have been added/modified in the Microbeam Analysis
Society Software Library (MASSL) in recent months.
The MASSL resides on freebie.engin.umich.edu
username: anonymous
password: your email address in the form user-at-domain.
Directory: /pub/MSA+MAS/MASSL
New files in:
1. /pub/MSA+MAS/MASSL/xphi
A Full abstract was not included by the author of this program. Here is a
summ
ary of the information that he supplied in printed form.

Xphi is a PhiRhoZ correction program. For a description see:
"An Accurate Computer Correction Program for Quantitative Electron Probe
Microa
nalysis", Claude Merlet, Mikrochim. Acta 114/115 363-376 (1994).
Install the program by exploding the auto-unzip file xphiz.exe into a
directory
on your hard drive (say, c:\xphi). Install the fonts, FIX8X14.FON and
FIX8X16.F
ON that come with the program in the Windows sytem directory (e.g. in
c:\windows
\system). The program is called xphi.exe, add the program to your program
manag
er listing so that you may double click it to run it from the windows shell.

2. /pub/MSA+MAS/MASSL/shrli
A program called Simply Shrli, designed to run on the PC. This from the
readme file.
SIMPLY : WHAT IS IT FOR ?
*************************
SIMPLY is a set of programs dedicated to Transmission Electron Microscopy in

Materials Sciences. It allows you to BUILD structures, DRAW and HANDLE cells,
CALCULATE, DISPLAY and HELP to INDEX diffraction patterns, CALCULATE and DIS-

PLAY High Resolution IMAGES.
SIMPLY runs "SHRLI", (c) M.A.O'KEEFE, (1980). .../...

SIMPLY first appeared as:
"SIMPLY: a package for the SIMulation and disPLaY of HREM images on PCs",
T. EPICIER, M.A.O'KEEFE, communication at 33rd Ann. Meeting of the French
Electron Microsc. Soc. (SFME), Villeurbanne-Lyon - F., june-july 1993.
It has been demonstrated during the "Computers Open lab", at the 13th Intern.
Congress on Electron Microscopy (ICEM 13), Paris - F., 17-22 July 1994.

3. /pub/MSA+MAS/MASSL/KAKER
Two abstracts here in the requested format (MANY THANKS Henrik!!!).
Title : Edax
Keywords : XEDS,SEM
Computer : IBM PC or compatible
Operating System : MS-DOS
Programming Language : Turbo Basic,GWBasic
Hardware Requirements : EDS Edax 9100,RS232C Card
Author(s) : Henrik Kaker
Correspondence Address : SEM/EDS Laboratory,.Metal d.o.o.,Koroska c.14
: 62390 Ravne,Slovenia,E-mail:kaker&ctklj.ctk.si
Abstract:

Program for connection energy dispersive spectromter Edax 9100 with IBM
PC or compatible computer via line printer port of the Edax 9100.Program
allows transfering intensity and spectral data to PC and processing this
data with standardless programs for bulk and thin film samples.

Documentation: EDAX.DOC

Source Code: Yes

and

Title : EPMA Database
Keywords : EDS, WDS, SEM, EPMA
Computer : None
Operating System : None
Programming Language : None
Hardware Requirements : None
Author(s) : Henrik Kaker
Correspondence Address : SEM/EDS Laboratory,.Metal d.o.o.,Koroska c.14
: 62390 Ravne,Slovenia,E-mail:kaker&ctklj.ctk.si
Abstract:

Database of 681, 826 and 40 published entries for performance testing
of EPMA programs. Database EPMA40.DAT present collection of published data
from different manufactures of EDS and WDS hardware and software and is
suitable for testing standardless (no-standard) analysis programs.

Documentation: EPMA.DOC

Source Code: No

Two other points of information.
A.
Some of the archived files have been found to be corrupted and even our
backups are no good. If anyone has good copies of the following files,
please send me copies.
They are under pub/MSA+MAS/MASSL
1) ~/ECPORI/ECPORI.SIT
2) ~/FINDCSL/FINDCSL.SIT
B. The MASSL and the Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis Public Domain
Libraries will be merged into one library, however this will only occur when
Nestor Zaluzec get chance to sit down and organise the files. So, please be
patient.
Many thanks.


John Mansfield.

Manyt thanks.










From: Willem.Jacob :      jacob-at-sch2.uia.ac.be
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 10:18:05 +0100 (MET)
Subject: contrast problems in EM

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Dear Em specialists,
since a few months we are dealing with a stupid problem: every time we
prepare samples for classical em investigation we sometimes have
contrast and sometimes not. The procedure we uses is:
3% glutaraldehyde fixation (from 1 hour to overnight), wash in 0.1 M
cacodylate (approx 30 min)
buffer, osmiumtetroxide fixation (1 or 2% in caco for approx 1h), again a
wash in caco (30 min), dehydration in a ethanol series (70, 90, 2x100
every step 30 min) then a 2X10min incubation in propylene oxide, an
overnight impregnation in 1:1 epon (lx): propylene oxide and finally an
embedding in lx at 60 degrees for 60 hours. After sectionning, the
sections are contrasted for 2 to 3 min with 5 % uranylacetate
in water and finally 1 min lead citrate. Every time we use exactly the
same procedure but the contrast varies
from perfect to absent. We have already tried to change the fixatives and
contrasting solution , prepare fresh, change lot, change companie but
nothing helped. Also we changed the incubation times but now ower
inspiration is gone so ... who can help us solving this irritating problem?
Thanks for your help.
Annette bakker






From: SveEn-at-pai.liu.se (Sverker =?iso-8859-1?Q?Enestr=F6m?= )
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 13:48:43 +0100
Subject: EM: contrast problems

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Annette wrote:
} since a few months we are dealing with a stupid problem: every time we
} prepare samples for classical em investigation we sometimes have
} contrast and sometimes not. The procedure we uses is:
} 3% glutaraldehyde fixation (from 1 hour to overnight), wash in 0.1 M
} cacodylate (approx 30 min)
} buffer, osmiumtetroxide fixation (1 or 2% in caco for approx 1h), again a
} wash in caco (30 min), dehydration in a ethanol series (70, 90, 2x100
} every step 30 min) then a 2X10min incubation in propylene oxide, an
} overnight impregnation in 1:1 epon (lx): propylene oxide and finally an
} embedding in lx at 60 degrees for 60 hours. After sectionning, the
} sections are contrasted for 2 to 3 min with 5 % uranylacetate
} in water and finally 1 min lead citrate. Every time we use exactly the
} same procedure but the contrast varies
} from perfect to absent. We have already tried to change the fixatives and
} contrasting solution , prepare fresh, change lot, change companie but
} nothing helped. Also we changed the incubation times but now ower
} inspiration is gone so ... who can help us solving this irritating problem?
} Thanks for your help.
} Annette bakker


Hello Annette!
I think we all have had more or less problems getting optimal contrast in
our specimens
but there are also the ugly precipitates which can terrify us.
We poststain with UAc (2.5% ethanol solution) for 10 min or with 5% water
solution of UAc
for 20-30 min, followed by staining with fresh Pb-citrate for 2 min. I
think your staining
periods are too short.
The staining results are also depending on what tissue you work with. UAc
reacts prin-
cipally with nucleic acids and proteins. Pb-citrate increases the general
contrast of
membranes and also stains nucleic acid, glycogen and proteins due to the
presence of
carboxyl and sulfhydryl groups.
Good luck and feel free to contact me for further discussions.
Sverker Enestr|m, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Pathology
Link|ping university, Sweden

=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=
=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=
=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD
Sverker Enestr|m
Tel: +46 13 22 15 20
=46ax: +46 13 13 22 57
=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=
=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=
=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD=hD






From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 08:56:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: Image enhancement

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Kem Rogers asked about image enhancement for cytochemistry

Here is my two cents worth,
As an ardent image processor enhancer, I have no apriori bias against
using image enhancement. However, in cytochemistry if you are comparing
two things, I think both images should be taken under the same conditions
and processed equivalently. Kem mentions processing to remove background,
and under the circumstances he outlines this seems reasonable. However,
I think background substraction should be done with great care.
One mans background could be
another mans signal. If you have measured background under conditions where
no signal is possible and then subtract it uniformly from all images that
seems reasonable. However, I have had people ask me to remove this defect
or that "small area of background staining". I think that begins to
constitute scientific fraud. Thats my humble opinion.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************





From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 10:53:46 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: contrast problems in EM

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concerning your staining problem:
1) try doing an "en bloc" stain with 2-4% UA, after OsO4 and your buffer
wash, and just before your dehydration step.
simply immerse your tissue in UA for 30-90 min (keep at 4 degrees C)
then proceed with dehydration
2) when staining your sections with UA and Pb citrate, staining times should
be 10-15 min. in each stain




From: DIRK DOMASCHKO :      DOMASCHK-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 13:46:12 +1100
Subject: Re: contrast problem

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Message-Id: {9501182059.AA11409-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}

Annette,
I agree with Dr. Sverker. The staining times are too short. I
stain for 25 min in uranyl acetate and 15 min in Pb citrate. These
times may seem excessive but we have never had a problem with
contrast. Additiionally, more than one rinse is suggested by my
sources (at least 3/15 min each) in rinse buffer to remove excess
glutaraldehyde. This should eliminate any interaction between
unreacted glutaraldehyde and OsO4 which will cause peppering and
general visual noise in your sections.

Hope this is helpful!

Dirk W. Domaschko
Marshall University
Huntington, WV
Domaschk-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu




From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 17:18:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: Grid Glue Recipe?

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In addition to the sticky from cellophane tape, thick sections which are
notoriously difficult to keep in place can be stuck to grids using
unpolymerized epoxy resin. Dip one side of the grid to the top of a drop
of epoxy, use compressed air to blow away excess resin from the open
spaces, adhere the section and cure the resin in the oven.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************





From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Phil Oshel)
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 1995 13:05:23 -0600
Subject: Re: contrast problems in EM

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I'm not allowed to give the name of my reference, but "word has it"
that the pH of the lead citrate is very important: if it is } 12, there will
be little staining, and it may in fact bleach the sections (and lots of ugly
contamination if much {12). Something to be checked each time the lead
citrate is made.
Also, small, unobvious changes in pipette bore, or how the pipette
is held can cause significant changes in drop size, therefore in amount or
concentration of solution delivered.
Phil Oshel
U Illlinois Center for Electron Microscopy
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
At 10:18 AM 1/18/95 +0100, Willem.Jacob wrote:
} Dear Em specialists,
} since a few months we are dealing with a stupid problem: every time we
} prepare samples for classical em investigation we sometimes have
} contrast and sometimes not. The procedure we uses is:
} 3% glutaraldehyde fixation (from 1 hour to overnight), wash in 0.1 M
} cacodylate (approx 30 min)
} buffer, osmiumtetroxide fixation (1 or 2% in caco for approx 1h), again a
} wash in caco (30 min), dehydration in a ethanol series (70, 90, 2x100
} every step 30 min) then a 2X10min incubation in propylene oxide, an
} overnight impregnation in 1:1 epon (lx): propylene oxide and finally an
} embedding in lx at 60 degrees for 60 hours. After sectionning, the
} sections are contrasted for 2 to 3 min with 5 % uranylacetate
} in water and finally 1 min lead citrate. Every time we use exactly the
} same procedure but the contrast varies
} from perfect to absent. We have already tried to change the fixatives and
} contrasting solution , prepare fresh, change lot, change companie but
} nothing helped. Also we changed the incubation times but now ower
} inspiration is gone so ... who can help us solving this irritating problem?
} Thanks for your help.
} Annette bakker
}
}
}
}
Phil Oshel
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Center for Electron Microscopy
Univ. of Illinois (Urbana)
(217) 244-3135





From: Jan Coetzee EM Univ Pretoria :      JANC-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 1995 08:24:56 GMT+2
Subject: EM Lab scheduling

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We operate 7 electron microscopes (4 scanners, 2 TEM's, 1 microprobe),
optical photomicroscope, 2 ultramicrotomes, materials science specimen prep
equipment, high vacuum coater, ion beam coater, darkroom, etc - pretty much
the generic general EM lab.
At present we use a paper-based (dog-eared diary) booking system for
scheduling users on the equipment.

I know that there are many labs that use electronic booking systems.
Is this worthwhile, or does it cause more problems than it solves?
Nearly all our users have access to ethernetted PC's.
Information on pros and cons, problems, solutions, which software etc
would be most useful. Our LAN superviser is especially interested in being
pointed in the right direction for sources of software that will do the job.


Jan Coetzee
Unit for Electron Microscopy Tel:+27-12-420-2075
University of Pretoria Fax:+27-12-342-1738
Pretoria Internet:janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
0002 South Africa




From: ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L. D. Marks)
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 1995 07:37:17 -0600
Subject: Re: EM Lab scheduling

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I implimented this type of approach back around 1990, and have found
it to be very useful. (My source code is very simple since it is designed
for VT100 emulation across the ethernet, so I would not recommend it.) Apart
from simple security issues such as making sure that authorized (safe) people
only use the microscopes, the biggest advantage is speed. Noone has to spend
hours collating the pages, and you do not have to worry about honesty -- how
many people write down all the hours that they use?
The major issue is not the software (trivial to write) but arranging
electronic locks for the hardware such that they can only be used with an
appropriate password (different for each user). We got an electronics technician
to build a simple card for our TEM to control the beam. I would be interested
in hearing of any more general solutions.




From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 19 Jan 1995 10:38:58 -0400
Subject: Re: EM Lab Scheduling

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Reply... RE} EM Lab Scheduling
Reply
from: John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html

Here at Michigan our lab serves users from many departments (nuclear,
materials, chemical , electrical, civil and mechanical engineering, physics,
chemistry, geology, pediatric cardiology and pharmacy to mention a few) and
they are spread out all over the city of Ann Arbor (about a five mile
radius).
Since there are University computer sites all over campus and many people
have Macintosh computers or can at least get access to them and there is a
campus-wide Appletalk network, we us a simple scheduling system based on a
collection of Hypercard stacks.
Each microscope, or other instrument that is schedulable, has a stack
associated with it. These stack are stored on a server in our lab and are
accessible from anywhere on campus. Each stack is a basic calendar with the
days of the week listed in four hour block for the day time (~8-5) and 8 hour
blocks in the evening and at night. Clicking on any one block of time allows
the user to book that entire block or part of it. The user needs a user name
and password and trained users are issued these ids that are stored within
the stack. users can book up to 1 week in advance normally but I have the
option of overriding that. When the stack reaches a certain size it is
archived and the current data is copied to a new stack. It is not a really
secure system but it works well for us.
If anyone wants a copy of any of the stacks to modify for their own purposes,
I will make them available on freebie.engin.umich.edu. The proviso is that
any improvements should be made available to everyone, us especially!.
OK?
Just my 2 cents worth.
Jfm.





From: randy nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 1995 16:31:03 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Light element EDS

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Message-Id: {9501192124.AA15279-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}


I am interested in the discussion of light element analysis using
a Kevex Quantum detector. From my discussions with Kevex, it seems that
the software available has a hard time compensating for matrix effects
when light elements are mixed with high atomic number elements. I was
wondering how other people deal with this. Our system runs on RT11, so
people who have TSX systems will have to bear with me. It appears that
the answer is standards, standards, and more standards. Let's hear it...
Randy Nessler







From: Alan Hall :      HALL-at-agric.up.ac.za
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 1995 10:34:11 GMT+2
Subject: Critical Point Drying

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A couple of questions on CPD:
1. How important is it to use CO2 from a cylinder furnished with an ejector
tube?

2.Can one use a conventional cylinder turned upside-down?

3.Am I right in assuming that cooling the CPD-chamber down to { 0 C, should
condensate the CO2 to a liquid?

4.What grade (purity) should one use? I have always used "Medical Grade",
obviously at a higher cost than "Technical Grade"

Discussion would be appreciated.Alan Hall
Unit for Electron Microscopy
University of Pretoria, Pretoria Tel +27-12-420-3297
South Africa Fax +27-12-420-3266




From: CAROLYN J. EMERSON, DEPT. OF BIOLOGY, MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 1995 09:50:12 -0230
Subject: SEM filters

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Message-ID: {950119110849E68.AERO-at-USCN.USCN.UGA.EDU} (UMass-Mailer 4.04)
{cemerson-at-kean.ucs.mun.ca}
Reply-To: cemerson-at-kean.ucs.mun.ca
To: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Message-ID: {0098ABD3.AF64FCE1.1-at-leif.ucs.mun.ca}

Could anyone please direct me to sources of Anopore disc filters or
Flotronics filters for use in support of particulate samples for
SEM viewing. A Canadian or US supplier would be helpful. Thanks
Carolyn J. Emerson
Biology Dept.
Memorial University
St. John's Newfoundland Canada
cemerson-at-kean.ucs.mun.ca




From: Jeffrey.Shield-at-mse.utah.edu (Jeffrey E. Shield)
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 1995 08:55:55 -0700
Subject: Reflection electron microscopy wanted

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To all:

I have someone interested in doing some reflection electron microscopy. Not
being the surface type, I am unable to assist. If anyone out there is
remotely interest in doing some REM please contact me directly for more
details.

Thanks for your time.

Jeff
--------------------------------------------------------- U U
| | U U
| Jeff Shield | U U
| Department of Materials Science and Engineering | U U U U
| University of Utah | U U U U
| Salt Lake City, UT 84112 | U U U U
| 801/581-3179 | UUUUU U
| Fax: 801/581-4816 | U U
| | U U
--------------------------------------------------------- UUUUU

Of making many books there is no end, and much study wearies the body.
-Eccl 12:12





From: jacobb-at-ux5.lbl.gov
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 1995 10:08:09 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM parts

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Message-Id: {199501201800.KAA15728-at-ux5.lbl.gov}

AMRAY has been very good about supplying parts for our 1000A (still our
workhorse 4-6 full days per week). Their telephone number is 800-225-1462.
We've also had to replace some of these switches after some years.

} We are trying to repair the push-push type switches in the control
} panel of our AMR 1000 SEM. The failure is mechanical rather than electronic.
} The switches have "Master Specialties Co." writen on them and are in the
} 12-4 series. Any line on where we can beg or buy at least two such switches
} would be greatly appreciated.
} Thanks in advance.
} "For want of a nail...."
} Tom Hanley
} 706 568-2075
} thanly-at-uscn.bitnet

Jacob
Jacob Bastacky, MD
1-116
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-lbl.gov
University of California Phone: (510) 486-4606
Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750





From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 20 Jan 1995 13:45:59 -0400
Subject: Re: CD ROM image archive

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Reply... RE} CD ROM image archive
Reply
from: John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html

While we are on the subject, has anyone seen the Pinnacle Micro drive for
$1995 that is a double speed reader and also a CD-R drive?
Sounds really nice!





From: SveEn-at-pai.liu.se (Sverker Enestr|m)
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 1995 12:24:13 +0100
Subject: REM

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Good morning,

You can read about reflection microscopy (which visualizes zones of
cellular attachment
to glass in epi-illuminated specimens by surface reflection interference)
in chapter 5 in
ELECTRONIC LIGHT MICROSCOPY, edited by David Shotton, Wiley-Liss Inc.,
1993. Modern REM
makes use of video-enhanced contrast technic, well described by David Shotton.

Sverker

==================================================================
Sverker Enestrom
Tel: +46 13 22 15 20
Fax: +46 13 13 22 57
==================================================================






From: nederlof-at-genmic.biochem.mpg.de (Petra Nederlof)
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 1995 13:26:40 +0100
Subject: unsubscribe

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subscribe nederlof-at-genmic.biochem.mpg.de

***************************************
Petra M Nederlof, Ph.D.
Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry
Dept. Structural Biology
Am Klopferspitz 18 a
D-82152 Martinsried (M=FCnchen)
GERMANY

nederlof-at-genmic.biochem.mpg.de
voice: +49 (0)89 8578 2624
fax: +49 (0)89 8578 2641






From: sje-at-po.CWRU.Edu (Steven J. Eppell)
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 11:48:25 -0500
Subject: Networking a dye sublimation printer

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I have a Tektronix Phaser II SDX printer that I want to put
on my campus network. I bought the Ethernet adaptor card but
my network administrator is telling me it's not possible to
put the printer on our network. We support Novell and TCP/IP.
Has anyone put this printer on a network using either of
these protocols? If so, can you give me any words of
wisdom that might help me get the printer on the net?

Steven J. Eppell
Center for Cardiovascular Biomaterials
Case Western Reserve University

sje-at-po.cwru.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 10:55:32 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Student Scholarships to MAS-95 & 96

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MICROBEAM ANALYSIS SOCIETY STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS TO MAS-1995 (Breckenridge, CO)
and IUMAS-1 (Sydney Australia)

All students (and faculty) involved in microanalysis-related research, should
note a remarkable opportunity for travel to two forthcoming microanalysis
conferences. The Microbeam Analysis society is offering student scholarships to
the 29th Annual MAS meeting in Breckenridge CO (August 6-11, 1995). Student
papers must be submitted, in standard MAS-MSA format to Dr. E. Etz, NIST,
Division 837, Bldg. 222, room Q-113, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 by March 15, 1995.
The best submitted papers will be awarded funds towards attending the annual
meeting in Breckenridge. Any more information about the program can be obtained
from Dr. Etz at etz-at-gapnet.nist.gov

What makes this scholarship offer extraordinary is that the best three papers
given by student scholarship winners at the Breckenridge meeting will be
awarded a minimum of $500 towards the cost of attending the 1st
International Union of
Microbeam Analysis Societies Conference in Sydney, Australia, February 5-9,
1996. These scholarships are only open to student members of MAS, and student
application forms for MAS are available in past issues of Microbeam Analysis,
the MAS journal. Student membership is a great bargain at $2.50, and doesn't
require that the advisor be a MAS member - although if you aren't, I ask that
you consider joining.

I will mail you more information with appropriate details about the meetings
and the paper format etc., but if you have any immediate questions, please don't
hesitate to contact me by email (dbw1-at-lehigh.edu).

Dave Williams






From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 09:20:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Networking a dye sublimation printer

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we connercted our printer up for multiple users via the ethernet connection
-first check to see that the installed tag is next to the ethernet port
(if not you need a bourd installed)
-connect to the ethernet port
-load the phaser utilities, the network utilities, and the drivers
-there are a few entries (words/code #'s/and commands) needed to load it
all and get it going
-if all else fails call Tektronix

good luck
Mike

On Mon, 23 Jan 1995, Steven J. Eppell wrote:

} I have a Tektronix Phaser II SDX printer that I want to put
} on my campus network. I bought the Ethernet adaptor card but
} my network administrator is telling me it's not possible to
} put the printer on our network. We support Novell and TCP/IP.
} Has anyone put this printer on a network using either of
} these protocols? If so, can you give me any words of
} wisdom that might help me get the printer on the net?
}
} Steven J. Eppell
} Center for Cardiovascular Biomaterials
} Case Western Reserve University
}
} sje-at-po.cwru.edu
}




From: noran!tanagra!kburton-at-uunet.uu.net (Kevin Burton)
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 11:54:16 +0600
Subject: Re: Networking a dye sublimation printer

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} } } } } "Steven" == Steven J Eppell {uunet!po.CWRU.Edu!sje} writes:

Steven} I have a Tektronix Phaser II SDX printer that I want to
Steven} put on my campus network. I bought the Ethernet adaptor
Steven} card but my network administrator is telling me it's not
Steven} possible to put the printer on our network. We support
Steven} Novell and TCP/IP. Has anyone put this printer on a
Steven} network using either of these protocols? If so, can you
Steven} give me any words of wisdom that might help me get the
Steven} printer on the net?

Steven} Steven J. Eppell Center for Cardiovascular Biomaterials
Steven} Case Western Reserve University

Steven} sje-at-po.cwru.edu

If you are trying to print from a Unix workstation you can use the
standard BSD print spooling mechanism to print to a network node (the
IP address assigned to the Ethernet adaptor. If this is a Novell
network and you need to print from a Sun Unix workstation you can use
a package from Puzzle Systems called SoftNet Utilities that allows
bidirectional printing.

--
Kevin Burton
Noran Instruments voice: (608) 831-6511 x317
2551 West Beltline Highway, Room 532 FAX: (608) 836-7224
Middleton, WI 53562 email: kburton-at-noran.com

Opinions expressed herein apparently spontaneously organized themselves.






From: sje-at-po.CWRU.Edu (Steven J. Eppell)
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 11:31:21 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Networking a dye sublimation printer

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All subscribers Please remember to
change your default address of "microscopy" to

Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

ANLEMC is dead, and mail is aliased to the new site.

Unfortunately the alias does not always work so some
messages to microscopy do not always come through.

---------------------------
As for your Tek IISDX....

You should likely talk to Tektronics people on
your network problem. I have a IISDX which is
on an Appletalk/Ethernet connection and works fine.
There are special drivers which you must load
for using the printer on Mac, PC, or Sun workstations.
You should have gotten these with your hardware.
You could also run a direct line between the printer
and your workstation.

On the Mac side you simply, plug-in and run. Virtually
no setup time is required, except to copy the drivers
from the disks to the system folder and connect the
printer to the net. Then simply use the "choozer" to
locate the printer on the appropriate zone on your
networks. (This is the network connection I use)

On the PC side you will have to install the Windows
drivers and then Mount the printer as a network
printer. However, I cannot help with Novell nets..
How do you normally connect network printers?
You must have laserprinters on your Novell network and
I would guess that the procedure would be similiar.
My version of the IISDX is NOT IP aware (it's about
2 years old) so TCP/IP is not an option here.

Just a warning. Putting a dye sub on a network can
also be expensive if you have users that are not
careful. People often forget that they were
using a dye-sub printer and when they want to print
their next manuscript/email note sometimes send it to a printer assuming
they are still connected to a standard text printer,
without checking to see that the have "de-selected" the dye sub.
Hope you have some ideas on how to limit access
otherwise you may end up having lots of expensive
text printed out on your dye sub.

I use the IISDX printer for literally all my image hardcopy now.
Haven't made a print from TEM negatives in nearly
2 years. Of course, some of my instruments are
entirely digital (VG HB603Z) and hence there is no film.


Good Luck...

Nestor Zaluzec




From: {rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-20-95 8:05am
Subject: RE: Light element EDS

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Message-Id: {9501232034.AA26017-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Light element EDS
Orig-Author: {randy nessler {rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu} }:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------

I am interested in the discussion of light element analysis using
a Kevex Quantum detector. From my discussions with Kevex, it seems that
the software available has a hard time compensating for matrix effects
when light elements are mixed with high atomic number elements. I was
wondering how other people deal with this. Our system runs on RT11, so
people who have TSX systems will have to bear with me. It appears that
the answer is standards, standards, and more standards. Let's hear it...
Randy Nessler









From: Alan Pooley :      pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 16:41:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Critical Point Drying

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An eductor tube ie a syphon tube (not ejector) is usual to get the
liquid phase of co2 out of the tube. Ris at Univ Wisc used a small
cylinder upside down, not very pratical for a large cylinder. I don't think it practical
to get the cylidar down to a low enough temp to get liquid out, I forget
the liquification temperature but it must be close to -70 C ie close to
dry ice temp? Quality is important, I have had cylinders that had water mixed with
the co2.... bad scene!! I order extra dry co2 (I believe, its written down
where I order, not here)
MOST important! be sure that the syphon/eductor tube is really there!
Test by letting gas out at a good rate, the valve should start to frost up
within 5-10 seconds at at a reasonable flow. about 20 percent of cylinders have
broken or missing eductor tubes! so beware.
A 'condenser valve' is available, I think from Fullam? (mine is ~12 years
old) this will bleed some c02 out while cooling an internal cold finger that
will recondense gaseous co2 passing through the valve to the cpd back
to liquid... provided the room temp is not too high and the cylinder is
not too empty etc.
Also only about 30 of the 50 pounds of co2 can be gotteon out as liquid
even with a condensing valve. Cold water around the chamber also helps.
Hope this helpes people.
alan pooley marine sci sem lab rutgers univ




From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 23 Jan 1995 17:31:32 -0400
Subject: HREM: SF6 for 4000EX

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Message-ID: {n1421239928.96853-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time: 4:46
PM

Date:1/23/95
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html NC EMAL

Hi there,
we are in the process of converting our JEOL 4000EX from freon to SF6 and
want to know where we can get the said gas at a reasonable price. At the
moment it looks like we are looking at between $1000 and $1700 for a single
charge and so I would appreciate it if anyone could give me pointers for a
source with a more reasonable cost
Please reply direct to me and I will summarize to the list if there is
sufficent interest.
Thanks
John Mansfield.





From: bjg-at-uniwa.uwa.edu.au (Brendon J. Griffin)
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 08:09:14 +0800
Subject: Successful hookup

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Message-Id: {199501240005.IAA11949-at-uniwa.uwa.edu.au}

Ta muchly - hooked up and ready to go
Brendon J. Griffin
Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
The University of Western Australia
Nedlands, WA, AUSTRALIA 6907
ph 61-9-380-2739 fax 61-9-380-1087





From: Glenn Holm :      KARUZIS-at-wccf.mit.edu
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 21:22:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: lucifer yellow antibodies (light microscopy)

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we're wanting to get back into the lucifer yellow business after a
few years - filling cells in slices, observing the fills with
fluorescence, then immunostaining with antibody against LY and through
to DAB. In the past, we used a gift antibody. Are there commercial
Ab's out there that also do a good job? I have heard that there can be
some loss of fine detail in the immuno procedure, and want to know
if anyone has strong preferences as to LY antisera.

------------------------------------------------------------------
|Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |
|M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |
|Cambridge, MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
------------------------------------------------------------------





From: H.J. Maier :      /S=MAIER/OU=IFWT/OU=MASCHINENBAU/-at-UNI-SIEGEN.D400.de (Tel +49 271 740 2184)
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 00:45:48 -0600
Subject:

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From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 09:10:43 EST
Subject: Re: HREM- SF6 for 4000EX

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John
In my recent experience, SF6 is available from all of the major
industrial gas suppliers (ie Selox) for about the same price...~$700 per
100 lb. That was enough for about 3 charges on our JEM 1210. Your 4000
must have a BIG tank. It took about 6 weeks for our SF6 to arrive.
Obviously there is some primary supplier, but I don't know where. Good
luck!

buddy

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: swatkins-at-pitt.edu (Simon Watkins)
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 09:49:14 -0500
Subject: Freeze Fracture

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A few months ago, I put a message on the board looking for a Freeze Fracture
machine, didn't get any good leads, so I thought it was time for another try:

We would like to obtain a freeze fracture machine in good working order (one
of the Balzers or Cressington machines would do fine). We have money to pay
for the machine, though not enough for a new one (sound familiar!). If you
or someone you know would be interested in selling a machine to a good home
please let me know

Thanks.
----------------------------------------------------
Simon Watkins Ph.D
Director Structural Biology Imaging Center
Scaife 840
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261

Tel:412:648-3051
Fax:412:648-1441
----------------------------------------------------





From: colijn-at-kcgl1.eng.ohio-state.edu (Henk Colijn)
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 11:13:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: HREM- SF6 for 4000EX

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The price for SF6 depends greatly on the purity. Commercial purity (99.7%)
is generally available around $650-700 for a cylinder (115lb capacity).
Instrument grade (99.99%) is near $1100 per cylinder. Our prices are from
AGA (about a year ago), although I don't think you'll find significant
price differences from other vendors.

The microscope manufacturers recommend instrument grade (of course!),
although we successfully ran our H9000NAR on commercial grade.

Cheers, Henk

}
} Hi there,
} we are in the process of converting our JEOL 4000EX from freon to SF6 and
} want to know where we can get the said gas at a reasonable price. At the
} moment it looks like we are looking at between $1000 and $1700 for a single
} charge and so I would appreciate it if anyone could give me pointers for a
} source with a more reasonable cost
} Please reply direct to me and I will summarize to the list if there is
} sufficent interest.
} Thanks
} John Mansfield.

Henk Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Research Law #1
If observations disagree with theory, the observations are obviously in error.






From: Tim Foecke :      tfoecke-at-NIST.GOV
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 14:21:55 -0500
Subject: TEM Opening at NIST

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Message-ID: {n1421168016.15503-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}
ONeilD-at-imb.lan.nrc.ca
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP/QM 3.0.0GM

Reply to: RE} SEM-Freeze Drying equipment

I surveyed sources of freeze drying units last year when finishing up my book
on "Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy". At that time, these devices were
available from:
Agar Scientific (UK) Fx:0279-815106
Bal-Tech Fx: 508-374-7070
Denton Vacuum Fx: 609-424-0395
Edwards High Vacuum Fx: 505-658-7969
Electron Microscopy Sciences Fx: 215-646-8931
Emitech Fx: 713-893-8443
Energy Beam Sciences Fx;413-789-2786
Fisons FX: 415-961-8656
GeneVac (UK) FX: 0473-461176
Microfield (UK) FX:0865-821459
VG Microtech (UK) FX: 0825-768343
I don't know about the degree of automation offered, but perhaps this
will give you a start on sorting things out. Good Luck!

--------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
| David O'Neil tel: (902) 426-8258 |
| National Research Council of Canada fax: (902) 426-9413 |
| Institute for Marine Biosciences _____ _____ |
| 1411 Oxford St. | | __/\__ | | |
| Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3Z1 | | __/\\ //\__ | | |
| Canada | | \ \\ // / | | |
| | | /___ ___\ | | |
| email: oneild-at-imb.lan.nrc.ca | | /__ __\ | | |
| | | || | | |
| |_____| |_____| |
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To: Microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV


This is a follow-on to the 'pre-announcement' that I posted
several weeks ago. The position is now real.

Tim Foecke


********************************************************

Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory
National Institute of Standards and Technology

We are presently expanding our capabilities within the
Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at NIST in
the area of HREM, and have an opening for a highly
qualified Ph.D. scientist. Candidates must have extensive
hands-on experience in high resolution imaging, be well
versed in imaging and diffraction theory, and have exper-
ience in image simulation. Experience in PEELS and EDS
is essential, as is some background in materials science.
Strong interest in development and implementation of new
methodology is necessary. The position will include
extensive work with other staff members of MSEL. For
permanent employment, US citizenship is required.

Interested parties should submit a curriculum vitae
and the names of three references by MARCH 15, 1995 to:

Dr. F.W. Gayle
NIST
Building 223, Room B164
Gaithersburg, MD 20899

email: fgayle-at-nist.gov

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer

********************************************************






From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 1995 16:11:08 -0600
Subject: Ed Basgall,print prosc.

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Message-Id: {m0rWsyx-000113C-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

Ed, I tried to respond to your request for print processor information, but my
attempt bounced back with "host unknown" message. Please contact me privately
and send e-mail address and I'll try again.



--

Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: Jan Coetzee EM Univ Pretoria :      JANC-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 09:28:47 GMT+2
Subject: Peltier devices

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Good day all,
Thanks to all the contributors who posted (and are still posting) responses
to my question on electronic lab work scheduling. Shall try to post a
summary of the responses.

Another query:
We need to put together a cooling stage for freeze drying of small
samples. One way of doing this could be by using Peltier-effect cooling.
These devices are used in various pieces of equipment but I have not been
able to find someone who makes them. Could anyone help by supplying
references to manufacturers of Peltier-effect devices?
Thanks


Jan Coetzee
Unit for Electron Microscopy Tel:+27-12-420-2075
University of Pretoria Fax:+27-12-342-1738
Pretoria Internet:janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
0002 South Africa




From: Romuald Wroblewski onkpat :      Romuald.Wroblewski-at-onkpat.ki.se
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 09:04:02 +0200 (METDST)
Subject: Re: SEM-Freeze Drying equipment

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I was looking for such a unit for years. I am currently using unit which
was build in our workshop for 10 years ago and still going strong. The
unit have rotary and turbo-pumps. For cooling Neslabs cryocool and liquid
nitrogen are used. Temperature of specimens down to -150C and condenser,
down to -180C. Using a data acquisition card from Strawberry Tree + Mac I
can use controll and register temperatures at 4 different sites and
register and display vacuum. Freeze-drier is used for both
SEM-preparations and Low Temperature Vacuum Embedding.
I will present the latest results from this system at SEM-meeting in
Houston, Texas in May 1995.
Costs of total unit are about USD 10 000 INCLUDING pumps, acq-card (not
crypcool).

Regards

Romuald

-------------------------
Romuald Wroblewski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Pathology
Karolinska Institute
voice/fax:+46-8-7293597
-------------------------





From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 08:24:54 -0500
Subject: EDS,results and weasel words

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Dear Folks,

I thought I would poll the EDS, WDS, EELS and other users about the proper
disclaimer to place in reports issued internally or externally.

Most of our analysis is concerned with mineral fillers and those elements
heavier than neon dispersed in an organic matrix. In some cases we will
examine the organic matrix or we ash the organic matrix and examine the
ash. The ash is either pressed on to a carbon block or on to a conductive
double-sided tape. We believe that a realistic blanket statement of
detectable for semi-quantification mode is "between neon to neptunium if
present in concetrations of approximately 0.5%" but we feel a need to add
some weasel words about the sample.

The question: Which best describes the limitations of our analysis by our
samples? 0.5% by weight or 0.5% by volume, or is there a better phrase?
Or are we just fooling ourselves?

Thanks........Frank


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: MOLE:: fskarl-at-goodyear.com 25-JAN-1995 07:27:47.64
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 08:31:37 -0600
Subject: EDS results & weasel words

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Dear Folks,

I thought I would poll the EDS, WDS, EELS and other users about the proper
disclaimer to place in reports issued internally or externally.

Most of our analysis is concerned with mineral fillers and those elements
heavier than neon dispersed in an organic matrix. In some cases we will
examine the organic matrix or we ash the organic matrix and examine the
ash. The ash is either pressed on to a carbon block or on to a conductive
double-sided tape. We believe that a realistic blanket statement of
detectable for semi-quantification mode is "between neon to neptunium if
present in concetrations of approximately 0.5%" but we feel a need to add
some weasel words about the sample.

The question: Which best describes the limitations of our analysis by our
samples? 0.5% by weight or 0.5% by volume, or is there a better phrase?
Or are we just fooling ourselves?

Thanks........Frank


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 9:50:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Test Messages

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X-Nupop-Charset: English


G'day Subscribers....

Just a note. It is clearly inappropriate to
use the Microscopy Listserver to send out Test
messages to see if your Email server is running.
There are somewhere over 2000 people receiving
these messages please be intelligent. If you are
having an Email problem then send a message to
only one person. If you are really in a bind then
just send a message to me and I will respond when
I get a chance, but not to the world!!

Nestor
Your Friendly (& Lately Tired) Neighborhood SysOp




From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab Univers :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 11:29:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Biol. SEM Textbook

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I am planning to teach a short course in biological SEM for novices and
need to find a textbook for the students. I am considering Postek et al., 1980
published by Ladd. Would any of you out there recommend anything more recent
that would be appropriate for grad students, staff, faculty, post-docs.
Any input willl be appreciated.

Although my course is intended for local consumption, iot would be
open to anyone, so if there are interested parties wanting to spend a week in
Florida in May, just E- mail me at the address below

Thanks
******************************************************
* Greg Erdos ** *
* Director, ICBR EMCL ** Phone 904-392-1295 *
* 218 Carr Hall ** FAX 904-846-0251 *
* University of Florida ** gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 ** *
******************************************************************




From: sc_marschman-at-ccmail.pnl.gov
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 1995 09:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Need Help Developing Optical Techniques for Uranium Hydride

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I posted this note yesterday on several newsgroups, but
just found out about this listserver today (1-25-95).
I am looking for some help...

My group is responsible for examining uranium-metal
spent nuclear fuel (N-Reactor, Single-Pass Reactors)
which has degraded over time while in water storage at
the Hanford, Washington site. There is a possibility
that some of the uranium may have reacted with water to
form uranium hydride which still may be present in some
of the fuel. One of our tasks is to determine if this
scenario is real. Thus, we will be examining several
fuel elements to look for evidence of hydrides. We
have (and will use) optical microscopy and electron
microscopy (AFM, SEM, TEM) in our efforts.

Because the fuel is highly radioactive, and has a
potential for pyrophoric reactions, our first efforts
will be to cut, section, polish, and optically examine
the fuel in a radiation hot cell using an argon cover
gas blanket over all operations. However, when we get
to the point of specifying etchants or etching
techniques to examine the uranium, no one is sure how
best to bring out the features of uranium hydride in
uranium metal. We will try cathodic etching first,
largely because this is what has been traditionally
done to examine uranium at our lab. However, we aren't
sure what to expect from the hydride (if it exists).
Our literature searches have drawn a blank with regard
to microscopy techniques for uranium hydrides.

So, I would like to ask, has anyone had experience
optically examining uranium hydrides? If so, could you
recommend a procedure? We also have the possibility of
hiring a consultant if the right person or lab anywhere
in the world) is identified to assist us.

Thanks
Steve Marschman
sc_marschman-at-pnl.gov




From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 13:33:15 +0800PST
Subject: lm-quantifying immunolabelling

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I have a question for those people involved in light microscopic
immunolabelling and trying to quantify the amount of stainig. Can
anyone do it reliably?? We have someone in the lab who wants to
determine if the staining obtained with 6 different antibodies
co-localize within the tissue. They are staining paraffin-embedded
sections and are staining one antibody/section. They want to know if
there is a way to do this using an imaging system of some sort. IMHO
I don't thinnk it can be done easily. If anyone has any
trhoughts/ideas they would be GREATLY APPRECIATED.

Thanks
Mark Elliott, PhD
Pulmonary Research Lab
UBC
Vancouver
Canada




From: X.m. Burany :      burany-at-sfu.ca
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 13:58:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: REM

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Hi Jeff:

We do some reflection diffraction electron microscopy. Would you
please let us know more details of your work on REM.

Sandy Burany
Dept. of Physics
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6
Canada
(604) 291-4082
Fax (604) 291-3592
Email xm_burany-at-sfu.ca





From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 18:46:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: lm-quantifying immunolabelling

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

Quantitative fluorescence microscopy can be tricky. Please refer to the
chapter by Jesse E. Sisken (Fluorescence Standards) in Methods in Cell Biology, vol. 30, edited by
L.Taylor and Y. Wang (1989; Academic Press) for recommendations.

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 17:10:31 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Conductive glue needed!

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Try using silver paint, we use it & it seems to be working well.
-Mike

On Wed, 25 Jan 1995 tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu wrote:

}
} Hi, microscopist,
}
} Does anyone know if there's any conductive glue by which we can attach
} our TEM samples to Cu/Au grids? M-bond is what I currently use and has
} been suspected to cause some shifting of images especially for tiny
} samples. Any information or comment will be appreciated.
}
} I-Fei Tsu
} ASC-MRG
} UW-Madison
}
}




From: Weimin Tao :      wtao-at-mtu.edu
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 1995 20:58:07 -0500
Subject: Re: Conductive glue needed!

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subscribe weimin tao







From: {tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-25-95 3:56pm
Subject: Conductive glue needed!

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Message-Id: {9501261225.AA04965-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Conductive glue needed!
Orig-Author: {tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------

Hi, microscopist,

Does anyone know if there's any conductive glue by which we can attach
our TEM samples to Cu/Au grids? M-bond is what I currently use and has
been suspected to cause some shifting of images especially for tiny
samples. Any information or comment will be appreciated.

I-Fei Tsu
ASC-MRG
UW-Madison





From: schwartz-at-mrvx03.mdc.com
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 1995 08:41:26 -0600
Subject: Electropolishing Mo-Re

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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My Fellow Microscopists:

I am trying to prepare TEM thin foils from Mo-47.5Re (at.%) using a
twin-jet electropolisher, without success. I have tried cold sulfuric
acid/methanol solutions and perchloric acid/methanol solutions. These
produce a pebbly surface with minimal electron transparent areas.

Does anyone out there have experience producing TEM thin foils from
Mo-Re? I would greatly appreciate any suggestions!
_ _
O-O
J (a sideways smiley) Thanks, Dan Schwartz
~





From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 26 Jan 95 12:56:27 EST
Subject: Electropolishing Mo-Re

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I spoke to Bernie Kestel at Argonne National Lab and he gave the following
solution that has worked well for him:

Material: Mo 30a/o Re
Equipment: South Bay Technology Model 550 Single Vertical-Jet
ElectroPolisher
Electrolyte: 12% Sulphuric Acid
83% Methanol
5% Butyl Cellosolve
Temperature: -50C
Voltage: 190V
Current: 50-75 ma
Pump Speed: Slow

Since the work was done with a SBT Single Jet System, he suggested that you
change the temperature to perhaps -40C and use a somewhat lower voltage for a
twin jet system.

Of course, my solution would be to buy a South Bay unit, but I do have a vested
interest in that! We also publish a bibliography of technical reports on sample
preparation and distribute copies of the papers free of charge. Most of the
reports deal with TEM sample preparation - primarily electropolishing, dimpling
and Tripod Polishing.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-2600





From: {schwartz-at-mrvx03.mdc.com}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-26-95 10:39am
Subject: Electropolishing Mo-Re

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Message-Id: {m0rXYnF-0000zMC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Electropolishing Mo-Re
Orig-Author: {schwartz-at-mrvx03.mdc.com}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
My Fellow Microscopists:

I am trying to prepare TEM thin foils from Mo-47.5Re (at.%) using a
twin-jet electropolisher, without success. I have tried cold sulfuric
acid/methanol solutions and perchloric acid/methanol solutions. These
produce a pebbly surface with minimal electron transparent areas.

Does anyone out there have experience producing TEM thin foils from
Mo-Re? I would greatly appreciate any suggestions!
_ _
O-O
J (a sideways smiley) Thanks, Dan Schwartz
~






From: emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 1995 13:42:12 -0800
Subject: EM embedding

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Greetings:

This may be a simple minded question, but I could use some advice. I just
mixed some Epon Araldite type embedding plastic and it got really dark in
color after adding the BDMA. I was using an Epon 812 substitute, DDSA,
Araldite 502, and BDMA. It is a slightly different recipe than we have used
before and our plastic is usually a pleasant golden color, this stuff was
like dark caramel in color. The color came from the interaction of the BDMA
and DDSA, or at least that is the way it looked after mixing the BDMA with
the other components individually.

Does anyone have a suggestion to explain the dark color and any free advice
about this phenomenon in general.

In a related question, can anyone say what the useful shelf lives of the
various embedding components might be. Some of ours are older, someone buys
a lot and never uses it up, should we toss everything and start over or can
we hold on and use what we have?

Thanks for your help.


Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu
(408) 459-2477






From: hukee.margaret-at-mayo.EDU (Marge Hukee)
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 1995 18:07:03 +0200
Subject: Re: EM embedding

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Message-Id: {9501270004.AA26961-at-fermat.Mayo.EDU}
X-Sender: hukem-at-fermat.mayo.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

JON:

I DON'T THINK THE AGE OF YOUR RESIN COMPONENTS HAS ANY INFLUENCE ON THE
DARK COLOR. OUR RESIN BATCHES ARE TURNED-OVER RAPIDLY, AND WE HAVE NOTICED
A DARK COLOR IN OUR SPURR IN COMPONENTS THAT WERE RECENTLY ACQUIRED. WE
CALLED ONE OF THE SUPPLY COMPANIES AND WERE TOLD THAT AN ALTERED PH IN ONE
OF THE COMPONENTS WAS RESPONSIBLE. SINCE OUR SPURR RECIPE AND YOUR RESIN
RECIPE DO NOT HAVE ANY COMPONENTS IN COMMON, PERHAPS THIS IS A GENERAL
RESIN PROBLEM. ANY COMMENTS FROM RESIN ENGINEERS?

MARGE

Marge Hukee
EM Core Facility hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Mayo Foundation (507) 284-3148
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--






From: Ron Oldfield (roldfiel-at-rna.bio.mq.edu.au)
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 14:11:56 GMT+1100
Subject: Re:unsubscribe

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Date sent: 27 January 1995

About to enjoy a break.....please unsubscribe, and thanks.




Ron Oldfield
School of Biological Sciences
Macquarie University
NSW Australia 2109
email: roldfiel-at-rna.bio.mq.edu.au
phone: (612) 850 8173
fax: (612) 850 8116







From: SveEn-at-pai.liu.se (Sverker Enestrom)
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 08:26:01 +0100
Subject: LM-quantifying immunolabeling

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Mats Karlsson (at Dept. of Pathology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital,
Orebro, Sweden)
et al. have recently described the methodological approach to quantify
immunostained
objects in histological sections by computerized image analysis in:
Pathology, Res. and
Pract. 1995 (in press), using frozen sections. Intra- and interindividual
variations were
less than 5% and the correlation of reproducibility was high.
If you are interested, contact me directly.

==================================================================
Sverker Enestrom M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Pathology
University of Linkoping, Sweden
Phone: +46 13 22 15 20
Fax: +46 13 13 22 57
==================================================================






From: Peter Makroczy RNDr. :      makroczy-at-ccsun.tuke.sk
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 09:06:02 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Channeling patterns on TEM

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Does anyone has experience how to get channeling patterns on JEOL Jem 2000FX
electron microscope equipped with ASEA20 in STEM/BEI mode? Please some
hints, advices.

Thank You.

Peter Makroczy
Technical University of Kosice
Dept.of Materials Science
Park Komenskeho 11
043 85 Kosice
Slovak republic

E-mail: makroczy-at-ccsun.tuke.sk




From: {schwartz-at-mrvx03.mdc.com}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 1-26-95 10:39am
Subject: Re: Electropolishing Mo-Re

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {9501271212.AA08568-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Electropolishing Mo-Re
Orig-Author: {schwartz-at-mrvx03.mdc.com}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
My Fellow Microscopists:

I am trying to prepare TEM thin foils from Mo-47.5Re (at.%) using a
twin-jet electropolisher, without success. I have tried cold sulfuric
acid/methanol solutions and perchloric acid/methanol solutions. These
produce a pebbly surface with minimal electron transparent areas.

Does anyone out there have experience producing TEM thin foils from
Mo-Re? I would greatly appreciate any suggestions!
_ _
O-O
J (a sideways smiley) Thanks, Dan Schwartz
~



--Boundary (ID 6KnNZ50yHI4SNRb1ETY+XQ)





From: Peter Makroczy RNDr. :      makroczy-at-ccsun.tuke.sk
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 13:28:36 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Channeling patterns on TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone has experience how to get channeling pattern on JEOL Jem 2000FX
electron microscope equipped with ASEA 20 in STEM/BEI mode. Please some
hints, advices.

Thank You.

Peter Makroczy
Technical University of Kosice
Dept. of Materials Science
Park Komenskeho 11
043 85 Kosice
Slovak republic

E-mail: makroczy-at-ccsun.tuke.sk




From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 08:39:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: EM embedding

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Jonathon,

Way back when, I was using EPON-ARALDITE resin components that were at least
10 years old at the time. No problems with using these. I do not recall
having any problems with a dark color. What % of BDMA are you using? I
used 2%(v/v). The only problem I can forsee in using a dark batch of resin
would be that your background of your sections will not be as light as they
should be. Best of luck.

Ed Calomeni




From: Herbert K. Hagler, Ph.D. :      hagler-at-UTSW.SWMED.EDU
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 08:01:13 +0800 (U)
Subject: Re: LM-Quantifying Immunolabelling

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Monica {NASSM-at-QUCDN.QueensU.CA}
Message-id: {01HMC1146R5U8ZUHIB-at-UTSW.SWMED.EDU}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link PT/Internet 1.5.1
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

It is hard to understand why people are still attempting to 'quantitate'
imunohistochical reactions which rely on a final step in which the 'quantity'
of stain is not related to the amount of antigen present. In order to
quantitate anything there has to be a quantitative relationship which can be
measured relating what is seen in the section to the amount of material
detected. In other words you cannot quantiate the standard immunoperoxidase
techniques used in immunocytochemistry. This does not negate their
importance, but means that one should not attempt to do image analysis on
this material.

For a complete discussion of these limitations see the bottom of page 6 in
the Gareth Griffiths book on "Fine Structure Immuno-cytochemistry,
Springer-Verlag, 1993, ISBN 3-540-54805-X.
The following is a quote from this page "..., Fig 1 shows a striking example
of a little appreciated fact, namely, how the immunoperoxidase method can
often give results that, though qualitatively correct, may be quantitatively
misleading.
Most people who have worked extensively with any of the HRP techniques become
aware of these problems and may be frustrated by the presence of many
variables that cannot, even empirically, be completely controlled. Even if
only qualitative data are required, it is very difficult in practice to find
the right compromise between acceptable fine structure preservation and
specific labelling. This does not belittle the historical importance of the
immunoperoxidase techniques..."


Herbert K. Hagler, Ph.D.
Microscopy and Imaging Service Center
Dept of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center
5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75235-9072
phone (214) 648-3890 fax (214) 648-3925




From: Giovanni Valdre' :      gvaldre-at-dogon.geomin.unibo.it
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 17:34:16 +0000
Subject: unsubscribe

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Message-Id: {9501271638.AA09836-at-Dogon.geomin.unibo.it}
Sender: {gvaldre-at-dogon.geomin.unibo.it}

please, unsubscribe
-------------------------------------------
Giovanni Valdre'
Dipartimento Di Scienze Mineralogiche
Piazza di Porta S. Donato 1
I-40126 Bologna, Italy
Tel. +39 51 243556 FAX +39 51 243336
email gvaldre-at-geomin.unibo.it
-------------------------------------------





From: Mriglermas-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 16:12:41 -0500
Subject: temhelp

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To whom it may concern:

Please send copies of Temhelp letters or questions to me. We perform all
types of EM analyses and can probably help with a variety of
techniques/comments.

Thank you very much.


Regards,


Mark W. Rigler, Ph.D.
Materials Analytical Services
Norcross, Georgia
1800-421-8451




From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 1995 22:14:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: EM embedding

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Many different epoxies from various manufacturers, with widely varying
ages have all given me exceptionally dark pot mixtures from time to
time. There are only two things that I've been able to narrow it down to.
One is accelerator, BDMA, DMAE or DMP-30 that has been opened too long.
Water contamination has been suggested by mfrs. I now toss the
accelerator when a bottle of epoxy (Epon, DER 736, etc.) is emptied.
Some suppliers are worse than others. We quit dealing with Polysciences
entirely, because of irregularities in the final blocks. (color is minor,
it's when things won't get hard, and kits arrive missing components that
things are serious).
The other correlation on block color is delay in mixing. If you delay,
you get coloration. Delay too long, or mix with a stir bar so slowly
that you get layer formation, and the upper layer will get very dark and
form lumps.
Just my $.02.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu






From: Norm Granholm :      Norman.Granholm-at-UC.Edu
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 1995 11:27:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 2D software for Unix platform

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I ask for comments, recommendations, advice, for 2D image analysis software
for a UNIX platform (SGI Indy R4000).

If there is interest I'll post a summary. Thanks.

Norm Granholm, Pathology, Univ. Cincinnati College Medicine
(granhona-at-ucbeh.san.uc.edu)
V: 513 558 0182





From: Alan Partridge :      alan-at-surf.phys.tue.nl
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 11:15:34 +0100 (MET)
Subject:

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Message-Id: {199501301017.LAA28059-at-mailhost.tue.nl}

Subscribe





From: Alan Partridge :      alan-at-surf.phys.tue.nl
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 13:26:15 +0100 (MET)
Subject: subscribe

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Message-Id: {199501301227.NAA01841-at-mailhost.tue.nl}

Subscribe





From: Marcelle A Gillott :      magem-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 08:43:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: cryo-ultramicrotomy equipment

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looking for feedback (mostly negative) from users - I have demo'd the
systems and have a few "satisfied customer" refs from sales and of course
each has annon. "horror stories" about the competition
Hi everyone

I am in the process on deciding on a purchase of cryo-fixation and
ultramicrotomy equipment and would appreciate some feedback from users -

I have demo'd both the Reichert Ultracut S and the RMC 7000 with their
cryo systems and they seem pretty comparable, each having its own
plusses and minuses -

This instrument will be used for both teaching and research - also it
will msot likey be a very long time before we purchase another one

I would appreciate any positive and/or NEGATIVE comments you might have
on these instruments - particularly your experience regarding reliability
and service and support after the sales (I will not be taking out a
service contract)

We are also contemplating the purchase of a jet freezer from either
Bal-Tec or RMC (they bought out the Life-cell system) & would appreciate
any comments from users about those instruments as well

Responses which are sent directly to me (as opposed to those posted to
the list) will remain confidential

Thanks


Marcelle Gillott, Ph.D.
Director, EM Laboratory
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

magem-at-csd.uwm.edu

PH: 414-229-4186





From: rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 16:01:37 +0000
Subject: Journal of Microscopy, December 1994 - February 1995

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Sender: rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
JTERLET-at-CEMMA.ADELAIDE.EDU.AU, microtoday-at-aol.com, ROSS.MACKENZIE-at-OX.AC.UK,
MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Message-ID: {0098B3E3.3A699A78.5-at-vax.ox.ac.uk}

Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
181-187.

In situ analysis of microbial consortia in activated sludge
using fluorescently-labelled, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide
probes and scanning confocal laser microscopy

M. Wagner, B. Assmus, A. Hartmann, P. Hutzler & R. Amann
Lehrstuhl fur Mikrobiologie, Technische Universitat Munchen,
Arcisstrasse 21, D-80290 Munchen, Germany


SUMMARY

Activated sludge flocs are complex consortia of various micro-
organisms. The community structures of samples taken from
municipal sewage treatment plants were characterized using
fluorescently labelled, 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted
oligonucleotide probes in combination with confocal scanning
laser microscopy (CSLM). In comparison with conventional
epifluorescence microscopy, CSLM considerably improved the
capability to visualize directly the spatial distribution of
defined bacterial populations inside the sludge flocs.
Analyses could be performed at high resolution undisturbed by
problems such as autofluorescence or limited spatial
resolution in thick samples. In addition, CSLM was used to
analyse some structural properties of paraformaldehyde-fixed
activated sludge flocs, such as floc size and homogeneity.
Typical floc sizes were found to be in the range between 5 and
50 micrometre. Whereas most of the flocs were completely
colonized by bacteria, there were also examples of flocs
containing gas bubbles or particles in the interior.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
188-194.

Scanning interference and confocal microscopy

R. Juskaitis & T. Wilson, Department of Engineering Science,
University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ, U.K.


SUMMARY

The form of the interference term image in scanning confocal
and scanning conventional interference microscopes is
identical in all respects including optical sectioning. This
observation is used to obtain confocal images and surface
profiles from conventional scanning interference microscope
images.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
195-203.

Time- and wavelength-resolved spectroscopy in two-photon
excited fluorescence microscopy

S. Andersson-Engels, I. Rokahr & J. Carlsson
Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, PO Box
118, S-221 00 Lund, Sweden


SUMMARY

Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy has been
performed at a microscopic scale in combination with normal,
white light microscopy. This gave simultaneously a spectral
resolution of 20nm and a temporal resolution of 20ps, from a
volume element less than 5 micrometre in all three dimensions.
The sample was excited with light from a continuously mode-
locked Ti:sapphire laser that was focused on the sample in a
fluorescence microscope. A polychromator and streak-camera
were used for detection. The method has been used on tissue,
plant and paper samples. It has also been demonstrated how
substances naturally occurring in the samples can be
identified from their spectroscopic properties and the spatial
distribution of these substances can be observed.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
204-210.

Intracellular localization of the antitumour drug adriamycin
in living cultured cells: a confocal microscopy study

S. Meschini, A. Molinari, A. Calcabrini, G. Citro & G. Arancia
Department of Ultrastructures, Istituto Superiore di Sanita,
Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy


SUMMARY

The intracellular distribution of the anthracyclinic
antibiotic adriamycin in living cultured cells has been
investigated by confocal microscopy.
In human melanoma cells (M14), adriamycin was localized
inside the nuclei. When adriamycin-treated M14 cells were
allowed to recover in a drug-free medium, a complete efflux of
the drug from the nucleus was revealed. In recovered cells, a
weakly fluorescent signal was observed in the perinuclear
region. When M14 cells were recovered in a medium containing
colcemid, a microtubule depolymerizing agent, the drug
transport from the nucleus to the cell periphery appeared to
be inhibited, suggesting that the microtubule network is
strongly involved in drug transport mechanisms. In multidrug-
resistant (MDR) cells the intracellular location of adriamycin
was shown to be noticeably different from that of the parental
wild-type cells. In particular, in resistant human breast
carcinoma cells (MCF-7), adriamycin appeared to be exclusively
located within the cytoplasm, whereas the nuclei were shown to
be completely negative. When adriamycin treatment was
performed in association with MDR revertants, such as
Lonidamine (inhibitor of the energy metabolism) or verapamil
(inhibitor of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump), a marked
enhancement of the cytoplasmic signal was observed in
resistant cells. Under these conditions, adriamycin appeared
concentrated in the perinuclear region, but the nuclei were
still negative. Confocal microscopy proved to be a useful
method for the study of the intracellular transport of
fluorescent substances, such as anthracyclinic antibiotics,
and for the investigation of the multidrug resistance
phenomenon in tumour cells.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
211-221.

A versatile tilting device for fluorescence microscopes

J. Bradl, M. Hausmann, B. Schneider, B. Rinke & C. Cremer
Institut fur Angewandte Physik, Albert-Uberle Strasse 3-5,
D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany


SUMMARY

A tilting device for biological specimens (rotation angle up
to 2 pi) especially fluorescence-labelled cell nuclei, was
developed. It consists of a quartz glass capillary and a
mounting adaptor for the microscope stage. The applicability
of the device was tested for several epifluorescence and
confocal scanning laser microscopes. The axis of rotation is
perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. The
capillary can be tilted around its axis at any desired angle
or in equiangular steps. This can be done manually or by
remote control using a stepping motor.
The three-dimensional (3-D) image-forming properties of
the capillary system were experimentally examined using an
inverse confocal scanning laser microscope. The results were
compared with measurements obtained from the same microscope
with the standard stage for plane slides with cover glasses.
The measured point spread function suggested that, in spite of
aberration effects, the optical arrangement used allows a gain
in the 3-D resolution by tilting the object.
A low-cost, fully-automated 3-D imaging system was built
on the basis of a conventional epifluorescence microscope with
a cooled black-and-white CCD camera. The system was operated
by a personal computer. The online visualization ('movie') of
rotating objects indicates the feasibility of the system.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
222-225.

Continuous wave excitation two-photon fluorescence microscopy

P. E. Hanninen, E. Soini & S. W. Hell
Department of Medical Physics, University of Turku, Center for
Biotechnology, Tykistokatu 6, FIN-20521 Turku, Finland


SUMMARY

Two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging is feasible with
continuous wave lasers. Images of biological specimens are
obtained by employing photon counting in conjunction with an
increasing recording time. The approach allows two-photon
three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently-labelled specimens
with inexpensive lasers.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
226-230.

Refractive-index-induced aberrations in two-photon confocal
fluorescence microscopy

H. Jacobsen, P. E. Hanninen, E. Soini & S. W. Hell
Department of Medical Physics, University of Turku, Center for
Biotechnology, Tykistokatu 6, FIN-20521 Turku, Finland


SUMMARY

The effect of refractive index mismatch on the image quality
in two-photon confocal fluorescence microscopy is investigated
by experiment and numerical calculations. The results show a
strong decrease in the image brightness using high-aperture
objectives when the image plane is moved deeper into the
sample. When exciting at 740nm and recording the fluorescence
around 460nm in a glycerol-mounted sample using a lens of a
numerical aperture of 1.4 (oil immersion), a 25% decrease in
the intensity is observed at a depth of 9 micrometre. In an
aqueous sample, the same decrease is observed at a depth of 3
micrometre. By reducing the numerical aperture to 1.0, the
intensity decrease can be avoided at the expense of the
overall resolution and signal intensity. The experiments are
compared with the predictions of a theory that takes into
account the vectorial character of light and the refraction of
the wavefronts according to Fermat's principle. Advice is
given concerning how the effects can be taken into account in
practice.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
231-237.

The tetrahedral tip as a probe for scanning near-field optical
microscopy at 30nm resolution

U. C. Fischer, J. Koglin & H. Fuchs
Westfalische Wilhelms Universitat, Physikalisches Institut,
Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, 48149 Munster, Germany


SUMMARY

The tetrahedral tip is introduced as a new type of probe for
scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Probe
fabrication, its integration into a scheme of an inverted
photon scanning tunnelling microscope and imaging at 30nm
resolution are shown. A purely optical signal is used for
feedback control of the distance of the scanning tip to the
sample, thus avoiding a convolution of the SNOM image with
other simultaneous imaging modes such as force microscopy. The
advantages of this probe seem to be a very high efficiency and
its potential for SNOM at high lateral resolution below 30nm.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
238-244.

Studies of porphyrin containing specimens using an optical
spectrometer connected to a confocal scanning laser microscope

O. Trepte, I. Rokahr, S. Andersson-Engels & K. Carlsson
Physics IV, The Royal Institute of Tech, S-100 44 Stockholm,
Sweden


SUMMARY

A spectrometer has been developed for use with a confocal
scanning laser microscope. With this unit, spectral
information from a single point or a user-defined region
within the microscope specimen can be recorded. A glass prism
is used to disperse the spectral components of the recorded
light over a linear CCD photodiode array with 256 elements. A
regulated cooling unit keeps the detector at 277K, thereby
allowing integration times of up to 60s. The spectral
resolving power ranges from 350 at 400nm to 100 at 700nm.
Since the entrance aperture of the spectrometer has the same
size as the detector pinhole used during normal confocal
scanning, the three-dimensional spatial resolution is
equivalent to that of normal confocal scanning. Light from the
specimen is deflected to the spectrometer by a solenoid
controlled mirror, allowing fast and easy switching between
normal confocal scanning and spectrometer readings.
With this equipment, studies of rodent liver specimens
containing porphyrins have been made. The subcellular
localization is of interest for the mechanisms of photodynamic
therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours. Spectroscopic detection is
necessary to distinguish the porphyrin signal from other
fluorescent components in the specimen. Two different
substances were administered to the tissue, Photofrin, a
haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and delta-amino levulinic
acid (ALA), a precursor to photoporphyrin IX and haem in the
haem cycle. Both are substances under clinical trials for PDT
of malignant tumours. Following administration of these
compounds to the tissue, the potent photosensitizer and
fluorescent compound photofrin, or protoporphyrin IX,
respectively, is accumulated. For our study Wistar/Furth rats
were injected either with Photofrin or with ALA 3-5h before
they were killed. The organs were removed directly after and
snap-frozen in carbon dioxide ice with isopentane. No further
staining or fixation procedures were adopted.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
245-253.

Modelling of inclined and curved surfaces in the reflection
scanning acoustic microscope

W. Weise, P. Zinin & S. Boseck
Institute for Materials Science and, Structure Research,
Physics Department, University of Bremen, 28334 Bremen,
Germany


SUMMARY

An expression is derived for the output signal when an
inclined plane surface is imaged by the reflection scanning
acoustic microscope, which is modelled as a spherical
transducer. This expression is applied to model non-planar
surfaces. The accuracy of this approach is tested for
perfectly reflecting spherical surfaces. The influence of
inclination on V(z) curves is considered when Rayleigh waves
occur.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
254-261.

Scanning force microscopy on live cultured cells: imaging and
force-versus-distance investigations

D. Ricci & M. Grattarola
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Biofisica, ed Elettronica,
Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Opera Pia 11a, 16145
Genova, Italy


SUMMARY

Extensive measurements with the scanning force microscope
(SFM) on living cells in their native liquid environment are
described with the purpose of critically assessing the extent
of the interaction between the SFM tip and the (soft) cell
materials and the effect of such interaction on topographic
information. Images are obtained under various force
conditions and systematically correlated with force-versus-
distance curves. As a result, detailed indications about tip
indentation are given, thickness estimates deduced and
identification of submembranous cytoplasmic structures
suggested.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
262-275.

In vivo analysis of angiogenesis and revascularization of
transplanted pancreatic islets using confocal microscopy

F. A. Merchant, S. J. Aggarwal, K. R. Diller & A. C. Bovik
Biomedical Engineering Research Program, ENS 612, University
of Texas, Austin 78712-1084, U.S.A.


SUMMARY

A technique to measure angiogenesis and revascularization in
pancreatic islets transplanted at the renal subcapsular site
in the rat has been developed. In vivo imaging of the
microcirculation of transplanted pancreatic islets was
conducted using a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) to
achieve optical sectioning through the graft in order to
perform a computer reconstruction of the three-dimensional
neovascular morphology. Individual islets were harvested by
enzymatic digestion of excised pancreas from Fischer 344 rats.
Isolated islets were cultured for 24h, and approximately 300-
350 islets were transplanted at the renal subcapsular site of
the left kidney in an anaesthetized rat. Six to 14 days post-
transplantation, the animal was anaesthetized and prepared for
in vivo imaging of the microvasculature on a Zeiss LSM-10.
Optical contrast of the microvasculature was enhanced by the
administration of fluorescein-labelled dextran into the
circulating blood. The transplant site was identified and
serial sections were obtained through the vascular bed at
varying z-intervals. Complementary fluorescence video images
were also obtained via a silicon intensifier tube camera
mounted on the CSLM. At completion of the imaging procedure,
the kidney was returned into the body cavity, the area was
sutured and the animal was allowed to recuperate for
subsequent examinations. Image processing algorithms, such as
grey-level thresholding, median filtering, skeletonization and
template matching, were applied to compute the vessel density
and diameters and extrapolated to measure 3-D vessel lengths
and the tortuosity index of the neovasculature.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
276-280.

Optoelectronic detector probes for scanning near-field optical
microscopy

H. U. Danzebrink
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100,
D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany


SUMMARY

A brief explanation of the optoelectronic probe concept and a
comparison between the implementation of passive waveguide
probes and optoelectronic probes in scanning near-field
optical microscopy (SNOM) is presented. The first probe
realizations using cleaved semiconductor crystals and the work
at present in progress using microfabricated Si pyramids are
described. These crystals with evaporated metal electrodes
forming a slit aperture with subwavelength dimensions work as
metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors. Their optical
detection behaviour is investigated by measuring the intensity
distribution of a laser focal point. Measurements where the
external bias voltage is changed show that it is possible to
modify the detection behaviour of the device because of the
varying depletion widths. The last part of the article
describes a concept where pyramidal probes should function
simultaneously as senors for scanning force microscopy (SFM)
to measure topography and as optoelectronic probes for
scanning near-field optoelectronic microscopy (SNOEM).


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
281-286.

Imaging in the far-red with electronic light microscopy:
requirements and limitations

C. Cullander
School of Pharmacy S926, University of California, San
Francisco, CA 94143-0446, U.S.A.


SUMMARY

The acquisition of simultaneous dual confocal images with red
and far-red light has both advantages (e.g. lower
autofluorescence) and limitations. An understanding of these
requisites is necessary to acquire high-quality images and to
avoid the misinterpretation of experimental data. The poor
detection of far-red light mandates a high optical transfer
efficiency for the system, thus the transmittance of the
objective lens and its axial and lateral chromatic aberration
in the far-red are important factors for consideration. This
technical note is an attempt to 'demystify' the process of
filter set design for confocal microscopy by discussing the
considerations that went into the construction of a filter set
for use with the reagents cyanine 3.18 (Cy3) and cyanine 5.18
(Cy5), and thus to encourage users to look beyond the
multipurpose designs available commercially. The 568-nm laser
line exciting Cy3 is at its emission maximum, which limits the
collectable Cy3 fluorescence. High-transmission optical
filters with sharp bandpass cutoffs are thus desirable for
maximum light throughput. Light path mirror efficiency rapidly
degrades above 700nm, but the loss of this portion of the Cy5
emission spectrum is acceptable since the fluorophore is very
bright, and these very long wavelengths are also likely to
introduce aberration. While resolution is decreased with far-
red light, there is also greater penetration and less
scattering, and it is thus possible to obtain high-quality
images from deeper within the specimen. Although only one make
and model of confocal microscope (the Bio-Rad MRC-600) is
considered, similar considerations pertain to the design of
filter sets for any confocal microscope that accommodates
user-installed filters.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 176, Pt. 3, December 1994, pp.
287-299.

Simultaneous confocal recording of multiple fluorescent labels
with improved channel separation

K. Carlsson, N. Aslund, K. Mossberg & J. Philip
Physics IV, The Royal Institute of Tech, S-100 44 Stockholm,
Sweden


SUMMARY

Confocal microscopes are often used to study specimens
labelled with fluorophores. A commonly used method for
simultaneous recording of the distribution of multiple
fluorophores is to divide the fluorescent light emitted by the
specimen into different wavelength regions using dichroic and
bandpass filters. These different wavelength regions are then
distributed to multiple detectors. However, fluorophores often
result in considerable cross-talk between channels. A new
technique, intensity-modulated multiple-beam scanning (IMS)
microfluorimetry, can be used to reduce this cross-talk
substantially.
The IMS technique is implemented with two laser beams of
different wavelengths, intensity-modulated at different
frequencies, which illuminate the specimen simultaneously. The
two laser wavelengths predominantly excite one fluorophore
each. Fluorescent light from the specimen is divided into two
wavelength regions (red and green) which are detected by two
photomultiplier tubes. The output signals from the
photomultiplier tubes are connected to lock-in amplifiers. The
effect of using modulated laser beams, in combination with
lock-in amplifiers, is strongly to reduce the cross-talk
between channels. The performance of the IMS technique using
various types of specimen is compared with the results
obtained using the conventional multi-detector design.




Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp. 1-6.

In vivo determination of fibril orientation in plant cell
walls with polarization CSLM

J.-P. Verbelen & D. Stickens
Department of Biology, University of Antwerp (UIA),
Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerpen, Belgium


SUMMARY

Congo Red fluorescence is used to detect cellulose in the wall
of plant cells. The orientation of the cellulose fibrils is
determined by using polarized light for excitation. The
absorption characteristics of Congo Red make this approach a
method of choice for applications with any standard confocal
scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The semi-quantitative
character of CSLM observations combined with the non-toxicity
of the stain allow a very fast and reliable assessment of
cellulose orientation in the wall of living plant cells.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
7-17.

Three-dimensional reconstruction of the human renal glomerulus

K. Preston Jr, B. Joe, R. Siderits & J. Welling
Kensal Corporation, 5055 East Broadway (Suite C206), Tucson AZ
85711, U.S.A.


SUMMARY

The capillary bed of human renal glomerulus is one of the more
complex capillary structures in the human body. This paper
illustrates three-dimensional reconstruction of the capillary
bed from serial sections. It shows that, although traditional
methods of three-dimensional rendering by computer fail to
handle the complexities of the capillary structure, new
methods based on filtering using three-dimensional
mathematical morphology are capable of revealing previously
unseen details. This is done at the expense of eliminating
fine structure (small capillaries). An error analysis allows
the degree to which fine details are lost to be estimated.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
18-30.

Quantitative water mapping of cryosectioned cells by electron
energy loss spectroscopy

S. Q. Sun, S.-L. Shi, J. A. Hunt & R. D. Leapman
Health & Human Services, Public Health Service, National
Institutes of Health, Building 13 Room 3W13, Bethseda MD
20892, U.S.A.


SUMMARY

A direct technique based on electron energy-loss spectroscopy
(EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)
has been developed to map subcellular distributions of water
in frozen-hydrated biological cryosections. Previously,
methods for water determination have been indirect, in that
they have required the cryosections to be dehydrated first.
The new approach makes use of spectrum-imaging, where EELS
data are collected in parallel at each pixel. Several
operations are required to process the spectra including:
subtraction of the detector dark current, deconvolution by the
detector point-spread function, removal of plural inelastic
scattering and correction for the support film. The resulting
single scattering distributions are fitted to standard
reference spectra at each pixel, and water content can be
determined from the fitting coefficients. Although the
darkfield or brightfield image from a hydrated cryosection
shows minimal structure, the processed EELS image reveals
strong contrast due to variation in water content. Reference
spectra have been recorded from the major biomolecules
(Protein, lipid, carbohydrate, nucleic acid) as well as from
vitrified water and crystalline ice. It has been found that
quantitative results can be obtained for the majority of
subcellular compartments by fitting only water and protein
reference spectra, and the accuracy of the method for these
compartments has been estimated as plus/minus 3.5%. With the
present instrumentation the maximum allowed dose of 2000e/nm2
limits the useful spatial resolution to around 80nm plus/minus
5% precision at a single pixel. By averaging pixel intensities
a value of 56.8% with a precision of plus/minus 2.0% has been
determined for the water content of liver mitochondria. The
water mapping technique may prove useful for applications to
cell physiology and pathophysiology.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
31-42.

Hybrid scanning transmission electron/scanning tunnelling
microscope system for the preparation and investigation of
biomolecules

H. F. Knapp, R. Wyss, R. Haring, C. Henn, R. Guckenberger & A.
Engel
Maurice E Muller Institut fur, Hochauflosende
Elektronenmikroskopie, Universitat Basel, Klingelbergstrasse
70, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland


SUMMARY

A hybrid scanning transmission electron/scanning tunnelling
microscope vacuum system is introduced, which allows freeze
drying and metal coating of biological samples and their
simultaneous observation by scanning transmission electron
microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Different
metal coatings and STM tips were analysed to obtain the
highest possible resolution for such a system. Bovine liver
catalase was used as a test sample and the STM results are
compared to a molecular scale model.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
43-52.

Backscattered electron imaging of the undersurface of
resin-embedded cells by field emission scanning electron
microscopy

R. G. Richards & I. Ap Gwynn
AO/ASIF Research Institute, Clavadelerstrasse, CH-7270 Davos
Platz, Switzerland


SUMMARY

In this study backscattered electron (BSE) imaging was used to
display cellular structures stained with heavy metals within
an unstained resin by atomic number contrast in successively
deeper layers. Balb/c3T3 fibroblasts were cultured on either
13mm discs of plastic Thermanox, commercially pure titanium or
steel. The cells were fixed, stained and embedded in resin and
the disc removed. The resin block containing the cells was
sputter coated and examined in a field-emission scanning
electron microscope. The technique allowed for the direct
visualization of the cell undersurface and immediately
overlying areas of cytoplasm through the surrounding embedding
resin, with good resolution and contrast to a significant
depth of about 2 micrometre, without the requirement for
cutting sections. The fixation protocol was optimized in order
to increase heavy metal staining for maximal backscattered
electron production. The operation of the microscope was
optimized to maximize the number of backscattered electrons
produced and to minimize the spot size. BSE images were
collected over a wide range of accelerating voltages (keV),
from low values to high values, to give 'sections' of
information from increasing depths within the sample. At 3-
4keV only structures a very short distance into the material
were observed, essentially areas of cell attachment to the
removed substrate. At higher accelerating voltages information
on cell morphology, including in particular stress fibres and
cell nuclei, where heavy metal were intensely bound, became
more evident. The technique allowed stepwise 'sectional'
information to be acquired. The technique should be useful for
studies on cell morphology, cycle and adhesion with greater
resolution than can be obtained with any light-microscope-
based system.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
53-67.

Tomographic reconstruction of the cross-sectional refractive
index distribution in semi-transparent birefringent fibres

T. C. Wedberg & W. C. Wedberg
Physics Department, University of Bergen, Allegt 55, N-5007
Bergen, Norway


SUMMARY

Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is used to reconstruct
the complex refractive index distribution in cross-sections of
semi-transparent, birefringent fibres. The selected fibres
were polymer and animal fibres of either circular or non-
circular cross-section with average thicknesses in the range
8-110 micrometre. This choice of samples was made to
illustrate the imaging capabilities of ODT, and also to
demonstrate some potential applications of the technique. The
images representing the reconstructed refractive index
distributions have a spatial resolution of about 2 micrometre,
and show noticeable image contrast for refractive index
variations of about 0.001. The ODT reconstructions compare
well with refractive index information provided with the
samples, and with scanning electron micrographs of cross-
sections of the same fibre samples. From these results it
appears that ODT can be used to reconstruct the complex
refractive index distribution in cross-sections of semi-
transparent birefringent fibres.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
68-76.

Computer simulated high-resolution transmission electron
microscopy (HRTEM) in tourmaline

E. A. Ferrow
Avdelningen for Mineralogi och Petrologi, Geologiska
Institutionen, Lund Universitet, Solvegatan 13, 223 62 Lund,
Sweden


SUMMARY

The contrast distributions observed in high-resolution
transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of tourmaline
depend on the types and magnitudes of the exchange components
present and on the degree of atom overlap along the direction
of observation. Furthermore, the fractional atomic coordinates
in tourmalines are valid only for the specific specimen
refined. These properties make the interpretation of
experimental HRTEM images of tourmaline using image simulation
if not impossible at least extremely difficult. A correct
interpretation of experimental HRTEM images of tourmaline is
possible provided the structural refinement data on the same
crystal are available. Nevertheless, it is possible to
interpret the experimental HRTEM images of tourmaline if the
composition of the structural model chosen during image
simulation approximates the composition of the specimen
studied by electron microscopy. A good control of the
composition of the specimen studied and an appropriate choice
of a structural model for image simulation are therefore as
important as properly controlling specimen thickness, specimen
tilt, beam tilt and objective lens defocus.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
77-84.

Confocal microscopy in the analysis of the etched nuclear
particle tracks in polymers

J. Jakes, P. Gais & H. Schraube
Institut fur Strahlenschutz, GSF-Neuherberg, Postfach 1129,
D-85758 Oberschleissheim, Germany


SUMMARY

The possibility of the morphometric analysis of etched tracks,
induced by protons and alpha particles in the organic polymer
allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), using the confocal scanning
laser microscope (CSLM), was studied. The detectors were
investigated in two groups of irradiation experiments, namely:
(a) irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons of energy 1.2MeV,
(b) exposed to the alpha radiation from 222Rn and its progeny.
Both groups were irradiated at normal incidence. Radiation-
induced latent tracks were electrochemically etched, and their
morphometric parameters were investigated in the reflection
mode by using the 488nm spectral line of an argon ion laser. A
constant number of up to 200 optical sections in Z-scan mode
was taken through each selected etched track at vertical
spacings of 0.642 micrometre. Successive reconstructions of Z-
sections were used to determine the following parameters: the
mean radius of the opening channel, the maximum diameter and
the length of the track, and the angle of the track wall to
the surface of the sample. The results show that tracks
produced by alpha particles differ from those induced by
protons. The radius of the opening channel of alpha-particle-
induced tracks ranges from 7.9 to 11 micrometre, whereas for
protons the same parameter ranges between 2.0 and 3.8
micrometre for a specific electrochemical etch procedure.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
85-89.

A simple method for overcoming some problems when observing
thick reflected biological samples with the confocal scanning
laser microscope

C. Rumio, M. Morini, J. R. Miani, I. Barajon & P. Castano
Institute of Human Anatomy, Via Mangiagalli 31, 20133 Milano,
Italy


SUMMARY

A simple device is described, which allows the range of depth
of scanning to be reduced when observing thick reflecting
biological specimens with a confocal scanning laser microscope
(CSLM). Thick histological sections of human skin and rat
brain stem were mounted between two coverslip ('sandwich
style') and the optical tomography was performed from both
sides by turning the 'sandwich' upside-down. The samples were
impregnated using standard Golgi-Cox, 'rapid Golgi' or other
silver methods. The ability to turn the sandwich upside-down
is particularly useful when the reflective structure inspected
is deep inside the section, i.e. near the lower surface of the
specimen, or when it is opaque to the laser beam of
excessively reflective.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 1, January 1995, pp.
90-92.

Thick section preparation using a silicon-rubber-based sealant

H. Cox, C. Walker & C. V. Howard
Department of Orthopaedic & Accident Surgery, Royal Liverpool
University Hospital, Prescot Street, PO Box 147, Liverpool,
L69 3BX


SUMMARY

A method has been developed, using a silicon-rubber-based
sealant, which allows 2-3-mm-thick specimens to be maintained
in a protected fluid environment for a number of months,
without risk of dehydration. Following this, the specimen can
be retrieved, stained, embedded and sectioned further. For
example, 2-mm-thick sections of fixed unstained bone are
easily examined by means of epi-illuminated polarized light
and fluorescence microscopies using either conventional or
confocal optics. The method could easily be extended to other
tissues, for example brain tissue.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

A method to compensate for light attenuation with depth in
three-dimensional DNA image cytometry using a confocal
scanning laser microscope

A. Liljeborg, M. Czader & A. Porwit
Physics IV, The Royal Institute of Tech, S-100 44 Stockholm,
Sweden


SUMMARY

A method to compensate for attenuation of detected light with
increased depth of the collected optical section, and its
application in three-dimensional (3-D) DNA image cytometry is
described. The method is based on studying the stack of 2-D
histograms that ca be formed from each consecutive pair of
sections in a stack of optical serial sections. An attenuation
factor is calculated interactively and a new compensated
section series is computed. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded
rat tissue was stained with propidium iodide. Each cell
nucleus is extracted by thresholding and its total intensity
is calculated. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the total
intensity of all cells in each stack is computed. For
comparison the CV of the same cells is computed in the
uncompensated stacks. This study shows a significantly lower
CV for the compensated data, thus contributing to the accuracy
of DNA quantification in 3-D DNA image cytometry.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Microfractography of granitic rocks under confocal scanning
laser microscopy

M. Montoto, A. Martinez-Nistal, A. Rodriguez-Rey, N.
Fernandez-Merayo & P. Soriano
University of Oviedo, Department of Geology, Group of
Petrophysics, 33005 Oviedo, Spain


SUMMARY

Scanning laser microscopy, in the confocal mode (CSLM) has
been applied to a granitic rock to characterize its fissure
space. The technique provides a unique three-dimensional
picture of the rock microfractomography. CSLM is unique in
observing fine details of the fractographic network
(connectivity, tortuosity, etc.), its geometry and its
relation to other rock-forming components.
The fractographic images with standard fluorescence
microscopy are compared with those obtained with CSLM. The
examples presented emphasize the advantages of CSLM: three-
dimensional visualization of the microfractographic network,
crack connectivity, automatic evaluation of direction and
slope of fissures.
These studies are related to the migration of
radionuclides in the geosphere. The relations between
potentially water-conducting open fissures and the rock-
forming minerals provide a means of modelling the
'radionuclide retardation mechanism', a security factor in
their definitive storage in rock masses.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

PHOEBE, a prototype scanning laser-feedback microscope for
imaging biological cells in aqueous media

T. L. Wong, S. L. Sabato & A. Bearden
Division of Neurobiology, Department of Molecular & Cell
Biology, 229 Stanley Hall, University of California at
Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720-3206, U.S.A.


SUMMARY

Based on the principle of laser-feedback interferometry (LFI),
a laser-feedback microscope (LFM) has been constructed,
capable of providing an axial (z) resolution of a target
surface topography of approximately 1nm and a lateral (x,y)
resolution of approximately 200nm when used with a high-
numerical-aperture oil-immersion microscope objective. LFI is
a form of interferometry in which a laser's intensity is
modulated by light re-entering the illuminating laser.
Interfering with the light circulating in the laser resonant
cavity, this back-reflected light gives information about an
object's position and reflectivity. Using a 1-mW He-Ne
(wavelength=632.8nm) laser, this microscope (PHOEBE) is
capable is obtaining 256x256-pixel images over fields from
10x10 micrometre to 120x120 micrometre in approximately 30s.
An electrochemical feedback circuit holds the optical
pathlength between the laser output mirror and a point on the
scanned object constant; this allows two types of images
(surface topography and surface reflectivity) to be obtained
simultaneously. For biological cells, imaging can be
accomplished using back-reflected light originating from small
refractive-index changes (} 0.02) at cell membrane/water
interfaces; alternatively, the optical pathlength through the
cell interior can be measured point-by-point by growing or
placing a cell suspension on a higher-reflecting substrate
(glass or silicon wafer). Advantages of the laser-feedback
microscope in comparison to other confocal optical microscopes
include: simplicity of the single-axis interferometric design;
the confocal property of the laser-feedback microscope (a
virtual pinhole), which is achieved by the requirement that
only light that re-enters the laser meeting the stringent
frequency, spatial (TEM00), and coherence requirements of the
laser cavity resonator mode modulate the laser frequency; and
the improved axial resolution, which is based on
interferometric measurement of optical amplitude and phase
rather than by use of a pinhole as in other types of confocal
microscopes.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Imaging periodic surface relief structures

J. T. Sheridan & T. O. Korner
TP 680, Institute for System Engineering and, Informatics
Science R&D, Joint Research Centre JRS/CCR, I-21020 Ispra
(VA), Italy


SUMMARY

Because of shadowing, multiple scatter and polarization
effects, the interpretation of images of grating with fine
periods, isolated deep structures, and multiple scattering
volume objects is seriously complicated. In this paper a
review of methods used to model such effects is presented.
Periodic surface relief gratings are of particular current
importance because of the possibility of producing calibration
samples using them. Several examples which illustrate
electromagnetic volume effects are examined. General trends
which help in validating the use of Fourier-transform-based
scalar transmittance theory are then indicated. The angular
spectrum approach, which can be used , together with a scatter
function generated using the rigorous electromagnetic theory,
to calculate coherent, partially coherent and confocal images
of volume objects, is also discussed.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Application of confocal laser microscopy and three-dimensional
Voronoi diagrams for volume and surface area estimates of
interphase chromosomes

R. Eils, E. Bertin, K. Saracoglu, B. Rinke, E. Schrock, Y.
Usson, M. Robert-Nicoud, E. H. K. Stelzer, J.-M. Chassery, T.
Cremer & C. Cremer
Institut fur Angewandte Physik, Albert-Uberle Strasse 3-5,
D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany


SUMMARY

This study demonstrates the use of Voronoi tessellation
procedures to obtain quantitative morphological data for
chromosome territories in the cell nucleus. As a model system,
chromosomes 7 and X were visualized in human female amniotic
fluid cell nuclei by chromosomal in situ suppression
hybridization with chromosome-specific composite probes. Light
optical serial sections of 18 nuclei were obtained with a
confocal scanning laser fluorescence microscope. A three-
dimensional (3-D) tessellation of the image volumes defined by
the stack of serial sections was then performed. For this
purpose a Voronoi diagram, which consists of convex polyhedra
structured in a graph environment, was built for each nucleus.
The chromosome territories were then described by three
morphological parameters, i.e. volume, surface area and a
roundness factor (shape factor). The complete evaluation of a
nucleus, including the calculation of the Voronoi diagram, 3-D
visualization of extracted territories using computer graphic
methods and parameterization was carried out on a Silicon
Graphics workstation and was generally completed within 5 min.
The geometric information obtained by this procedure revealed
that both X- and 7-chromosome territories were similar in
volume. Roundness factors indicated a pronounced variability
in interphase shape for both pairs of chromosomes. Surface
estimates showed a significant difference between the two X-
territories but not between chromosome 7-territories.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Forbidden light scanning near-field optical microscopy

H. Heinzelmann, B. Hecht, L. Novotny & D. W. Pohl
Institut fur Physik, Universitat Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82,
4056 Basel, Switzerland


SUMMARY

Near-field optics (NFO) opens the door to light microscopy
techniques with resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit.
The richness of optical investigations is now applicable on a
near-molecular level. Among the novel scanning near-field
optical microscopy (SNOM) schemes, the most prominent
representatives are aperture SNOM and scanning tunnelling
optical microscopy (STOM or PSTM).
New experimental and theoretical work has to be performed
to study the phenomena specific to NFO. One such example is
the angular dependence of light emission in aperture SNOM. The
detection of radiation at angles greater than the critical
angle of total internal reflection alpha=arcsin(1/n), where n
is the sample refractive index, can represent a microscopy
scheme that combines the respective advantages of both
aperture SNOM and STOM. Recent experiments have demonstrated
the expected exponential dependence of light intensity on gap
width (for fixed emission angle). The decay length as a
function of alpha is in agreement with the Fresnel description
of the evanescent field when total reflection occurs at an
interface. These investigations were additionally motivated by
calculations based on the multiple multipole method.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Automated correction of linear deformation due to sectioning
in serial micrographs

T. Jansson, T. Gustavsson, M. Rydmark, C.-H. Berthold, R.
Pascher & T. Skoglund
Department of Applied Electronics, Chalmers University of
Technology, S-412 96 Goteborg, Sweden


SUMMARY

This paper describes an objective and automatic method for
detection and correction of sectioning deformations in
digitized micrographs, as well as an evaluation of the method
applied to light and electron microscopic images of semi-thin
and ultra-thin serial sections from brain cortex. The
detection is based on matching of image subregions and the
deformation model is bi-linear, i.e. two first-order
polynomials are used for modelling compression/expansion in
perpendicular directions. The procedure is applicable to
prealigned serial two-dimensional sections and is primarily
aimed at three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue samples
consisting of a large number of cells with random distribution
and morphology.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Comparison of three-dimensional imaging properties between
two-photon and single-photon confocal fluorescence microscopy

Min Gu & C. J. R. Sheppard
Physical Optics Department, School of Physics, The University
of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia


SUMMARY

The imaging performance in single photon (1-p) and two-photon
(2-p) fluorescence microscopy is described. Both confocal and
conventional systems are compared in terms of the three-
dimensional (3-D) point spread function and the 3-D optical
transfer function. Images of fluorescent sharp edges and
layers are modelled, giving resolution in transverse and axial
directions. A comparison of the imaging properties is also
given for a 4Pi confocal system. Confocal 2-p 4Pi fluorescence
microscopy gives the best axial resolution in the sense that
its 3-D optical transfer function has the strongest response
along the axial direction.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Double pulse fluorescence lifetime imaging in confocal
microscopy

M. Muller, R. I. Ghauharali, K. Visscher, T. D. Visser & G. J.
Brakenhoff
Department of Molecular Cytology, University of Amsterdam,
Plantage Muidergracht 14, 1018 TV Amsterdam, The Netherlands


SUMMARY

A theoretical analysis of a new technique for fluorescence
lifetime measurement, relying on (near steady state)
excitation with short optical pulses, is presented.
Application of the technique to confocal microscopy enables
local determination of the fluorescence lifetime, which is a
parameter sensitive to the local environment of fluorescent
probe molecules in biological samples. The novel technique
provides good time resolution, since it relies on the laser
pulse duration, rather than on electronic gating techniques,
and permits, in combination with bilateral confocal microscopy
and the use of a (cooled) CCD, sensitive signal detection over
a large dynamic range. The principle of the technique is
discussed within a theoretical framework. The sensitivity of
the technique is analysed, taking into account:
photodegradation, the effect of the laser repetition rate and
the effect of non-steady-state excitation. The features of the
technique are compared to more conventional methods for
fluorescence lifetime imaging.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 177, Pt. 2, February 1995, pp. .

Near field imaging: some attempts to define an apparatus
function

D. Courjon
Laboratoire d'Optique PM Duffieux, Associe au CNRS URA-214,
UFR des Sciences et des Techniques, 25030 Besancon Cedex,
France


SUMMARY

Near-field microscopy is a promising new tool capable of
imaging details smaller than the wavelength. The mechanism of
imaging is analysed and an overview of the apparatus functions
which could be used to define an image quality criterion is
given.


Apologies for sending such a long file at once. Please note that summaries will
be posted less frequently as Gillian Wilson is now on maternity leave.

************************************************************************

Gillian Wilson Executive Editor
The Royal Microscopical Society Journal of Microscopy &
37/38 St Clements Proceedings of the RMS
Oxford
OX4 1AJ UNITED KINGDOM
rms-at-uk.ac.ox.vax OR rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)865 248768
Fax +44 (0)865 791237

************************************************************************




From: imgp-at-mbimp1.mbl.TNO.NL (Kees van der Wulp)
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 12:39:54 +0100 (MET)
Subject: addition to : Re. 2D softw. for Unix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear microscopists,

I apologize for not being complete regarding the URL I gave
on the SCIL-Image software. Here is a more precise specification
of the path towards the information.

URL: http://www.tn.tudelft.nl

select : Pattern Recognition Group -
Software Developments -
SCIL-Image

Hope this saves you time.

--
Kees van der Wulp

******************************* ATTENTION ***************************
* *
* Change in INTERNET address ! *
* *
* From : vanderwulp-at-mbl.tno.nl *
* To : vanderwulp-at-voeding.tno.nl *
* *
*********************************************************************

TNO - Nutrition & Food Research INTERNET : vanderwulp-at-voeding.tno.nl
Division : Toxicology VOICE : +31 15 843101
Department : Genetic Toxicology FAX : +31 15 843989
PO-Box 5815 General TNO Info : http://www.tno.nl
2280 HV RIJSWIJK (NL)
THE NETHERLANDS




Groeten,
Gert van Antwerpen.
TNO Institute of Applied Physics.
P.O.Box 155, 2600 AD Delft, The Netherlands.
Phone: +31 15-692226, Fax: +31 15-692111
Email: antwerp-at-tpd.tno.nl

--
Kees van der Wulp

******************************* ATTENTION ***************************
* *
* Change in INTERNET address ! *
* *
* From : vanderwulp-at-mbl.tno.nl *
* To : vanderwulp-at-voeding.tno.nl *
* *
*********************************************************************

TNO - Nutrition & Food Research INTERNET : vanderwulp-at-voeding.tno.nl
Division : Toxicology VOICE : +31 15 843101
Department : Genetic Toxicology FAX : +31 15 843989
PO-Box 5815 General TNO Info : http://www.tno.nl
2280 HV RIJSWIJK (NL)
THE NETHERLANDS





From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 10:33:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Here's Dabco references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

X-Sender: glenmac-at-homer07.u.washington.edu

The references:

1,4-Diazobicyclo(2,2,2)octane (Dabco) delays fading of
immunofluorescence preparations
Langanger, Gabriele; De Mey, Jan; Adam, Hans
Mikroskopie 1983; 40 (7-8): 237-41
Language: German

Fading of immunofluorescence during microscopy. A study of the
phenomenon and its remedy
Johnson G D; Davidson R S; Mcnamee K C; Russell G; Goodwin D;
Holborow E J
J Immunol Methods 55 (2). 1982. 231-242

Regards,
Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu






From: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu (Steve Barlow)
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 1995 10:46:55 -0800
Subject: Re EM embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jon

I encountered the identical problem of dark caramel colored epon mix after
addition of DMP-30, Substitution of the standard DDSA component with a
new bottle of "Specially Distilled DDSA" corrected the problem and
produced the golden colored resin mix. I was also told (see Marge Hukee's
reply) the problem was a function of the pH of the resins

----------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
San Diego CA 92182-0057
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu





From: imgp-at-mbimp1.mbl.TNO.NL (Kees van der Wulp)
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 11:09:54 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: 2D IP software for Unix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopy friends,

Because I still miss the original message and only received the additional
message I posted (Re : 2D software for Unix), I repost the original correc-
ted message to the microscopy list.
I apologize for this 2nd message if you DID receive the first one somehow.

Dear Norm,

Regarding your question,

}
} I ask for comments, recommendations, advice, for 2D image analysis software
} for a UNIX platform (SGI Indy R4000).
}
} If there is interest I'll post a summary. Thanks.
}

I can give you 2 URL's, leading to the same SCIL page, that provide you with
a brief description of SCIL-Image (version 1.3), as well as an e-mail address
of Mr. G. van Antwerpen whom I gave your address. He will take care of providing
you with more information on SCIL-Image.

I am using SCIL-Image on my Personal IRIS 4D/35 for a couple of years now.
It is an extensive 2D multi-layered image processing package (} 200 ip commands).
It can be used on various platforms (Sun, HP, SGI, IBM, PC's, Mac's)
and can be run from a mouse driven menu(1), a commandline interpreter (2)
and from compiled routines (3) which makes it run very fast.
It is a combination of a Standard C Interpreter Language (part 1) and
an extensive Image processing library (part 2). It incorporates a complete program
flow control mechanism and enables you to create and mix C- statements
(and complete programs) with image processing commands. You can also easily extend
the package with your own library of user created (compiled or C-source)
routines and incorporate them into the mouse driven menu.
I run it from my X-Terminal (Tektronix XP 27 and XP 356, colour terminals)
in interactive as well as batch mode.
I heard from mr. van Antwerpen that you can evaluate the full package for
a period of 3 months at a rate of about US$ 250.= However for these kind
of things please contact him, for I am only a user of the package.

URL: http://www.tn.tudelft.nl

select : Pattern Recognition Group -
Software Developments -
Scil-Image

or
URL: http://galaxy.ph.tn.tudelft.nl:2000/Software/scil.html


e-mail address G. van Antwerpen : antwerp-at-tpd.tno.nl

All people interested in more info can get it from him.

Good luck,

--
Kees van der Wulp

TNO - Nutrition & Food Research INTERNET : vanderwulp-at-voeding.tno.nl
Division : Toxicology VOICE : +31 15 843101
Department : Genetic Toxicology FAX : +31 15 843989
PO-Box 5815 General TNO Info : http://www.tno.nl
2280 HV RIJSWIJK (NL)
THE NETHERLANDS





From: slc6-at-Lehigh.EDU (SHARON L. COE)
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 08:58:26 EST
Subject: Microscopy courses at Lehigh

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199501311358.IAA08013-at-ns1.CC.Lehigh.EDU}

1995 MICROSCOPY SHORT COURSES AT LEHIGH UNIVERSITY
25TH ANNIVERSARY
June 12-23, 1995

Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis (June 12-16, 1995)

Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy with Digital Imaging (June 19-22, 1995)

Quantitative X-ray Microanalysis of Bulk Specimens and Particles (June 19-22,
1995)

Atomic Force Microscopy and other Scannned Probe Microscopies (June 20-23, 1995)

Analytical Electron Microscopy (June 19-22, 1995)

For more information please e-mail a response with subject "Short Course Info"
to Sharon Coe at slc6-at-lehigh.edu or call 610/758-5133.

If you e-mail, please leave name and postal address and I will send you a
brochure and registration form.






From: ischmitz-at-fbch.tuwien.ac.at (Ingo SCHMITZ)
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 16:20:30 +0100 (MET)
Subject: NEW software for LINK users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



To all LINK / JEOL users,

We have developed a new method for fast data transfer from
a JEOL microscope connected to a LINK eXL computer system
to DOS based personal computers.

In our institute we are using a JEOL JSM 6400 SEM
equipped with an energy dispersive detector driven by
a LINK eXL computer running the GENIE operating system.

In former days we experienced great problems transferring
images captured from the screen and stored in tiff format
to DOS based computers, since we neither posses any GENIE
image processing software nor do we have network
connectivity on the Link system.

That's why we have developed a unique hardware/software
solution which allows users to transfer tiff files at the
rate of approx. 1 sec. per file (262 KB) from the Link
computer to the DOS computer.

The software is capable of viewing the contents of GENIE
formatted floppy disks, hard disks, MO's and changeable
devices (e.g. Syquest drives) and copying selected images
and spectra to the target computer.

Anyone interested may contact us for further details at:


email: ischmitz-at-fbch.tuwien.ac.at
snikolov-at-email.tuwien.ac.at

phone: ++43-1-58801-4852
-4843

FAX: ++43-1-5867813

mail: Ingo Schmitz
University of Technology
Institute of Analytical Chemistry E151
Getreidemarkt 9/151
A-1060 Vienna
Austria







From: JoRita Jordan :      jjordan-at-world.std.com
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 1995 15:25:22 +0001 (EST)
Subject: TEM survey

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TEM Users:

I publish a monthly newsletter, Analytical Consumer, that reports on
customer satisfaction with manufacturers of analytical equipment. We are
currently doing a survey of TEM users, similar to an SEM study we published
last July, in conjunction with Microscope News & Technology (who is also
collaborating on this study). I am looking for labs with TEMs who would be
willing to talk about their equipment.

I'm looking for:

What kind of TEM (manufacturer and model) do you use?
How old is it (roughly)?
Why did you buy from that particular manufacturer?
Have you been satisfied with the equipment?
Are you satisfied with the service? Do you get service from the equipment
mfr, do it yourself, or have an outside service supplier? Do you have a
service contract?
What kind of samples do you typically use the TEM for?
What kind of lab are you in? R&D, research, instrument facility, service
lab, or ...? What kind of company is the lab?

If you answer these questions and want a copy of the survey, please include
your address. If you would like to talk about it in person, give me a call
at (508) 369-9079, or send me your phone number and I'll call you.

Thanks!

Jo Rita Jordan
Editor and Publisher
Analytical Consumer

jjordan-at-world.std.com
or
76150.2171-at-compuserve.com




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 11:09:03 +1300
Subject: NZ Microscopy Conference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MICROSCOPY CONFERENCE
(In conjunction with the 18th National Conference
of the New Zealand Society for Electron Microscopy)

Dunedin, New Zealand
4th - 8th September 1995.


A Microscopy Conference will be held in Dunedin, 4th to 8th September,
1995. The conference will be held in conjunction with the 18th National
Conference for the New Zealand Society for Electron Microscopy (NZSEM)
however will cover all aspects of Microscopy with emphasis on the
techniques of both Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy.

The venue for the conference will be the Otago Medical School.

Workshop sessions will run on Monday and Tuesday (Sept 4th - 5th); the
conference proper will run from Wednesday until midday Friday (Sept 6th -
8th).

Guest speakers include:

Professor John M Robinson, Ohio State University, U.S.A.
Professor Robinson has published widely on the practical aspects of enzyme
cytochemistry (in particular the recently developed cerium-based
techniques) and immunocytochemistry. His application of these techniques
utilises many forms of microscopy including conventional light microscopy,
confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron
microscopy.

Professor Anthony S-Y Leong, University of Adelaide, Australia.
Professor Leong is well known for his work with microwave techniques, both
at the light microscope and the electron microscope level. His application
of microwave technology includes fixation and processing for L.M. and
T.E.M., and the use of microwaves in immunocytochemistry.

Dr Brian Brooker, Institue of Food Research, England.
Dr Brooker is a food scientist particularly interested in the structure and
behaviour of oil-in-water emulsions and the influence of emulsifiers on
their functions. He applies many microscopy techniques to study these
difficult samples including conventional light microscopy, confocal
microscopy, freeze fracture, X-ray microanalysis, cryofixation and electron
microscopy.

Dr Brendon Griffin, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Perth, Australia.
Dr Griffin's field of interest are the microscopy of rare minerals. He is
experienced in microprobe analysis particularly EDS, environmental SEM and
field emission SEM. He has a particular interest in EM education. Dr
Griffin is currently president of the Australian Society for Electron
Microscopy.

Trades displays will be a feature of the Conference. We are also planning
a techniques forum with the invited guests forming the panel.

If you are interested in receiving more information about this conference
you are invited to contact the organising committee at the address below;

Allan Mitchell
Organising Committee, 1995 Microscopy Conference
C/- Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
Otago Medical School
P.O. Box 913 Tel; National 03 479 7301 International 64 3 479 7301
Dunedin Fax; National 03 479 7254 International 64 3 479
7254
New Zealand. email address; allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz




Richard Easingwood
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology,
P.O. Box 913
University of Otago,
Dunedin, New Zealand.
Fax:64-3-479 7254
Telephone:64-3-479 7301






From: M.Dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Mel Dickson)
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 10:56:20 +1100
Subject: TEM survey

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TEM Users:

I publish a monthly newsletter, Analytical Consumer, that reports on
customer satisfaction with manufacturers of analytical equipment. We are
currently doing a survey of TEM users, similar to an SEM study we published
last July, in conjunction with Microscope News & Technology (who is also
collaborating on this study). I am looking for labs with TEMs who would be
willing to talk about their equipment.

I'm looking for:

What kind of TEM (manufacturer and model) do you use?
How old is it (roughly)?
Why did you buy from that particular manufacturer?
Have you been satisfied with the equipment?
Are you satisfied with the service? Do you get service from the equipment
mfr, do it yourself, or have an outside service supplier? Do you have a
service contract?
What kind of samples do you typically use the TEM for?
What kind of lab are you in? R&D, research, instrument facility, service
lab, or ...? What kind of company is the lab?

If you answer these questions and want a copy of the survey, please include
your address. If you would like to talk about it in person, give me a call
at (508) 369-9079, or send me your phone number and I'll call you.

Thanks!

Jo Rita Jordan
Editor and Publisher
Analytical Consumer

jjordan-at-world.std.com
or
76150.2171-at-compuserve.com






From: M.Dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Mel Dickson)
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 10:56:19 +1100
Subject: TEM survey

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TEM Users:

I publish a monthly newsletter, Analytical Consumer, that reports on
customer satisfaction with manufacturers of analytical equipment. We are
currently doing a survey of TEM users, similar to an SEM study we published
last July, in conjunction with Microscope News & Technology (who is also
collaborating on this study). I am looking for labs with TEMs who would be
willing to talk about their equipment.

I'm looking for:

What kind of TEM (manufacturer and model) do you use?
How old is it (roughly)?
Why did you buy from that particular manufacturer?
Have you been satisfied with the equipment?
Are you satisfied with the service? Do you get service from the equipment
mfr, do it yourself, or have an outside service supplier? Do you have a
service contract?
What kind of samples do you typically use the TEM for?
What kind of lab are you in? R&D, research, instrument facility, service
lab, or ...? What kind of company is the lab?

If you answer these questions and want a copy of the survey, please include
your address. If you would like to talk about it in person, give me a call
at (508) 369-9079, or send me your phone number and I'll call you.

Thanks!

Jo Rita Jordan
Editor and Publisher
Analytical Consumer

jjordan-at-world.std.com
or
76150.2171-at-compuserve.com






From: Riitta Harjula :      rharjula-at-cc.oulu.fi
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 14:38:54 +0200 (EET)
Subject: TEM survey

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Subscribe Riitta Harjula

Riitta.Harjula-at-oulu.fi




From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 11:39:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Confocal Scope in San Diego

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Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502011127.A7624-9100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I am in need of access to a confocal scope in the San Diego area. Would
anyone know of a lab that has one and who to contact? Thanks in advance
for your help.

Marc

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 16:45:52 EST
Subject: RE: EM Lab scheduling

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Jan Coetzee asks about electronic vs. "dog-eared diary" for schedules.
Dear Jan,
We use a large desk calendar ourselves. It seems easier, since there
are frequent changes, and everyone can check it instantly. I'm sure that a
calendar page on a computer might do as well, but when a user calls, we are
not always booted up, so it would take us more time than it does with paper
and pencil. If your scopes are computer-controlled, it might save some time
and/or effort to have schedules on the same computer--e.g. the computer could
dial a user you need to contact re schedule changes--but we have not thought
this to be worthwhile for us. Sometimes low-tech works very well!
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 17:43:19 EST
Subject: Peltier devices

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Jan Coetzee inquired about mfgrs of pltrs.
Dear Jan,
Melcor makes them. Their address, phone & fax are
1040 Spruce Street
Trenton NJ 08648-4587
United States of America (our USA)
(609) 393-4178 (phone)
(609) 393-9461 (fax)
One potential problem is that Peltiers have a limited delta-T, and can
get very expensive. I asked Melcor about setting up a cold stage for epitax-
ial deposition in a vacuum, and there was nothing which would get cold enough.
Furthermore, if you wish to thermostat the device, you need to use a cooler
which has a 100% duty cycle and output current proportional to the difference
between target and actual temperatures. We found this out when we installed
Peltiers in our darkroom as heaters/coolers to maintain developer temperature.
The intermittant current put out by the usual commercially available devices
blew the Peltiers out! Otherwise, Peltiers are marvelous devices. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: WayneWNB-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 22:28:40 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscope Pictures

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Message-Id: {25020121201502-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

G'day Subscribers...

I've received this request for help on locating micrographs
of bacteria. I could not help this individual. So is there
anyone out there that can?

Cheers....Nestor Z.
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
=====================================

P.S.

I'm working on concept of adding an Image Library to the Software
Library. When it's ready for contributions I'll post
a message to the Listserver....


====================================



I need an electron microscope picture of Methanosarcina barkeri and
Methanobacterium wolfei. I called the University of California at Berkeley
and they gave me your address. They said that they don't keep a file of
their past work and would charge $300 per picture to do the work again. I'm
fairly certain that the pictures already exist somewhere. I believe that
NASA may have some of them but I don't know who to ask there . Thank you for
any help in getting any pictures of the two bacteria.

------------------




From: T.K. Wilson :      WILSONTK-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 09:08:47 -500
Subject: Position Openning

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The following files have been delivered to you - please use
the eXtract command in the browser to work with them:

MARSALL.ASC (format: Text)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas K. Wilson wilsontk-at-MUohio.edu
Dept. of Botany
Miami University ! Miami was a University when
Oxford OH 45056 ! Florida belonged to Spain !
USA
513.529.4210 office
513.529.4243 fax








-------------- Enclosure number 1 ----------------
The following is posted as a favor to
Marshall University, and to any interested
applicants on the MSA-BBS. Please distribute this
message to any and all interested people you may
know.

I am not involved with this Supervisor search
in any way whatsoever (Other than having promised
to post this ASAP). Please contact Dr. W.B.
Rhoten directly at the address below (his E-mail
address is Rhoten-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu)




POSSITION OPEN


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTRON MICRSCOPY FACILITY


To supervise and perform day-to-day
operations of the Electron Micrscopy Facility and
assist students, research assistants, and
investigators. Participate in graduate level EM
Course.

Bachelor's degree including courses in
biological and physical sciences and at least 3
years experience in EM, or a Masters degree and at
least 3 years of relevant experience, or a Ph.D.
degree. Qualifications include comprehensive
knowledge of EM and ability to enhance educational
and research activities. Experience in image
processing and computers desired.

Qualified applicants should send a cover
letter, resume, and list of at least 2 references
to:

Dr. W. B. Rhoten
Dept. of Anatomy, Cell & Neurobiology
School of Medicine, Marshall University
Huntington, WV 25704-9388


For full consideration submit application by
March 1, 1995.

MARSHALL UNIVERSITY IS AN AFFERMATIVE
ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER






From: Richard Lee :      richard_lee-at-qmgate.anl.gov
Date: 2 Feb 1995 13:01:13 -0600
Subject: subscibe

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Message-Id: {n1420392126.63194-at-qmgate.anl.gov}

subscibe 2/2/95

subscribe, PLEASE!
12:46 PM




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:56:44 +1100
Subject: TEM:Staining glycogen in sections

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Message-Id: {199502022051.JAA12437-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

One of EM Unit users is studying developing Red deer. The samples we are
examining are skull and pedicle (developing antler) taken from the deer at
set time intervals over atwo year period. The samples are processed
routinely, ie glutaraldehyde fixed,decalcified, OsO4 post fixed, uranyl
acetate bloc stain, dehydrated and embedded in Agar 100 epoxy resin.

Our problem is that it now seems to be that the glycogen content is of some
significance to the investigation. Unfortunately the above process is not
ideal for showing the glycogen.
Some recently processed samples using potassium ferrocyanide with the
osmium are brilliant however we would like to enhance the glycogen in the
previous blocks.
Does anyone out there know a method to enhance "unstainable" glycogen in
ultrathin sections?
Thanks in anticipation.

Allan Mitchell
South Campus EM Unit
allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz






From: randy nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 14:51:56 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Site for JCPDS

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Does anyone know of a site that I can download files from the JCPDS?
Randy Nessler
rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu







From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:31:16 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Convert PS files

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} I am looking for a way to convert my PostScript files into "regular" image
} files. Does someone know of such siftwares on either Mac or Unix platforms?
} Any information would be appreciated.
}
Do you mean postscript or encapsulated postscript? If postscript then
one of the postscript interpreters available should do it. I use one
an a PC called GoScript that outputs to TIFF files as well as
printers. I am not sure, but you should take a look at the GNU
Ghostscript interpreter that runs on virtually anything - certainly
on unix systems. If you mean encapsulated postscript (EPS) then just
import the files into a Mac word processor such as WordPerfect on
Microsoft Word and then copy and paste to whereever you want to.
+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:58:20 -0500
Subject: Bacteria Micrographs

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Group -
Responding to an inquiry from Nestor, Custom Medical Stock Photo is a
company which purchases micrographs and then sells them to publications, etc.
They have a considerable inventory - in microscopy, and a number "with"
bacteria.
Many readers may be interested in contacting them and explore the sale of
their micrographs. I have, of course, no financial interest in the company.

Custom Medical Storck Photo, Inc.
3819 North Southport Ave
Chicago, IL 60613
Tel.: 312-248-3200
Fax: 312-248-7427

Regards,
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today




From: Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST
Subject: Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.

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Message-Id: {1995Feb03.100340.2874650620-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (M)

Subject: Time: 9:45 AM
OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date: 2/3/95
Dear Microscopists,
Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where it might be obtained? I
have been told that it is no longer manufactured commercially. It might be
an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy control.
Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence standards
besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very convenient, but
they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein, and Texas Red
specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co. no longer
makes pre-mounted standards.
I have been managing the UCSF core flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab
for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I had no real QC for our 2
occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I need to establish QC
protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized fluorescence (one
scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular Cytogenetics
Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal references)
seem to be available.
Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
much. Kris Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu








From: John Kloetzel :      kloetzel-at-umbc.edu (John Kloetzel)
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 14:14:17 -0500
Subject: EM network

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subscribe microscopy kloetzel-at-umbc.edu

** JAK **

****************************************************************************
John A. Kloetzel, Ph.D. {kloetzel-at-umbc.edu}
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)
Catonsville, MD 21228-5329 USA
Phone: (410) 455-2247 or -3913 (Lab)
FAX: (410) 455-3875
****************************************************************************








From: Dr. William Dentler, University of Kansas, Dept. of Cell Biology,
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 15:24:59 -0600
Subject: fix pepper redux

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Message-Id: {m0raUmA-00011cC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

A few months ago a thread ran on fixation and embedding pepper contaminant
artefact in biological ultrathin sections. A colleague of mine read the Pepper
Summary I compiled and sent me the following fixation protocols that he has used
successfully without pepper. Notice the first one in which glutaraldehyde,
phosphate buffer AND OSMIUM are all mixed TOGETHER!

If anyone out there wants a copy of my Pepper Summary, contact me off-line at my
e-mail and I will zip a copy out to you.

------------------------------------------------------------------------


"1. For fixing cilia in mammalian trachea, I have used an "instant fixation"
method using a combination of osmium, phosphate buffer, and glutaraldehyde - in
the cold - for many years and have never seen the pepper described in the Pepper
Summary you sent to me. Right - all that stuff in the same buffer dumped on the
tissue. Works great, but may extract a bit of actin.

"The method I used was one described in a paper by Omnoto
and Kung in the J. Cell Biol 87:33-46. I think it uses 50 mM NaPhosphate,
pH 7.2, 2% OsO4, 2% glutaraldehyde. Add the Osmium just before you add
the tissue and fix on ice for 10 min. If you want, you can remove the
black fix after 10 min and add another slug of fix for another 10 min but
that is optional.

"Omoto and Kung used it to fix Paramecium and their cilia. I have used it to
fix mammalian trachea (with their cilia). The advantage is that it seems
to "freeze" cilia in position, as opposed to glutaraldehyde, in which cells
actualy swim for a dab before either being fixed or dying (we fix cells,
we don't kill them, do we?). The osmium does not penetrate for more than
a few cell layers but, with epithelial tissue or single cells, it does
not make much difference.

"I have never tried that fix method on Chlamydomonas or Tetrahymena. Over the
last year I have done a lot of embedding of Chlamy and have never seen pepper.
For those beasts, I find that cacodylate gives the best preservation of the
cytoplasm, although others find that phosphate buffer works fine too.
I do fix with glutaraldehyde in culture medium (pretty much phosphate buffer),
overnight in glut in cacodylate, rinse a few times in cacodylate, then
into 0.5-1% OsO4 in cacodylate for 30-60 min on ice, rinse with a few
changes of water and into uranyl acetate for a few hours prior to dehydrating in
acetone and embedding in epon.

"I've also tried another method in which you fix with glut in phosphate buffer,
rinse, then incubate overnight in uranyl acetate (in water) at 70 degrees
C. It works on Chlamy and avoids osmium. It is supposed to eliminate the
need for poststaining of sections, but I did not find this to be the
case. I believe that I once read that the reason for staining sections is
to put a dab of stain on structures at the last surface of the plastic
that the beam sees before blasting through the objective lens. I don't
know, but, for Chlamy, I usually use the more old fashioned method that I
gave you above. Pepper does not seem to be one of my problems."
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contributed to MICROSCOPY by:

--

Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 18:23:23 EST
Subject: Re: TEM film

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Dear Lucille,
I just got a number from Kodak for technical questions, but they could
probably direct you to a distributer. It is (800) 242-2424 x19. We usually
use a local vendor, National Graphics, but I have not noticed a great range
of prices with other vendors. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Dr. Edmund Glaser :      eglaser-at-umabnet.ab.umd.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 22:12:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM film

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I am not aware that "cheap" is an a.k.a. for "reliable". Please be kind
to the English language.

On Fri, 3 Feb 1995, Lucille A. Giannuzzi wrote:

} Can anyone recommend a reliable (a.k.a. cheap) U.S. vendor for TEM film?
}
} Thanks in advance,
} Lucille Giannuzzi
}
}
} *************************************************************************
} Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.
}
} Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng. phone (407) 823-5770
} University of Central Florida fax (407) 823-0208
} 4000 Central Florida Blvd. email lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu
} Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
} *************************************************************************
}
}
}
}




From: Karpura V Kommineni :      komminen-at-student.msu.edu
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 1995 12:32:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: immunolabeling of wood

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Message-Id: {9502051732.AA72211-at-student1.cl.msu.edu}

DDoes anyone know about work done on immunolabelling of wood tissue of fruit
trees. I'm interested in any kind of information I can get on fixation,
embedding and the labelling procedure. I plan to be using ProteinA-colloidal
gold to tag the antibody.I'll be using a confocal microscope for this study.If
anyone knows any work done in this area could you please send me the
references. Thank you in advance.
my email address: komminen-at-student.msu.edu






From: Ian Hall :      hall-at-me.udel.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 08:31:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: WDS Software

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,
We have recently acquired a scanning electron microscope with a
four crystal Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometer but the associated
computer system is rather old and probably not worth re-activating.
I know that there is software for the Macintosh, such as
"D.T.S.A." and "Flame", for ENERGY Dispersive Spectroscopy but my question
is "Is there any (Mac) software out there which can handle W(AVELENGTH)DS
spectral acquisition and processing?".
Any leads would be very much appreciated. Thanks.

Rick Hall
Materials Science Program
University of Delaware







From: Not Specified :      Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST
Subject: Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.

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Reply to: RE} Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.
Hi Kris,
Uranium glass slides can be purchased from:

Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.
1631 Monrovia Ave.
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Tel: 714-642-9980
Fax: 714-645-6800
Contact person: Bill Larsen (you can tell him I sent you).
Sold as a 6.5x6.5" sheet (you can specify 1 mm height), so you may want to form
a "consortium" to have Newport pre-cut a sheet to slide size (nominal extra
cost, but your lab only needs one or two slides). If there is a lot of
interest, my company may start selling single slides.

As for references and the Shading Correction equation: please see my article in
the 11/94 issue of Journal of NIH Research 6(11): 80 (usual Internet
disclaimer: yes, that is an ad from my company on the facing page). Also look
at Jericevic et al (1989) Methods in Cell Biology 30:47-83.

MutliSpeck beads: The Molecular Probes pre-mounted slide kits should be ideal
for DAPI and Fluorescein. I believe they were optimized for Rhodamine, but
should still work ok for Texas Red. If your problem is with mounting, Mol.
Probes now sells the beads in solution, so you can 'sprinkle' some on your
specimens. If you have a different problem with the current MultiSpeck's, Mol.
Probes may be able to work something out for you.

Sorry, but I usually buy my reference material from Mol. Probes and don't keep
close track of other slide manufacturers.

Sincerely,

Dr. George McNamara
Universal Imaging Corporation
George_M-at-Image1.com
--------------------------------------

Subject: Time: 9:45 AM
OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date: 2/3/95
Dear Microscopists,
Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where it might be obtained? I
have been told that it is no longer manufactured commercially. It might be
an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy control.
Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence standards
besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very convenient, but
they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein, and Texas Red
specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co. no longer
makes pre-mounted standards.
I have been managing the UCSF core flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab
for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I had no real QC for our 2
occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I need to establish QC
protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized fluorescence (one
scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular Cytogenetics
Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal references)
seem to be available.
Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
much. Kris Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu











From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 13:53:07 -0500
Subject: subscribe

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Subscribe, please.

Thanks,

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: Deborah Holmberg :      dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 11:01:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Scanning 95 meeting

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The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting want about 25
student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions in
exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact:
Mary K. Sullivan
FAMS, Inc
P.O. Box 832
Mahwah, New Jersy
07430,0832

or leave me a message.
Debe Holmberg e-mail {dlholmberg-at-peseta.ucdavis.edu}
Lab 916-752-9021
FAX 916-752-4604




From: David Leaffer (415)852-1828 :      David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com
Date: 06 Feb 1995 11:56:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM Calibration

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Return-receipt-to: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com
Registered-mail-reply-requested-by: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com

I am going to be working on an TEM project that will be under "GLP" . GLP are
guidlines for doing certain experiments for the FDA (I think the equivalent in
Europe is ISO 9000). I was wondering if anyone out there is doing TEM under
these guidlines? And if so what are they using for magnification calibration.
I do not believe that there are any vendors who can supply a certified
magnification standard for TEM, which, I think is required for GLP.

Thanks,
David Leaffer
Syntex Research
david.leaffer-at-syntex.com





From: Deborah Holmberg :      dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 16:38:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Scanning 95 meeting

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The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting want about 25
student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions in
exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact:
Mrs. Mary K. Sullivan
FAMS. Inc.
P.O. Box 832
Mahwah, NJ 07430-0832


or leave me a message.
Debe Holmberg
Lab 916-752-9021
Fax 916-752-4604
dlholmberg-at-peseta.ucdavis.edu





From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:50:28 +1100
Subject: Academic role

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Dear All,
We are are multi-user electron microscope facility which has an extensive
range of equipment and uses a wide range of techniques.
Five technical staff from three contributing University departments are
employed full-time to undertake for work coming from both inside and
outside the University.

The role of the 'academic in charge' of the facility is shortly to come up
for reassessment and so it is a pertinent time for us to reconsider what
that role should entail.
We are looking for feedback from other individuals as to what they see the
contribution of an academic in this environment should be.
Any opinions/suggestions?






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 21:59:52 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Post Doc In Tribology

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From: wabutter-at-ix.netcom.com (Wayne A. Buttermore)
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 20:03:15 -0800
Subject: subscribe

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Message-Id: {9502071626.AA16923-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}

Subscribe





From: Peter Goodhew :      goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 08:43:25 GMT
Subject: Re: Academic role

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} The role of the 'academic in charge' of the facility is shortly to come up
} for reassessment and so it is a pertinent time for us to reconsider what
} that role should entail.
} We are looking for feedback from other individuals as to what they see the
} contribution of an academic in this environment should be.
Easy -
1. Keep abreast of all techniques which a) you have, b) exist, and c) potentially exist.
2. Be an expert practionioner of two or more of these. Publish a lot in your own name.
3. Give advice on the application of all techniques and on the high-level interpretation of all results. Publish
jointly with others.
4. Raise funds to replace equipment and to buy new techniques as they become applicable.
5. Make sure all users publish, and tell you about it!
6. Establish a reputation as a scientist in some major subject area, not just as a microscopist. Publish a lot.
7. Keep friendly with the heads (or budget controllers) of all potential user departments.
8. Get to know lots of people in your institution by playing sport/drinking/etc with them.
9. In your spare time, publish some more.

I offer this advice after 20 years of running such a facility!

Peter Goodhew



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Professor Peter J Goodhew, Department of Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
LIVERPOOL Fax (44) (0)51 794 4675
L69 3BX, UK Tel (44) (0)51 794 4665 (secretary Debra)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
inter alia: Director of the MATTER project for educational software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: Philip.P.Edge-at-ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:11:01 +0000
Subject: Subscribe

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From: Philip.P.Edge-at-ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:14:29 +0000
Subject: Bioimaging

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Institute of Physics Publishing
Techno House Tel: +44 272 297481
Redcliffe Way Fax: +44 272 294318
Bristol
BS1 6NX England Telex: 449149 INSTP G


E-mail Contact Details
----------------------
Internet : {mailbox} -at-ioppublishing.co.uk
Janet : {mailbox} -at-uk.co.ioppublishing
X400 : /s= {mailbox} /o=ioppl/prmd=iopp/admd=0/c=gb/

IOPP Internet services
----------------------
Gopher : gopher.ioppublishing.com
WWW Url : http://www.ioppublishing.com

Dear Moderator

I am the Publisher of the journal Bioimaging which I hope you have heard
of. I would like to place information about the journal, including tables
of contents, on your bulletin board. Will this be possible and how should I
do it?

Best wishes, Philip Edge.




From: jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu (James V. Jester)
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 1995 12:10:01 -0600
Subject: Lab Design

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Several years ago there appeared an article in Science discussing
laboratory space design and a recent "New" model being implemented in
England. Does anyone remember this article, and what has happened
to the English experiment?






From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 10:04:15 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Timelapse Cell Culture Movies

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Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Functional Neuroimaging List {lat-at-po.cwru.edu} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} ,
Cell Bio List {cellbiol-at-net.bio.net}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502081015.B14211-a100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Can Anyone point me to sources (free to minimal cost) of analog (VCR tape)
or digital timelapse movies of cells in culture? This is not for
commercial use, only presentation demonstration. Of course I would credit
each source in the presentation. Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

Marc

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830





From: evansnd-at-ornl.gov (Neal D. Evans)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:17:21 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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Subscribe Microscopy evansnd-at-ornl.gov

Dr. Neal D. Evans
Shared Research Equipment Program
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Building 5500, MS 6376, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376
voice(615-576-4427) fax(615-574-0641) email(evansnd-at-ornl.gov





From: stuw-at-lanl.gov (Stuart Wright)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:22:29 -0700
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

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Message-Id: {9502081818.AA09732-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov}
X-Sender: stuw-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?


+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+






From: Daniel E. Sampson :      des-at-rupture.ucsc.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:22:29 -0700
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

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Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?


+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+




------ Forwarded message ends here ------


*******************************************************************
Daniel E. Sampson dsampson-at-earthsci.ucsc.edu
Instrumentation Specialist Phone: (408) 459-4992
Earth Sciences FAX: (408) 459-3074
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
*******************************************************************




From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 17:34:11 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: Reconditioned SEMs

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Stuart,
Have you tried contacting the instrument manufacturers themslves? I
believe that JEOL and Hitachi, for instance, may sell the
reconditioned SEMs that comes in on trade-ins. Failing that, give
us a call, we'll try to direct you to more sources.

Ellie Solit,
Publisher of MICROSCOPE TECHNOLOGY & NEWS AND
THE MICROSCOPE BOOK


On Wed, 8 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:

} Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?
}
}
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
} | Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
} |.........................................................|
} | Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
}
}




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 16:43:19 +1100
Subject: Academic role

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Message-Id: {199502090437.RAA16024-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear All,
Further to my message of 8.2.95, thank you very much to those who have
responded so candidly to my request for people's feelings and experiences
on this topic. I appreciate that it can be a sensitive issue, not helped
when one is replying to someone who doesn't even identify themselves
properly.
As I neglected to state who I am and where I work (I changed computers days
ago and forgot to put the automatic signature on - the ramifications of
this I am just becoming aware of...) that info now follows.
Maybe now I'll get some more replies...

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254






From: Kathy Walters :      kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 07:17:27 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Neg stain of lipids

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,

I have been asked to do particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)
and had hoped to be able to do a very quick negative staining procedure as
this may need to be run frequently. I toyed with the idea of freeze
fracture, but the time involved is not convenient for lots of runs. Has
anyone tried this? What stains would you suggest? Is Osmium
vaper fixation nessecary?

Thanks for any help!
Kathy Walters






From: stuw-at-lanl.gov (Stuart Wright)
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 09:06:22 -0700
Subject: reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {199502091342.AA01519-at-mail.mmmg.com}

Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?



+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+






From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 11:10:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Neg stain of lipids

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We have considerable experience with negative stain of phospholipid
vesicles, lipoproteins, and triacylglyceride emulsions. In these
circumstances fixation is not critical, and in fact can produce
artefacts. PTA stain seems to work best. We concentrate our sample on
grid by drying multiple drops under gentle nitrogen gas stream prior to
negative stain. This avoids clumping in the suspension. Some sizing
artefacts can occur as dryed particles of large size can deform slightly.
See Ganz et al, 1991, J Lipid Res 31:163 for nice discussion of this.
Good luck-


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************

On Thu, 9 Feb 1995, Kathy Walters wrote:

} Dear Fellow Microscopists,
}
} I have been asked to do particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)
} and had hoped to be able to do a very quick negative staining procedure as
} this may need to be run frequently. I toyed with the idea of freeze
} fracture, but the time involved is not convenient for lots of runs. Has
} anyone tried this? What stains would you suggest? Is Osmium
} vaper fixation nessecary?
}
} Thanks for any help!
} Kathy Walters
}
}
}




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 09 Feb 1995 12:06:33 EST
Subject: Re: Neg stain of lipids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Kathy,
Staining is not really my field, but I'd suggest a water-soluble heavy
metal and NO osmium. The Os would only dissolve in the lipid and reduce con-
trast. If possible, looking at a frozen, hydrated (or lyophyllized in-situ)
specimen would be best. You don't specify either the matrix of the emulsion
(I assume aqueous) nor the technique to be used (I assume TEM), but a possible
protocol would be to add the stain to the emulsion and rapidly freeze, then
cryo-section, examine on a Friday, raise the temp to ~-90C, come in Saturday
and raise the temp to -80C, Sunday to -70C, and look at the freeze-dried spec-
imen Monday. If you can do the particle sizing from the frozen-hydrated spec-
imen, the last steps can be omitted. Keeping the stain strictly in the aqueous
phase should prevent size changes, etc. in the lipid drops. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: jacobb-at-ux5.lbl.gov
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:50:06 -0800
Subject: Re: Reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stuart,

E.J. Fjeld Co,
3 Executive Park Drive
North Billerica MA 01862
Phone 508-667-1416

Provides reconditioned AMRAY microscopes. They also make special stages and
accessories. They've been around for a long time and are reliable.

Jacob Bastacky, MD
1-116
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-lbl.gov
University of California Phone: (510) 486-4606
Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 15:20:13 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stuart, my attempts to reply to your question by email have resulted in 6
notices of undelivered mail. I left a voice message on your phone this
morning. I think we can help you in your search.

Regards,
Ellie Solit, Publisher/Executive Editor of Microscope Technology & News
and The Microscope Book, a Smart catalog.


On Thu, 9 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:

} Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?
}
}
}
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
} | Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
} |.........................................................|
} | Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
}
}




From: Jean Armour Polly :      jpolly-at-nysernet.ORG
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:00:28 -0500
Subject: Apple QuickTime Conferencing

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Message-ID: {95020916094142E.RQDA-at-USCN.USCN.UGA.EDU} (UMass-Mailer 4.04)
Neuroscience List {neur-sci-at-net.bio.net} ,
Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Digital Video List {digvid-l-at-ucdavis.edu} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} ,
Cell Bio List {cellbiol-at-net.bio.net}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502091131.A22203-e100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I thought this post should be quickly disseminated.

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830

---------- Forwarded message ----------


THE FOLLOWING RELEASE MOVED OVER PR NEWSWIRE ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1995 AT
11:42 AM, PST.


Contact:
Julie Karbo
Stirling & Cohan
(415) 513-0974
e-mail: jkarbo-at-applelink.apple.com

Brooke Cohan
Stirling & Cohan
(415) 513-0973
e-mail:cohan-at-applelink.apple.com

Apple Announces QuickTime Conferencing
Open, Cross Platform Conferencing, Collaboration and Multimedia
Communications Technology

SAN FRANCISCO, California--February 7, 1995--Apple Computer today
announced a cross platform conferencing, collaboration and
multimedia communications technology that allows personal computer
users to share real-time information, images and sound anywhere in
the world. Apple is currently making the technology, called
QuickTime Conferencing, available to corporate allies who plan to
create or have announced they are creating end user applications
based on the technology. QuickTime Conferencing is a standards-
based architecture that allows users to:

-- video conference and collaborate--to share and annotate text,
images, screen capture, sound, video and virtual scenes real-time
among fellow conference participants in a variety of locations
worldwide. QuickTime Conferencing allows users to record
conversations and transform those conversations into QuickTime
movies. All of this can be done on a variety of networks such as
an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the worldwide
internet, local area and wide area networks and Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. QuickTime Conferencing can be used
by a number of simultaneous users, the total number being only by
available network bandwidth.

-- conduct cross platform video conferencing connectivity
between Macintosh computers, PCs, UNIX systems and room-based
conferencing systems through the use of the H.320 worldwide
teleconferencing standard.

-- broadcast and view multimedia content--digital audio, music
and video on a local or wide area network.

Through alliances QuickTime Conferencing technology is expected to
yield product bundles such as:
-- Apple Media Conference Kit--Consisting of the QuickTime
Conferencing system extension, the Apple Media Conference
application and a high quality, color video camera.
-- Apple Media Conference Pro Kit--Consisting of the QuickTime
Conferencing system extension, the Apple Media Conference
application, a color video camera and an H.320 codec/ISDN adapter
board. Being developed by Sagem/SAT, a leading international
communications product company, the board is designed to allow
interoperability between platforms (Power Macintosh to Macintosh,
PC, UNIX and room systems) and full-screen image sharing.
--Complete Media Conference System--Consisting of an Apple Media
Conference Kit, a Power Macintosh 7100 AV, a 17 inch color
monitor, external speakers and a keyboard.

Because QuickTime Conferencing is software-based, it is easily
incorporated into new and existing third party products. As such,
Apple believes that QuickTime-compatible products could yield
extremely affordable prices:
-- Apple Media Conference Kit--under $200
-- Apple Media Conference Pro Kit--under $1,750
-- Complete Media Conferencing System--under $6,000

Apple is working with a wide range of companies including telcos,
network, software and hardware providers and developers to provide
a range of solutions that take advantage of the benefits of
QuickTime Conferencing (see associated releases). These allies
have announced that they expect to make products available in the
second quarter of 1995.
From the home office to university campuses to the multinational
enterprise network, QuickTime Conferencing will allow users to
communicate with people across the country or across the world.
Users won't have to worry about whether their hardware equipment,
networking equipment and applications are compatible with the
solutions being used on the other end of the network line.
QuickTime Conferencing is designed to be fully operational with
H.320 standards-based systems.
"The introduction of QuickTime Conferencing will not only extend
Apple's leadership in multimedia, but will make an important
difference in the video conferencing and collaboration market,"
said Rick Shriner, vice president of Apple's Core Technologies
Group. "Our goal in designing QuickTime Conferencing was to
develop a solution that allowed people the opportunity to
communicate and collaborate. By making it open in every sense of
the word, our users can metaphorically break down the walls of
their homes, schools and offices and expand the boundaries of
their lives."
QuickTime Conferencing users can have access to people,
information, sights and sounds that could never be combined
before. For example:
-- An author in Tokyo, Japan and her publisher in San Francisco,
California can view and discuss cover art for a new novel. They
can each view the design at several different angles, change
the visual perspective of the artwork, and annotate the image and
accompanying text for the other to see.
-- A sixth grade class in Dallas, Texas can discuss and view the
effects of global warming with an environmental scientist at U.C.
Berkeley's Lawrence Labs in California by using QuickTime
Conferencing over the internet.
-- A special effects producer in Hollywood, California can take a
movie director on the East Coast through a virtual tour of a
proposed set design. While the producer records their discussion
as a QuickTime movie, the director can pan around the scene, zoom
in to look at props and view the set design from a variety of
angles.
-- A breast cancer patient and her doctor in Fargo, North Dakota
can consult with a leading oncologist in Boston, Massachusetts on
her prognosis and course of treatment. The Boston physician can
view her mammograms and annotate her medical chart as they
converse.
-- A CEO's company-wide address can be broadcast for easy viewing
by all employees at their personal desktop.

Because QuickTime Conferencing allows for sharing of multimedia
data and reduces the time and expense of travel, it allows people
to be more productive than ever before.
"In the past people found video conferencing easy to resist
because prices were high and the number of people they could
communicate with was extremely limited," said Rick LeFaivre,
senior vice president of the Apple Technology Group. "Now for
what we expect to be very aggressive prices, people can conduct a
media conference with virtually anyone, anywhere in the world. A
Power Macintosh QuickTime Conferencing user can share QuickTime VR
(virtual reality) images, annotate text documents and share digital
music over networks from basic rate ISDN to the internet to ATM."
Because QuickTime Conferencing is a software-based architecture,
application developers, communications providers and hardware
vendors can easily develop compatible solutions. For example,
Crosswise Corporation, the maker of Face to Face, a cross-platform
document conferencing application, developed a QuickTime
Conferencing-compatible version of their software in just one
month. A QuickTime Conferencing compatible application shares the
interface of other QuickTime Conferencing-enabled third party
applications, so customers can begin using applications quickly
and easily.
QuickTime Conferencing is based on Apple's award winning QuickTime
technology. It is a conferencing architecture which allows
support for both industry standards such as H.320, as well as
proprietary architectures, and codecs such as Indeo by Intel
Corporation. QuickTime Conferencing is transport, compression and
media-device independent. Apple's built-in AV capabilities
combined with the performance of the PowerPC RISC architecture,
make it easy for users to make multimedia connections with others
on the information superhighway almost as soon as they pull
QuickTime Conferencing out of the box.
"Having QuickTime Conferencing available in my home, office, and
studio literally allows me to be in multiple locations at one
time--it's the next best thing to having a Star Trek transporter,"
said Los Angeles-based screenwriter and multimedia special effects
consultant Michael Backes, co-author of the screenplay for
Jurassic Park and other motion pictures. "Within the next few
months, I'll be counting on QuickTime Conferencing as the backbone
for my business."
"The short and sweet of QuickTime Conferencing is that it requires
less network bandwidth and uses innovative technology," says Matt
Ghourdjian, National Director of Technology at Howrey & Simon, a
300-lawyer law firm serving Fortune 50 clients. Howrey & Simon
intends to use the product to send QuickTime movies of depositions
and re-enactments for lawyers to use in court; for live document sharing;
for consultation between partners; and to conduct tours of the firm's
Washington, DC office from Los Angeles. "It's simply outstanding," says
Chris Masten, Howrey & Simon's Technical Litigation Support Manager.
To use the Apple Media Conference Kit on the Macintosh, users need
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System 7.5, a network interface such as Ethernet, ISDN, Token
Ring, and optionally the ability to digitize audio and video using
the built-in AV subsystem or a third party digitizer card. To use
the Apple Media Conference Pro Kit on Macintosh, users need at
least 16 Megabytes of RAM, an AV PowerPC-based Macintosh and an
ISDN connection. To communicate with QuickTime Conferencing users
from the PC and other platforms, users will need an H.320
compatible codec on their machine, available from a variety of
vendors. QuickTime Conferencing technology is currently under
development and products using the technology have not yet been
completed. Apple will provide pricing and availability
information when products are completed and ready for release.
Apple Computer, Inc., a recognized pioneer and innovator in the
information industry, creates powerful solutions based on easy to
use personal computers, servers, peripherals, software, online
services, and personal digital assistants. Headquartered in
Cupertino, California, Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) develops, manufactures,
licenses and markets products, technologies and services for the
business, education, consumer, scientific & engineering and
government markets in over 140 countries.


-30-

Apple, the Apple logo, QuickTime and Macintosh are registered
trademarks and Power Macintosh is a trademark of Apple Computer,
Inc. Additional company and product names may be trademarks or
registered trademarks of the individual companies and are
respectfully acknowledged.

END

Applelink pathway:
News Break
Apple & Industry News
PR Express
Apple Press Releases
2/7/95













From: Dascorr-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 10:38:26 -0500
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I know of a company that reconditions old AMRAY SEMs. The owner used to work
at AMRAY before starting his own company. Company is E.J. Feld located in
Massachusetts. I can give you the phone on Monday, 2/13 when I return to
work.
Dr. David A. Shifler
Powell Labs Ltd.
Baltimore, MD 31231
(410) 327-3500
(410) 327-7506 (FAX)




From: Liang, Long :      LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM
Date: 10 Feb 1995 11:07:11 CST
Subject: Books-- EM & Geology ?

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Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.061405110095041FMACMS-at-IS.ARCO.COM}


Dear Microscopists,

Does anyone know if there is any recent books about applications of
microbeam techniques to mineralogy and petrology?

The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of Canada
(Short Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.

Thanks in advance.

Long LIang
ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
PLano, TX






From: JoRita Jordan :      jjordan-at-world.std.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:27:19 +0001 (EST)
Subject: TEM comments sought

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TEM users:

Thanks to all the replies to my recent TEM survey, I am well on my way to
preparing the survey for publication. I need some information -- I'm a
chemist, not a microscopist -- What do TEM users see as important trends in
TEM? New technology? Important applications? Is there other technology that
is replacing TEM in any way. How important are accessories like EDS and
EELS? For what uses?

Any comments on today's TEM would be greatly appreciated -- I'll send a copy
of the survey to any contributor.

Jo Rita Jordan
Analytical Consumer




From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:50:01 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed

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Does anyone in the group have the phone number for PRESENTATION
TECHNOLOGY? We are in the information gathering stage for the purchase
of a 35mm slide maker and the phone number we have (408-774-3733) is not
correct.

Thanks for your help.

Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(602)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 22:41:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed

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help

Peter D. Barnett - Forensic Science Associates - Richmond CA
pbarnett-at-crl.com VOICE: 510-222-8883 FAX: 510-222-8887






From: timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl (Timon Fliervoet)
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 08:24:35 +0100
Subject: Re: Books-- EM & Geology ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {n1419587852.54350-at-qmgate.anl.gov}

} Dear Microscopists,
}
} Does anyone know if there is any recent books about applications of
} microbeam techniques to mineralogy and petrology?
}
} The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of Canada
} (Short Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Long LIang
} ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
} PLano, TX


Try:
McLaren, A.C., 1991, TEM of minerals and rocks, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge

Boland, J.N. & FitzGerald, J.D. (eds), 1993, Defects and processes in the
solid state: geoscience applications, Developments in Petrology, Vol 14,
Elsevier, Amsterdam

Buseck, P.R. (ed), 1992, Minerals and reactions at the atomic scale: TEM,
Mineralogical Society of America, Reviews in Mineralogy, vol 27.

Cheers Timon

------------------------------------------------
Timon Fliervoet, Timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Department
of Geology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.021 3508 TA Utrecht, the
Netherlands.
tel: ++31 30 - 535054, fax: ++31 30 - 537725






From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 09:29:32 -0500
Subject: Need TEM analysis

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Help please!! SiSTek is looking for TEM analytical services in the
southwestern US, preferably in the Phoenix metropolitan area where we are
located. We are a company that provides consultant services to a number of
manufacturers of Si-related deposition systems and need *local* (turnaround
time and iterative analysis is important for our clients) TEM support. We
believe there is a company in the Phoenix area offering TEM services, but
can't find the name. Does anyone know the name/contact?

Many thanks,

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: ckblack-at-dow.com (U096585)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 11:03:19 -0500
Subject: mycoplasm in cell culture

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Hello folks.....

This may not be the correct forum for the
following query, however, any info out there would
be greatly appreciated.

We are interested in microscopy techniques,
testing procedures, staining , etc., for detection
of mycoplasm in cell cultures.

Thankyou in advance.

Cary Black (ckblack-at-dow.com)
Dave Williams

The Dow Chemical Company




From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 14 Feb 1995 09:05:10 -0800
Subject: Ecomet Polisher for sale

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Message-ID: {n1419369693.44281-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 9:13 AM
OFFICE MEMO Ecomet Polisher for sale Date: 2/14/95

FOR SALE: ECOMET 1 8" Polisher/grinder, complete with various polishing
discs, alumina and lapping oil. 115 volt, 5 amp, new price in 1988 =
$1250.00
Best offer.
Call Doug Davis of EM Lab at UC Berkeley at (510) 642-2085
or e-mail: doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu






From: jad1-at-cec.wustl.edu (Joe DeMaro)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 12:02:43 -0600
Subject: SEM well plates

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Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture plates would be
greatly appreciated.

Joe
Joseph A. DeMaro
Washington University Medical School
Department of Neurology
660 S. Euclid
Rm 212 Biotech
St. Louis, MO 63110
jad1-at-cec.wustl.edu
314-362-9448





From: Self :      SALES/GREGB
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:25:54
Subject: Re: printers for gray scale prints

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Forwarded message:

All,

LaserMaster Corporation - Imaging Division is the ONLY company
that manufactures a 1800 dpi plain paper laser printers. I work for
LaserMaster and have just completed printing the 100/300 dpi Round
Robin Greyscale Test images. If you are interested in obtaining
them, you may e:mail me at Gregb-at-Sales.LMT.com and I will mail you a
printout of the test images from the LaserMaster printer. I can be
reached at 1-800-950-6363 Ext: 3207 if you have questions about your
specific situation and resolution needs.

Thank You all,
Greg Begin - LaserMaster Corp.
Scientific/Medical Imaging Div.
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

} Date sent: Thu, 09 Feb 95 07:42:30 -600
} From: Supratik_Guha-at-mail.mmmg.com (SG)
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: printers for gray scale prints

} I am looking around for a gray scale printer to attach with our Gatan
} slow scan CCD image aquisition system and would appreciate any
} suggestions. We would prefer not to get a dye-sub printer due to the
} high costs of printing. I understand that there are 1800 dpi laser
} printers available, could someone point out manufacturers for these
} machines?
}
} Supratik Guha
} Senior Materials Scientist
} 3M Corporate Research Labs.
}




From: NANCY SMITH :      NSMITH-at-darwin.sci.csuhayward.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 13:51:37 PSD8PDT
Subject: sem culture well

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Hello Joe:

When I want to process cells for SEM from 24 well culture dishes I
use a Bunsen burner and a scoopula (the curved metal device for
scooping out dry chemicals). First, the cells are fixed as usual with
glutaraldehyde then washed in buffer and distilled water. Then,
working within a fume hood and wearing a heatproof glove, the scoopula
is heated until red then touched to the underside of the culture dish.
The curved metal is about the right size for the 24 well dishes. It
takes 2 or 3 times to heat and cut until the whole bottom is
released. Once the initial cut is made you need to keep the cells wet
and this is easily done using a squirt bottle of distilled water.
This technique does not appear to cause damage to the cells but we
normally look at the more centrally positioned cells to avoid any
artefacts. Hope this helps.

Nancy Smith
Cal State Hayward
nsmith-at-csuhayward.edu




From: Eric Wang :      ewang-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 15:07:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Electron mean free path

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X-Sender: ewang-at-hardy.u.washington.edu

Hello, everyone:
Does anyone know where I can find some reference on measurement
of electron mean free path of different materials? The mean free path I
mean here is the mean free path for measuring the thickness when doing
EELS, so this includes electrons of all the energy losses rather than one
particular energy loss. We are particularly interested in getting the
right electron mean free path for Chrome Oxide and evaporated Carbon.
Thanks a lot.

Eric Wang
FB-10 Roberts Hall
Univ. of Washington
Seattle. Wa 98195
(206) 543-1514




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 16:49:15 +1100
Subject: SEM well plates

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Message-Id: {199502150442.RAA12340-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

)Joe,
} Subject: SEM well plates

} Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture plates would be greatly
} } appreciated.
} Joe
} Joseph A. DeMaro

Depending on what exactly it is you are doing, how about using Thermanox
(Thermonox?) plastic slides on the bottom of the wells - they make them
specially to fit into the wells of 12 well plates and possibly the 24 well
ones too. They come sterilised and you just pop them into the well before
you add medium and cells and remove later, fix, dry etc and mount on a
stub. The slide surface properties are supposed to duplicate the ordinary
well bottoms.
Its easier than cutting wells out of the bottom of the trays.
Regards R Easingwood

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254






From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 01:11:08 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please Subscribe




From: Rich2442-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 02:45:32 -0500
Subject: Request to join mailing list

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I work for an OEM of scanning electron microscopes and am interested in
keeping up with the latest technology and issues. I would like to subscribe
to the mailing list. Could you please let me know what I need to do.




From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 08:41:37 EST
Subject: Cell culture plates

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We process a considerable number of cell cultures for both SEM and TEM,
and have found what we consider to be the ideal system. For this purpose,
we have our investigators culture their cells in Leighton tubes...these
are cell culture tubes with a flat bottom which holds a long, narrow
plastic coverslip. Once the cells are attached, the medium is replaced
with fixative, then the coverslip (which is attached to a nifty little
handle) is removed. The plastic on the coverslip is impervious to all
solvents used in microscopy, and can be embedded and sectioned for TEM.

I wouldn't think of doing it any other way.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Fermin, Cesar :      Fermin.Cesar-at-tmc.tulane.edu
Date: 15 Feb 1995 09:37:10 -0600
Subject: Beseler Enlarger tune-up

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.

We have two Beseler enlarger needing adjustments. Any information
on available service person in the south, please remit details
directly to me. Number I called was disconnected!

************************************************************
*Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D \|*|/ Fax (504) 587-7389 *
*Tulane Medical School /|*|\ Answ. Mach.(504) 584-2618 *
*Pathology/SL79 \|*|/ Secretary (504) 584-2436 *
*New Orleans, La 70 112 /|*|\ Lab (504) 5841 *
*Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu -} Director of Morphological Services*
************************************************************




From: dhoyle-at-tic.ab.ca (David Hoyle)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 10:59:42 -0700
Subject: registration

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Message-Id: {25021509453900-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

Thank you for responding so quickly to my inquiry.
I look forward to your news letters and hope to be able to
contribute any information I can.

Subscribe Microscopy dhoyle.tic.ab.ca





From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 11:24:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Beseler Enlarger tune-up

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Back around '82 or '83 I found that I had a problem with my Besseler's
constantly slipping focus just a tiny bit. So I put pipe clamps (those
metal rings that can be tightened of loosened with the turn a a screw) on
the metal guides for the focus which I would tighten when focusing the
bellows particulalry tight.
-mc

On 15 Feb 1995, Fermin, Cesar wrote:
} ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.






From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 13:37:13 EST
Subject: Leighton Tubes

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For those interested, Leighton tubes for cell culture are manufactured by
Corning Costar and are available from Fisher Scientific (Cat.# 07-200-
367). They appear in the 95-96 catalog on page 721.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 15:14:40 EST
Subject: Re: Electron mean free path

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Dear Eric,
If no expert in the field has a table of the mfp's, I can fax you
tables of stopping powers for electrons in carbon, oxygen, iron & titanium--
you have to interpolate for chromium and calculate the mpf from dE/dx. Good
luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 08:42:49 -0500
Subject: FIXATION OF TESTES FOR HISTOLOGY

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GREETINGS,

DOES ANYONE KNOW OF A BETTER FIXATIVE FOR TESTES THAN BOUINS FOR
LIGHT MICROSCOPY? WE ARE TRYING TO AVOID THE LONG RINSING REQUIRED WITH
BOUINS.

THANK YOU!

BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ
(201) 579-4343
(201) 570-4211 (FAX)

E-MAIL:
MAIL/ADMD=TELEMAIL/PRMD=SCHERING-PLOUGH/PN=BARBARA.HARTMAN/C=US/-at-SPRINT.COM






From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 13:48:59 -0500
Subject: Need TEM / Many thanks!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Many thanks to all who responded for my call for help with locating TEM
service near us in the Phoenix metro area. As we thought, there is an
established group in Phoenix who have been around for a few years and who
provide TEM services.

For anyone else who might be interested, the company is called NanoTEM, Inc,
7620 E. McKellips Rd., Suite 4109, Scottsdale, Arizona 85257, phone 602 759
2808, fax 602 947 7615.

Again, many thanks for all your help.

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tobias Baskin)
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 1995 13:47:11 -0600
Subject: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Greetings,
Is there something out there that will make a thin film that
isn't formvar? I have been using wire loops coated with a film of 1.2%
formvar to support my small samples during rapid freezing and substitution.
This works fine for acetone substitution but we would like to try
Tetrahydrafuran (THF) as a substitution medium and, alas, THF eats the
formvar.

We get a formvar film on the wire loop by casting small rectangles
of formvar on water and then trasfering one to a loop.

Are there other compounds that could be used to make a film across
the loop and that might survive THF??

Thanks for any suggestions,

Tobias Baskin

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
___ ____ ^ ____ _____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ / University of Missouri
/ | / / \ / / Biological Sciences
/___ / /__ /_____\ / /__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ ( / Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ / voice: 314-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \____/ /_____ fax: 314-882-0123






From: Liang, Long :      LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM
Date: 17 Feb 1995 14:34:14 CST
Subject: Sample Prep--Steel

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Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.644426140095048FMACMS-at-IS.ARCO.COM}


Dear Microscopists,

I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

Your help is high appreciated.

Long Liang
ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
Plano, TX
LLIANG-at-is.arco.com






From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 08:25:04 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Sample Prep--Steel

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950220082504.256-at-FS-IAM-1.JRC.NL}

}
} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

I have always stuck to the simple silicon carbide paper (in steps
from 120 to 1200 grade) and then diamond (6,3,1um) route, and found
no problems with that.

Doug

+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 11:10:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: student microscopy competition

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CALL FOR PAPERS
STUDENT COMPETITION
TO BE HELD AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
WHITEWATER, WISCONSIN
Friday, March 24, 1994
AWARDS:
FIRST PLACE $100
SECOND PLACE $75
THIRD PLACE $25
Abstracts will be published in Midwest Microscopy.
Microsgraphs from first place winner will be on the cover of Midwest
Microscopy.
Students will be judged on written abstract, presentation, and quality of
study.
Student competition is open to undergraduate and graduate students and
may involve any type of microscopy.
Student and sponsoring faculty member must be members of MSEM.
Abstracts should be submitted before March 15 to :
Dr. Lance Urven
University of Wisconsin- Whitewater
800 West Main,Whitewater, WI 53190





From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 20 Feb 1995 12:02:20 -0400
Subject: TEM: Metals,Electropolishing

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Message-ID: {n1418836731.26217-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time:
11:59 AM

Date:2/20/95
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html NC EMAL

I have some colleagues that want to electropolish some fairly heavily
deformed steel. Composition is:
0.4% C
0.6-0.9%Si
22-24%Cr
7-9%Ni
Trace N
Balance Fe.
Does anyone have a good starting solution and condidtions for this alloy?
Many Thanks.
John Mansfield.





From: tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 13:23:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Sample Prep--Steel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel by
use of a colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with 9.8pH].
Dampen the cloth [such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;
apply liberal amount of the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the
cloth, and apply firm pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45
seconds, rotating the sample quite abit. A final word of caution:
this solution [Mastermet], besides having the high pH [rough on skin],
will crystallize into small, -very hard- particles. Is therefore highly
advised to filter the solution a few times into a smaller bottle before
each use. Have found this stuff to be -very- effective tho'. LECO also
has a similar solution, but have not used it enough to get comfortable
with it as the Mastermet.

In the previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC papers, then
a 9, 6, 1, & sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for the
rough polish (9 & 6), and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on
the grade and condition of the steel tho'... [all these recommendations
are based on me hand polishing individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a
ring held in hand]

Hope this helps,
-Rob
PS: I have no ties with Buehler, just a satisfied customer for +10 years.
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
| tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 20 Feb 95 16:15:25 EST
Subject: Polishing Steel/Colloidal Silica

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The techniques described by Rob Tayloe are certainly in agreement with the
references I have for polishing steel and will work quite well. The only note
I would make is that we do supply a Colloidal Silica which DOES NOT CRYSTALLIZE.
This is an important feature as Rob has mentioned because the crystallized
particles can be a real problem if you do not realize they are there.

Our Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica is available as follows:

Part No. Description Price
CS1-16 Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica 16 oz bottle $16.00
CS1-128 " " " 1 gallon bottle 78.00

If you'd like more information (MSDS etc) on this prodcut or any of our other
products, please let me know.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu (Steve Barlow)
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 15:01:32 -0800
Subject: Tem: insect heart

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one of my users is looking at TEM of insect heart. Does anyone have some good
references on insect heart ultrastructure? Some of the cells associated with
the heart appear highly vesiculated at the cell periphery. The morphology of
these cells looks good, so we don't feel these stuctures are an artifact, but
we have so far been unable to identify what kind of cell or cell type it might
be. Can anyone suggest a reference or an investigator we could contact in
this regard?

----------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
San Diego CA 92182-0057
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu





From: SUSAN R. SESACK :      SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 08:45:41 EDT
Subject: enrollment

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Message-Id: {25022013111522-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

Dear Colleagues,

Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
obliged.

S.




From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG :      RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 9:41:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: enrollment

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} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:
}
} Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
} the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
} obliged.


To subscribe, please send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"
with "Subscribe Microscopy your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.

Holland Cheng
--------------------
Structural Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
Purdue University
W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1101

InterNet: rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu




From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG :      RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 10:03:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: enrollment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:
}
} Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
} the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
} obliged.


To subscribe, please send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"
with "Subscribe Microscopy your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.


Btw, can someone in the server fix the returning route so that
the reply can a global one? I would like to be on a list that
I can see discussions (questions and answers) rather than a
collection of of questions. Thanks in advance!


Holland Cheng
--------------------
Structural Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
Purdue University
W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1101

InterNet: rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu




From: cel1-at-Lehigh.EDU (Charles Lyman)
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 11:44:22 -0500
Subject: Preparing polished sections of steel samples for EPMA analysis

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++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++I would like to add a small point about polishing specimens for
analysis in the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). I prefer to leave the
scratches in from the 1/4micron diamond polishing step in order to have an
image feature on which to focus with the light optics. Since quantitative
x-ray microanalysis samples should be flat-polished but unetched, it is
hard to find a suitable surface feature to use for focusing without these
fine scratches. For some reading on this, try Chapter 11 of Goldstein et
al., Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, 2nd edition,
Plenum Press, 1992.

Good luck, Prof. C E Lyman

Electron Optics Lab
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18015
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

} } I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} } analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} } fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?
}
} A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel by
} use of a colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with 9.8pH].
} Dampen the cloth [such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;
} apply liberal amount of the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the
} cloth, and apply firm pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45
} seconds, rotating the sample quite abit. A final word of caution:
} this solution [Mastermet], besides having the high pH [rough on skin],
} will crystallize into small, -very hard- particles. Is therefore highly
} advised to filter the solution a few times into a smaller bottle before
} each use. Have found this stuff to be -very- effective tho'. LECO also
} has a similar solution, but have not used it enough to get comfortable
} with it as the Mastermet.
}
} In the previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC papers, then
} a 9, 6, 1, & sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for the
} rough polish (9 & 6), and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on
} the grade and condition of the steel tho'... [all these recommendations
} are based on me hand polishing individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a
} ring held in hand]






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 13:19:07 EST
Subject: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Dear Tobias,
A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-cleaved mica--should do the
trick. After evaporation, float the film onto water and pick it up with the
loop. You may have to experiment with thickness etc. to get the proper mech-
anical strength, but it should certainly survive the THF. You may also want
to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the carbon film is not strong enough.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: {tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 2-21-95 1:51pm
Subject: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Message-Id: {9502212303.AA26486-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films
Orig-Author: {tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Dear Tobias,
A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-cleaved mica--should do the
trick. After evaporation, float the film onto water and pick it up with the
loop. You may have to experiment with thickness etc. to get the proper mech-
anical strength, but it should certainly survive the THF. You may also want
to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the carbon film is not strong enough.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tiv





From: Dave DeFily :      defily-at-tam2000.tamu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 1995 13:41:26 -0600
Subject: graphs to data

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Matthias -

I've done this quickly with "Image" by measuring the distance from the graph
axis (x or y) to the data points in question. To calibrate (pixels to data
units), just measure the distance between axis values.

-Dave defily-at-tamu.edu





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 1995 15:45:00 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: New SEM any Suggestions??

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Mark,

We published an article last Fall on the criteria and process for
purchasing an SEM. Readers tell us it is useful.

Suggest you or your friend call for more information.

Ellie Solit,
Executive Editor, Microscope Technology & News.
800-440-0311


On Wed, 22 H
Feb 1995 Noonan_Eddie/perth-at-perth.atd.cra.com.au wrote:

} I have been asked by a colleague of mine who at present does not have
} access to the Microscopy Listserver and who presently is sourcing a
} new SEM for his lab to put out the following question.
}
} "In the next few weeks I shall be ordering a new analytical SEM. We
} will use this SEM almost exclusively for EDS analysis. A motorised
} stage will also be required for the SEM to accommodate overnight runs.
} Therefore I require an ultra stable, reliable instrument. If any one
} with experience in this area has any thoughts I would be grateful to
} hear from you."
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Mark Stewart
}
} Replies to: ejn-at-perth.atd.cra.com.au
}




From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:24:26
Subject: Re: Fixation of blood cells

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To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov






From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:29:17
Subject: Re: Blood fixation

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To: microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

Jan Coetzee and Philip Oshel have posted about blood fixation but I havn't
seen any replies on this topic. We have a project that will try to tie
distortion of red cells to heat stress so fixation needs to be as artefact
free as we can get it. Please Jan or Philip can you mail me with the best
method you can recommend?

Mel Dickson, Univ. of NSW

m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au




From: Glenn Holm :      KARUZIS-at-wccf.mit.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 00:27:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 3 questions

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3 separate requests for information:

1) In the February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's
a blurb for a "Probe Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by
Grace Bio-Labs. Anyone have experience with these and/or a contact
phone/fax # for Grace Bio-Labs?

2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold Silver (LM)
immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second antigen.
The silver was originally present, but faded out in the second reaction.
Could have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were wondering
is - is it possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium thiosulfate
"fixer" step after the IGSS to protect it in subsequent immunoreactions,
dehydrating and coverslipping? Any practical suggestions would be appre-
ciated.

3) A colleague in Australia wants to purchase an antiserum to met-
enkephalin. We have been buying from Incstar and getting good results,
but the Australian distributor for Incstar charges outrageous prices.
Does anyone know of an alternate antibody supplier that may be less ex-
pensive for Australian customers?

------------------------------------------------------------------
|Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |
|M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |
|Cambridge, MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
------------------------------------------------------------------





From: KAKER-at-ctklj.ctk.si
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 8:13:54 +0100 (WET)
Subject: Coster-Kronig

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Dear Microscopists,

I am looking for Coster-Kronig transition probabilities for M lines.

Henrik Kaker
SEM/EDS Lab
Metal d.o.o.
62390 Ravne
Slovenia

Kaker-at-Ctklj.ctk.si




From: Kathy Walters :      kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 08:20:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: lipid sizing

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Recently I posted a request for methods for lipid sizing. I have put
together a summary of that request. If anyone would like a copy I will be
happy to send you one, but it is rather lengthy for the listserver.

Thanks to all respondents,

Kathy Walters






From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 09:25:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: 3 questions

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ProbeClip

GBL inc. 1-800-813-7339 810-332-7100

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830


On Thu, 23 Feb 1995, Glenn Holm wrote:

} 3 separate requests for information:
}
} 1) In the February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's
} a blurb for a "Probe Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by
} Grace Bio-Labs. Anyone have experience with these and/or a contact
} phone/fax # for Grace Bio-Labs?
}
} 2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold Silver (LM)
} immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second antigen.
} The silver was originally present, but faded out in the second reaction.
} Could have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were wondering
} is - is it possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium thiosulfate
} "fixer" step after the IGSS to protect it in subsequent immunoreactions,
} dehydrating and coverslipping? Any practical suggestions would be appre-
} ciated.
}
} 3) A colleague in Australia wants to purchase an antiserum to met-
} enkephalin. We have been buying from Incstar and getting good results,
} but the Australian distributor for Incstar charges outrageous prices.
} Does anyone know of an alternate antibody supplier that may be less ex-
} pensive for Australian customers?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} |Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |
} |M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |
} |Cambridge, MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
}






From: Dave L Robinson :      robin019-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 13:20:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: How do I subscribe?

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How do I subscribe to this newsgroup?

Thank you!

Dave Robinson
University of Minnesota

robin019-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu




From: nee-at-beta.lanl.gov (Norman Elliott)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700
Subject: TEM negatives

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Dear list,

I believe this question was asked on this list before, so I am
sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is having problems with
negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010 TEM. JEOL
suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but is
really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently when
atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of the
static discharge problem and/or have a practical solution.




Norman Elliott | E-mail: nee-at-lanl.gov
Los Alamos National Lab | Fax: 505-665-2104
MST-7 MS E549 | Voice: 505-667-1587
Los Alamos, NM 87545 |






From: KJMcCarthy :      KJMCCARTHY-at-bmg.bhs.uab.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 15:08:07 CST+6CDT
Subject: Digital Imaging Microscopy/FTP site

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950223140219.480-at-bmg.bhs.uab.edu}

I would like to announce the establishment of an FTP site for the Macintosh/Power PC
based digital imaging microscopy software IPLabspectrum from Signal Analytics
Corporation. There are several reasons for development of this site:
1. To provide individuals interested in developing a digital imaging microscopy system
a chance to access and download demonstration versions of this particular
Macintosh/PowerPC based digital imaging software for evaluation purposes.

2. To provide users of IPLabspectrum software for a site to download and upload
user-generated system extensions and scripts .

Although the software is from a commercial source, the establishment of the FTP site
was a decision by made by myself and other users of the Digital Imaging Microscopy
Facility here at the University of Alabama at Birmingham as one way of promoting the
digital imaging microscopy as a research tool. Signal Analytics Corporation, the
developers of the software, has generously made available demonstration versions of their
entire software line for FTP download purposes. If any other developers of imaging
software wish to use this site as a repository for demonstration versions of their software I
would be more than happy to accomodate them.

The demonstration versions of this software are organized into several folders, and
separated into Macintosh and PowerPC versions of that software. There are versions of the
software that support specific imaging boards (e.g. Scion LG-3) in the demo folders. Also in
the site are demo versions of calcium ratio (IPLab Ratio), Three Dimension Reconstruction,
and Multiprobe (FISH) extensions. In addition is a separate program for reading scanned
images of electrophoretic gels. (IP Lab Gel)

There is a folder (directory) for Uploading of Scripts, Extensions, Messages, ect.
provided-however the caveat there is that downloading the extensions from that
directory is at your own risk, since this is a public access directory. If you choose to
download from this directory, please take the time to scan the files for viruses or other
nasties. Our aim is to monitor the upload directory as the usage increases, test the material
in the directory for problems (bugs, viruses, and other annoying creatures) and then shift
those programs that we consider problem free to a specific download-only directory. At
present this download-only directory for user-uploaded files does not exist.

To access the site use the address FTP.BMG.UAB.EDU, logon as ANONYMOUS to enter the
public directory. In the directory is a subdirectory (folder) IP_Labspectrum. Within this
subdirectory are other directories containing the various demos of the software. I also
included the shareware programs FETCH and BinHex 5.0 in a directory named
FTP_SITE_Utilities for individuals (like myself) who rather use FETCH as a front end for
FTP browsing and transfer.

This site is still undergoing development, so please forgive the style of organization. Any
comments, suggestions, ect. about the site, digital imaging microscopy would be greatly
appreciated. My e-mail address is KJMcCarthy-at-CellBio.BMG.UAB.EDU

Best Regards
Kevin McCarthy
Assistant Professor
Department of Cell Biology
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama 35294
Phone 205-934-9923/9924
Fax 205-934-7029




From: Leo D Frawley 03 5667464 :      FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:44:58 +1100
Subject: Extraction Replicas MnS ppts.

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Return-Receipt-To: FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Registered-Mail-Reply-Requested-By: FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN.MUAS; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:44:58 +1100
Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:59:09 +1100
Disclose-Recipients: prohibited

I am interested in using an extraction replica technique to determine MnS precipitate size distributions in a
TEM.

The technique being considered is as follows:
-Polish sample
-Etch to give some surface relief
-Carbon coat
-Using blade cut 1mm size grid on surface
-Release carbon film containing ppt's. from surface using etchant
-Wash carbon replica in alcohol and water
-Position on TEM grid.

My problem is finding an etchant that will not attack the very small MnS ppts. It has been reported that some
etchants attack the Mn in these ppt's.

Any suggestions on the technique or the etchant would be appreciated.

Regards Leo D Frawley
frawley-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au







From: peter smith :      PS-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 16:20:57 EST-10
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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} Date sent: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: nee-at-beta.lanl.gov (Norman Elliott)
} Subject: TEM negatives

} Dear list,
}
} I believe this question was asked on this list before, so I am
} sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is having problems with
} negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010 TEM. JEOL
} suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but is
} really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently when
} atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of the
} static discharge problem and/or have a practical solution.
}
}
We had this static discharge problem when first we bought our
2010. It was solved when JEOL replaced the Teflon drive gear (large)
in the camera with a conducting (metal) one. Coating the gear with a
conducting spray didn't work!
We also installed a separate vacuum desiccator for the plates
(diffusion pump and liquid nitrogen trap).

Peter Smith ps-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
RMIT App Physics Ph: (03) 660 3390 Office
GPO Box 2476V (03) 660 2205 Lab
Melbourne Fax: (03) 660 3837
Vic 3001
AUSTRALIA







From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 24 Feb 1995 10:27:10 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Message-Id: {n1418500529.67061-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be}

REGARDING Re} TEM negatives

About your discharge problem, we believe this is indeed strongly linked with
the vacuum. Therefore we always use one or more desicators before the plates
enter the microscope. This way also the vacuum in the microscope restores
faster. The problem also depends on the plates: we had the experience that
Ilford plates always gave discharge, while Kodak and Agfa did not in the same
environment. Also handling of the plates can be important: sliding plates
over one another can cause discharges before and after use in the microscope.
Hope this can be of help,
Nick Schryvers





From: Larry Hawkey :      hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 08:50:07 -0500
Subject: RE>EM negatives

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I had some static discharge problems with my JEOL 1200exII
some time ago. Every 8th to 10th neg had streaks on
it. they were thin and sharp with two or three finger
like projections coming fron the same point. The service
tech. cleaned the camera (several times) and that cleared the
problem up. It did take several tries and return trips to
get the dirt (thought to be a metal fragment) cleaned up.

I hope this helps.
Larry Hawkey
hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
919-641-6425




From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 07:48:30 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Norman,
Although I am not familiar w/ this particular model of JEOL, could it be
possible that the static discharge is occuring before or (more likely)
after the film has gone into/come out of the scope? We had an individual
in the lab I was in before who tended to wear synthetic fabrics and on
particularly dry Arizona days they could really ZAP the film. One
solution is to wear a wrist grounding strap when handling the film (like
the kind that people are supposed to wear when working inside their
computers). Hope this helps.
Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(602)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: :      Image-at-beelzebub.ucsf.EDU
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 22:36:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 10:28:53 EST
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Dear Norman,
We, too, have had occasional problems with static discharges on our
films--especially with LoDose, which is very sensitive to light. Our worst
problems occur when the humidity is low. You must be very careful when sepa-
rating films from the stack and when removing the stack from the package. You
might also check if your lab coats produce static electricity--we just got new
polyester coats which are terrific generators. If you are completely dark-ad-
apted and loading the folm in total darkness, you can see the discharges as
they occur, so at least you will know what is going on. [oops, I meant film]
If your desiccant is too efficient, the discharge problem will be worse. Good
luck, sometimes the procedures necessary to prevent these discharges are te-
dious. If all else fails, try using 4489 film--it's not nearly as sensitive
as SO163, but it is much finer grain and gives excellent images. We've never
had discharge problems with it, probably because discharges are not intense
enough to show up.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: dlmedli-at-california.sandia.gov (medlin douglas l)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 09:11:50 -0800
Subject: Re: em negatives

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In the past we too have had problems with static discharge ruining negatives
(the film was SO163 being used in a JEOL 4000EX). We found that
the discharges were coming from our vinyl gloves; when we switched to
cotton gloves the problem went away. Additionally, when loading
the camera we never use pre-dessicated film, but instead load the
camera with film that has been at atmosphere (and warmed up to room
temperature if it's been in the refrigerator). We then dessicate the camera
box prior to putting it in the microscope.

On a related topic, on occasion we've observed a fine network of cracks in
the emulsion of our SO163 film. Under an optical microscope the film
looks similar to a dried out mud flat with cracks spaced rougly
0.05 mm apart. These cracks would appear regardless of whether
we dried the film at room temperature overnight or in a heated film drier.
The cracking also appeared with both new and old chemicals (D19 diluted
2:1 4 minutes; kodak rapid fixer 5 minutes). Thinking we had a bad
batch of film we sent some of the material to Kodak, but they were
unable to duplicate the effect. Finally, it was suggested that we
reduce the concentration of hardener in the fixer to half of what
Kodak recommends. This seems to have reduced the cracking quite a bit, although
not entirely. Has anyone had similar problems?

+---------------------------------------------+
! Douglas L. Medlin !
! Physical Properties of Materials Department !
! Mail Stop 9402 !
! Sandia National Laboratories !
! Livermore, California 94551 !
! !
! (510) 294-2825 !
! dlmedli-at-california.sandia.gov !
+---------------------------------------------+
.\




From: Glenn Poirier :      GLENN_P-at-GEOSCI.Lan.McGill.CA
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 13:51:56 EST5EDT
Subject: anhydrous polishing

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Message-Id: {199502241853.NAA28700-at-sifon.CC.McGill.CA}

Greetings Microscopists

Is there anyone out there who has any tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic
material for microanalysis. Specifically, I need to polish some CaO
particles with CaC rinds. I could probably polish them with silicone
oil, but how do I get the oil off the samples before I put them in
the microprobe? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Glenn
**********************************************************************
* Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *
* Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *
* Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *
* McGill University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *
* Montreal, Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *
**********************************************************************




From: Po-Fu Huang :      huang020-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 13:14:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: literature needed

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Greetings,

I am a graduate student currently working on a project utilizing EDS to
get quantitative elemental information of atmospheric particles. In past
few monthes, I have been trying to get hold of a article cited below through
the interlibrary service and without any success. It will be greatly
appreciated if anyone out there can direct me where and how to get this
article.

Heinrich, K. F. J. (1987) "Mass Absorption Coefficients for Electron Probe
Microanalysis." in
"Proc. 11th Int. Cong. on X-ray Optics and Microanalysis." edited by J.
Brown and R. Packwood, published by J. D. Brown, University of Western,
Ontario, pp67-119.


Po-Fu Huang
Particle Technology Laboratory
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Minnesota
(Office) (612) 626-7227
(Lab) (612) 625-7307
(Fax) (612) 625-6069





From: hukee.margaret-at-mayo.EDU (Marge Hukee)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:10:12 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Message-Id: {9502242007.AA12178-at-fermat.Mayo.EDU}
X-Sender: hukem-at-fermat.mayo.edu
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We pre-pump negatives in a separate vacuum chamber with phosphorus
pentoxide powder placed in the bottom of chamber. This film is loaded into
a spare cassette and has always been suitable for use after being pumped
for 1-2 hours or left under vacuum. After about a week, the powder absorbs
moisture and must be replaced. The old powder can be neutralized with NaOH
pellets and when NaOH pellets have dissolved, can be discarded by flushing
with water.

Marge Hukee
EM Core Facility hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Mayo Foundation (507) 284-3148
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--






From: John F. Conroy :      John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues

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Hello,

I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I have been knocking my head
against the wall looking for some sort of data on the optical transmission
properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone have a good
reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain tissue
slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
oximetry.).

Thanks in advance,

John Conroy
University of Utah
Dept. Bioengineering




From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
Date: 24 Feb 1995 17:10:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: EM negatives

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We had some static discharge on our 35 mm film in the past. It
occurred when pre-desiccated bulk was being rolled onto
cassettes. The problem disappeared after bulk film was left in
atmosphere. We never had problem with plates because we did not
pre-desiccate plates. One may try leaving the exposed plates in a
humid chamber for a while before developing them, if the problem
persisted.

Ann Fook Yang




From: emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:28:17 -0800
Subject: LKB Ultratome III

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Greetings:

I have an LKB Ultratome III that is surplus to our needs. Purchased in
1978, almost never used. If you might be interested in making an offer or
know of a worthwhile place for a donation, please let me know.

Thanks,


Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu
(408) 459-2477






From: Maggy Piranian :      maggy-at-sparky2.esd.mun.ca
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 17:46:50 -0330 (NST)
Subject: Re: anhydrous polishing

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Glenn (and others)
I have polished B2O3 with the 3M lapping film and no water. It
doesn't produce a great polish, but you can usually find a few spots
where you can squeeze a beam in. If you don't use the 3M film, let me
know and I'll tell you where you can get some or even send you a scrap.
Maggy Piranian
M.U.N.

On Fri, 24 Feb 1995, Glenn Poirier wrote:

} Greetings Microscopists
}
} Is there anyone out there who has any tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic
} material for microanalysis. Specifically, I need to polish some CaO
} particles with CaC rinds. I could probably polish them with silicone
} oil, but how do I get the oil off the samples before I put them in
} the microprobe? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Glenn
} **********************************************************************
} * Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *
} * Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *
} * Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *
} * McGill University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *
} * Montreal, Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *
} **********************************************************************
}




From: Miguel Avalos B. :      miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 19:51:33 -0800
Subject: Re: LKB Ultratome III

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From: smithj-at-acad.winthrop.edu
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 1995 20:55:59 -0500
Subject: Problems with 35mm T-max in TEM

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EM folk:
I'm trying to use T-max 100 in the 35mm camera on
my Zeiss EM 10C. Everything works well (you get nice
short exposures, and this particular camera can be
handled in the light, so there's no problem with using
a panchromatic film).
But the film gets *BRITTLE* in high vacuum. I have
snapped the film in half simply by bending it as I
unloaded the camera. Any hints, or do I just need to
switch to one of the orthochromatic films? If so, which
one(s) have you tried and liked?
Julian Smith III
Biology
Winthrop University
Rock Hill, SC
803-323-2111 (vox)





From: Dirk Knoesen, UWC, SA :      DIRK-at-physics.uwc.ac.za
Date: 27 Feb 95 08:45:52 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: TEM film

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950227084552.256-at-physics.uwc.ac.za}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Douglas Medlin wrote about fine cracks appearing on some of their TEM
negatives. I believe you are experiencing what photographers called
:crazing:. This is an effect that occurs when the temperature of the
developer and fixer is not the same, or at least the difference is
not small enough. It is exactly as you describe it, a fine line
structure on the film that looks that mud cracks.

Dirk Knoesen
Department of Physics, University Western Cape, Bellville, 7530
South Africa
e-mail: dirk-at-physics.uwc.ac.za
Phone: (+21) 959 2236 Fax: (+21) 959 3474




From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
Date: 27 Feb 1995 09:30:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE:35mm film in TEM

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We use Eastman motion picture film (5302 fine grain release
positive film) in Philips EM300 in the past and currently in
Zeiss EM902 without any problem.

Ann Fook Yang




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 27 Feb 95 12:12:22 EST
Subject: anhydrous polishing/Abrasive Films

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One suggestion I would make would be polishing with abrasive lapping films.
These are abrasive particles which are bonded to a polyester film. It is a
higher grade of traditional SiC grinding paper and it comes in micronized
particle sizes. The material is designed to be used either with or without a
lubricant which should take care of your problem.

While it is always preferable to polish with some sort of lubricant, this is a
viable alternative for anhydrous materials. I must also add that the lapping
film is one of our products so I do have a vested interest in this suggestion.
If you would like a sample to try out, please contact me. It is avaialable in
Aluminum oxide down to .05 micron and in Diamond down to 0.1 micron. Typical
price for Al2O3 film is about $1.39 per 8" PSA Disc and for Diamond about $24
per 8" PSA disc. 8" Plain Back Diamond Film is more typically used and is
priced at about $20 per 8" Disc. Prices, of course, will decrease in quantity.
The diamond plain back films are used extensively in Tripo Polishing for SEM and
TEM applications.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499






From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:50:49
Subject: Re: RE:35mm film in TEM

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To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov


I have used Kodak Fine Grain Release Positive (5302) in Philips microscopes
for 30 years. Never gave a problem with cracking with the unperforated (no
longer available) or perforated stock. Gave some problems with "lightning
strikes" on the final 4-5 frames out of 40. Philips have special cameras with
large diameter hubs so the film is never bent much and used unperforated film
so there was no tendency to crack at perforations. A 35 mm camera in our
Hitachi H-7000 gives very fine cracking across the film between the edges of
the perforations even when using the film Hitachi recommends. This can only
be avoided by using film which is only JUST dry enough, shooting the whole
roll and processing it in about 4 hours.







From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 02:24:41 -0500
Subject: Materials Microscopy

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For your information, Materials Microscopy is a new newsletter dedicated to
the professional interests of the working materials microscopist. Those who
wish to receive a free subscription should provide us with their full mailing
address via FAX -at- (602) 947-7615 or E-mail: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com. Contributed
articles should be mailed to:
Materials Microscopy
P.O. Box 2014
Scottsdale, AZ 85252
Please contact me if you need any further information. Thank you.

Rene E. Nicholas
Circulation Manager
Materials Microscopy





From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 08:25:56 +0100 (MET)
Subject: for Barbara Hartmann

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Hi Barbara!
I tried to no avail to send you the present message at your email
address: it stubbornly bounced back, so I eventually post it to the
microscopy list.
I apologize to the members of this list if they should feel this is
wasting bandwidth: just delete and go on to the next message ;-)

Barbara!
I am afraid I did not make my question clear enough ;-)
What I wanted to know was:
1) the testes you wish to fix are from what species ?

2) for what kind of microscopy are they to be processed ? I.e.
T.E.M., S.E.M., or light microscopy ?

3) What's the embedding medium?

4) in the case of light microscopy, do you contemplate using some special
technique (besides for recognizing the different stages of the
seminiferous epithelium) which would require that some specific
chemical would be either required or, on the contrary, avoided?

In my personal experience with rat testes and light microscopy (this
is rather very long ago: more than 30 years! :-( ), Bouin and other
picric acid containing variations thereof are not optimal fixatives
for preservation of the acrosomial apparatus of spermatids, which is
one of the features used by most classification methods (Clermont's
among others...).
The best fixatives for light microscopy of paraffin embedded tissue
are those containing potassium dichromate such as, for example,
Helly's fluid (Zenker + formaldehyde), but they also are followed, after
rinsing and dehydration, by shrinkage which is still more important than
that observed after Bouin's or Bouin-Hollande's (somewhat better) fluids.

BTW, what's wrong with picric acid? It is always shipped in 'moist
condition' in order to minimize hazards. I work in our lab since 1953,
with Bouin, Bouin-Allen, Bouin-Hollande, Dubosq-Brazil etc., every day,
and we never experienced any problem. We store the picric acid for our
needs in the form of a saturated aqueous solution which keeps for as long
as you will. This stock solution is then used for preparing all picric
acid containing fixatives.

There is no point in trying to eliminate the picric acid from the fixed
pieces of tissue before sectioning. If the presence of picric acid in the
slides should hamper subsequent staining (a rare occurrence, btw), then
the easiest and expeditious way to get rid of it is to pretend your tissue
was fixed with a sublimate containing fluid: at the rehydration step, your
slides should undergo treatment by alcoholic iodine (or lugol solution) and
sodium thiosulfate in the usual way and 'voila': no more picric acid on the
slides within 2 minutes!
Under no circumstances should the pieces of tissue fixed with a picric
acid containing fixative undergo rinsing in water! This is sheer heresy ;-)
because it induces a lot of swelling in the tissue before shrinking even
more during dehydration (I never found out which histologist ever advocated
such method, but I know quite a number of renowned ones who firmly condemned
it, and with good reason). If you insist on rinsing the pieces of testes after
fixation, then merely increasing the number of steps through 90x alcohol should
do the trick; you may even add a thin layer (1-2 mm thick) of lithium
carbonate on the bottom of the alcohol containing flasks: this helps
dissolving part of the picric acid away.

Possibly the method which should yield the best pictures has been documented
in a book entitled 'Histological and histopathological Evaluation of the
Testis', by Russell,Ettlin, Sinha Hikim and Clegg: Cache River Press 1990,
(15777 Bolesta, Box 129, Clearwater, Fl 34620): ISBN 09627422-0-1.

At the end of the book, there is an appendix about the materials and methods
which you might find useful (although perfusion fixation of rat testes is
among the most frustrating experiences I ever had, even with a lot of
heparin ). This would also require embedding in epoxy resin and making large
semi-thin sections, which I don't know whether you are prepared to do ;).
Glutaraldehyde certainly seems to me the best choice, but then paraffin
embedding would be ruled out (too hard and too brittle after paraffin
embedding).
HTH, and good luck.
Let me know about the outcome (good, I hope)
John
(correction: alcohol above should read 90 percent in volume)



***********************************************************
* Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
* Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
* Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
* e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
* snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
* B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
***********************************************************




From: Ker{nen Jaakko-Tuomas :      jaakko-at-butler.cc.tut.fi
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:14:33 +0200
Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy

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Yes, I want more information about the Materials Microscopy. Please
send me a free subscription.

Jaakko Keranen
Centre for electron microscopy
Tampere Univ. of technology
P.O.Box. 589
FIN-33101 Tampere
FINLAND




From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:38:53 -0500
Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain

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To whomever,
Would someone please repost the recent info on lipid sizing (K.Walters?)
and the three responses on lipid negative staining. I had another crash and
lost
these responses.
Thanks
Mike D.





From: John F. Conroy :      John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950228091038.320-at-ahabs.wisc.edu}




Hello,

I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I have been knocking my head
against the wall looking for some sort of data on the optical transmission
properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone have a good
reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain tissue
slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
oximetry.).

Thanks in advance,

John Conroy
University of Utah
Dept. Bioengineering


Dear John,

It has been years since I worked in this area, but I suggest you might
look at the literature for the optical transmission properties of retina.
As a nervous tissue, its optical properties should be quite similar to the
CNS as long as the measurements are not made in the vicinity of the fovea.
And, of course, due the importance of retinal transparency for vision, its
optical properties must be well known. For a place to start I'd have a
look at the "Handbook of sensory physiology" Springer-Verlag.

Just my two cents worth, Steven
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steven L. Goodman, Ph.D.
Dept. Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences 608-262-0816 (office)
University of Wisconsin 608-262-7420 (FAX)
1655 Linden Drive
Madison, WI 53706 SLG-at-AHABS.WISC.EDU
--------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:00:41 -0500
Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain

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} Return-Path: {delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} Received: from AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV by welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (5.0/SMI-SVR4)
} id AA04845; Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:52:41 -0500
} Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:38:53 -0500
} Message-Id: {9502281438.AA02618-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} X-Sender: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain
} X-Mailer: {Windows Eudora Version 1.4.2b16}
} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
}
} To whomever,
} Would someone please repost the recent info on lipid sizing
(K.Walters?)
} and the three responses on lipid negative staining. I had another crash and
} lost
} these responses.
} Thanks
} Mike D.
}
}





From: Miguel Avalos B. :      miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 10:37:19 -0800
Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy

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From: Damon Heer :      DLH-at-fei2.feico.com
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 16:07:22 -0800
Subject: Used SEM for sale

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NANOMETRICS QWIKSCAN II
FESEM

$4,900

If interested, please contact Paxton Hong
InnfoGraphics
503 235-0227

Best regards,
Damon Heer

FEI Company
7451 N.E. Evergreen Parkway
Hillsboro, OR 97124-5830

Phone (503) 640-7582
fax (503) 640-7509
email dlh-at-feico.com




From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 22:42:01 -0500
Subject: No link to Newsgroup

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Message-Id: {199503010340.WAA29098-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}
X-Sender: jfmjfm-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Just a note to let you guys know that our link from this mailing list to
the Usenet newsgroup sci.techniques.microscopy has been broken. The
gateway at
sci.techniques.microscopy.usenet-at-decwrl.dec.com has been closed down. Dec
no longer support it.
If you want as much coverage for you questions and posts as possible I
encourage you to post both to this list and also to the Newssgroup.

If anyone knows how to set up a mail gateway to the Newsgroup, and also
from the Newsgroup to the mailing list, I would be very interested to hear
how to do it so we could reestablish the link and possibly make it
bi-directional this time!

Many thanks
Jfm.


______________
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html






From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Wed, 1 Mar 1995 08:17:01 +0100 (MET)
Subject: to Barbara Hartman

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Hi Barbara!

I tried to no avail to send you the present message at your email
address: it stubbornly bounced back, so I eventually post it to the
microscopy list.
I apologize to the members of this list if they should feel this is
wasting bandwidth: just delete and go on to the next message ;-)

Barbara!
I am afraid I did not make my question clear enough ;-)
What I wanted to know was:
1) the testes you wish to fix are from what species ?

2) for what kind of microscopy are they to be processed ? I.e.
T.E.M., S.E.M., or light microscopy ?

3) What's the embedding medium?

4) in the case of light microscopy, do you contemplate using some special
technique (besides for recognizing the different stages of the
seminiferous epithelium) which would require that some specific
chemical would be either required or, on the contrary, avoided?

In my personal experience with rat testes and light microscopy (this
is rather very long ago: more than 30 years! :-( ), Bouin and other
picric acid containing variations thereof are not optimal fixatives
for preservation of the acrosomial apparatus of spermatids, which is
one of the features used by most classification methods (Clermont's
among others...).
The best fixatives for light microscopy of paraffin embedded tissue
are those containing potassium dichromate such as, for example,
Helly's fluid (Zenker + formaldehyde), but they also are followed, after
rinsing and dehydration, by shrinkage which is still more important than
that observed after Bouin's or Bouin-Hollande's (somewhat better) fluids.

BTW, what's wrong with picric acid? It is always shipped in 'moist
condition' in order to minimize hazards. I work in our lab since 1953,
with Bouin, Bouin-Allen, Bouin-Hollande, Dubosq-Brazil etc., every day,
and we never experienced any problem. We store the picric acid for our
needs in the form of a saturated aqueous solution which keeps for as long
as you will. This stock solution is then used for preparing all picric
acid containing fixatives.

There is no point in trying to eliminate the picric acid from the fixed
pieces of tissue before sectioning. If the presence of picric acid in the
slides should hamper subsequent staining (a rare occurrence, btw), then
the easiest and expeditious way to get rid of it is to pretend your tissue
was fixed with a sublimate containing fluid: at the rehydration step, your
slides should undergo treatment by alcoholic iodine (or lugol solution) and
sodium thiosulfate in the usual way and 'voila': no more picric acid on the
slides within 2 minutes!
Under no circumstances should the pieces of tissue fixed with a picric
acid containing fixative undergo rinsing in water! This is sheer heresy ;-)
because it induces a lot of swelling in the tissue before shrinking even
more during dehydration (I never found out which histologist ever advocated
such method, but I know quite a number of renowned ones who firmly condemned
it, and with good reason). If you insist on rinsing the pieces of testes after
fixation, then merely increasing the number of steps through 90x alcohol should
do the trick; you may even add a thin layer (1-2 mm thick) of lithium
carbonate on the bottom of the alcohol containing flasks: this helps
dissolving part of the picric acid away.

Possibly the method which should yield the best pictures has been documented
in a book entitled 'Histological and histopathological Evaluation of the
Testis', by Russell,Ettlin, Sinha Hikim and Clegg: Cache River Press 1990,
(15777 Bolesta, Box 129, Clearwater, Fl 34620): ISBN 09627422-0-1.

At the end of the book, there is an appendix about the materials and methods
which you might find useful (although perfusion fixation of rat testes is
among the most frustrating experiences I ever had, even with a lot of
heparin ). This would also require embedding in epoxy resin and making large
semi-thin sections, which I don't know whether you are prepared to do ;).
Glutaraldehyde certainly seems to me the best choice, but then paraffin
embedding would be ruled out (too hard and too brittle after paraffin
embedding).
HTH, and good luck.
Let me know about the outcome (good, I hope)
John
(correction for above glitch about the alcohol/ethanol: should read
alcohol 90 percent (in volume); I am still stuck with kermit and an
awfull editor :( ).



***********************************************************
* Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
* Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
* Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
* e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
* snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
* B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
***********************************************************





From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Wed, 1 Mar 1995 08:46:40 +0100 (MET)
Subject: ignore, please

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this just is a test because it seems I am not able to reach the
list. Please ignore and delete. I apologize for the inconvenience.
desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be





From: jpawley-at-macc.wisc.edu (James Pawley)
Date: Wed, 1 Mar 1995 18:17:03 -0600
Subject: High resolution HVEM about to be trashed. Do you need it?

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The 1 MeV AEI EM-7 at the University of Wisconsin, Madison has been used
for the study of biological specimens for the past 23 years. In the early
1980's, almost every subsystem of this instrument (magnetic shielding and
ambient field, lens-current and HV stability, vibration isolation, LaB6
source, TV-interface, Axis-centered stereo-tilt stage, high-resolution
cold-stage etc.) was upgraded with a view to performing high-resolution
studies on frozen biological specimens. Images of oriented gold films at
that time showed 0.14 nm spots in bright field and using an 11 mm gap
(Pawley, J.B. (1984) Ultramicroscopy 13-4:387-406, describes most of these
improvements in detail.)

Because it seems probable that the present management of this instrument
will decide (has decided?) to decommission it in the very near future, (It
was almost scrapped over last Christmas), I am posting this notice in case
there are those that feel that the country has need of a second instrument
with the general specifications of the Berkeley ARM or even of the
very-stable Haefely 1-MEV supply that it contains.

The instrument is in operating condition, but, until recently, has received
less maintenance than it should have for the past five years or so.

The questions are:

1. Do you have important projects that require higher resolution (or a
large gap) than that available from 200-400kV instruments? (Keep in mind
that knock-on damage may be more severe at the higher voltage.)
2. Would you be willing to travel to Madison to obtain such facilities?
3. Would you be interested in relocating the instrument to a more
convenient location?

Bear in mind that, because the instrument requires a room 3 floors high and
a large (100 t) vibration-isolation block and also has substantial power
and cooling requirements, moving it would be a bit complex. However, it
could surely be done at less than 10% of $5M cost of the new Stuttgart 1.25
MeV instrument.

It would also need stage-rods more suited for material-science applications
but it is possible that the stage formerly fitted to the Cambridge HREM
could be fitted without great trouble as both instruments used the same
column.

The purpose of this communication is solely for the information of possible
users with the aim of avoiding anyone in the future saying "If only you had
told me?". I do not represent the Integrated Microscopy Resource where the
instrument is installed.

Please send any responses directly to me and do so ASAP:

jpawley-at-macc.wisc.edu (James Pawley)

***************NEW ADDRESS**************
Prof. James B Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 1235, Engineering Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1500 Johnson Dr. Madison, Wisconsin, 53706.
JPAWLEY-at-MACC.WISC.EDU






From: Keith Moulding :      MCMOULDK-at-usthk.ust.hk
Date: 02 Mar 1995 15:38:58 +0800
Subject: Channel Software - EBSP

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Hi,

I have been trying to contact Niels-Henrik Schmidt (author of Channel). The
FAX number I have seems to be out of date.

Does anyone have Niels-Henrik Schmidt current FAX number and address?

Thanks in advance.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dr. Keith Moulding,
Materials Characterisation and Preparation Centre,
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon,
Hong Kong.

Tel: (852) 2358 8724
Fax: (852) 2358 2451

E-mail: mcmouldk-at-usthk.ust.hk

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From: andreas.brech-at-bio.uio.no (Andreas Brech)
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 1995 09:14:14 +0100
Subject: subscribe

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Andreas Brech
Electron Microscopical Unit for Biological Sciences
Department of Biology, University of Oslo.
P.O.Box 1062 Blindern
N-0316 Oslo 3
Norway
Tel.: + 43-22 85 61 89 (work)
+ 43-22 43 83 23 (privat)
Fax.: + 43-22 85 47 26
e-mail.: abrech-at-bio.uio.no





From: andreas.brech-at-bio.uio.no (Andreas Brech)
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 1995 09:18:32 +0100
Subject: subscribe

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Please, I would like to join the list.
Andreas Brech
Electron Microscopical Unit for Biological Sciences
Department of Biology, University of Oslo.
P.O.Box 1062 Blindern
N-0316 Oslo 3
Norway
Tel.: + 43-22 85 61 89 (work)
+ 43-22 43 83 23 (privat)
Fax.: + 43-22 85 47 26
e-mail.: abrech-at-bio.uio.no





From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 2 Mar 1995 14:59:45 +0100
Subject: HREM versus high ground wat

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Message-Id: {n1417965773.25625-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be}

REGARDING HREM versus high ground water

Does anyone has experience with high ground water levels troubeling HREM
operation?
Nick Schryvers
EMAT, RUCA
Antwerp, Belgium





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 1995 10:35:15 EST
Subject: Electron backscattering cross-sections

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Does anyone have a referrence for backscattering cross-sections of electrons
in various substances as a function of energy and/or of angle? I'd really
appreciate a reply either to the list, by email or if I could get a table by
fax at (518) 474-8590. TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu




From: Richard E. Edelmann :      EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 10:58:56 -500
Subject: Freeze-Fracture

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I'm looking for any recomendations for freeze-fracture units.
We're putting together a grant here to obtain one and the only souce
I've come up with is Bal-tec. I am looking for other possible
vendors. Apparently JEOL has stopped production of their freeze-
fracture unit. Specifically we're looking for units comparable to
the Bal-Tec BAF 060 (not that I as of yet have anything against the
BAF 060, but it is nice to look around first.)

Thank you.

Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio




From: T. Page Owen Jr :      tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 13:25:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Freeze-Fracture

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Cressington makes a nice freeze-fracture machine. I don't have the
address at hand, but I believe they are based in England.

Page Owen
Dept. of Botany
Connecticut College
New London, CT 06320






From: Dennis Shubitowski :      dennis%odin-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 15:43:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject:

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Errors-To: {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}






From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 13:43:38 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: Freeze-Fracture

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Message-Id: {9503022058.AA09986-at-julian.uwo.ca}


SUBJECT: Freeze-fracture
Riichard,

I don't think there is a unit out as yet that can match the specs
and design of the new BAL-TEC unit. Cressington is another company which
manufactures freeze-fracture unit. While it may not have all the features of
the new BAL-TEC one, it is reported to be good for routine freeze-fracture.

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 11:58:20 -0700
Subject: Re: Freeze-Fracture

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Message-Id: {v01510100ab7bc4018e5c-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

} I'm looking for any recomendations for freeze-fracture units.
} We're putting together a grant here to obtain one and the only souce
} I've come up with is Bal-tec. I am looking for other possible
} vendors. Apparently JEOL has stopped production of their freeze-
} fracture unit. Specifically we're looking for units comparable to
} the Bal-Tec BAF 060 (not that I as of yet have anything against the
} BAF 060, but it is nice to look around first.)
}
} Thank you.
}
} Richard E. Edelmann
} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

It looks as though you have some misinformation. JEOL is making the JFD
9000 series freeze-fracture instruments. I know that John Rash has
recently purchased and installed the 9010CR with the latest modifications,
including a specimen stage with rapid cooling.

Both Bal-Tec and JEOL make fine instruments and are worth looking at.


John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins CO






From: Jake Schaper :      Jake_Schaper-at-chdqm.sps.mot.com
Date: 2 Mar 1995 14:00:50 -0700
Subject: Subject-EM / AL/Si Stress

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Message-Id: {n1417969004.27274-at-chdqm.sps.mot.com}

Many published investigations on stress voids in aluminum/silicon alloys
report using CF4/O2 plasma as the deprocessing method to remove the final
PECVD oxynitride/ SiN. Does the use of this plasma chemistry generate its own
voids by removing silicon precipitates which in turn leave voids possibly
identified as stress voids? Precipitates that were in or near the correct
orientation give the appearance (typically wedge-shaped) of a stress void.
Optical inspection without deprocessing does not have adequate resolution.
I'd appreciate any comments on the CF4/O2 method and a possible alternative
method (other than argon backsputtering).

**********************************************************
Jake Schaper
Product Analysis Lab
Motorola
Chandler, Arizona
Phone 602-814-4756
**********************************************************






From: Dennis Shubitowski :      dennis%odin-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 15:43:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Epoxy Resins: Accelerator?

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Errors-To: {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}

One of the divisions of our lab teases apart sural nerve tissue that have
been kept in a 1:1 mixture of epon:propylene oxide. The samples are very
easy to tease when the mixture is very fresh. The problem is that samples
became back-logged and were not able to be teased right away. A quick
decision had to be made, and the samples were frozen at -70C until they
could be teased.

The nerve fibers need to be infiltrated to be teased but not polymerized
or else they become too fragile. A problem is becoming evident that after a
long period of storage, the nerve samples are being fully infiltrated
and polymerized despite being frozen (which we thought would almost stop
the polymerization process because it is largely dependant on heat).
Realizing that hind-sight is 20/20, would it have been better to leave the
accelerator out of the epoxy mixture? What affect would this have on the
quality of the resin? I understand accelerator to act as a catalyst being
a part of the polymerization reaction but not really consumed. Any
opinions to offer?

Thanks,

Dennis








From: emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 2 Mar 1995 11:12:14 -0800
Subject: Survey: Lab Changes

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Hi again:

I have been asked to make a brief (15 min) presentation at Scanning 95 in
Monterey, on March 30, 1995. The topic is 'Changing Role of the Microscopy
Lab in the University'. I know how my lab has changed, but would like to
get some idea from a broader sample of microscopists about changes in our
role etc.

My rough observations at this time include some of the following. More labs
seem to be consolidating, so we keep trying to catch up with too many
techniques, especially as staffs are reduced.

There are lots of other places for researchers to spend their funding than
before, we have lost lots of users in biology to molecular techniques. Some
of the new faculty see microscopy as 'too hard'.

There are fewer and fewer students who want to be 'microscopists'. Most
seem to want to come in on Monday, drop off something, and return on Friday
with a picture or two for their thesis.

The EM lab on our campus has evolved into an imaging and microscopy lab.
Because of our interest in images, we have always had the best darkrooms,
now we are trying to lead the way into digital imaging. This means more
computers and branching out from traditional 'microscopy'.

I could probably think of other changes, but that wouldn't leave anything
for you to add. Don't be shy, reply directly to me and I will try to
incorporate your comments in my presentation in a constructive way. Let me
know if you want specific credit for an idea, or if you prefer to have your
input blended for anonymity.

If you can't make it to Monterey, I'll send a summary if you ask.

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu
(408) 459-2477






From: John F. Conroy :      John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues

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Reply to: RE} Re: Optical Microscopy of Tissues
Dear John,
Sorry about the delay in responding - I missed your message in the deluge I
received while visiting labs for a few days. Check out the following papers on
infrared DIC-videomicroscopy.

H.-U. Dodt, W. Zieglgansberger (1990) Brain Research 537:333-356; (1994) Trends
in Neurosciences 17 (11): 453-458 (and references therein).

They looked with transmitted light at depths of up to 100 um in 300 um thick
sections. Used a 63x 1.4 NA oil immersion objective and DIC optics to visualize
nerve terminals. Note that the Nikon 60x 1.2 NA WATER immersion objective is
now available and has advantages in deep sections (see for example Mel
Brenner's application note in the November 1994 Journal of NIH Research).

Infrared penetrates well because water and tissues doesn't absorb it as much as
visible. For video work a CCD (or cooled CCD) is used because they are
sensitive to IR (unlike most tube cameras and your eye). DIC is the method of
choice because of optical sectioning. A general review or IR cameras is:
Silverman et al (March 1992) Scientific American 78-83 and 112-113. Any high
quality video CCD camera will work (as long as it does not have an IR blocking
filter!).

Sincerely,

Dr. George McNamara
Universal Imaging Corporation
--------------------------------------

Hello,

I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I have been knocking my head
against the wall looking for some sort of data on the optical transmission
properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone have a good
reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain tissue
slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
oximetry.).

Thanks in advance,

John Conroy
University of Utah
Dept. Bioengineering

---------
Dear John,

It has been years since I worked in this area, but I suggest you might
look at the literature for the optical transmission properties of retina.
As a nervous tissue, its optical properties should be quite similar to the
CNS as long as the measurements are not made in the vicinity of the fovea.
And, of course, due the importance of retinal transparency for vision, its
optical properties must be well known. For a place to start I'd have a
look at the "Handbook of sensory physiology" Springer-Verlag.

Just my two cents worth, Steven






From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 3 Mar 1995 08:26:09 +0100
Subject: obj. lens 100C replacement

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REGARDING obj. lens 100C replacement

The objective lens and the upper and lower column parts of our 20 year old
side entry JEOL 100 C microscope need replacement. New parts, however, are
rather expensive in view of the age of the instrument so we're looking for
anyone who has some second hand spare parts for sale. Sincerely,
Nick Schryvers tel: 32-3-2180247 fax: 32-3-2180257
EMAT, University of Antwerp
Groenenborgerlaan 171
B-2020 ANTWERP
Belgium






From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 1995 17:37:52 +1100
Subject: Resins: BDMA vs DMP-30

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A message from Allan Mitchell:

The BDMA versus DMP-30 debate continues.

I first became aware of the recomendation to replace the epoxy resin=
acelerator DMP-30 with the acelerator BDMA when Audrey Glauert published=
her article "Accelerators for epoxy resins" in the RMS Proceedings (Sept, 1=
987).

The reason offered to encourage the switch from DMP-30 to BDMA was the fact=
that BDMA is less viscous, therefore diffuses into the tissue sample=
better. This gives a more even polymerisation and better sectioning. BDMA=
also has a longer shelf life.

I followed Glauert's recomendation, replacing DMP-30 with BDMA in our resin=
formula's. However, Audrey Glauert did not mention in the article that=
we should double the quantity of BDMA in the formulation when switching=
from DMP-30 to BDMA.

I replaced the DMP-30 with BDMA, using the BDMA at the same concentration as=
I had used the DMP-30.

Generally, it worked fine. Occasionally I had 'strange embedding' problems,=
ie samples not properly polymerised.

It then came to my attention that I should be using BDMA at twice the DMP-30=
concentration. I did not pay much attention to this at the time as=
generally everything had been working fine and I was to busy to experiment=
with the change.

After recent 'flow' on the List server the topic again surfaced i.e. I=
should be using BDMA at twice the DMP-30 concentration. This I have now tr=
ied.

My problem is that if I do an overnight infiltration in resin with the=
increased concentration of BDMA the resin is so viscous next morning it=
won't even come out of the vial when tipped upside down. To change to=
fresh resin is almost impossible, in fact it is easier to change the=
samples to fresh resin in a new processing tube. Unfortunately even then=
it is not totally successful as a large 'blob' of tacky resin stays with=
the sample.

I did a little experiment as outlined below;

1. Made up resin with normal DMP-30 concentration.
2. Made up resin with BDMA at normal DMP-30 concentration.
3. Made up resin with BDMA at twice DMP-30 concentration.

Results

Viscosity (by eye) Colour
To start with
DMP-30 most viscous slightly orange
BDMA (-at- DMP-30 conc) least viscous straw coloured
BDMA (-at- 2 x DMP-30 conc)similar to BDMA -at- DMP 30 conc straw coloured

After 5 hours
DMP-30 least viscous darker straw coloured
BDMA (-at- DMP-30 conc) similar to DMP-30 straw coloured
BDMA (-at- 2 x DMP-30 conc)quite viscous straw coloured

Overnight
DMP-30 least viscous straw coloured
BSMA (-at- DMP-30 conc) slightly more viscous than DMP-30 straw coloured
BDMA (-at- 2 x DMP-30 conc)very very viscous straw coloured

After the overnight step both the DMP-30 mix and the BDMA mix at the DMP-30=
concentration were quite acceptable, ie no difficulty replacing the old=
resin with fresh resin.

The BDMA mix at the twice DMP-30 concentration ws very very tacky.

After polymerisation both the DMP-30 and the BDMA -at- the DMP-30=
concentration are a light straw colour (normal expectation). The BDMA -at-=
twice the DMP-30 concentration was slightly darker, although still an=
acceptable straw colour.

By modifying my processing schedule such that the samples stay in 3 parts=
plastic and 1 part propylene oxide overnight I can successfully process a=
sample however, I am a little unhappy with the short time the sample is in=
'resin only' the following day, ie out of 3;1 and into fresh plastic first=
thing in the morning, embedded and in the oven before I go home. With a=
lot of samples to embed at times trying to give the samples as long as=
possible in the 'resin only' makes the end of the day a bit tight for time=
.

The problem becoming particularly accute when using our Lynx Automatic=
Tissue processor. If using BDMA -at- twice the DMP-30 concentration I cannot=
leave the resin in the processer overnight as it is to tacky the next day.

My Question ??? (at last some may say)

1. How are others out there, who are using BDMA at twice the DMP-30=
concentration getting around the problem of the resin going very tacky=
overnight, during infiltration?

What sort of infiltration times do you use?


2. Are any of you using BDMA at twice the DMP-30 concentration in an=
automatic tissue processor?

3. Is any one else having problems with the resin if made up with BDMA at=
twice the DMP-30 concentration?



Thank you in anticipation.


Allan Mitchell
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
Otago Medical School










From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 1995 08:21:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Epoxy Resins: Accelerator?

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Dennis Shubitowski {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}

Dennis,

If you omit the accelerator, it would probably work well. We use
Epon-Araldite (Polyscience kit), and we routinely store the mixed resin
(Epon + Araldite + DDSA), without catalyst (DMP-30), in a 4 degree C
refrigerator. It will remain good for at least 6 months. When we are
ready to embed, we measure out whatever volume we want, add DMP-30 to
make 2%, mix, and it is fine. If you stored your nerve samples in 1:1
Epon (no accelerator):PO, and later decided to embed them, you could then
embed them by standard procedures with catalyzed resin. If you have any
questions about this, give me a call (763-1287), or drop over (2 blocks
away).

Kent

A. Kent Christensen
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
{akc-at-umich.edu}

----------------------------------------

On Thu, 2 Mar 1995, Dennis Shubitowski wrote:

} One of the divisions of our lab teases apart sural nerve tissue that have
} been kept in a 1:1 mixture of epon:propylene oxide. The samples are very
} easy to tease when the mixture is very fresh. The problem is that samples
} became back-logged and were not able to be teased right away. A quick
} decision had to be made, and the samples were frozen at -70C until they
} could be teased.
}
} The nerve fibers need to be infiltrated to be teased but not polymerized
} or else they become too fragile. A problem is becoming evident that after a
} long period of storage, the nerve samples are being fully infiltrated
} and polymerized despite being frozen (which we thought would almost stop
} the polymerization process because it is largely dependant on heat).
} Realizing that hind-sight is 20/20, would it have been better to leave the
} accelerator out of the epoxy mixture? What affect would this have on the
} quality of the resin? I understand accelerator to act as a catalyst being
} a part of the polymerization reaction but not really consumed. Any
} opinions to offer?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dennis
}
}
}
}
}




From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab)
Date: Fri, 03 Mar 1995 09:09:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Epoxy Resins: Accelerator?

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MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Cc: Dennis Shubitowski {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}
Message-id: {01HNOZPUD02Q93M845-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}
MIME-version: 1.0
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
Content-type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

In reference to Dennis Subitowksi's question about expoxt
accelerator, I can say that we routinely exclude the accelerator during
infiltration with Epon, Epon/Araldite mixture and Epon substitutes and add
it only to the second pure resin infiltration step. This allows long
infiltrations in earleir steps with difficult specimens. When we have
compared adding it to all steps, the results seem to be the same.
Hope that helps

*****ORIGNINAL MESSAGE BELOW********
} One of the divisions of our lab teases apart sural nerve tissue that have
} been kept in a 1:1 mixture of epon:propylene oxide. The samples are very
} easy to tease when the mixture is very fresh. The problem is that samples
} became back-logged and were not able to be teased right away. A quick
} decision had to be made, and the samples were frozen at -70C until they
} could be teased.
}
} The nerve fibers need to be infiltrated to be teased but not polymerized
} or else they become too fragile. A problem is becoming evident that after a
} long period of storage, the nerve samples are being fully infiltrated
} and polymerized despite being frozen (which we thought would almost stop
} the polymerization process because it is largely dependant on heat).
} Realizing that hind-sight is 20/20, would it have been better to leave the
} accelerator out of the epoxy mixture? What affect would this have on the
} quality of the resin? I understand accelerator to act as a catalyst being
} a part of the polymerization reaction but not really consumed. Any
} opinions to offer?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dennis
}
}
}
}
}
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 1995 12:28:33 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscopes for Sale

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Interested parties:

Due to renovations within the department, and the purchase of a confocal
microscope, we have 2 transmission EMs in excess of our needs that we
would like to move. Both microscopes are in good working condition, one
has been under a service contract until this past year (though lightly
used). The scopes:

1. Hitachi H-600 STEM (the one under service contract until recently)

2. Zeiss EM-9S TEM

We are not quite at a "No reasonable offer refused!" price level, but we
would like to see these scopes get some more use and we're eager to make
use of the space they are now occupying. So....if you are at all
interested, contact me and we can discuss the particulars and terms
of sale.

TIA,

Phil Rutledge
voice: (410) 455-3582
Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Fax: (410) 455-3875




From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 1995 10:40:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Epoxy Resins: Accelerator?

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Dennis Shubitowski {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}

We had a similar experience some years ago. Not with nerve, but with
other material. I can offer the following humble comments.

1. As you learned, resin does polymerize in even at freezing
temperatures. We have not tried -70 C and you did not specify how far
below freezing you stored your specimens. We did not test exactly why,
but reasoned that since the reaction is highly exothermic and since both
resin and tissue are good insulators, it is probable that local areas are
heated enough to allow polymerization. I look forward to any comments on
the errors in our reasoning, since this was only a guess to explain the
results.
2. Leaving out the accelerator does tremendously slow down the reaction,
but polymerization still occurs in absence of accelerator, and even in
the cold, so don't store for grossly extended times. To polymerize
infiltrate tissue with fresh resin containing accelerator (we use 2
changes, 4 hours each) after thawing tissue. This works well, although
some areas may have obvious interfaces between resins of different
hardness.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************

On Thu, 2 Mar 1995, Dennis Shubitowski wrote:

} One of the divisions of our lab teases apart sural nerve tissue that have
} been kept in a 1:1 mixture of epon:propylene oxide. The samples are very
} easy to tease when the mixture is very fresh. The problem is that samples
} became back-logged and were not able to be teased right away. A quick
} decision had to be made, and the samples were frozen at -70C until they
} could be teased.
}
} The nerve fibers need to be infiltrated to be teased but not polymerized
} or else they become too fragile. A problem is becoming evident that after a
} long period of storage, the nerve samples are being fully infiltrated
} and polymerized despite being frozen (which we thought would almost stop
} the polymerization process because it is largely dependant on heat).
} Realizing that hind-sight is 20/20, would it have been better to leave the
} accelerator out of the epoxy mixture? What affect would this have on the
} quality of the resin? I understand accelerator to act as a catalyst being
} a part of the polymerization reaction but not really consumed. Any
} opinions to offer?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dennis
}
}
}
}
}





From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Mar 1995 16:09:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Tissue processors

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From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Mar 1995 14:23:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Resins: BDMA vs DMP-30

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Richard-
Why not try infiltrating your samples overnight in 100% resin with the lower
concentration of BDMA, then swithching to a "short" infiltration with
fresh resin made with 2X concentration BDMA. then embedding in the higher
concentration of BDMA in fresh resin?
just a hunch.
-Mike




From: JOHNA-at-SCI.WFEB.EDU
Date: Fri, 03 Mar 1995 17:14:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: BDMA vs DMP-30

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I performed a similar set of experiments: BDMA vs DMP-30. Although it
infiltrated specimens adequately and although they sectioned fine;
dealing with changes of 100% plastic that were sooooo viscous was more than
I could tolerate. In spite of it's initial higher viscosity and shorter
shelf life, I switched back to using DMP-30 in our PolyBed 812 resin.
Doing changes of 100% plastic is no longer a headache and something to be
dreaded. If someone has a solution to the overnight BDMA-plastic blob
problem, I'd like to hear as well.

Cheers...........JohnA

___________________________________________________
| |
| John G. Aghajanian, Ph.D. |
| Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology |
| 222 Maple Avenue |
| Shrewsbury, MA 01545-2737 |
| |
| Tel: 508 842-8921 ext. 147, 161 |
| Fax: 598 842-9632 |
| JOHNA-at-sci.wfeb.edu |
| |
|_________________________________________________|





From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab Univers :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Mar 1995 22:48:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Fw: Electron Microscopes

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Dear EM Brothers & Sisters,

This message came to me and I have no good answers. Any comments will
be appreciated and I will forwrad to the questioners
=
=Greg,
=
=Tom Mareci suggested that you might be able to give us some technical
=advice on EM's to help us solve a temporary problem we're having.
=
=We're wanting to move our 4.7T magnet to a location in the ARB basement
=120' from Dr. Craig Tisher's EM facility, which has a Zeiss EM 10 SEM
=and a Topcon/International Scientific Instruments DS-130C TEM. The SEM
=specs {= 3 mG AC and {= 5 mG DC. The TEM specs {=6 mG AC. Dr. Tisher
=is reluctant to have us install our magnet, which with shileding is
=calculated to produce a DC magnetic field of about 17 mG in the EM room.
=Tom and I are having a hard time understanding the DC spec, in light of
=the earth's magnetic field being 100x greater than the 5 mG spec.
=We are also finding it difficult to get good scientifically sound
=answers from the EM manufacturers (at least that we NMR people can
=understand!). Could you enlighten us?
=
=Our main questions are: Will our DC field of 17 mG really pose a problem
=for the EM's? If so, how can it be remedied? How much will it cost?
=How are these systems currently shielded/compensated for the earth's
=magnetic field? (My guess is that at most, a quick realignment of a
=passive shield will be all that's required, if there's an observable
=effect.)
=
=Secondarily, since before and after image quality may be the best bottom-
=line test of the effect (if any) of our magnet, what standard samples can
=you recommend for these Q.C. checks?
=
=Thanks for your advice and comments.
=
=-Richard Briggs
=
=tel: 395-0680 ext 54279 (55-4279)
=FAX: 395-0279
=pager: Shands # 3497
=e-mail: rbriggs-at-ufnmr.health.ufl.edu
=
=P.S.: You may not remember, but I met you at Tom's Christmas party.
=
******************************************************
* Greg Erdos ** *
* Director, ICBR EMCL ** Phone 904-392-1295 *
* 218 Carr Hall ** FAX 904-846-0251 *
* University of Florida ** gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 ** *
******************************************************************




From: images1-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Michael Stanley)
Date: Sat, 4 Mar 1995 12:15:37 -0600
Subject: sheep ovary

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Hello All,
I have a user that is attempting double-label fluroescence for
protein localization in sheep ovaries. The ovaries seem to auto-fluoresce
very strongly in the FITC channel with some signal in the Rhodamine as
well. They have talked to other researchers who have not seen this
problem. The tissue is fixed in Carnoy's and paraffin embedded.
Has anyone seen or heard of this particular tissue lighting up like
a Christmas Tree?
TIA,

C. Michael Stanley, Ph.D.
Coordinator, Associate Director
Molecular Cytology Core Facility
Molecular Biology Program
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri-Columbia
Columbia, MO. 65211
(314) 882-4895
fax= 314-882-0123






From: xin yang li :      xl48-at-uow.edu.au
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 1995 22:14:58 +1000 (EST)
Subject: subscribe

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Hi, everyone there.

I have changed my e-mail address because the up date of the system here. I'd
like to keep subscribing information from you.

My old address:g9177248-at-wumpus.cc.uow.edu.au

My new address:xl48-at-wumpus.cc.uow.edu.au

Thanks

Xinyang Li




From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 1995 14:39:46 -0500
Subject: Materials Microscopy

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In response to my invitation for a free subscription to Materials Microscopy
(posted on Feb. 24), we have been receiving a large number of requests and
inquiries on a daily basis via e-mail and FAX. We will try to process all
your subscription requests prior to the circulation of our next issue. Due
to the high volume of mail we have received, I cannot respond to your
inquiries individually. However, I have tried to summarize, itemize, and
respond to your most frequently asked questions as follows:
a. Materials Microscopy is published and circulated at no cost among the
materials microscopy community members by Promotech Associates, Inc.
b. Our publication is mainly concerned with providing articles and material
of interest to working materials microscopist. We would appreciate your
contribution which meets this requirement. Further information in this
regard can be obtained by contacting our technical editor, Dr. Patricia Labun
(a materials microscopist).
c. I will send a copy of our "rate sheet" to those of you who expressed
interest in placing ads or promotional material. Please feel free to contact
me if you require any additional info.
Thank you all for your interest in Materials Microscopy.

Rene E. Nicholas
Circulation/Sales Manager

Materials Microscopy
P.O. Box 2014
Scottsdale, AZ 85252

TEL (602) 947-7603
FAX (602) 947-7615
MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com




From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Sun, 5 Mar 1995 15:52:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Resins: BDMA vs DMP-30

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MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

I'm wondering if the possible advantages of BDMA (lower viscosity,
longer shelf life) are worth all this. I'm still using a 1989 Polysciences
Epon-Araldite kit (with DMP-30) that still gives excellent results with
standard procedures.

A. Kent Christensen
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
{akc-at-umich.edu}




From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 08:25:18 +0100 (MET)
Subject: fixation of testes

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Hi Barbara!
I tried to no avail to send you the present message at your email
address: it stubbornly bounced back, so I eventually post it to the
microscopy list.
I apologize to the members of this list if they should feel this is
wasting bandwidth: just delete and go on to the next message ;-)

Barbara!
I am afraid I did not make my question clear enough ;-)
What I wanted to know was:
1) the testes you wish to fix are from what species ?

2) for what kind of microscopy are they to be processed ? I.e.
T.E.M., S.E.M., or light microscopy ?

3) What's the embedding medium?

4) in the case of light microscopy, do you contemplate using some special
technique (besides for recognizing the different stages of the
seminiferous epithelium) which would require that some specific
chemical would be either required or, on the contrary, avoided?

In my personal experience with rat testes and light microscopy (this
is rather very long ago: more than 30 years! :-( ), Bouin and other
picric acid containing variations thereof are not optimal fixatives
for preservation of the acrosomial apparatus of spermatids, which is
one of the features used by most classification methods (Clermont's
among others...).
The best fixatives for light microscopy of paraffin embedded tissue
are those containing potassium dichromate such as, for example,
Helly's fluid (Zenker + formaldehyde), but they also are followed, after
rinsing and dehydration, by shrinkage which is still more important than
that observed after Bouin's or Bouin-Hollande's (somewhat better) fluids.

BTW, what's wrong with picric acid? It is always shipped in 'moist
condition' in order to minimize hazards. I work in our lab since 1953,
with Bouin, Bouin-Allen, Bouin-Hollande, Dubosq-Brazil etc., every day,
and we never experienced any problem. We store the picric acid for our
needs in the form of a saturated aqueous solution which keeps for as long
as you will. This stock solution is then used for preparing all picric
acid containing fixatives.

There is no point in trying to eliminate the picric acid from the fixed
pieces of tissue before sectioning. If the presence of picric acid in the
slides should hamper subsequent staining (a rare occurrence, btw), then
the easiest and expeditious way to get rid of it is to pretend your tissue
was fixed with a sublimate containing fluid: at the rehydration step, your
slides should undergo treatment by alcoholic iodine (or lugol solution) and
sodium thiosulfate in the usual way and 'voila': no more picric acid on the
slides within 2 minutes!
Under no circumstances should the pieces of tissue fixed with a picric
acid containing fixative undergo rinsing in water! This is sheer heresy ;-)
because it induces a lot of swelling in the tissue before shrinking even
more during dehydration (I never found out which histologist ever advocated
such method, but I know quite a number of renowned ones who firmly condemned
it, and with good reason). If you insist on rinsing the pieces of testes after
fixation, then merely increasing the number of steps through 90pc x alcohol should
do the trick; you may even add a thin layer (1-2 mm thick) of lithium
carbonate on the bottom of the alcohol containing flasks: this helps
dissolving part of the picric acid away.

Possibly the method which should yield the best pictures has been documented
in a book entitled 'Histological and histopathological Evaluation of the
Testis', by Russell,Ettlin, Sinha Hikim and Clegg: Cache River Press 1990,
(15777 Bolesta, Box 129, Clearwater, Fl 34620): ISBN 09627422-0-1.

At the end of the book, there is an appendix about the materials and methods
which you might find useful (although perfusion fixation of rat testes is
among the most frustrating experiences I ever had, even with a lot of
heparin ). This would also require embedding in epoxy resin and making large
semi-thin sections, which I don't know whether you are prepared to do ;).
Glutaraldehyde certainly seems to me the best choice, but then paraffin
embedding would be ruled out (too hard and too brittle after paraffin
embedding).
HTH, and good luck.
Let me know about the outcome (good, I hope)
John



***********************************************************
* Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
* Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
* Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
* e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
* snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
* B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
***********************************************************





From: Marcel.Paques-at-2488PAS.urlnl.sprint.com
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 04:42:00 -0500
Subject: freeze fracture

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X400-Received: by mta merit in /PRMD=internet/ADMD=telemail/C=us/; Relayed; Mon, 6 Mar 1995 04:53:08 -0500
X400-Received: by /ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Mon, 6 Mar 1995 04:38:08 -0500
X400-Received: by /PRMD=SMXFL2/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Mon, 6 Mar 1995 04:42:47 -0500
X400-Received: by /PRMD=LANGATE/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=GB/; Relayed; Mon, 6 Mar 1995 04:42:00 -0500

Cressington makes an excellent freeze fracture machine. Suitable for
routine work and high resolution shadowing at very low temperatures.
In particular the reproducibility, even of W/Ta, is very good, and
attainable for everyone (user friendly).

The address is:
Dr Peter A Walley
CRESSINGTON Scientific Instruments Ltd
24 Chalk Hill Watford Herts WD1 4BX UK
Tel 0923 220499
Fax 0923 816646

Success

Marcel Paques
Unilever Research Laboratory Vlaardingen
The Netherlands
E-mail: Marcel.Paques-at-2488PAS.URLNL.Sprint.Com





From: Kevin H Jennings :      Kevin_H_Jennings%notes-at-sb.com
Date: 6 Mar 95 13:28:00 ES
Subject: freeze-fracture

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Message-Id: {9503061636.AA1118-at-pho018.sb.com}
To: Microscopy {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}

Further to the comments made concerning Cressington - they also have a US
distributor:

Alan Berginc
Cressington Scientific Instruments
508 Thomson Drive
Cranberry TWP
Pittsburgh
PA16066-6425

Tel: 412-772-0220
Fax: 412-772-0219

We use a Cressington CFE- 50B which has proved excellent for reproducible
rotary low-angle shadowing of peptides. The system is also very flexible for
both W/Ta and Pt/C operation and is easily re-configured for a variety of
research applications.


Kevin Jennings
SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals UK
Microscopy & Flow Cytometry Section
The Frythe
Welwyn
Hertfordshire
AL6 9AR
United kingdom

e-mail Kevin_H_Jennings%Notes-at-SB.com





From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 09:22:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: TISSUE PROCESSORS

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Dear biological TEM'ers,

I am in the info gathering stage of purschasing a tissue processor for
EM samples. I have info on the Reichert-Lynx unit and the one made by RMC.
How do you like these units? Comments on advantages and disadvantages are
welcome.
I also have brouchers on a unit made by Sakura Finetek USA, Inc..
The phone number I called is no longer in working order.(213-539-5441)
Is this company still around? These brouchers are probably from the early 80's.
Are the any other companys that made tissue processors?

Thanks in advance

Ed Calomeni
Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, OH

emlab-at-opus.mco.edu

PS Sorry about the post on last friday with no message in the body. Computers
can be such good friends.




From: Christine Powers :      cp-at-insitu.ummed.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 10:08:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM-Cell culture monolayers

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I recently read W. L. Steffens comments regarding the use of Leighton
tubes for embedding cell cultures. Has anyone embedded the coverslips from
these tubes in LRWhite resin? I've been having trouble getting consistent
polymerization of monolayers on other coverslips (eg Thermanox) and am in
search of a new method for obtaining "en face" sections of monolayers for
immunocytochemistry. TIA for any hints on the topic.

Christine Powers
Dept. of Cell Biology
University of Massachusetts Medical Center
Worcester, MA 01655




From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 10:06:02 EST
Subject: Tissue Processors

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Ed,
I can comment on the Lynx tissue processor which we have been using
since it first came out, about 8 years ago. The Lynx is made in
Australia, and was originally distributed in this country by Fairleigh-
Dickinson Laboratories until the distributorship was snatched up by
Reichert (now Leica). We paid about 5.5K for the unit and have had little
trouble with it aside from a blown power supply (they have upgraded this)
and a defective exhaust fan (we fixed this). We use it routinely for
processing TEM (epon and L.R. White) and SEM (through dehydration). It
works very well is quite consistent.
My only complaint involves the expendables for it...vials, caps,
baskets, etc. Originally, it was economical to use them once and dispose
of them as is intended. Once Leica became the distributor, the price of
the expendable essentially tripled...some things quadrupled. As a result,
we clean and recycle these components for as long as we can.
Additionally, the quality control of these items has suffered immensely.
There are now occasional vials that are distorted and won't fit the
turntable, and lids and baskets with burrs that must be filed.
If you can accept this, I still think that for the money (nearly 9K by
now?) its the best one out there. Good Luck.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Beth Trend :      trend-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 11:07:06 -0600
Subject: TEM: JEOL100CX for sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have a JEOL 100CX scanning transmission electron microscope that we no=
longer
need because of more recent acquisitions. It was maintained continuously=
during
operation here and was in perfect working condition before we turned it o=
ff in =

July, 1994. =


This is a conventional scanning transmission electron microscope with =

resolutions of 3.4 =81 TEM.

It has specimen holders for heating-cooling, double tilt (tilt range is =B1=
45=A1), =

or rotation. =

We would be deligted to entertain offers for it.

Please contact Beth Trend if you are interested.




______________________________________________***************************=
*******
Beth Trend trend-at-cems.umn.edu or btrend-at-maroon.tc.=
umn.edu
Coordinator, Characterization Facility University of Minnesota
Center for Interfacial Engineering =

100 Union St SE Room 187 phone 612-624-1365 fax 612-626-7530=

Minneapolis, MN 55455 =






From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 12:13:29 -0600
Subject: BDMA vs DMP-30 summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In July and September of 1994, there was some disciussion of BDMA vs. DMP-30. I
saved and consolidated 13 of those messages into a single document. If anyone is
interested in getting a copy, send me your e-mail address and I will zip one out
to you within a day or two.

--

Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu

"MICROSCOPY & MICROANALYSIS 96" in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Aug.11-15, 1996





From: Alec Madsen :      alecm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 10:48:35 -0800 (PST)
Subject: PC diffraction programs

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X-Sender: alecm-at-homer11.u.washington.edu

Folks,
I'm aware of several programs for the Mac that simulate
diffraction patterns and stereographic projections, etc. How about
similar programs for the PC? Thanks in advance.

Alec Madsen
alecm-at-u.washington.edu
Seattle, Wa




From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 15:21:18 -0500
Subject: Wall Street Journal: Thermo buys Fisons

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Message-Id: {199503062018.PAA14966-at-totalrecall.rs.itd.umich.edu}

Well it may not sopund exciting to microscopists until you note that it
tranlates into
Noran's parent company buys Kevex's parent company!
March 3rd issue of Wall Street Journal. Thermo Instrument Systems to
acquire Fisons PLC's scientific instrument division. Cost $320million!
Anyone know whether this covers VG too?

Just thought you guys might like to know.

--
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu, John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
or jfmjfm-at-umich.edu they all reach me!
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 14:38:46 -0600 (CST)
Subject: PC Programs for Diffraction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There are at least 1 or 2 old diffraction programs
for the PC in the EMMPDL library. You may access
it by Anonymous FTP at:

WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV

Username=Anonymous
Password=Your Email Address..


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.............




From: John Phelps :      phelps-at-ENH.NIST.GOV
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 14:37:36 -0700 (MST)
Subject: terminal emulators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,
I know this is a little of the subject, but can anyone suggest a ftp site
that has terminal emulators. We need to emulate a tektronics 4205 terminal
to use our new xrd software. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

thanks,
John

John Phelps
NIST - Boulder, CO
303-497-7570




From: Fred Hayes :      fahayes-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 13:34:13 -0800 (PST)
Subject: used equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for the following pieces of used equipment either in good
working order, fair condition and/or in need of minor repair:

1) glass knife breaker for LM microtomy
2) embedding oven (35-80C)
3) balance (top loading or mechanical)

Contact:

Fred A. Hayes 916-752-7712 work
University of California,Davis 916-752-4701 work
School of Medicine
Department ofMedical Pathology; EM Lab
MSIA E-mail:
Davis, CA 95616 fahayes-at-ucdavis.edu

1320 Dogwood Court 916-678-6280 home
Dixon, CA 95620-3227







From: John Phelps :      phelps-at-ENH.NIST.GOV
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 15:44:30 -0700 (MST)
Subject: terminal emulators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I know this is a little off the subject, but can anyone suggest a ftp site
that has terminal emulators. We need to emulate a tektronics 4205 terminal
to use our new xrd software. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

thanks,
John

John Phelps
NIST - Boulder, CO
303-497-7570




From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab)
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 10:30:32 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: obj. lens 100C replacement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Microscopy Mail {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
Message-id: {01HNT9F975CY93NYWI-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}
MIME-version: 1.0
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
Content-type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

At 08:26 AM 3/3/95 +0100, NICK SCHRYVERS wrote:
} REGARDING obj. lens 100C replacement
}
} The objective lens and the upper and lower column parts of our 20 year old
} side entry JEOL 100 C microscope need replacement. New parts, however, are
} rather expensive in view of the age of the instrument so we're looking for
} anyone who has some second hand spare parts for sale. Sincerely,
} Nick Schryvers tel: 32-3-2180247 fax: 32-3-2180257
} EMAT, University of Antwerp
} Groenenborgerlaan 171
} B-2020 ANTWERP
} Belgium
**********************************************************
There is a JEOL 100 C that may be headed for the scrap heap. They
might be willing to give you parts. Contact Dr. Henry Aldrich, P.O. Box
110700, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA FAX 904-392-5922
(no e-mail) or his department chairman, Edward Hoffmann, at the same
address and FAX number who gets E-mail at EMH-at-GNV.IFAS.UFL.EDU


Good Luck
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: HUANGY-at-PHYAST.LA.ASU.EDU
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 17:15:27 -0700 (MST)
Subject: change address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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please change my address to yi_huang-at-qmgate.anl.gov. I'd like to continue the
subscription at the new address. Thank you.
Yi Huang
Argonne National Lab
building 212/c221
building 212/c221




From: mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu (Michael Dunlap)
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 16:57:54 -0800
Subject: RE:Thermo buys Fisons

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X-Sender: szmdunla-at-bullwinkle.ucdavis.edu
Message-Id: {ab815e0000021004c2be-at-[128.120.187.4]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

John-

All instruments divisions of fisons are going to Thermo Instrument Systems
including VG.

Just what we all needed. I sure service and parts are going to be even
easier to get.

Mike

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Michael Dunlap | lab (916) 752-0284 |
| Facility For Advanced Instrumentation | fax (510) 422-2282 |
| University of California | mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu |
| Davis CA, 95616 | |
===========================================================================






From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 10:46:32 EST
Subject: TEM of Cell Culture

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To Christine Powers,

We have successfully used LR White resin for embedment of monolayers
grown in Leighton tubes. The problems encountered were the same ones you
encounter when using LR White in open molds or silicone rubber molds, or
just about anything other than gelatin capsules. It's most convenient to
embed coverslips in flat, open molds such as the silicone rubber type. We
had such problems with this (ie excluding oxygen, penetration of the molds
by the resin, etc) that we began embedding the coverslips standing upright
in gelatin capsules. The long narrow coverslips of the Leighton tubes are
just accommodated by a 00 gelatin capsule. This neccessitates
considerably more hand trimming to get to the monolayer profile, but
embedding problems are eliminated.
I might also add, that once the block face is prepared for cutting,
the exposed coverslip may be peeled away from the embedded cells, greatly
facilitating cutting. If you do this, I would also recommend mounting the
sections on a support filmed grid, as the cells will be on the edge of the
section.
Good Luck!

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Software department :      software-at-oimag.win-uk.net
Date: Mon, 06 Mar 1995 17:46:23
Subject: Job Opportunities/Microanalysis Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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X-Mailer: WinNET Mail, v2.30
Message-ID: {463-at-oimag.win-uk.net}
Reply-To: Software department {software-at-oimag.win-uk.net}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

The following advertisement has recently been placed in the press
and may be of interest to those who read this Newsgroup who would
like to work in the UK:

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT FOR MICROANALYSIS
The Software team at Oxford Instruments Microanalysis Group develop
high quality instrumentation products to satisfy customers in an
international marketplace. Currently we have a number of vacancies
for individuals who would enjoy the challenge of solving complex
problems to generate leading edge products. If you are competent in
Visual Basic, C++ or C, have a basic understanding of electronics and
computer interfacing and feel you could make a strong contribution in
any or all of the following areas please contact us:

Practical applications experience using an SEM or microprobe.
Knowledge of x-ray microanalysis and familiarity with operation of WD spectrometers.
Experience in project management and identifying the "voice of the customer".
Practical use of applied mathematics, numerical methods, chemometrics.
Experience with real time control and hardware automation.

Successful applicants will receive an attractive benefits package
and salary commensurate with capability.

Please send a copy of your CV, and a telephone contact number to

Peter Statham ,
Oxford Instruments Microanalysis Group
Halifax Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HP12 3SE England
Telephone (01494) 442255 Fax (01494) 461033
email: software-at-oimag.win-uk.net


-----------------------------------------------------------------
Please reply to this e-mail with the name of the person you
wish to recieve it in the subject (i.e. FAO John Smith), as this is
a shared e-mail address.





From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 1995 14:41:40 -0500
Subject: Job Posting

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X-Sender: jfmjfm-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu
Message-Id: {ab811569160210033ef2-at-[141.212.196.13]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The following is a copy of the job posting that recently appeared on the
University of Michigan Gopher Server UM GopherBlue.

The full URL is:
gopher://gopher.itd.umich.edu:8888/00/acadaff/hris/gopher/Job%20Postings/Pro
fessional%5CAdministrative/-at-39-at-RES%20ASSOC%20II%20ENGR%20%28Materials%20Scie
nce%20%26%20Engineering%29


Job Title: RES ASSOC II ENGR Grade: 09 Min/Max $ 25,500/ 64,500
Posting Number: T-95-0826-LM Materials Science & Engineering
Open Date: 03/06/1995 Close Date: 03/10/1995
Jobclass: 12871 Hours: 40.00

DUTIES:
Operate and train users in the use of the lab instruments: a JEOL
200FX Analytical Electron Microscope, a JOEL 4000EX High Resolution
electron Microscope, a Philips EM420 Transmission Electron Microscope,
an ElectroScan E3 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope, a
Digital Instruments Scanning Force Microscope, a PHI 5400 X-ray
Photoelectron Spectrometer and a PHI 600 Scanning Auger Microprobe;
the successful candidate will not necessarily need to be proficient in
the use of all instruments specified, but familiarity with at least
four is essential; other duties include: aiding users with reduction
and analysis of data recorded on lab instruments; aiding users with
sample preparation equipment and preparing samples; help other lab
staff maintain lab equipment; maintain lab darkroom and supplies; take
part in collaborative projects with other members of the University;
develop personal research projects as time permits.

DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:
Knowledge of Analytical Electron Microscopy, Scanning Transmission
Electron Microscopy and High Resolution Electron Microscopy; TEM
expertise should include detailed understanding of diffraction
contract, defect imaging, selected area diffraction, high resolution
imaging, high resolution image simulation and analysis; experience
with computer programming in FORTRAN, C or Pascal.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Master's degree or equivalent in a scientific related field;
demonstrated prior related work experience; familiarity with computer
systems such as Apple Macintoshes, PCs and/or UNIX workstations;
working knowledge of general transmission electron microscopy and
scanning electron microscopy; experience with standard data analysis
for analytical techniques such as X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy
(XEDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and micro
diffraction; good interpersonal skills.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Present Applications For This Position To The Following Office:

Ann Arbor Campus Employment Services Office
Room G250 Wolverine Tower
3003 South State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48l09

(313) 764-6580

8 AM to 5 PM, Monday - Friday



John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu, John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
or jfmjfm-at-umich.edu they all reach me!
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html






From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 11:00:54 +0100 (MET)
Subject: testis fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Barbara!
I am afraid that, under the conditions you describe for fixation,
significant shrinkage should be unavoidable whatever fixative
would be used.
I already mentioned that picric acid 'per se' in the fixing fluid
does not ensure adequate preservation of acrosomial structure which
is required for easy classification of spermatids (and thus of
stages of the seminiferous epithelium.)
What should be avoided in any case is the presence of acids usually
part of most recipes for fixatives, such as acetic acid and the like.
If you use '10 percent formalin', you may experience some problems
because you in fact never know the actual composition of such
solution: it polymerizes on the shelf and becomes also quite acidic!
You should prepare a solution of phosphate buffered (pH 7.2) 4 percent
formaldehyde from paraformaldehyde powder on the same day (or the
previous one) that you are sacrificing the animals (you should find
recipes for making such solution in any practical handbook for
microscopical technique ;-)).

Fixation through immersion of the testes in the fixative may be
almost acceptable for mice testes because they are small; this won't
be the case for other species, even for the rat. You may try to make
small (with caution!) incisions in the albuginea with a very sharp
razor blade when the testes have stayed for at least an hour in the
fixative, in order to improve penetration of the formaldehyde.
Another trick to improve diffusion and fixation is to add from 0.5 to
1.0 percent (in volume) of DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) to the fixing
fluid (best is to combine both...)

BUT,LAST and PROBABLY _MOST_ IMPORTANT: you should realize that
formaldehyde fixation, i.e. crosslinking, proceeds exceedingly
slowly! Therefore, tissues should stay in the fixative at least
two weeks (one year or more won't harm!) before being further
processed (two weeks probably is a conservative estimate). Assessment
of pathological tissues fixed for only a few hours in NBF may
frequently be required for practical reasons, but don't expect such
methods to result in nice preservation of testis tissue, especially
if you need estimating quality of spermatogenesis!

You also may try to enhance fixation - and shorten the duration
required for fixation - by performing it in the microwave oven: several
cycles of no more than one minute at a time (perhaps 10 times, tissue
temperatures exceeding 50 degrees celsius should be avoided), if
you are indeed in a hurry and can't wait several weeks for
fixation to proceed at its usual pace. If you try this, don't forget
to place a water load (a becher container with about 750-1000 ml
of water) besides your fixative containing flask in the oven.

That's all what I can think of. HTH
Good luck
John


***********************************************************
* Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
* Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
* Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
* e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
* snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
* B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
***********************************************************




From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab)
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 1995 09:38:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: JEOL 100 C parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Regarding the following message:

I was unable to reach Nick Schryvers at his E-mail address therefore
my reply is below. Perhaps others will be interested:

Nick writes:
} } } The objective lens and the upper and lower column parts of our 20 year old
} } } side entry JEOL 100 C microscope need replacement. New parts, however, are
} } } rather expensive in view of the age of the instrument so we're looking for
} } } anyone who has some second hand spare parts for sale. Sincerely,
} } } Nick Schryvers tel: 32-3-2180247 fax: 32-3-2180257
} } } EMAT, University of Antwerp
} } } Groenenborgerlaan 171
} } } B-2020 ANTWERP
} } } Belgium
} } **********************************************************

} } My reply:

There is a JEOL 100 C that may be headed for the scrap heap. They
} } might be willing to give you parts. Contact Dr. Henry Aldrich, P.O. Box
} } 110700, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA FAX 904-392-5922
} } (no e-mail) or his department chairman, Edward Hoffmann, at the same
} } address and FAX number who gets E-mail at EMH-at-GNV.IFAS.UFL.EDU
} }
} }
} } Good Luck
} } -at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
} } Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
} } Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
} } 218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
} } University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
} } Gainesville, FL 32611
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 10:38:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: testis fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I concur with Dr. Desclin's suggestions- however, I would add that pH and
osmolarity of your solutions is easy to do, and can be helpful.
Perfusion fixation of the testis is also a possibility. Those are my
humble additions-


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************

On Tue, 7 Mar 1995, Desclin Jean wrote:

}
}
} Hello Barbara!
} I am afraid that, under the conditions you describe for fixation,
} significant shrinkage should be unavoidable whatever fixative
} would be used.
} I already mentioned that picric acid 'per se' in the fixing fluid
} does not ensure adequate preservation of acrosomial structure which
} is required for easy classification of spermatids (and thus of
} stages of the seminiferous epithelium.)
} What should be avoided in any case is the presence of acids usually
} part of most recipes for fixatives, such as acetic acid and the like.
} If you use '10 percent formalin', you may experience some problems
} because you in fact never know the actual composition of such
} solution: it polymerizes on the shelf and becomes also quite acidic!
} You should prepare a solution of phosphate buffered (pH 7.2) 4 percent
} formaldehyde from paraformaldehyde powder on the same day (or the
} previous one) that you are sacrificing the animals (you should find
} recipes for making such solution in any practical handbook for
} microscopical technique ;-)).
}
} Fixation through immersion of the testes in the fixative may be
} almost acceptable for mice testes because they are small; this won't
} be the case for other species, even for the rat. You may try to make
} small (with caution!) incisions in the albuginea with a very sharp
} razor blade when the testes have stayed for at least an hour in the
} fixative, in order to improve penetration of the formaldehyde.
} Another trick to improve diffusion and fixation is to add from 0.5 to
} 1.0 percent (in volume) of DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) to the fixing
} fluid (best is to combine both...)
}
} BUT,LAST and PROBABLY _MOST_ IMPORTANT: you should realize that
} formaldehyde fixation, i.e. crosslinking, proceeds exceedingly
} slowly! Therefore, tissues should stay in the fixative at least
} two weeks (one year or more won't harm!) before being further
} processed (two weeks probably is a conservative estimate). Assessment
} of pathological tissues fixed for only a few hours in NBF may
} frequently be required for practical reasons, but don't expect such
} methods to result in nice preservation of testis tissue, especially
} if you need estimating quality of spermatogenesis!
}
} You also may try to enhance fixation - and shorten the duration
} required for fixation - by performing it in the microwave oven: several
} cycles of no more than one minute at a time (perhaps 10 times, tissue
} temperatures exceeding 50 degrees celsius should be avoided), if
} you are indeed in a hurry and can't wait several weeks for
} fixation to proceed at its usual pace. If you try this, don't forget
} to place a water load (a becher container with about 750-1000 ml
} of water) besides your fixative containing flask in the oven.
}
} That's all what I can think of. HTH
} Good luck
} John
}
}
} ***********************************************************
} * Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
} * Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
} * Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
} * e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
} * snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
} * B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
} ***********************************************************
}




From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 11:12:26 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Epoxy Resins: Accelerator?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dennis Shubitowski {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}
In-Reply-To: {Pine.3.03.9503021552.B11478-b100000-at-odin}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.89.9503071104.A27101-0100000-at-ecom3.ecn.bgu.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII



On Thu, 2 Mar 1995, Dennis Shubitowski wrote:

} One of the divisions of our lab teases apart sural nerve tissue that have
} been kept in a 1:1 mixture of epon:propylene oxide. The samples are very
} easy to tease when the mixture is very fresh. The problem is that samples
} became back-logged and were not able to be teased right away. A quick
} decision had to be made, and the samples were frozen at -70C until they
} could be teased.
}
} The nerve fibers need to be infiltrated to be teased but not polymerized
} or else they become too fragile. A problem is becoming evident that after a
} long period of storage, the nerve samples are being fully infiltrated
} and polymerized despite being frozen (which we thought would almost stop
} the polymerization process because it is largely dependant on heat).
} Realizing that hind-sight is 20/20, would it have been better to leave the
} accelerator out of the epoxy mixture? What affect would this have on the
} quality of the resin? I understand accelerator to act as a catalyst being
} a part of the polymerization reaction but not really consumed. Any
} opinions to offer?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dennis
}
Why do you store the fibers in resin? Isn't teasing them very messy? I
teased sural nerve fibers when
working for a neuropathologist. I fixed them and stored in buffer.
Also I sometimes used collagenase, which made the teasing easier. } } }
}




From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 09:20:30 PDT
Subject: Re: Image Analysis Systems

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950307092030.384-at-vanlab.paprican.ca}
To: "Griffin, Robin" {rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu} , microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Hello,
I have information on an "Imagist" image analysis system from
Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) which seems to be finding quite a bit of
popularity. I have come across it several times in speaking to users
during my hunt for an EDX system.
Imagist runs on a sparc station.
PGT in New Jersey, USA , can be reached at (609) 924-7310.

I have not used this system I have only seen it in use at the university
here.
Goodluck,
Laurie


On 1 Mar, 1995 Robin Griffin wrote:
}
} I'm interested in finding out what the most commonly used image
analysis
} systems for light microscopy, materials applications. I am aware of
} home-built, Beuler, Leco, and Kontron/Ibas. What else is out there
and what
} is used most in both University and industrial settings?
}
} Thanks for your help.
}
}

______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab)
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 1995 14:21:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Negative scanner

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We are considering purchasing a scanner for TEM negatives.

1. Is this a good idea?

2. Is there a consensus on which one to buy?

Any and all input appreciated.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: meh-at-aretha.jax.org (Margaret Hogan)
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 1995 15:38:40 -0500
Subject: job openning

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Histology - Biomedical Technologist/ Senior Biomedical Technologist

A regular full time position is open in The Jackson Laboratory Biological
Imaging Department - Histology Laboratory. The Jackson Laboratory is a
non-profit independent laboratory founded in 1929 on the premise that the
causes of cancer and other diseases could be discovered through
Mammalian genetic research. The Laboratory specializes in mammalian
genetics using inbred laboratory mice as model systems to study health
problems such as cancer diabetes, anemia, heart disease and aging.
Located on a large island in the gulf of Maine and surrounded by Acadia
National Park, The Jackson Laboratory is currently undergoing a major
expansion of its scientific staff and its research facilities.

Applicants with a Bachelors degree and two years related
laboratory experience working with Murine specimens preferred. The
position includes routine histological techniques ie paraffin embedding,
single and serial sectioning and cryotomy in conjunction with
Immunohistochemistry techniques, staining using heavy metals as well as
other special stains.

The successful candidate must be a self starter, pay attention to detail
and be able to work independently with little supervision.
This individual will be responsible for providing services in support of
numerous diverse research projects, must interact well with multiple
users and work productively in a team environment. The position includes
opportunities for advancement.

Salary range is mid to high $20,000 plus benefits and is negotiable
depending on level of experience.

Interested applicants should send CV to:

Joanne Bradt
Employment Specialist
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main Street
Bar Harbor Maine 04609
(207) 288-3371 ext. 1281
(207) 288-3371 ext. 1082 FAX
jcb-at-aretha.jax.org





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Mar 1995 16:08:09 EST
Subject: Re: Negative scanner

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Dear Greg,
There are at least two types of scanner to consider depending on your
application. For scanning images of the usual type with many gray levels, a
CCD array will give excellent results and is very fast; however, for quantita-
ting ED patterns, nothing beats a scanner with a small illuminating spot. The
problem with a CCD array for ED is that the highest intensities are in areas
with very low transmission surrounded by areas with high transmission, so in-
ternal reflections in the CCD lens, etc. will give erronious values for the
intensities. Any of the high-resolution CCD arrays will work for images, since
the changes in contrast are not so abrupt. Perkin-Elmer and Optronics are two
names for small-illuminating-spot scanners, and doubtless there are others.
We had an Eikonix (linear CCD array) at one time, but were not happy with it.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Richard E. Edelmann :      EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 16:42:53 -500
Subject: Polaroid Films

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Here's a little information that I just received from polaroid
that should be of interest to the microscopy community. I'd be
interested in hearing any comments anyone (particularly any Polaroid
reps.) might care to share with the BBS.

Recently we have been noticing that the type 55 film we are
purchasing was arriving with a relatively short period before
expiration. We were questioning if our supplier might have trying to
unload older film on us. So I just called up Polaroid an asked them
what their lead time from manufacture to expiration date was, and I
was informed that for type 55 and type 665 (B&W P/N film) the
expiration lead time is only 9 months.

If you allow say 2-5 months from manufacture to shipping to
distributors to shipping to users (which seems very reasonable for
such commercial retail) this leaves only 4-7 months before
expiration! This short of an expiration date does not lend itself at
all to buying in larger quantities in order to obtain any sort of a
price break.

I do not know how much extension can be obtained by storage at say
4 C (May be someone out there does know). But we seem to start
having problems with film only a couple of months after the
expiration date even after cold storage for a few months.

You might want to consider this short time to expiration before
you go and stock up on polaroid film.


Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: John E. Johnson, Jr. :      76055.2216-at-compuserve.com
Date: 07 Mar 95 17:05:15 EST
Subject: Referees for Microscopy Research and Technique

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Although the journal Microscopy Research and Technique has a large editorial
board, we cannot cover every research area that involves microscopy. Therefore,
I would like to invite those of you who are interested in serving as ad hoc
referees for articles submitted to the journal to send, by e-mail, your name,
mailing (regular mail) address, phone number, fax number, and research interests
using key words such as biology, materials science, pathology, microanalysis,
stereology, magnetic domain, ceramics, immunocytochemistry, kidney, etc.

John E. Johnson, Jr., Ph.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Microscopy Research and Technique






From: gwerdos
Date: Tuesday, March 07, 1995 2:21PM
Subject: Negative scanner

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We are considering purchasing a scanner for TEM negatives.

1. Is this a good idea?

2. Is there a consensus on which one to buy?

Any and all input appreciated.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: charlesworth.jon-at-mayo.EDU (Jon Charlesworth)
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 1995 16:10:54 +0200
Subject: Tissue Processors

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Ed,
We have had 3 different tissue processors in the past 6 years, 3
LKB's, one Lynx, and 3 RMC's model 4189. LKB no longer manufactures a
system so I will forego 'ripping' their machine. We purchased a Lynx
system about four years ago. We found the same problem that W.L. Steffens
had with the QC of the expendibles. We lost tissue due to improper sealing
of the specimen chambers. Also the side 'openings' are relatively large
and we therefore do not run tissue smaller than 0.5 mm3 in these holders.
Extreme care must be used when removing tissue from the holders because
tissue has a tendency to adhere to the lid of the holder making it possible
to mix tissues when using the multiwell chambers. The unit itself though
has been extremely reliable.
About 10 months ago we purchased 3 RMC processors. These have
proven not to be as reliable as the Lynx (we have had temperature and some
programming problems). We therefore have had the opportunity to test RMC's
service department which to date has been able to get us up and running
with minimal down time. The big advantage of the RMC units are the
specimen chambers which seal better and hold smaller pieces of tissue.
Currently we use only the RMC units for tissue processing
(approximately 3000 samples annually). The Lynx system has been modified
and is used 3-4 days (and evenings) a week to immunolabel grids for our IEM
program. Hope this helps.

{jon charlesworth}
Electron Microscopy Facility
Mayo Clinic







From: gwerdos
Date: Tuesday, March 07, 1995 2:21PM
Subject: Negative scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are considering purchasing a scanner for TEM negatives.

1. Is this a good idea?

2. Is there a consensus on which one to buy?

Any and all input appreciated.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv,ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 1995 08:19:08 -0500
Subject: Long term storage of Polaroid film

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} noticing that the type 55 film ... with a relatively short period before
} expiration
}
} But we seem to start
} having problems with film only a couple of months after the
} expiration date even after cold storage for a few months.

Please forgive the above condenstation :-}

For the last 15 years we have stored Polaroid type 55 film in a freezer
without harm. This appears to negate the expiration date. We usually
allow the film to thaw out completely before opening the sealed package,
but sometime this process is rushed a bit and then, more often than not we
have problems.


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: Michael Boucher :      BOUCHER-at-tcrca.usbm.gov
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 1995 09:12:42 CST
Subject: Re: Polaroid Films

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We have found that to be the situation for years, but we order it by
the case and refrigerate it (not freezing). It seems to be good for
at least a year past expiration and we have had some film that was
several years old still work. I suspect that there could be some
degradation, but for our routine SEM and light microscopy, it hasn't
been a problem. Maybe Polaroid has done some testing?

*****************************************************************
Michael L. Boucher Sr. Boucher-at-TCRCA.USBM.GOV
Geology-Mineralogy/Chemistry Labs Ph 612-725-4614
Twin Cities Research Center Fax 612-725-4527
U.S. Bureau of Mines Center 725-4500
Department of Interior
5629 Minnehaha Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55417-3099
U.S.A.
*****************************************************************





From: chswartz-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Wed, 08 Mar 1995 11:06:43 EST
Subject: ultrathinsectioning material containing quartz

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I am going to be attempting to thin section sediment samples containing
quartz and want the thin sections to be approx. 50-70nm in thickness for TEM
analysis. I have to buy a diamond knife and would much appreciate input on the
blade angle to choose. A representative at Polysciences told me I should go to
a 55 degree knife instead of a 45, but I was wondering if I would be sacrificing
much of the ability to cut sections down to 50nm. The quartz grains are approx.
200 um in diameter. Is there a particular manufacturer I should get the knife
from? What is an appropriate cutting speed? Can I expect the knife to last
only a VERY short time? I would appreciate any suggestions and advice. My
address is:
chswartz-at-MIT.edu

THANKS




From: jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 1995 12:03:50 -0500
Subject: Carbon Putty

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Does anyone on the listserver know where (prefereably in the U.S.)
that I can get Carbon Putty. I'm down to the last of what I had that
someone picked up at a conference in Germany a few years ago. It is
basically a mixture of some kind of soft wax and carbon and is a very good
specimen mounting material since there is no drying or out-gassing. Ted
Pella doesn't seem to have it so maybe someone out there knows about this
product and can save me a hunt.

Thanks---Jerry





From: ard-at-atom.ansto.gov.au (Arthur Day)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 04:22:35 +1100
Subject: Re: Polaroid Films

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} I do not know how much extension can be obtained by storage at say
} 4 C (May be someone out there does know). But we seem to start
} having problems with film only a couple of months after the
} expiration date even after cold storage for a few months.
}
} Richard E. Edelmann

We are just finishing our last few boxes of September 1994 Type 55 film
(stored in a refrigerator). It still seems to be OK.


Arthur Day, Electron Microscopy Group
Ansto Advanced Materials Program Phone: 61-2-717-3457
PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Fax: 61-2-543-7179
Australia
Email: ard-at-atom.ansto.gov.au







From: Eric Kokko :      kokko-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Wed, 08 Mar 1995 15:30:52 -0500
Subject: Tracor 8502 users, help: Image convert to tiff

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Message-Id: {sf5dcd2b.022-at-EM.AGR.CA}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1


------------------- tn8502.asc follows --------------------
Tracor 8502 users: Help with image convert to tiff

We operate a Tracor Northern (Noran) 8502 Image Analyzer and have
been trying to export images to a VAX via KERMIT with no success.
Has anyone done this sort of image file conversion and transfer
successfully?

Background: The Tracor software can convert an image file from
TN's format (.IMG) to a .TIF file (type 4, version 42). We can
successfully transfer this TIFF image file, via KERMIT, to or VAX
(ie. the file appears and has the appropriate size). When we try
to open this TIFF image (using a PC on our LAN), we always fail
regardless of the software we have employed (e.g. with Photoshop,
HiJack Pro).

If you have any ideas, please contact. I have lots of additional
contextual information to add to this. Thank you!

Eric Kokko
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Lethbridge Research Centre
P.O. Box 3000,
Lethbridge, Alberta
CANADA T1J 4B1

Phone 403-327-4591 (Voice 367)
FAX 403-382-3156
INTERNET kokko-at-em.agr.ca





From: jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 1995 15:47:44 -0500
Subject: Carbon Putty

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To those interested in Carbon Putty,

Someone has just given me all you could ever want to know about this
product. It is available from:
Bal-Tec Products, Inc.
984 Southford Road
P.O. Box 1221
Middlebury, CT 06762; (800) 875-3713, FAX (203) 598-3658

It is called "Leit-C-Plast; Cat. # B 801014075
Current price is $70.00 for 15g

Other properties:
-high electric conductivity
-long-life plasticity
-high vacuum resistance
-sufficient adhesive power
-low sample contamination
-no disturbing ED-x-ray lines
-Resistance R~100 kOhm mm2/m
Thanks for saving me the hunt---Jerry





From: M. ROOKS :      rooks-at-nnf.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Mar 1995 17:59:37 EST
Subject: carbon putty

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"Mung II" is not carbon putty, but is very much like it: electrically
conducting, a good thermal conductor, and very low vapor pressure.
We use Mung in our ion mill, but in the SEMs most people prefer clips
or carbon tape. You can buy mung from

Comonwealth Scientific Corp.
500 Pendleton St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-548-0800

$160 for 5 gr.



_______________________________________________________________
Michael Rooks 607-255-2329 voice
National Nanofabrication Facility 607-255-8601 fax
at Cornell University rooks-at-nnf.cornell.edu
Knight Laboratory
Ithaca, NY 14853 USA

__ __ __ __ ________ National
____ __ ____ __ __ Nanofabrication
__ ____ __ ____ _____ Facility
__ __ __ __ __ Cornell University

_______________________________________________________________






_______________________________________________________________
Michael Rooks 607-255-2329 voice
National Nanofabrication Facility 607-255-8601 fax
at Cornell University rooks-at-nnf.cornell.edu
Knight Laboratory
Ithaca, NY 14853 USA

__ __ __ __ ________ National
____ __ ____ __ __ Nanofabrication
__ ____ __ ____ _____ Facility
__ __ __ __ __ Cornell University

_______________________________________________________________








From: Charles A. Garber
Date: Thu, 09 Mar 1995 01:36:29 EST
Subject: "Carbon putty"

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To: Jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu

SPI Supplies

RE: Question about "carbon putty"

You are asking about a product called "Leit-C-Plast", which is found on
page 46 of the current SPI Supplies "SourceBook" as SPI #5057-AB. It is a
highly conductive adhesive plastic and is designed for mounting large
specimengo a very long way. I hope
this information will be useful to you.


Charles A. Garber, Ph. D.
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES
PO BOX 656
West Chester, PA 19380

Ph: (800) 242-4SPI
FAX: (610) 436-5755





From: John Millar :      jjmill-at-RMIT.EDU.AU
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 10:38:46 EST-10
Subject: Re: Polaroid Films

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"Richard E. Edelmann" {EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU}

Richard Edelmann wrote " I'd be
} interested in hearing any comments anyone (particularly any Polaroid
} reps.) might care to share with the BBS.
}
} Recently we have been noticing that the type 55 film we are
} purchasing was arriving with a relatively short period before
} expiration. We were questioning if our supplier might have trying to
} unload older film on us. So I just called up Polaroid an asked them
} what their lead time from manufacture to expiration date was, and I
} was informed that for type 55 and type 665 (B&W P/N film) the
} expiration lead time is only 9 months. "
}
I have used Polaroid 665,667,55 for nearly 20 years with no problems
of any continuing significance (except maybe cost !!). We have always
purchased in bulk (large boxes of 50 boxes) and stored the material
in a standard refrigerator, not freezing it. Usual practice would be
to allow the boxes to equilibrate at room temperature before use but
sometimes usage rate prevented this. The sensitivity does appear to
change with temperature, but we have nver bothereded to investigate
in detail. In the usual situation, we have not expereinced any
problems and have both negs and prints which are old and still very
good quality.
Cleanliness of the holder and specially the rollers is critical to
performance and they are cleaned after EVERY cartridge is exhausted
and before the next one is in place.
cheers
jjm
Professor John J. Millar
Head, Department of Applied Physics
Electron Microscope Unit
RMIT, GPO Box 2476V, MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA 3001
+613 660 2602 fax 613 660 3837
email jjmill-at-rmit.edu.au




From: Charles A. Garber
Date: Thu, 09 Mar 1995 01:36:53 EST
Subject: Thin sectioning of quartz particles

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To: chswartz-at-MIT.edu

SPI Supplies
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

RE: Ultrathin sectioning material containing quartz

We have had some amount of experience in our own laboratory with the thin
sectioning of these kinds of samples for TEM characterization.

There are the obvious trade offs, that is, th that a) the price is much
cheaper and b) you are using the "normal" narrow angle (e.g. 45 deg.)
knives and therefore you don't have to worry about compression effects.

While the ability to cut sections is somewhat related to the experience of
the one doing the sectioning (and it is also an art), so long as you are
patient, you should be able to do it.

If you wanted to send us one of your samples, we could produce sections for
you, and essentially determine the exact conditions under which you too
could easily get sections. There would be a fee of course for this,
however, you would know for sure, one way or another, whether sections
could or could not be made of your material,and if they could, then you
would also know the exact cutting conditions.

Another important consideration would be the choice of embedding resins and
we would recommend for quartz particles our SPI # 2660 SPI-PON 812 resin
kit since this particular resin seems to be the most user friendly in terms
of polymerizing to a hardness for which sections can be made of the
embedding quartz particles.

You have also asked a question that touches on the expected longevity of
the diamond knife when cutting these kinds of materials. You sort of have
to think about it as an analog to the mileage expected from a pair of
tires. You can buy imported tires or you can buy domestic ones, however,
what really counts is how you drive your car. Be gentle, and the knife will
last longer. Be abusive, and it will have a shorter life time. Obviously,
cutting quartz particles is going to be "hard" on the knife. You can
extend the longevity be making the particles smaller before embedding. You
can get good sections faster, and therefore also less knife wear, by curing
the SPI-Pon 812 resin harder right away, putting less wear and tear on the
knife to get to that point.

I hope this information has been helpful to you. Let me know if you have
any other questions.

Charles A. Garber
SPI Supplies
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (800) 242-4SPI
FAX: (610) 436-5755
e-mail: cgarber-at-cerfnet.com





From: jouneau-at-cime.epfl.ch (Pierre-Henri Jouneau)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 15:51:13 +0100
Subject: TRINOCULAR JOINT MEETING ON ELECTRON MICROSCOPIES

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***************************************************************************

ANNOUNCEMENT

Trinocular Joint Meeting on Electron Microscopies

Lausanne, June 26-30, 1995

***************************************************************************

The Swiss Society of Optics and Electron Microscopy, the French Society
of Electron Microscopy and the Belgian Society of Microscopy have decided
to hold a joint meeting in 1995. This conference will be held at the
"Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne" (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland,
from June 26 to 30, 1995. It will include two tutorial days and a three-days
conference which will be mainly focused on the recent progresses in TEM and
scanning probe microscopies for materials science and biological fields.


********** SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMME **********

Monday 26 and Tuesday 27
TUTORIALS, with practical training, for groups of 6 to 20 people.

- Cryo-microscopy of vitrified specimens: theory and practice
(Jacques Dubochet)
- Practical aspects of the methodology of image analysis in oncology
(Ricardo Laurini)
- TEM image simulation of crystalline materials (Pierre Stadelmann)
- Electron holography (Conradin Beeli)
- Analytical microscopy with a field emission TEM (Klaus Leifer)
- TEM sample preparation in materials science (Daniele Laub)
- Applications of large angle convergent beam electron diffraction
techniques (LACBED) (Jean-Paul Morniroli)

Evening Tuesday 27
Welcome ceremony and conference opening lecture.

"Perception du monde exterieur par les systemes vivants"
by Yves de Ribaupierre, University of Lausanne.

Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 - Conference

**** PHYSICS-MATERIALS-BIOLOGY-PATHOLOGY JOINT SYMPOSIA ****

- New microscopies: STM, AFM, SNOM, confocal, ultra-sound, ...
(A. Engel, D. Pohl)

- Energy filtered images and electron spectroscopy
(C. Colliex, D. Bazett-Jones)

- Life in extreme environment (F. Gaill)

**** BIOLOGY-PATHOLOGY SYMPOSIA ****

- Fertilization and early embryogenesis in mammals
(J. E. Flechon)

- Freeze substitution, microscopy of frozen hydrated samples
(J. Dubochet, S. Fakan)

- Image analysis and cancer diagnosis (R. Laurini)

- High-resolution electron microscopy of biological specimens
(E. Delain, M. Muller)

- Cytoskeleton (G. Gabbiani)

- New applications of scanning probe microscopies
(M. Robert-Nicoud)

**** PHYSICS-MATERIALS SYMPOSIA ****

- Electron holography (C. Beeli, D. van Dyck)

- New progress on CBED/LACBED (J. P. Morniroli, J. Steeds)

- High-Resolution microscopy of aperiodic structures
(J. van Landuyt, P.Stadelmann)

- New applications of analytical microscopy: filtered images, EDS, EELS
(C. Colliex, C. Humphreys)

- New applications of scanning probe microscopies (D. Pohl, D. Courjon)

**** Commercial exibition ****

A substantial commercial exhibition of scientific equipment will also be
held during the conference. For information, please contact G. Peter,
EPFL-CIME CH 1015 Lausanne
Fax: +41 [21] 693 44 01, email: peter-at-cime.epfl.ch


********** REGISTRATION **********

The symposia will consist essentially of a small number of lectures (mainly
invited, with some selected from the conference abstracts) and of poster
sessions. The presentations may be given in English, or in any languages
of the three national societies. However, certain parts of the presentation
should be in English, at least abstracts, figure captions, transparencies...
Discussion sessions will be devoted to a few hot points emerging from the
poster presentations.

The registration fees for the conference, including attendance at the
symposia and the abstract booklet, are 250 CHF (non-members), 200 CHF
(members) and 100 CHF (students and lab technicians). The registration fees
for the tutorial days will be communicated in the final circular. A maximum
of 100 CHF/course is expected. A few grants have been founded by the
national societies in order to encourage the participation of young
scientists and technicians


********** GENERAL INFORMATION **********

The conference will be held at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
(EPFL), located approximately 4 km from the city centre, near (500 m) the
idyllic scenery of lake Leman. Hotel rooms in different categories (from
"Formule 1" to ****) have been reserved by the tourist office for the
organization committee, with prices ranging from 25 (F1, 3 persons per room)
to 230 CHF. A final hotel booking form will be included with the registration
form.

Excursions for participants and accompanying persons are planned: e.g. a
tour to the beautiful region of "la Gruyere" famous for its cheese, to a wine
cellar on the coast of lake Leman !! ... These excursions will be organized
in small groups of 20 to 30 persons according to their preferences.


********** ORGANIZING COMMITTEES **********

Honor committee:
Walter Bollmann, Alain Gautier, Eduard Kellenberger, Bernard Vittoz

International Scientific Committee:
M. Deschuyteneer (SmithKline Beecham, B), J. Dubochet (Uni. Lausanne, CH),
A. Engel (Uni. Basel, CH), J. Gunter (Uni. Zurich, CH),
D. Hernandez-Verdun (Inst. Jacques Monod, F), J. Lecomte-Beckers
(Uni. Liege, B), J.-P. Morniroli (Uni. Lille, F), R. Portier (ENSCP, F),
M. Praet (Uni. Gent, B), D. Schryvers (Uni. Antwerpen, B), P. Stadelmann
(EPFL Lausanne, CH), D. Thomas (Uni. Rennes, F)

Local Scientific Committee:
M. Campiche (Uni. Lausanne), J. Dubochet (Uni. Lausanne),
S. Fakan (Uni. Lausanne), R. Gotthardt (EPFL Lausanne),
R. Laurini (Uni. Lausanne), P. Stadelmann (EPFL Lausanne)

Local Organizing Committee:
P.A. Buffat (Chairman), R. Rouquier (Secretary),
C. Beeli, F. Bobard, B. Garoni, P.-H. Jouneau, D. Laub, G. Peter,
B. Senior, P. Stadelmann


***************************************************************************

For additional information and registration details, please contact
as soon as possible:

Mrs Ruth Rouquier, Congres Trinoculaire,
CIME-EPFL, CH 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Fax: (021) 693 4401, Tel: (021) 693 4405
email: ruth.rouquier-at-cime.epfl.ch, http://cimewww.epfl.ch

***************************************************************************



Pierre-Henri Jouneau
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausane
CIME-EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne
tel: +41 (21) 693 44 37 fax:+41 (21) 693 44 01






From: Giles John E Jr on Thu, Mar 9, 1995 10:07 AM
Date: 9 Mar 1995 10:21:34 U
Subject: Digital Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for information about software to read .bmp or TIFF files using a
Mac. We have a Targa+ video capture board to capture images from the SEM onto
a 486-66 PC. I would like to be able to import them over e-mail to a Mac
Quadra 650 and paste into a Word document. Word will import the image, but
there seem to be a decrease in resolution and the file size is reduced from
650K to 375K when it is converted to the Mac.
I would like to here from other users who are capturing images as we are just
getting the system set up.
Thanks,

John Giles
Honeywell Space Systems
jegiles-at-space.honeywell.com
(813)539-2270 phone
(813)539-3630 Fax





From: ychen-at-macc.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 12:55:21 -0600
Subject: Re: Polaroid Films

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Message-Id: {25030912503075-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

} I do not know how much extension can be obtained by storage at say
} 4 C (May be someone out there does know). But we seem to start
} having problems with film only a couple of months after the
} expiration date even after cold storage for a few months.
}
} Richard E. Edelmann

I had a problem of inside sticky #52 Polaroid film, which will expire on
Sept. 1995, so that run out of our film. I found a box of old #52 film
which expired on Aug. 1992 left in a drew (at room temperature) and tried
to use it. To my surprise, it worked fine.
For my experiences, the problem of Polaroid does not really related to the
expiration date. Instead, I found a lot of problems are caused by storage.
I have used a lot of good expired films and a lot of fresh films as well
for 5 years.

Ya Chen
Integrated Microscopy Resource
Madison, WI 53706
USA
Email: ychen-at-macc.wisc.edu






From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 08:33:53 -0700
Subject: Re: Fujix Pictrography 3000 Printer

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Message-Id: {v01510101ab84cec55d80-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

William Dentler wrote:

} We are in the process of purchasing a new printer and are looking at the
} Tektronix Phaser II SDX, Kodak ColorEase PS, and Kodak 8600. Samples
} provided by
} Kodak and Tektronix look great. I have heard that the Mitsubishi S3600-32U
} is a
} great printer but cannot get any useful information, prices, or samples from
} Mitsubishi or local dealers. I am curious about the Fujix 3000. Could you let
} me know how or where to contact Fujix, since I have never heard of them.

You can contact Ron Saltzman, at Fujix Electronic Imaging Group at
800-736-3600 ext. 8282 (voice mail). If he's no longer with that group,
you might try the general numbers, 914-789-8100 or 800755-3854, to get to a
sales rep. They also advertise in some of the photo lab trade magazines.

Good luck. They are really worth a look.


John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins CO






From: jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 10:53:34 -0500
Subject: Carbon Putty

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Thanks to those who have helped me locate sources where I could find
a material matching the description I gave for what I called "carbon putty."

Since posting the first source given to me (Bal-Tec) yesterday, I
have received a few more. So, for those other subscribers who asked me to
post any info. I got, here are the other sources.

SPI Supplies/P.O. Box 656/West Chester, PA 19380/(800)242-4SPI/
Cat.# SPI 5057/$63.75 15g

Marivac LTD./Hailfax, N.S./Canada/(800)565-5821/Cat.# AS508-3/
$66.50 Canadian 15g (Approx. $50.00 American)

SGL-Carbon/Niagara Falls, N.Y./P.O.Box 667/(716)236-2859/
This company makes carbon epoxy material that sets-up for permanent
attachments. It is not a soft putty after it sets but it is highly
conductive and may be of some use for other purposes.

Thanks for all the help --- Jerry





From: jyoung-at-inforamp.net (James Young)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 18:28:32 +0500
Subject: Info on Agr Sta Closings

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I was talking to Frank Skelton. It seems Agr Cda Van is closing. Any other
closings or layoffs?
Interested only.

JIM Young





From: images1-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Michael Stanley)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 18:01:19 -0600
Subject: zamboni fix

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Hello All,
I have a user who was told to try Zamboni Fix on their tissue.
Could some kind soul tell us what it is and how to make it. I know what
and Zamboni is in relation to ice rinks and I can even drive one (it's a
real hoot!!) but I've never heard of the fix...
TIA,

C. Michael Stanley, Ph.D.
Coordinator, Associate Director
Molecular Cytology Core Facility
Molecular Biology Program
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri-Columbia
Columbia, MO. 65211
(314) 882-4895
fax= 314-882-0123






From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 11:21:44 +1100
Subject: Tissue processors

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Message-Id: {199503092314.MAA28868-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Ed Calomeni wrote:
} I am in the info gathering stage of purschasing a tissue processor for EM
} samples. } I have info on the Reichert-Lynx unit and the one made by RMC. How
} do you like } these units? Comments on advantages and disadvantages are
} welcome.

} Thanks in advance

} Ed Calomeni
} Medical College of Ohio
} Toledo, OH

We have a Lynx tissue processor which we are now very happy with. There
were a few teething problems when it was first installed (the main control
board and the motor control unit had to be replaced) but these problems I
believe have now been sorted out at the factory and shouldn't apply to new
instruments now - it was some three years ago when we bought our one.
The only other problem we had was with voltage spikes from the mains. This
problem was eliminated by putting an isolating transformer between the
mains and the processor.
We have not experienced any problems with the samples mixing upon opening
up the vials (someone -sorry I forget who- mentioned this in an earlier
reply).
Infiltration of resin seems to be fine, something I was a little sceptical
of initially, given the small holes in some of the basket types. There is a
good choice of different specimen baskets anyway and I have always found
one suitable for whatever specimens I happen to be processing.
Hope this is helpful for making your decision.
Regards,
RE



Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254






From: pmarkiew-at-alchemy.chem.utoronto.ca (Peter Markiewicz)
Date: Wed, 08 Mar 1995 15:50:25 -0500
Subject: AFM deconvolution program

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Message-Id: {199503092054.PAA03408-at-alchemy.chem.utoronto.ca}
X-Sender: pmarkiew-at-alchemy.chem.utoronto.ca (Unverified)
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Fellow Microscopists,

This is a general announcement which should be of interest to atomic force
microscopists.

We are making the latest version of our deconvolution program MIDAS95
available for free on the Internet. The program is designed to work under
Windows on Nanoscope files. It is being released as a beta version, meaning
the program lacks a certain polish. The program works properly for both the
Nano II and III, although testing on the latter system has been limited.

Through deconvolution, one can account for the volume occupied by the tip in
the AFM images obtained. By eliminating the tip effect, the result is often
a truer representation of the sample topography. Deconvolution also allows
for the in situ measurement of the tip geometry. This 3D data file of the
tip can be used as a check of the tip's integrity or for improvement of
other AFM images. Further details are given in the README.TXT file.

The program can be accessed by the following:
ftp surfturf.chem.utoronto.ca
login: anonymous
password: yourname-at-location
Please use your E-mail address for the password. We wish to keep a record
of the users of this program and notify them of any problems or updates.

The public directory has three files of interest here. One is the
README.TXT file if you want to know what is in MIDAS.ZIP without having to
download it. MIDAS.ZIP contains several files, including some AFM files to
see how deconvolution is done and some TIFF files for viewing. Fan-xing Wei
and Dr. Dan Thomas of the University of Guelph have modified our program so
that it works for Burleigh Instruments. This program is available in BURL.ZIP.

If you have any difficulty, please be patient as our server allows only one
user at a time and tends to lock up when doing calculations.

Thank you,

Peter Markiewicz





From: waheeschen-at-dow.com (Bill Heeschen (517)636-4005 PMRC/ASL)
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 1995 16:19:57 -0500
Subject: re: Digital Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John

The best way to get bitmap and/or TIFF images into your Mac is with the NIH
Image software (via ftp: anonymous-at-zippy.nimh.nih.gov directory /pub/nih-
image). It can handle either format, but you will probably have to go through
the IMPORT diaolog, not the OPEN dialog. Look at the documentation (also on
Zippy) to guide you through. As long as there is a full valid bitmap in the
image file, NIH Image can import the image and allow you to save it as a useful
file. We have done a lot of image file format trouble-shooting for "standard"
formats written by multiple vendors on multiple platforms around here using
that capability.

A plug here: NIH Image has a nearly infinite performance to price ratio - it
is free once you are on the internet. It also outperforms a whole lot of
commercial stuff on any computer platform up to about the $2000 price point and
the support system is unbelievably good, considering the annual maintenance non-
fee. 8-).

Two hurdles are: getting the file onto your Mac (which it sounds like you are
already doing) then getting a good image into Word. I do the latter by pasting
the image from NIH Image into Word, then shift-shrinking the image to about
50%. The original paste goes in at 72 dpi, the shift-shrink gives the final
image resolution of 144 dpi which, with a decent gray-scale printer, gives you
very acceptable print quality. By the way, I __STRONGLY__ advise against using
the image editor in Word. I have found it unreliable in addition to the fact
that it reduces your grayscale image to 16 levels. This could explain the drop
in file size (the editor converts the 8-bit image to 4-bit). A similar result
would happen if you started with a 16-bit TIFF and wound up with 8-bit.

Hope this helps.


Bill
==========================
Bill Heeschen/Analyt. Sci.- Mat. Char. -----
1897-F Building / The Dow Chemical Co. --- ---
Midland, MI 48667 U.S.A. --- D O W ---
phone: (517)636-4005 fax: (517)636-5453 --- ---
Email: waheeschen-at-dow.com -----
========================== R




From: {chswartz-at-MIT.EDU}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 3-8-95 12:54pm
Subject: Re: ultrathinsectioning material containing quartz

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Message-Id: {9503092328.AA21558-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ML:WPAFB
cc: Lloydpf:ML:WPAFB
Subj: ultrathinsectioning material containing quartz
In-Reply-To: Message from WALCKSD:ML:WPAFB of 3-8-95
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott,

I would recommend that the knife of choice be a Diatome knife. The angle
would depend on how hard the sediment is. If the sediment is very hard, then
yes I too suggest a 55x knife. Using a knife with this angle still allows one
to obtain sections on the order of 70nm. If the sediment is not that hard,
then a 45x knife will work also. I generally use a 55x knife for all materials
that I cut except for polymers, where I use a 45x knife.

I hope this helps!

Pam


---------------------- Replied Message Body ----------------------
To: LLOYDPF
Subj: ultrathinsectioning material containing quartz
Forwarded: Message from {chswartz-at-MIT.EDU}:ddn:wpafb of 3-8-95
------------------------------------------------------------------



--------------------- Forwarded Message Body ---------------------
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: ultrathinsectioning material containing quartz
Orig-Author: {chswartz-at-MIT.EDU}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
I am going to be attempting to thin section sediment samples containing
quartz and want the thin sections to be approx. 50-70nm in thickness for TEM
analysis. I have to buy a diamond knife and would much appreciate input on the
blade angle to choose. A representative at Polysciences told me I should go to
a 55 degree knife instead of a 45, but I was wondering if I would be
sacrificing
much of the ability to cut sections down to 50nm. The quartz grains are
approx.
200 um in diameter. Is there a particular manufacturer I should get the knife
from? What is an appropriate cutting speed? Can I expect the knife to last
only a VERY short time? I would appreciate any suggestions and advice. My
address is:
chswartz-at-MIT.edu

THAN





From: Mike Gregory :      mgregory-at-pixie.udw.ac.za
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 08:34:29 +0200 (SST)
Subject: Re: BDMA vs DMP-30 summary

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On Mon, 6 Mar 1995, Gib Ahlstrand wrote:


Hi Gib:

I'd appreciate a copy of the BDMA vs DMP-30 responses.

Regards

Mike Gregory

} In July and September of 1994, there was some disciussion of BDMA vs. DMP-30. I
} saved and consolidated 13 of those messages into a single document. If anyone is
} interested in getting a copy, send me your e-mail address and I will zip one out
} to you within a day or two.
}
} --
}
} Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
} Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
} 495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
} 612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
}
} "MICROSCOPY & MICROANALYSIS 96" in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Aug.11-15, 1996
}
}




From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 08:33:09 GMT+0200
Subject: re: Digital Images

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} The best way to get bitmap and/or TIFF images into your Mac is with the NIH
} Image software (via ftp: anonymous-at-zippy.nimh.nih.gov directory /pub/nih-
} image). It can handle either format, but you will probably have to go through
} the IMPORT diaolog, not the OPEN dialog. Look at the documentation (also on
} Zippy) to guide you through. As long as there is a full valid bitmap in the
} image file, NIH Image can import the image and allow you to save it as a useful
} file.

As a follow-up, we use NIH Image for our image processing and also
import BMP and TIFF files from PC capture systems. NIH Image will
import TIFF directly using 'OPEN', and from our experience BMPs
should be IMPORTed using CUSTOM, setting OFFSET to 1760 and chsing
the relevant bitmap size.

I hope this is of use

Doug


+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: epicier-at-univ-lyon1.fr (Thierry Epicier)
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 08:39:58 +0100
Subject: S-SIMPLY update...

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A short message for users of (or people interested in) 'S-SIMPLY'
(SHRLI-SIMulation and diSPLaY of TEM & HRTEM images, for PCs) : the freeware
version, available on FTP.UNIV-LYON1.FR (/pub/dos/HRTEM) has been
significantly updated, and new features are available (graphical displays, a
"Make Interface" tool,...).
With best regards,

______________________________________________

Thierry EPICIER
GEMPPM-502, INSA de Lyon,
69621 VILLEURBANNE, France
tel : (33) 72 43 84 94 (83 85)
FAX : (33) 72 43 85 28
Email : EPICIER-at-CISMSUN.UNIV-LYON1.FR





From: jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 08:44:59 -0500
Subject: Carbon Putty correction

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Via: bham.ac.uk; Fri, 10 Mar 1995 09:08:17 +0000

To those interested in Carbon Putty,

Two days ago I posted a Cat.# and price for Leit-C-Plast from
Bal-Tec that was given to me incorrectly. The correct Cat.# is B801014077
and the cost is $40.00 for 15g. This is now the best price I've found.

Bal-Tec Products/984 Southford Rd./P.O.Box 1221/Middlebury CT/
(800)875-3713;Fx (203)598-3658

Hope this helps---Jerry





From: Marcel.Paques-at-2488PAS.urlnl.sprint.com
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 10:19:00 -0500
Subject: Fuji Pictography 3000 printer

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I recently purchased a Pictography 3000 printer after a extensive
comparison of printer systems available on the market.
The printer is attached to the network (Token ring, novell) via a pc,
and is transparent configured: all pc's in the network can reach the
printer.
The printer is used for production of hard-copies of image files
generated by various techniques: CSLM, VEM, cryo-SEM, FESEM (+EDS
Noran SUN), TEM (Gatan SSC, Mac), SPM, IA (SEMPER).

We are quit satisfied.

E-mail: Marcel.Paques-at-2488PAS.URLNL.Sprint.Com
Unilever research Laboratory Vlaardingen
The Netherlands




From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 10:42:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: zamboni fix

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Zamboni fix is an EM version of the classical LM Bouin's fix.
Zamboni's original abstract didn't contain any details about how to make
it up. The details are in: Stefanini et al., 1967, Nature 216:173.

A. Kent Christensen
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
{akc-at-umich.edu}

------------------------------------------

On Thu, 9 Mar 1995, Michael Stanley wrote:

} Hello All,
} I have a user who was told to try Zamboni Fix on their tissue.
} Could some kind soul tell us what it is and how to make it. I know what
} and Zamboni is in relation to ice rinks and I can even drive one (it's a
} real hoot!!) but I've never heard of the fix...
} TIA,
}
} C. Michael Stanley, Ph.D.
} Coordinator, Associate Director
} Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} Molecular Biology Program
} 2 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri-Columbia
} Columbia, MO. 65211
} (314) 882-4895
} fax= 314-882-0123
}
}
}




From: Smith, Peter :      SMithP-at-agresearch.cri.nz
Date: Thu, 09 Mar 1995 14:14 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: [LM] -Immunocytochemistry method using c

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I have recently been shown a research report in BioTechniques, Vol 13, No
3. (1992) by Reed, J.A., Manahan, L.J., Park, C-S, and Brigati, D.JL
describing an immunocytochemical method based upon capillary action. This
was using the "MicroProbe" marketed by Fisher Scientific, Pittsburgh, PA.

My question is, has anyone used this system? If so what are its advantages
and/or disadvantages . Also could you please give me a contact address, FAX
number or E-Mail for Fisher Scientific.

Thanks in advance.




From: Beverly E Maleeff :      Beverly_E_Maleeff%notes-at-sb.com
Date: 10 Mar 95 10:09:30 ES
Subject: Re: zamboni fix

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Message-Id: {9503101815.AA2900-at-pho018.sb.com}
To: images1 {images1-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu} ,
microscopy
{microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}

In response to this question:

Hello All,
I have a user who was told to try Zamboni Fix on their tissue.
Could some kind soul tell us what it is and how to make it. I know what
and Zamboni is in relation to ice rinks and I can even drive one (it's a
real hoot!!) but I've never heard of the fix...
TIA,

C. Michael Stanley, Ph.D.
Coordinator, Associate Director
Molecular Cytology Core Facility
Molecular Biology Program
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri-Columbia
Columbia, MO. 65211
(314) 882-4895
fax= 314-882-0123


I think that the fixative you're referring to is cited in this paper:
Zamboni, L. and DeMartino, C., 1967. Buffered picric acid-formaldehyde: A new,
rapid fixative
for electron microscopy.

We came across Zamboni's fix when we were perfusion-fixing rat testes a couple
of years ago.
However, it didn't preserve Leydig cell structure as well as some of the other
fixatives we tried.

Hope this info helps. (I want to hear more about driving a Zamboni!)

Bev Maleeff
SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals
Toxicology-US, UE 0462
709 Swedeland Road
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610/270-7987
610/270-7202 fax
e-mail: maleeffbe-at-sb.com





From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Mar 1995 17:12:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Meeting Announcement, Atlanta GA

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The 30th annual meeting of the SouthEastern Microscopy Society (SEMS) will be
held on May 17-19, 1995, at the Omni Hotel in Atlanta, GA. Scheduled invited
speakers and their titles are: 1) Nestor Zaluzec, Argonne National
Laboratory, Integrating Computers, Microscopy, and Microanalysis; 2) Phil
Russell, North Carolina State University, Instrumentation and Application of
Scanned Probe Microscopy; 3) Larry Peterson, GBI, Forensic Microscopy; 4)
Terence Mitchell, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Experience with Field
Emission on an SEM, STEM, and TEM; and 5) Jay Jerome, Bowman Gray School of
Medicine of Wake Forest University, Exploring Ultrastructure with
Quantitative 3-D Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy. Also on the
program are pre-meeting workshops and tours, contributed papers and posters,
the RUSKA student competition, and commercial exhibits. Social events are the
Wednesday night Exhibitor's Mixer and the Awards Banquet, which will be held
Thursday night at the Fernbank Museum of Natural History

For further
information, contact Janet H. Woodward, SEMS '95 Program Chair, at (912)-945-
3152, FAX (912)-945-3155.



Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************





From: jyoung-at-inforamp.net (James Young)
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 1995 20:03:18 +0500
Subject: Your message.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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My goodness I got the message several times. Also the one I sent came back
to me several times. I guess the Government wants to make sure evereything
gets through.

Too bad about the cuts. Frank Skelton told me about Van Closing also I guess
the Farm got hit.

PCI is selling well particularly in the USA and some to Japan.

I have full internet access now. PPP with every application which is
Freeware and Shareware. All windows based and relatively easy to use.

Our site in the office is working under a private account, but we haven't
got the domain name yet. It will be NSCTOR. Anyway I will let you know
when it comes through.





From: Peter Goodhew :      goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 08:51:38 GMT
Subject: Re: Electron optics teaching

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David Cockayne asked:
}
} WITH REGARD TO THE QUESTION ABOUT TEACHING OPTICS, CAN ANYONE
ADVISE ME OF WHAT SOFTWARE PACKAGES ARE AVAILABLE FOR TEACHING
ELECTRON OPTICS?

At the same time a similar question was posted on the Microscopy
list (by someone different).

I would be delighted if anyone can update the following list of
teaching software (in the area of microscopy) known to me:

The Institute of Materials (UK) distribute:

The Transmission Electron Microscope by Goodhew
The Scanning Electron Microscope by Humphreys (John)
Electron Diffraction by Goodhew
The Stereographic Projection by Humphreys
Analysis in the Electron Microscope by Goodhew, Humphreys and
Cliff
X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy by Watts
X-ray Auger and Laser emission by Goodhew

These are all IBM PC DOS versions, available from Institute of
Materials, 1 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5DB, fax
+44(0)171 839 2078
The MATTER project is currently working on greatly-improved
Windows and Mac versions of most of these topics: Completion of
the first two topics (TEM and SEM) is scheduled for the end of
1995. All the above are aimed firmly at teaching, not at research
applications.

There is also an SEM simulation available which originated in
Australia but which is supposed to be downloadable from Nestor
Zaluzec's Microscopy Bulletin Board. However we have consistently
failed to transfer it. Has anyone in the UK succeeded?

I also saw recently a very full simulation of a light microscope.
This is aimed at biologists and was written (and is distributed)
by Maurice Smith at: mol-at-molcol.demon.co.uk

If you can add to this list please reply to both lists [
microscopy and materials-l ]

Thanks

Peter

PS 120+ members of the materials list now!

------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
Professor Peter J Goodhew, Department of Materials Science &
Engineering
University of Liverpool
LIVERPOOL Fax (44) (0)151 794 4675
L69 3BX, UK Tel (44) (0)151 794 4665 (secretary
Debra)
------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
inter alia: Director of the MATTER project for educational
software
------------------------------------------------------------------
-----






From: Fangl-at-fpms.fpms.ac.be
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 12:29:36 +0100
Subject: help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sir: Would please give some information about mail list of microscopy.
L.FANG




From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 10:30:19 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Midwest Society of Electron Microscopists

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Midwest Society of Electron Microscopists

STUDENT COMPETITION
TO BE HELD AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
WHITEWATER, WISCONSIN
Ambrose Health Center, Room 162
Friday, March 24, 1995
PROGRAM:
1:00 PM: Dr. Ursula K. Charaf, Senior Research Scientist, Johnson Wax:
BLOW IT UP! Applied Industrial Microscopy
1:45 PM: Student Presentations
3:00 PM: Dr. Robert Cardell, University of Cincinnatti Medical Center,
MSA/LAS Sponsored Presidential
Speaker: Modern
Microscopical Approaches to Biomedical Problems
4:00 PM: Reception and Award Presentations

If you are planning to come, telephone or E-mail registrations are
required by March 22.
If you are planning to present your research, please send your abstract
to:
Dr. Lance Urven
University of Wisconsin- Whitewater
800 West Main
Whitewater, WI 53190
urvenl-at-uwwvax.uww.edu
PHONE 414-472-5132
Reception provided by Oxford Instruments Inc.,
Microanalysis Group.:





From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 10:31:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: SEM/AFM - CD-recordable, specimen prep.

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Don-
1) the thin film coatings on the polycarbonate are very tightly held
proprietary secrets. try some EDS or WDS.
2) try SEM to determine where these "pits" reside.
3) the "trick" is to plunge the CD into liquid nitrogen (30 sec), then
give it a shot with a hammer. it shears at the interface

we are investigating the CD's by AFM and SEM here in our lab, keep in
touch about further results?

-Mike

On Sun, 12 Mar 1995, Chernoff wrote:

} I am seeking advice regarding specimen preparation. I wish to
} examine the physical pits created when a CD-Recordable disk is
} written. I would like to understand:
} - the physical arrangement of thin film coatings on the
} polycarbonate substrate, i.e. what materials are stacked up, and
} what their typical thicknesses are.
} - what layer contains the physical pits.
} - how to expose that layer for examination by SEM or AFM.
}
} Thanks for your help.
}
} DON CHERNOFF 317-251-1364
} ADVANCED SURFACE MICROSCOPY FAX: 317-254-8690
} 6009 KNYGHTON RD. E-MAIL: echernof-at-ucs.indiana.edu
} INDIANAPOLIS IN 46220 Toll free: 800-374-8557
}
}
}




From: Larry Hawkey :      hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 14:53:43 -0500
Subject: fair market value for scope?

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Where could I findout what was the fair market value for
a JEOL 1200ex II 5 years old. Basic TEM no Scanning
EDX or stuff like that.
Who has the blue book??

Thank you
larry hawkey
hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu




From: Davisbl-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 15:14:53 -0500
Subject: IMAGES

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I'VE BEEN ASKED TO ADDRESS A GROUP OF STUDENTS (LATE HIGH SCHOOL AND EARLY
COLLEGE) A LOCAL COLLEGE SCIENCE CAREER DAY. I AM PLANNING ON USING A
VARIETY OF SEM MICROGRAPHS TO ILLUSTRATE THE APPLICATIONS OF THE SCANNING
ELECTRON MICROSCOPE TO MANY SCIENTIFIC AREAS. IF ANYONE HAS ANY PC-FORMAT
IMAGES THAT THE WOULD BE WILLLING TO E-MAIL TO ME, I WOULD BE VERY GRATEFUL.

THANK YOU ALL IN ADVANCE,
BONNIE DAVIS
E-MAIL:




From: Charles A. Garber
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 02:19:13 EST
Subject: Larry Hawkey; Market Value JEOL 1200EX

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To: Larry Haweky

SPI Supplies

RE: Market Value of JEOL 1200EX

There really isn't anything equivalent to a "blue" book, since there are
just not enough instruments of this type getting sold in order to get any
kind of meaningful sales statistics. However, there are basically three
different types of prices discussed:

a) Selling price of a used instrument from the OEM

b) Selling price from a third party service company

c) Offering price from a former owner


If you want to find out (a), the best person would be Robert Santorelli at
JEOL in Peabody, MA Ph; (800) 343-6766.

For (b), you should contact Mr. Clark Houghton, Secondary Images,
Winchester, OH FAX: (513) 927-5557.

For (c), you should contact again, either Mr. Houghton (above) or Mr. James
Nicolino, X-ray Optics, Florida, Ph: (904) 646-3069 FAX: (904) 565-1897.
Mr. Nicolino services wave length dispersive microprobe systems but has a
good understanding of what different instruments fetch when sold by an
owner, free of any guarantee or warranty, and such sales are generally on
an "as is, where is" basis.

Hope this information will be useful to you.

Charles A. Garber
SPI Supplies
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (800) 2424-SPI
FAX: (610) 436-5755
e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com





From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 02:19:01 EST
Subject: RE: ELECTRON OPTICS TEACHING

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--[ FORWARDED PRIVATE MESSAGE ]--------

To: goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk Order #4457898
From: GVKM07A
Date: 03/13/95 11:46 PM

Prof. Peter Goodhew

Hello! I think that the soft ware you are thinking of is called the
emTutorial system, and it is indeed produced in Australia. There are
actually two different system programs, emTUTOR and semTUTOR, and they have
been designed to be used as a self-instruction tool, an instruction aid for
class labs and for lecture demonstrations.

Also I think the commercial producers of these really outstanding software
products would be quite unhappy if it should turn out that their
proprietary software was distributed without any benefit to them. I could
be wrong about that, but if I was a betting person, that would be my
opinion.

The product can be ordered from SPI Supplies as SPI #09000-AB and has a
regular price of $345. By coincidence, we have been running a "special"
and until April 15, the price is $250.

There is another new product from the same Australian firm called PARFOCAL,
which is a graphics file conversion program for confocal microscopy and
image analysis. The regular price is $325 but this product is not current
on any kind of special sale.

If you provide a FAX number, we can FAX you additional information.

Charles A. Garber
SPI SUPPLIES (USA)
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (800) 242-4774 Toll free in USA only
(610) 436-5400 Regular phone number
(800) 526-6562 Toll free in Canada only - rings in USA

FAX: (610) 436-5755
1-800-55-7780 Toll free FAX from Ireland only
0800-44-0873 Toll free FAX from New Zealand
0800-89-3066 Toll free FAX from UK



FAX: (610) 436-5755





From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 22:53:38 EST
Subject: 1st Int'l Conf. EM/Ismalia EGYPT

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I have received the following information from the organizers and wanted to
publicize it to anyone interested in attending or participating:

First International Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in REsearch in Different Fields of Science

September 2-4, 1995
Ismailia-ETAPT

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia EGYPT

Special Topics of the Conference:
1] Role of EM in diagnostic virology
2] Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cytology and urinary stones
3] Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic conditions)
4] X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metallurgical,
mineralogical, and biological
5] Scanning EM of plants, animal, insects, and mineral material
6] Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic electron
diffraction patterns
7] Skin pathology by EM
8] Morphological identification of antigens by EM
9] Different low temperature methods for biological EM
10] Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM

There will be an equipment exhibition in conjunction with this meeting.

Registration for foreigners will be US $150 inclusive of full board during
the time of the meeting.

For further information, contact the organizer:

Prof. Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscope Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia EGYPT

Ph: (20) 64-226418
(20) 64-333318
FAX: (20) 64-333318 [phone and FAX number]


Message from:

Charles A. Garber
SPI Supplies
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (610) 436-5400
FAX: (610) 436-5755





From: Marcel.Paques-at-2488PAS.urlnl.sprint.com
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 03:41:00 -0500
Subject: mail test m

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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X400-Received: by mta merit in /PRMD=internet/ADMD=telemail/C=us/; Relayed; Tue, 14 Mar 1995 03:40:10 -0500
X400-Received: by /ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Tue, 14 Mar 1995 03:38:06 -0500
X400-Received: by /PRMD=SMXFL2/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Tue, 14 Mar 1995 03:41:49 -0500
X400-Received: by /PRMD=LANGATE/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=GB/; Relayed; Tue, 14 Mar 1995 03:41:00 -0500

test m




From: Peter Goodhew :      goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 13 Mar 1995 08:51:38 GMT
Subject: Re: Electron optics teaching

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--[ FORWARDED PRIVATE MESSAGE ]--------

To: GVKM07A
From: Peter Goodhew
Date: 03/13/95 06:01 AM

David Cockayne asked:
}
} WITH REGARD TO THE QUESTION ABOUT TEACHING OPTICS, CAN ANYONE
ADVISE ME OF WHAT SOFTWARE PACKAGES ARE AVAILABLE FOR TEACHING
ELECTRON OPTICS?

At the same time a similar question was posted on the Microscopy
list (by someone different).

I would be delighted if anyone can update the following list of
teaching software (in the area of microscopy) known to me:

The Institute of Materials (UK) distribute:

The Transmission Electron Microscope by Goodhew
The Scanning Electron Microscope by Humphreys (John)
Electron Diffraction by Goodhew
The Stereographic Projection by Humphreys
Analysis in the Electron Microscope by Goodhew, Humphreys and
Cliff
X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy by Watts
X-ray Auger and Laser emission by Goodhew

These are all IBM PC DOS versions, available from Institute of
Materials, 1 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5DB, fax
+44(0)171 839 2078
The MATTER project is currently working on greatly-improved
Windows and Mac versions of most of these topics: Completion of
the first two topics (TEM and SEM) is scheduled for the end of
1995. All the above are aimed firmly at teaching, not at research
applications.

There is also an SEM simulation available which originated in
Australia but which is supposed to be downloadable from Nestor
Zaluzec's Microscopy Bulletin Board. However we have consistently
failed to transfer it. Has anyone in the UK succeeded?

I also saw recently a very full simulation of a light microscope.
This is aimed at biologists and was written (and is distributed)
by Maurice Smith at: mol-at-molcol.demon.co.uk

If you can add to this list please reply to both lists [
microscopy and materials-l ]

Thanks

Peter

PS 120+ members of the materials list now!

------------------------------------------------------------ ------
-----
Professor Peter J Goodhew, Department of Materials Science &
Engineering
University of Liverpool
LIVERPOOL Fax (44) (0)151 794 4675
L69 3BX, UK Tel (44) (0)151 794 4665 (secretary
Debra)
------------------------------------------------------------ ------
-----
inter alia: Director of the MATTER project for educational
software
------------------------------------------------------------ ------
-----


-------- Original message header follows --------
From goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk Mon Mar 13 06:01:17 1995 [PIM 3.2-342.56]
Received: from AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV (aaem.amc.anl.gov [146.139.72.3]) by
inetgate.prodigy.com (8.6.10/8.6.9) with SMTP id GAA64180 for
{GVKM07A-at-mail.prodigy.com} ; Mon, 13 Mar 1995 06:01:17 -0500

-------------- End of message ---------------





From: DRStadden:R_D:Armstrong
Date: 3-14-95 8:09am
Subject: AFM Learning Curve

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To: MICROSCO:CENTRAL
cc: DRStadden:R_D:Armstrong
Subj: AFM Learning Curve
------------------------------------------------------------------

One of our researchers is looking into buying an AFM, primarily for
studying latex coatings. As a microscopist (PLM,SEM,EDX) in the
analytical group, I'm interested in the broader applications we might
find for our entire product line.

These are my questions:

1.) What is the "typical" learning curve for the AFM for non-
microscopists vs. microscopists?

2.) How useful is it for one to have access to other types of
microscopies to correlate with AFM results?

3.) Does the usual rule of "fewer operators, less downtime" apply
to any greater or lesser degree with the AFM?

I look forward to any thoughts and experiences you can share.

Dave Stadden
DRStadde+aCENTRAL%ARMSTRONG-at-MCIMAIL.COM
Phone 717-396-5109
FAX 717-396-5865






From: KAKER-at-ctklj.ctk.si
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 14:46:00 +0100 (WET)
Subject: Re:Electron Optics Teaching

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Price list for emTUTOR and semTUTOR (informations from 4th March 1995
direct from Guy Cox Software, Australia):

1. emTUTOR or semTUTOR alone: 100 $
2. Combined package: 160 $
3. Parafocal: 150 S

For detail write or call:

Guy Cox Software
Attn:Guy Cox, M.A., D.Phil.
P.O.Box 366
Rozelle, N.S.W.2039 Australia
Phone & Fax:(02) 818 1896
E-mail:guy-at-emu.su.oz.au

Henrik Kaker
kaker-at-ctklj.ctk.si




From: bjg-at-uniwa.uwa.edu.au (Brendon J. Griffin)
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 00:00:44 +0800
Subject: Australian 'Virtual SEM' teaching package via FTP

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {199503141555.XAA29381-at-uniwa.uwa.edu.au}

Dear All,

I am the author of "Virtual SEM", an earlier version of which called
"SUPERSEM" is available through FTP from the EMMPDL library.

"Virtual SEM 1.2" is an update of this earlier package and is much
enhanced. I'm a bit short of time but the recent discussion (Prof.
Goodhew, and Chuck Garber - regards to both) I think is in part mistaking
my software for that available commercially through SPI and others.

The latest version will be passed to Nestor and John Mansfield in about a
fortnight at the Scanning meeting and I hope they will see fit to update
the old version. It is public domain and comments are most appreciated.
To summarise it is a MAC product utilising real images controlled through a
"SEM console" simulation. It includes tutorial information and two self
assessing tests, the results from which are automatically stored on file.
We have been using it for 18 months and feedback has been good.

The drawback is that it is now around 35 meg in size and I expect it to
reach 40 meg soon. It only needs 4 meg of ram to run on, for example, a
MAC IIsi or better. I developed most of it on a powerbook 180C.

The size is a problem for FTP and as noted in earlier versions I can supply
it on a multisession CD. To do this I am charging US$75 to cover writing
and postal costs only. I will upgrade to later versions and hope to be
able to at postal cost, if I have to hire a bod to do it then would have to
cover the time but cost would still be minimal. We also have a virtual EDS
in development and plan to fully integrate the two.

I will try and answer any queries. Those that have contacted me earlier, I
have not lost your requests, am working my way thru as fast as I can -
please be patient.


Brendon
Brendon J. Griffin
Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
The University of Western Australia
Nedlands, WA, AUSTRALIA 6907
ph 61-9-380-2739 fax 61-9-380-1087





From: mullerw-at-rmslab.rockefeller.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 10:59:43 EST
Subject: Microscopy listserver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sir or Madam:

I am an Associate Professor at The Rockefeller University interested
in obtaining access to the microscopy listserver. A colleague told me that
this would be a good medium to advertise postdoctoral and technical positions
that may be available in my laboratory.

Please let me know if I need to submit any more information. My address
is:
William A. Muller, MD, PhD
Box 176
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021
Phone (212) 327-8104
Fax (212) 327-8875

e-mail address: mullerw-at-rmslab.rockefeller.edu

Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,


Bill Muller






From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 14 Mar 1995 16:31:43 -0400
Subject: Int'l MAS Conf??

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Message-ID: {n1416923531.369-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

Subject: Time: 4:23 PM
OFFICE MEMO Int'l MAS Conf?? Date: 3/14/95

I have heard rumors that there will be an international microbeam analysis
meeting in Australia early in 1996. Does anyone know if
this is so; and if it is, do you have any information about when and
where it will be?





From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 17:04:50 -0400
Subject: FM crossover between FITC & Rhodamine

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I'm staining spinal cord and medulla's neurons from rats' fetuses, 10 days
old, with the following primaries antibodies: Rabbit anti Glycine 1:2500,
1:4000; Rabbit anti GABA 1:100, 1:200; Rabbit anti GAD 1:300, 1:500; and
anti-synaptophysin 1:150, 1:300. I'm using FITC 1:100 or Rhodamine 1:100 as
my secondary antibodies. I keep getting crossover between FITC and
Rhodamine despite the different dilutions of the primary antibodies I have
used. Does anyone has any suggestion?
Thanks in advance,

Ciprian Almonte
Research assistant
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology
3200 Henry Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19129
Voice: (215) 842-4081







From: Dave DeFily :      defily-at-tam2000.tamu.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 16:28:18 -0600
Subject: 1.53 vs. 1.57

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We've been trying to measure "integrated density" of some fluorescent images and
found significant differences in the numbers calculated in v. 1.53 and 1.57. We
have 1.53 on a quadra 950 and 1.57 on an 8100. Working with the same image,
1.53 returns numbers approximately 2,000,000 and 1.57 gives us numbers about
400. The mean intensity, Std dev, background, number of pixels...are identical
in both versions. LUTs are also the same in both versions. These are TIFF
images acquired on a DOS machine. I'm not sure if it's related to the
integrated density difference, but in 1.57 we can "open" the TIFF files, while
in 1.53 we have to "import" the TIFF file.

Is there something obvious I'm overlooking? Any suggestions are appreciated.
Thanks

-Dave defily-at-tamu.edu







From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 17:40:19 -0400
Subject: FITC and Rhodamine crossover????

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm staining spinal cord and medulla's neurons from rats' fetuses, 10 days
old, with the following primaries antibodies: Rabbit anti Glycine 1:2500,
1:4000; Rabbit anti GABA 1:100, 1:200; Rabbit anti GAD 1:300, 1:500; and
anti-synaptophysin 1:150, 1:300. I'm using FITC 1:100 or Rhodamine 1:100 as
my secondary antibodies. I keep getting crossover between FITC and
Rhodamine despite the different dilutions of the primary antibodies I have
used. Does anyone has any suggestion?
Thanks in advance,

Ciprian Almonte
Research assistant
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology
3200 Henry Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19129
Voice: (215) 842-4081







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 1995 22:45:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: FTP & WWW at ANL site

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G'day Subscribers....

A general posting since I've had a bunch of questions all
about the same thing.

Yes the EMMPDL/MASLIB/PD Shareware libraries are avaiable
via anonymous FTP. The site is

WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV (= 146.139.72.10 )

Login via standard FTP protocols with
Username=Anonymous
Password=Your Email Address

but please note that you CANNOT access these files using a WWW Browsing program
like Mosiac, Netscape or any other, even though they have FTP
capabilities. You must use a standard FTP protocol client program.
which accesses the conventional FTP ports.

The reason for this is that the although WWW server and the FTP
server are both on the same Computer (WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV=146.139.72.10)
they reside on two different disk partitions which are NOT linked.
The FTP server looks in one place and the WWW server another.
When you login to the WWW site, your browser (client) program
has only access to the disk space assigned to the WWW server hence
it (the WWW program) will NEVER see the FTP files and vice versa!
The reasons for this are a combination of security and convenience
on my part, but with the explosion of the WWW I've created yet
another headache for myself.

So for all of you that have tried and failed this is the most
common reason. If you don't understand this call me next week
sometime and I'll explain, or better yet come to the Telecommunications
Tutorial which I'll be giving at the August MSA meeting.

In retrospect I should have put them on different machines with
different DN's and then the problem would not have happened, but
the damage is done and until I get a chance to come up for air
it will have to stay that way. There is yet another alternative
which is to define an alias on the DNS for the FTP server. If
I can figure out the right person to contact I'll try that route
but be guarenteed it will not be soon.

Just a reminder.....
Abstracts/Papers for the August MSA meeting are due March 15th
i.e. probably the day you receive/read this message.

Cheers...
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

Nestor








From: Greg Begin :      GREGB-at-sales.lmt.com
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 08:11:43 CST6CDT
Subject: ? August Microscopy Meeting

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Howdy All,

If anyone has information on the Microscopy Meeting in August
could you please send information on contacts for the meeting.

Also, I am looking to attend regional meetings and would love to
find a calendar of meetings and places with contacts. I would be
attending for training and exibiting.

Thank You all!!!

P.S. all that are interested about the LaserMaster ImagePrinter
1800 DPI the "NEW" price is $ 6,995.00 and an upgrade from a 60
mhz processor to a 100 mhz. WOW, 1K off plus upgrade.

Greg Begin - LaserMaster Imaging
Specialist in Scientific/Medical Imaging




From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 07:23:22 +0800PST
Subject: FITC and Rhodamine crossover????????

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Just read the posting by Ciprian Almonte concerning crossover between
FITC and Rhodamine and had a couple of questions about what he is
doing. What are your FITC and Rhodamine linked too--goat
anti-rabbit??? Are you trying to do double labelling??? Or is it
that you are getting fluorescence of the FITC at the rhodamine
settings?? More information is required to help.
Yours
Mark Elliott, PhD
UBC-Pulmonary Research Laboratory,
St. Paul's Hospital
Vancouver BC Canada




From: gkennedy-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 07:42:33 -0800
Subject: FITC/rhodamine

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You need to "fine tune" your microscope filters. Do you perhaps have an older Olympus?? Call your local microscope rep and ask for the correct filters to narrow the band pass of the dichroic filters. Grace






From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 07:19:05 +0800PST
Subject: epon alternatives

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I think this may have been discussed by this group earlier but at the
time we were not worried about it so I didn't keep a record of the
responses. One of our tech's asked me to post this:
We are looking for a plastic medium which can replace Epon in
Biological TEM. In our lab we regularly use Epon 812 for its good
stainability of membranes. Recently however, we have just too many
samples to infiltrate and Epon is just too viscous for multiple
tissue transfers. The result is extensive numbers of labour hours.
Please let us know if you have succcessfully worked with any plastic
that has equal stainability of the membranes but is less viscous.
Thanks
Mark Elliott
UBC-Pulmonary Research Laboratory
St. Paul's Hospital
Vancouver BC Canada




From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 13:42:20 -0400
Subject: Re: FITC and Rhodamine crossover????????

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} Just read the posting by Ciprian Almonte concerning crossover between
} FITC and Rhodamine and had a couple of questions about what he is
} doing. What are your FITC and Rhodamine linked too--goat
} anti-rabbit??? Are you trying to do double labelling??? Or is it
} that you are getting fluorescence of the FITC at the rhodamine
} settings?? More information is required to help.
} Yours
} Mark Elliott, PhD
} UBC-Pulmonary Research Laboratory,
} St. Paul's Hospital
} Vancouver BC Canada

FITC and Rhodamine are linked to anti-rabbit, and I'm planning to do double
labelling. My major problem is that I'm getting flourescence of the FITC at
the rhodamine settings and viceversa. Thanks, to all of those that have
replied so far. I appreciate all their suggestions.
Ciprian

Ciprian Almonte
Research assistant
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology
3200 Henry Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19129
Voice: (215) 842-4081
E-mail almonte-at-medcolpa.edu







From: Wayne A. Buttermore :      butterw-at-iia.org
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 18:00:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Unsubscribe

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Unsubscribe butterw-at-iia.org





From: MacisNo1-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 21:12:05 -0500
Subject: FITC/ Rhod

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Try using more selective excitation filters (narrower band pass). Another
suggestion is to use a "Red Cut" Filter. This greatly supresses the secondary
peak that is associated with FITC. Contact you local microscope supplier or
Omega Optical at (802) 254-2690. Good Luck,

Lawrence Kordon
Nikon, Inc.
(410) 740-7404




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 15:50:13 +1100
Subject: SEM of Microcapsules

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Message-Id: {199503160342.QAA24006-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
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Hello all,
We have a user wanting to look at the inside of Polycaprolactone
Microcapsules in the SEM. We are not wanting to do sections for the TEM.
I have tried to fracture the microcapsules in liquid N2, after embedding
them in resin, but they dont fracture through the capsule, only around it.
Also, I have tried to section the block face of the capsules in resin, but
resin seems to infiltrate into the capsule and so no internal structures
can be seen.
These capsules are between 100 microns - 20 microns in diameter, and have a
melting point around 65oC.
Has anyone tried this before and had success? The references I have
contain no details about preparation of their specimens.
Any help would be appreciated.

Richard Lander.

richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 22:54:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Int. MAS Meeting (IUMAS)

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G'day Subscribers (actually in it's now about 11 pm in Chicago)

Here's the info that was posted about the IUMAS meeting that
I dug out of the Archives. You will have to check with Dave
Williams of Lehigh (dbw1-at-lehigh.edu) if you want further details.

Also the WWW site is also starting to get fairly busy, lately
we've been averaging ~ 250 connections/day. So if it
appears slow, consider yourself forwarned.

The FTP server crashed sometime on Monday Evening.
So if anyone tried to get to the libraries, it was
a useless battle. As of a few minutes ago it was back
up and running.


Why does this always happen just before deadlines for
MSA abstracts?

It must be the Ides of March syndrome,
but then again maybe it was a Leprechaun.

G'night all.... Nestor

-------------------------------------------------------------



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 22:54:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Int. MAS Meeting (IUMAS)

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MICROBEAM ANALYSIS SOCIETY STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS TO MAS-1995 (Breckenridge, CO)
and IUMAS-1 (Sydney Australia)

All students (and faculty) involved in microanalysis-related research, should
note a remarkable opportunity for travel to two forthcoming microanalysis
conferences. The Microbeam Analysis society is offering student scholarships to
the 29th Annual MAS meeting in Breckenridge CO (August 6-11, 1995). Student
papers must be submitted, in standard MAS-MSA format to Dr. E. Etz, NIST,
Division 837, Bldg. 222, room Q-113, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 by March 15, 1995.
The best submitted papers will be awarded funds towards attending the annual
meeting in Breckenridge. Any more information about the program can be obtained
from Dr. Etz at etz-at-gapnet.nist.gov

What makes this scholarship offer extraordinary is that the best three papers
given by student scholarship winners at the Breckenridge meeting will be
awarded a minimum of $500 towards the cost of attending the 1st
International Union of
Microbeam Analysis Societies Conference in Sydney, Australia, February 5-9,
1996. These scholarships are only open to student members of MAS, and student
application forms for MAS are available in past issues of Microbeam Analysis,
the MAS journal. Student membership is a great bargain at $2.50, and doesn't
require that the advisor be a MAS member - although if you aren't, I ask that
you consider joining.

I will mail you more information with appropriate details about the meetings
and the paper format etc., but if you have any immediate questions, please don't
hesitate to contact me by email (dbw1-at-lehigh.edu).

Dave Williams






From: Richard E. Edelmann :      EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 08:01:30 -500
Subject: Epoxy resin dust saftey

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Can anyone out there point me in the right direction for finding
information on the health risks associated with epoxy resin dust
produced by jewler's saws, jig saws, dremel tools, files, sand paper,
etc.. Yes, I have looked at the various MSDS for the resins but they
haven't provided much real world information (I at least haven't run
into the problem of a tanker truck spillage of NSA).


Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Biological Science Building
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu (Michael Dunlap)
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 08:11:26 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM of Microcapsules

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Richard -

We use double stick tape to fracture the Microcapsules. On a SEM stub we
mount an stip of tape. On tape that is covering the stub we add a small
amount of dried microcapsules. Using an exta piece of tape cover the tape
and capsules and rip off. This will fracture many of the microcapsule so
that you will be able to look inside and outside many of them. Coat the
stubs and view in the SEM.

Good luck

Mike

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Michael Dunlap | lab (916) 752-0284 |
| Facility For Advanced Instrumentation | fax (510) 422-2282 |
| University of California | mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu |
| Davis CA, 95616 | |
===========================================================================






From: Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Louisa Howard)
Date: 16 Mar 95 11:16:20 EST
Subject: TEM and LM on cell monolayer

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Message-id: {14465545-at-blitzen.Dartmouth.EDU}

I have done many TEM preparations on cell monolayers, using tissue culture
dishes and/or glass coverslips. There is a lab here that would like to do light
microscopy and TEM on a single cell in a monolayer. I assume this can be done,
if I had a coverslip that was etched with a marker grid. This marked grid
pattern would have to show on the epoxy face, after the coverslip was separated
from the embedding media. Can anyone tell me if there are glass or plastic
coverslips that have some type of etched grid pattern that could be used in
this way and where they could be ordered in the U.S.

I would prefer working with a plastic/tissue culture type of coverslip, as
they are easier to remove before sectioning.

thanks
Louisa Howard
Ripple Electron Micrscope Facility
Dartmouth College
Hanover, N.H 03755
Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.edu




From: Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Louisa Howard)
Date: 16 Mar 95 11:36:20 EST
Subject: TEM and LM of cell monolayer

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Message-id: {14465851-at-blitzen.Dartmouth.EDU}

I have done many TEM preparations on cell monolayers, using tissue culture
dishes and/or glass coverslips. There is a lab here that would like to do light
microscopy and TEM on a single cell in a monolayer. I assume this can be done,
if I had a coverslip that was etched with a marker grid. This marked grid
pattern would have to show on the epoxy face, after the coverslip was separated
from the embedding media. Can anyone tell me if there are glass or plastic
coverslips that have some type of etched grid pattern that could be used in
this way and where they could be ordered in the U.S.

I would prefer working with a plastic/tissue culture type of coverslip, as
they are easier to remove before sectioning.

thanks
Louisa Howard
Ripple Electron Micrscope Facility
Dartmouth College
Hanover, N.H 03755
Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.edu




From: Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Louisa Howard)
Date: 16 Mar 95 12:56:52 EST
Subject: TEM and LM of cell monolayer

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Message-id: {14466868-at-blitzen.Dartmouth.EDU}

I have done many TEM preparations on cell monolayers, using tissue culture
dishes and/or glass coverslips. There is a lab here that would like to do light
microscopy and TEM on a single cell in a monolayer. I assume this can be done,
if I had a coverslip that was etched with a marker grid. This marked grid
pattern would have to show on the epoxy face, after the coverslip was separated
from the embedding media. Can anyone tell me if there are glass or plastic
coverslips that have some type of etched grid pattern that could be used in
this way and where they could be ordered in the U.S.

I would prefer working with a plastic/tissue culture type of coverslip, as
they are easier to remove before sectioning.

Thanks.

Louisa Howard
Ripple Electron Micrscope Facility
Dartmouth College
Hanover, N.H 03755
Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.edu




From: nina allen :      allen-at-wfu.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 14:54:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM and LM of cell monolayer

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If you are going to look at cells in a light microscope, it is a poor
idea to use plastic coverslips. You will not get a good image in
Differential Interference Contrast or Polarized light...as the cover slip
may be strained, and so forth. N.Allen




From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 15:32:58 -0500
Subject: curing resins

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Hello Microscopists,
Although I can't help Richard Edelmann with his question regarding
resin dust except to say that we do use dust masks when sawing or cutting
blocks; I would like to pose a question closely related to this.
How many of you have your curing ovens vented to a hood?
We have a VERY low volumn of resins being cured at any given time and
have sought, somewhat unsuccessfully, information that would help us
determine at what level it would be necessary to do this. As Richard said,
the MSDS sheets don't provide much real world information. I did call one
of the EM suppliers (I don't recall which one now), and was told that
venting to a hood would be necessary only in an industrial situation.
I would be very interested in hearing your opinions and how you handle
this problem.
I would also be willing to summarize any responses and post that to the
list.

Thank you very much, Sandra Zane

Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: Patty Jansma :      plj-at-manduca.neurobio.arizona.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 13:52:43 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: TEM and LM of cell monolayer

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We use glass gridded coverslips for tracking cells. You can get them from
Bellco Glass, Inc. P.O. Box 340 Edrudo Road Vineland, New Jersey 08360
Cat. # 1916 -92525 Etched gridded coverslips 1 case approx. $30.00.


Patty Jansma Tel:602-621-6671
plj-at-manduca.neurobio.arizona.edu
Arizona Research Labs Division of Neurobiology
University of Arizona


On 16 Mar 1995, Louisa Howard wrote:

} I have done many TEM preparations on cell monolayers, using tissue culture
} dishes and/or glass coverslips. There is a lab here that would like to do light
} microscopy and TEM on a single cell in a monolayer. I assume this can be done,
} if I had a coverslip that was etched with a marker grid. This marked grid
} pattern would have to show on the epoxy face, after the coverslip was separated
} from the embedding media. Can anyone tell me if there are glass or plastic
} coverslips that have some type of etched grid pattern that could be used in
} this way and where they could be ordered in the U.S.
}
} I would prefer working with a plastic/tissue culture type of coverslip, as
} they are easier to remove before sectioning.
}
} Thanks.
}
} Louisa Howard
} Ripple Electron Micrscope Facility
} Dartmouth College
} Hanover, N.H 03755
} Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.edu







From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 16:08:03 -0500
Subject: EM:curing resins

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Hello Microscopists,
Although I can't help Richard Edelmann with his question regarding
resin dust except to say that we do use dust masks when sawing or cutting
blocks; I would like to pose a question closely related to this.
How many of you have your curing ovens vented to a hood?
We have a VERY low volumn of resins being cured at any given time and
have sought, somewhat unsuccessfully, information that would help us
determine at what level it would be necessary to do this. As Richard said,
the MSDS sheets don't provide much real world information. I did call one
of the EM suppliers (I don't recall which one now), and was told that
venting to a hood would be necessary only in an industrial situation.
I would be very interested in hearing your opinions and how you handle
this problem.
I would also be willing to summarize any responses and post that to the
list.

Thank you very much, Sandra Zane

Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: jthompso-at-wiley.csusb.edu (Jeff Thompson)
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 14:00:42 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM and LM of cell monolayer

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Glass coverslips etched with an alphanumeric grid are available
from Bellco Glass, Inc. (800-257-7043). I have successfully grown cells in
culture on these coverslips for LM and SEM analysis after coating the
coverslips with either poly-lysine or collagen. Identified cells are
relatively easy to re-identify when going from one system to the other. I
have not embedded cells grown on these coverslips, so I do not know if the
grid will show up on the surface of the plastic when the coverslip is
removed.

Jeff Thompson, Ph.D.
Director, Electron Microscope and Image Analysis Center
California State University
San Bernardino, CA 92407
jthompso-at-wiley.csusb.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 1995 23:50:47 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Nanotubes & X-sections

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Message-Id: {199503170423.AA27446-at-pccms.pku.edu.cn}


I must confess I'm a bit perplexed by Z.Q. Liu's question about
x-sections of Nano-tubes. If they are truely "nanometer" in size
why would you attempt to x-section them? Are they actually larger?
All the EM I've seen about nanotubes did not involve x-section, but
simple direct imaging.

Okay so let me ask the dumb question. How big are they really?

Nestor....
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.




From: Leszek Kepinski :      kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 12:09:15 +0100 (CET)
Subject: HRTEM negatives - digitalization

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What is the appropriate way to digitize TEM negatives for HRTEM work at
resolution of approx.0.23 nm? Please give approximate cost of the digitizing
hardware when possible.
Leszek Kepinski


*****************************************************************
Leszek Kepinski
Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research,
Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 937, 50-950 Wroclaw, Poland
tel:(4871) 350 21 ext.153
fax:(4871) 44 10 29
email: kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
*****************************************************************




From: Carl Henderson :      chender-at-umich.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 09:48:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Mprobe.Geol

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On Fri, 17 Mar 1995, Robert McDonald wrote:

} I have been asked to analyse some micas for Rb and from a
} preliminary examination it looks like I should use the L alpha
} line - except that the Si K alpha is rather close making the
} Rb sit on the slope to the right of it.
}
} Anyone have any advice on backgrounds etc?
}
} I am using TAP xtals, 25 kV,55 nA with a counting time of
} 60 seconds for peak and background - is this reasonable?
}
} Machine is Cameca SX50.

25kV, 55 nA sounds pretty high for routine mica analyses, though it might
be OK to analyse the Rb at this condition after analysing the major
elements. At 25kV, you could use the Rb KA line on an LIF crystal and
avoid the Si overlap. The counting times sound reasonable, though you
may have to increase them if you are really interested in "trace"
analysis of low levels of Rb.

I suspect that you will always obtain "false" Rb when analysing Rb LA on
TAP in the presence of high Si in your sample. The Si KA peak is about
-750 steps from the Rb LA line (and about +200 from the Rb LB line). This
is far enough that most of the Si peak will be resolved, but there will
probably be some tail effect of the Si under the Rb LA peak. You can
check for this be analysing SiO2. This will give you the worst case Si
interference for silicates. You could continue this process and draw up a
working line (curve) of wt.% Si vs. wt.% measured Rb by measuring various
silicates with differing Si contents and no Rb. You could then use this
curve to correct for your analyses of Rb on your unknowns.

The SX50 software should also give you the chance to use a background
"slope" instead of having to take background counts at both +bkgd and
-bkgd positions. The "slope" on the older CAMECA MBX software was defined
as (bkdg+ + bkgd-)/(2*bkgd+). Thus, a "flat" background would have a
slope of 1.000, while a background that increases with lower sin(theta)
will have a slope } 1.000. Using a background slope will not solve the
tail effect of the Si under the Rb LA, but may help you in using the Rb KA
line on LIF, where the bkgd- position may be out of range for the
spectrometer.

Good luck!

Carl

Carl Henderson
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2005 C.C. Little Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA
-----------------------------------------------------
(313) 936-1550 (voice) **** Next time, ****
(313) 763-4690 (FAX) *** take the ***
chender-at-umich.edu (e-mail) **** train! ****
-----------------------------------------------------




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 10:33:50 EST
Subject: Re: Nanotubes & X-sections

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Dear Nestor,
John Cowley gave me reprints of some of his recent papers in which
there are images of nanotubes which are on the order of 10 nm across (O.D.).
He and his co-workers have found different structures at various places in
the nanotubes, so I can see why someone might wish to section them (although
it is hard to imagine how this can be done without perturbing (destroying?)
the structures). John would likely send you reprints if you asked him.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 10:55:30 EST
Subject: Re: HRTEM negatives - digitization

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Dear Leszek,
In order to retain the original resolution (0.23 nm), the digitization
should have a pixel size corresponding to no more than half that resolution.
That is, if the magnification of the negative is 100,000x, the pixel size must
be ~10 micrometers. This can be done on (among other brands) a Perkin-Elmer
flatbed microdensitometer (cost ~ $100,000). A much cheaper alternative is
a CCD camera. By arranging to image the negative with the CCD so that the
pixels are ~10 micrometers you can get the required resolution. This means
that a 1000*1000 CCD array will look at a 1 cm**2 area. This can be done at
a cost of ~$50,000 (maybe less--I'm no expert here). You also save scan time
with the CCD; however, quantitation of intensities--especially for ED patterns
etc. where there are regions of very high OD surrounded be regions of low OD--
is much worse with CCD than with a flatbed scanner. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Larry Allard :      allardlfjr-at-ma160.ms.ornl.gov
Date: 17 Mar 1995 08:42:26 U
Subject: nanotube x-sect.

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Message-ID: {n1416690645.11463-at-ma160.ms.ornl.gov}

Subject: Time: 8:16 AM
OFFICE MEMO nanotube x-sect. Date: 3/17/95

Can standard TEM images normal to the axis of the nanotube determine
unambiguously the cross sectional shape of tubes (i.e. whether the tubes are
facetted, circular cylinders, oval-shaped, hollow or filled with amorphous
material, etc?). We think there are 2 ways to get this information: direct
imaging of cross-sections or electron holography (in which case you don't
need cross-sections). The problem with cross-sections is the potential
development of artifacts during the preparation process. We suggest strongly
to use electron holography (see for example: J. Mater. Sci., 29 (1994)
5612-5614 (this is on Pd particles, but the principle is the same). Also see
our paper which includes nanotubes in the Proceedings of the 1st Int'l
Workshop on Electron Holography, Elsevier, in press.





From: ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L. D. Marks)
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 11:56:54 -0600
Subject: Re: HRTEM negatives - digitization

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Bill Tivol said in his email that "the digitization should have a pixel size corresponding to no more than half that resolution". I think that this is a
typo: you need at least 2 sampling points for a given wave. Therefore if
one wants to quantify 0.23nm spacings in HREM the smallest sampling is half
this (Nyquist limit) and } 6 samplings is more standard.




From: Larry Allard :      allardlfjr-at-ma160.ms.ornl.gov
Date: 17 Mar 1995 15:35:47 U
Subject: Digitizing TEM negatives

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I've repeated the original question below, in case someone's missed the
thread. I suspect that Liu is trying to make cross-sections to
characterize growth mechanisms. Nanotubes, like asbestos fibers, are
easily examined in plan-view, since their high aspect ratio virtually
guarantees that they will lie flat on a film with the long axis parallel
to the film surface. Most of the pictures that I have seen claiming to
be nanutubes in cross-section had no supporting evidence that they were
anything but an essentially spherically symmetric "bucky onion."

In order to get a true nanotube cross section, one will first probably
have to anneal the mass to remove all lesser fullerenes, including the
onions. Then break the mass up and embed in a hard epoxy. Although
ultramicrotomy isn't a bad idea, there is no real way to align the
nanotubes and I'm not certain what effect this would have on cutting.
It is probably better just to sandwich between silicon and do a standard
cross-section by mechanical polishing, dimpling, and ion-milling. It is
going to be hard to prevent rapid milling of the epoxy as opposed to the
tubes, so it is important to mechanically thin as far as possible before
ion-milling (hence, the silicon as an optical guide).

That's my 2 cents worth.

Daniel L. Callahan
Department of Mechanical Engg. and Materials Science
Rice University
dlc-at-owlnet.rice.edu
---------- Forwarded message ----------

Subject: Time: 3:27 PM
OFFICE MEMO Digitizing TEM negatives Date: 3/17/95

Regarding the recent debate on negative scanning:
The Ektron scanner is {$30K, and gives a highly linear image up to 4096 x
4096 pixels. It will permit accurate density corrections to be done for best
quantitative results (see Voelkl, et al., Ultramicroscopy 55 (1994) 75-89,
for all you could ever want to know about scanning negatives and density
corrections etc.)





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 16:22:54 EST
Subject: Re: Re: HRTEM negs - digit

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L.D. Marks is correct--I meant a pixel size corresponding to twice the reso-
lution, or half the size. I always seem to have trouble writing about things
for which less is better :-).
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: MILLERS-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
Date: 17 Mar 1995 10:17:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: microscopical society of canada annual meeting

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Microscopical Society of Canada
22nd Annual Meeting

The MSC Executive and the Local Organising Committee cordially invite you to attend
and participate in the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Microscopical Society of Canada.
This meeting will be held in the University Centre Building, University of Ottawa, Ottawa,
Ontario, Canada, June 4-7, 1995. A varied and interesting scientific program has been
planned and will consist of a combination of interdisciplinary symposia presented by
speakers from around the world, separate physical and biological symposia, oral and
poster presentations, workshops on TEM specimen preparation of materials and cryo-
SEM specimen preparation and X-ray analysis, and commercial exhibits.

Local Organising Committee

Jim Corbett (Chairman, Secretary, University of Ottawa Liaison)
John McCaffrey (Treasurer, Space Management, Social Program, Accommodation)
Jeff Fraser (Commercial Exhibits, Social Program, Accommodation)
Graham Carpenter (Scientific Program Chair, Materials)
Larry Arsenault (Scientific Program Chair, Biology)
Peter Sewell (Corporate Liaison, Commercial Exhibits)
Kamal Botros (Scientific Program)
Louise Weaver (Scientific Program)
Paula Allan-Wojtas (Registration)
Shea Miller (Registration)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF ABSTRACTS: March 31, 1995

DEADLINE FOR PRE-REGISTRATION: May 1, 1995

For further information contact:

Program: Registration:

Jim Corbett Shea Miller or Paula Allan-Wojtas
Department of Physics Centre for Food and Animal Research
University of Waterloo Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Waterloo, Ontario Room 2016, K.W. Neatby Bldg.
Canada, N2L 3G1 Central Experimental Farm
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A 0C6
Tel: (519) 885-1211 Tel: (613) 957-4347, ext. 7908 (Shea),
7970 (Paula)
Fax: (519) 746-8115 Fax: (613) 943-2353
e-mail: corbett-at-physics.watstar.uwaterloo.ca e-mail: millers-at-ncccot.agr.ca
allanwojtasp-at-ncccot.agr.ca


PRELIMINARY MEETING PROGRAM

INTERDISCIPLINARY SYMPOSIUM
ADVANCES IN MICROSCOPY


J. Watson (Michigan State University) Events in science and microscopy
J. Hillier (Princeton University) Early developments in EM
A. Eades (University of Illinois) Electron microscopes of the future
O. Krivanek (Gatan Inc) Nanoscale elemental and chemical
mapping
M. Hansen (FEI Inc.) A comparison of LaB6 and CeB6
thermionic cathodes
I.A. Rauf (Queen's University) STM, AFM, CTEM and STEM imaging
of polycrystalline tin-doped indium
oxide thin films
H.J. Kreuzer (Dalhousie University) Lensless low-voltage electron
holography

MATERIALS SCIENCES

D. Dorset (University of Buffalo) Direct structure determination by
electron crystallography
A. Eades (University of Illinois) RHEED: progress towards the
extraction of quantitative information
P. Midgley (University of Bristol) Electron diffraction for structure
determination
D. McCombe (McMaster University) Scanning tunnelling microscopy of
semiconductor surfaces and
interfaces
D. Perovic (University of Toronto) Direct imaging of semiconductor
dopants by EM
M. Loretto (University of Birmingham) Analytical TEM of advanced
materials
G. Weatherly (McMaster University) Microstructures of SiC-reinforced Mg
casting alloys
C. Hansen (Queen's University) The application of environmental
SEM to studies of concrete

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

W. Chiu (Baylor College of Medicine) Cryo-imaging
P. Ottensmeyer (University of Toronto) Imaging and computer analysis
H. Hagler (University of Texas) Calcium imaging
P. Ingram (Research Triangle Inst) Elemental mapping
P. Echlin (Cambridge University) Cryo-methods


WORKSHOPS



TEM specimen preparation for Materials Science
Topics include: Ion-beam sputtering
Cleaving
Ultramicrotomy
Cross sections, etc.



Cryo-SEM specimen preparation and X-ray analysis
Topics include: Fracturing and cryo-planing for morphometric and elemental
analysis
Cryo-conductive coating
Standards for frozen hydrated specimens
Light element detection and quantification



Satellite Workshop (June 8, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa)
Applications of Microscopy in Agricultural Research
Topics include: Preparative techniques
3-D view of the cell
Microtubules
Soils in agricultural use
Electron microscopy in dairy research
Entomology
Image analysis-seed quality
Image analysis of SDS-PAGE gels
Spore development
Immunogold labelling
Food microstructure




From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:54:20 -0500
Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide2of3

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DVC Video Camera Guide And Release 2 of 2

Remember, if the camera is on the ragged edge of 8 bit performance and
you want to add gain for more sensitivity, even the smallest amount of
gain might put you in the 7 bit range if you we not there already.
If you have 10 bit capability on your board why not use a 10 bit camera.
* Also a camera specification of 60dB is not a 10 bit camera only an 8.
* Also there are many types of noise in a sensor besides thermal noise.
Cooling a sensor will reduce (thermal noise only) and allow you to
integrate longer. I would double check the impression some make that
when a 50db sensor is cooled it offers a better s/n of 10 or 12 bits vs
just 7.
The reduction of one type of noise (thermal) is all that cooling
provides.
* Other types of sensor noise besides dark current include photon, nyquest,
shot, gain noise, and flicker noise etc.
* The signal to noise of the sensor at room temperature is a good measure
of what you can expect.
** Look at the quantum efficiency at the nm range needed.
** look at the spectral response of the sensor.
** There are different grades of sensors available relative to dead
pixels and gray level variation on other manufacturers cameras.
*Digital RS-422 eliminates pixel jitter for sub-pixel accuracy if it is
needs versus the genlock action between the digitizer board and the
camera as they try to lock to each other in the RS-170 analog mode.
*Digital cameras of the higher end variety typically offer 7.5 frames/sec
vs 30 (real time) or even less depending on the amount of pixels you need
to process. If you wish to do real time imaging 30fps, 7.5fps will not
do. Also for fluorescence the shortest duration exposure is preferred.
* The camera has to have a good performance to cost ratio. At the low end
there are plenty of security type cameras out there, but will they offer
you the performance you require.
* The big point here is that the higher the signal to noise, the quieter
the signal, the more gain that can be added to the signal/ which adds noise
as a result, but allows the user to get more sensitivity.
Thus if you start with the quietest / highest signal to noise obtainable
the better off you are when trying to get more gray levels with minimum
sensitivity or more signal to noise allows more gain to be added to achieve
a set sensitivity far superior to a signal to noise start point less than
the DVC.

The following features listed below are offered by the DVC camera line:

General Statement: Analog video RS-170 focus
*Most digitizer boards are typically 8 bits some go higher with digital
RS-422
input. With Dc's 10 bits of signal on the analog RS-170 video, this offers
first of all more top end room for adding more sensitivity and still
maintaining
8 bits/ 256 gray levels for the digitizer board.
*You will see more digitizer boards with 10 bit capability on the analog
RS-170
input. What will you use as a real time 30 frame / sec camera to match that
feature. With most ( real time ) cameras being in the 7 bit range, they
would
better qualify for security applications. There are some 8 bit cameras, but
they only offer 256 gray levels with not much room to add gain for more
sensitivity. The DVC camera line offers 10 bits or 1024 gray levels output
for those boards along with simultaneous digital RS-422 on the digital models
One of the digitizer boards with a 10 bit analog front end is Mutech. They
are the only one presently that has that capability for now and others will
follow soon.

* Very high signal to noise } 62dB at .5 lux at 30fps/ real time
* Frame transfer 1/2" format sensor with 755 horizontal by 484 vertical
pixels, or 565 TV lines horizontal by 350 TV lines vertical resolution.
* The only upgradable research camera with the researchers funding
limitations in mind using the same high quality sensor on all 3 models.
Upgradability from the RS-170 analog unit to the dual output 8 bit
digital or to the dual output 10 bit digital models with RS-170 analog.
(This allows the camera to grow with the researcher) and his budget.
See part 3 of 3 next.




From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:52:28 -0500
Subject: Guide to Choosing A CCD Video Camera With New DVC Product Release

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And Digitizer Selection Guide For Benefit of Microscope Users Group

Monochrome Digital And Analog Video Camera Line By DVC Company
Part 1 of 3 due to capacity limitations of e-mail
*****************************************************************
With all due respect: If anyone is offended by a guide to choosing a
CCD video camera with a new product release that is
applicable for the users in this group ( HIT YOUR DELETE KEY NOW! )
There are some users that might appreciate this information.
(This was done with good intentions) so any providers of negative feedback
have been given the DELETE KEY OPTION and need not waste net time, thank you.
Valid questions are appreciated and I will try to answer them relative to
the volume I receive. Included is list of RS-422 digitizer boards in part 2
and 3.
* Please address any inquiry directly to dvcco-at-aol.com, not the main file
server.
*****************************************************************
Dear Microscope Users,

I wish to share some data with you on analog and digital monochrome cameras
that I thought you might be able to make use of when reviewing your present
or future camera situation. Some of the below information you might be aware
of, but others might not. If anyone belongs to other pertinent groups and
believes this information to be of benefit to that particular group we would
appreciate you letting us know of them.

Monochrome cameras offer much superior gray level and resolution performance
along with higher signal to noise specs than the typical color versions.
Everyone has different needs and the data below is for researchers who have
decided to utilize the benefits of monochrome cameras. Adding pseudo colors
to the many more gray levels attainable with a monochrome camera might be a
option for you, or adding a tunable liquid crystal filter in line with the
camera for serial Red, Green, Blue could also be a option if accurate
correlation of the pixel is important. For monochrome applications a
electronic tunable filter exists that is very selective with 5,7,10,15,20
,35 or 50nm band pass filters from 450 to 1050 nm range tunable
electronically!
See 2 of 2 for info on tunable filters.

Some things to look for in a research grade monochrome camera are the
following:
* The highest signal to noise possible in a real time 30 frames/sec. unit.
Signal to noise is the ultimate measure of a camera and no amount of
manipulation, bells and whistles, or 20 different knobs to adjust, will
change the bottom line which is the amount of gray levels obtainable.
* No geometric distortion- CCD cameras offer basically no distortion while
any tube camera gives you distortion in the } 5% range. My opinion is
that to use a tube camera where a ccd unit could be substituted is just
qualitative, not quantitative microscopy.
* No dead pixels on your sensor and lowest pixel variation with no false
fill-ins of pixels with data from the pixel next to it by use of memory
circuits due to imperfections in the manufacturing process.
Different types of CCD cameras have their uses.
The 2 main types are frame transfer (FT) and interline transfer (IT)
types for microscopy. CID types are also out there but have uses more in
machine vision applications.
Interline transfer sensors have large gaps between the pixels due to the
construction. They offer 100% fill factor by the use of plastic
micro lenses that help their sensitivity due to smaller well capacity,
but still have the ( same smaller wells.) Plastic does not offer good
performance down in the UV range below 400nm, and have other limitations
at the near IR range. 1/3 format sensors have even less well capacity
and I feel are only produced to provide better yields/profit for the
manufacturers for security applications.

Frame transfer sensors which DVC uses have dynamic range of 70dB to start
and have no dead pixels and no false fill-ins. The wells are very
large and the dark current is {30 electrons at 25C, room temperature.
The pixels are contiguous, or within angstroms of electrical separation.
Larger wells offer higher signal to noise. Double correlated sample and
hold circuits built right into the sensor help reduce noise further on
some frame transfer sensors. Frame transfer units offer one half the
vertical
resolution when doing integration and shuttering due the field transfer
technique used.
Spectral range with glass face plate attached 400-1100nm. Customers
doing (laser) work have reported response in the low 200nm range with
face plate removed and up to 1300nm.

Typical bit vs signal to noise ranges:
7 bits = 44dB to technically 50dB but more like 54dB realistically
8 bits = 55dB to 61dB or 256 gray levels
10 bits = 62dB+ for 1024 gray levels. **10 bits offers 4 times the
performance of an 8 bit camera.
* Another words a camera specification of 50dB falls into the 7 bit range
even though manufacturers and sales people might have you believe
otherwise. If you have an 8 bit board why not use a 8 bit or higher
camera.





From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:54:55 -0500
Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide3of3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Video Camera Selection Guide and DVC Product Release 3 of 3

* Sensitivities in the 1x10-4fc range at over 50% video. When other (IT)
type cameras barely see an image these DVC units are offering a perfect
image with extra gain to spare and no vertical line noise. Estimate
performance at about 5-6 ND filter better sensitivity than 768 type
interline transfer sensors.
* The only 10 bit digital camera with dual outputs RS-170 & RS-422 and at
real time video rates! 30 frames per second
* The only camera that has no sensor board. Sensor is physically mounted
to the front plate of the camera. Cooling above dew point can then be
done to have a truly quantitative camera in that temperature of sensor
can be lowered from room temperature or regulated at a constant
temperature or our -40C unit can be added.
* No need to cool the camera in most applications/ save the money.
* The DVC camera line was designed from the ground up to be a digital
output camera not a security camera. We use linear well regulated
multiple voltage linear power supply and solid C-Mounts with a 360
degree compression ring holding the c-ring firmly in place, not just a
little set screw that tends to loosen with time and strip out the
threads.
* 30dB of additional gain can be added for manual internal adjustable
operation accessible via a port from outside the camera, or external gain
and offset, or computer controlled gain! 30dB gain vs the others at 20dB
because the } 62db performance can fully utilize the 30db range. Where
with more than 20db on the IT types you just might end up with snow.
* Many other modifications can be done and our units do not come with AGC
unless you specify automatics. Automatics are for security cameras.
DVC will be responsive to your requirements from the end user to the OEM.
* Glass face plate removal to allow the user to easily go down to 300nm or
so. Customers with laser applications have reported response in the low
200nm range obviously at low quantum efficiencies.

The DVC camera line is excellent for any high signal to noise or low light
application and in real time!

DVC fits a niche between the too pricey and slow non real time digital only
video cameras and the security type cameras which don't offer enough of what
you need. If you like the resolution DVC can offer our flexibility in being
able to upgrade to the digital models is nice to have.
If any of you are interested in having a digital camera that works with your
Silicon Graphics Indy /Indigo 2 or Sun system, let us know.
DVC cameras are made in the USA and have a two year warranty.

* Three models of monochrome camera which are all upgradable to the DVC-10.
DVC-0A - RS-170 only with DB-37 connector for remote gain and upgradable
to the digital output RS-422 versions offering both
outputs.
DVC-8 - 8 bit RS-422 digital with RS-170 simultaneously.
DVC-10 -10 bit RS-422 digital with RS-170 simultaneously.

*** Below you will find a list of RS-422 digitizer boards that are compatible
to the DVC camera line, others are in the works.

****** Compatible Digitizers for RS-170 analog monochrome video are any
manufacturer. RS-170 is standard, typically from a BNC connector.
Does your board have capability to process RS-170 at 10 bits?
The DVC analog output will offer this. Remember if running 10 bit analog
RS-170 to a 8 bit board you will only see 8 bits.

Some of these boards have either 8 bit or 10 bit and higher capability.
*Compatible digitizers for RS-422 digital video that are
plug and play with the DVC digital camera line are listed below:

Manufacturer A-Z Platform Board Name/Model
Alacron IBM Alacron
Bit Flow IBM/MAC Raptor-VL
Coreco IBM F-64, OC-500
Datacube IBM MV-200
Dipix IBM P-360, XPG-1000
Epix IBM 4 Meg, Model 12
EDT SUN S-bus EDT
Hyperspeed IBM Hyperspeed
Imaging Technology IBM 15040, AFG, MFG
Imagraph IBM HI-Def
Matrox IBM Magic, 1280, 640, L/C
MuTech IBM 10 bit analog video in
Precision Digital (PDI) IBM/MAC IMAXX-PCI, SD
Univision IBM Piranha

Let DVC know if you wish, the following information:
Which digitizer board you are using or would like to use, or need help on.
If you have interest in the PCI bus
IBM, MAC, Sun, or SGI Indy or Indigo2 computer used
If DVC can help answer some of your technical concerns.
If your interest is analog or digital or both
If your interest is in tunable electronically selectable filters call DVC.

*****************************************************************************
***New DVC Camera Release estimated 4/95 will be the following:
Same features as above except now the digital RS-422 can be programmed or
reprogrammed for the VINO digital bus on the
((( SGI- Silicon Graphics Indy/Indigo 2 workstations)))
Imagine being able to move from SGI to RS-422 digital compatibility
with simultaneous RS-170 analog video!
Info on our cameras will be on the SGI Web soon.
*****************************************************************************

Feel free to e-mail, fax, or call DVC for more information.
If DVC can not reach you, we can not help you, so we chose to put this info
on
the net in hopes of helping anyone that needs it with a cost effective
research
grade video camera product that we feel, has a definite focus to this
microscope group. DVC has heard many of your problems and can be helpful,
and
possibly offer a solution. Stay in touch.

Sincerely,

Richard Klotsche
DVC Company
e-mail: dvcco-at-aol.com
phone: (619) 444-8300
fax: (619) 444-8321









From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 1995 14:44:14
Subject: Re: Int'l MAS Conf??

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In article {n1416923531.369-at-mse.engin.umich.edu} "Wil Bigelow" {Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu} writes:
} Date: 14 Mar 1995 16:31:43 -0400
} From: "Wil Bigelow" {Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}
} Subject: Int'l MAS Conf??

} Subject: Time: 4:23 PM
} OFFICE MEMO Int'l MAS Conf?? Date: 3/14/95

} I have heard rumors that there will be an international microbeam analysis
} meeting in Australia early in 1996. Does anyone know if
} this is so; and if it is, do you have any information about when and
} where it will be?

The meeting is the first meeting of the International Union of Microbeam
Analysis Societies (AKA IUMAS).

It will be held at the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW Australia for Feb 5
to Feb 9 1996 (Preceeded by workshops) in conjunction with our 14th E.M.
Conference and 9th LM symposium. All welcome. Warm weather, water, cool
beer. David Cockayne is the chair.

Information on the WWW at http://www.bio.uts.edu.au/em.html





From: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 1995 21:08:19
Subject: Subscription request

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Message-Id: {9503201754.AA22869-at-miat0.vein.hu}





From: Calidris-at-ett.se (George Farrants)
Date: 20 Mar 1995 08:38:54 GMT
Subject: Digitising TEM negatives

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Digitising images

For low cost, high capacity, high resolution and high quality,
_nothing_ beats film!

“Unfortunately” if you want to do digital image processing on
micrographs then they must be digitised. As previous answers have
indicated there is a choice between flat bed scanners and CCD
cameras. There’s no doubt that the flatbed scanner produces better
data, but the cost is very high. (In addition to purchase price you have
maintenance, and so on.). Bill Tivol’s first reply overestimated the
cost of the CCD camera solution. You can get away with well under
$10000 for camera, lens, stand and light box, a tenth of the price for
flat bed scanners.

Optronics made a rotating drum scanner some years ago, but I think
it’s disappeared now. Does anyone know? What did/does it cost?

The Ektron scanner mentioned by Larry Allard is new to me. Does the
referenced article give details? Who makes it?

Lab quality CCD cameras often have a geometric distortion between x
and y directions of a few percent. This must be measured and
corrected for in software. Another limitation is nonlinearity of the
response with OD, if you are planning on intensity measurements.
Again, it must be measured (with a stepwedge of standard ODs) and
corrected for.

CCD cameras have problems with ED patterns, as Bill also pointed
out. The very sharp spots with very high gradients cause trouble. I
know of some people who are using CCD camera for ED digitising,
maybe they can comment in the List about performance.

Another solution is to miss out film and have the CCD camera on the
microscope. Horribly expensive, but it has certain advantages. Is
anyone digitising ED patterns in this way, and what sort of
performance are they getting? I know of one group who is doing so,
with success. Are the specifications of on-line CCD cameras so much
better than lab ones?

As my old dad used to say “You get what you pay for” when
confronted with The Sun newspaper at 20p and The Times, at 30p.

Yours,
George Farrants






From: sje-at-po.CWRU.Edu (Steven J. Eppell)
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 1995 10:13:55 -0500
Subject: networking a printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199503201513.KAA19483-at-robin.INS.CWRU.Edu}


I would like to thank everyone that replied to my query concerning
networking a Tektronix Phaser IISDX dye sublimation printer.
Following is a summary of the problem and the responses.

I wished to put the printer on a Novell network so that it could be
accessed from macs, PCs, and Unix boxes. I had purchased Tektronix's
Internal Ethertalk card (~$650).

I was told by several listserver users and multiple people at Tektronix
that this was absolutely impossible to network the printer under a Novell
server using the Ethertalk card. Tektronix put me on to a company in
California called Milan that makes a network interface box that should
have allowed me to use the parallel port of the printer as the network
port. The cost of this box was ~$850.

I was told by several listserver users that it was trivial, no problem, plug
it in and it works regarding hooking the printer up to the network.

Finally, I convinced my network administrator to set up a que on one of
the network servers and to activate a faceplate so that I could connect
my printer to the net. The result .... Novell works fine with Tektronix's
Ethertalk card. I have printed from all three platforms and they all work.

The moral of the story: Keep asking your question until you get the
answer you want to hear!

p.s. For all of those highly experienced network users who told me in no
uncertain terms that I was a fool for not checking with my network
administrator before purchasing the printer .... Our local network here
has, conservatively speaking, 5,000 users. The network administration
is organized with a flowchart of personnel that would make the Ex-
Soviet politburo blush. I did try to go through logical channels before
making the purchase and was told, "we won't guarantee that it will work,
the best we can offer is for you to buy the printer and we'll test it out
when it gets here." I suppose this is probably an indication of what the
future of networking will be (once everybody's LAN gets so huge).




From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 1995 17:08:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: CCD Guide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry for wasting the bandwidth, but last week a 3 part information guide
on a particular ccd camera was posted to this forum or the confocal
microscopy list server. A disk crash lost my
copy of this posting as well as the address of the sender before I had a
chance to review it. If the sender could repost a copy directly to me, I
would appreciate it.
Again, sorry for cluttering your mailbox.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************





From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 1995 18:21:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: embedding media & thick sections .....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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X-Sender: glenmac-at-homer07.u.washington.edu

Well, I was cleaning my email folders on the mainframe and came across
this postponed message. Here it is, hope it can still be useful.

Regards,
Glen


There is always celloidin, its disadvantages are a lengthy embedding
process. It produces a lot of shrinkage in animal tissue, the plant
cell wall should resist gross shrinkage, but there may be vacuolization.

For material that has been stained prior to embedding you might try
embedding in an epoxy like Pelco's EMBed. You can cut up to 50 microns
by either a carbide tungsten knive or using a standard steel knife.
These are real knives, not those disposable blades. You also need a
solidly built microtome.
The carbide knife only needs a slow cutting stroke. The steel knife
needs an extremely slow stroke or you can watch the metal forming the
knife's edge be ripped away before your very eyes. A small tacking iron,
like those used for dry mounting photographs, can be clamped on the end of
the knife with a C-clamp. Heat the knife to about 50 deg. C and the
plastic will cut more easily.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu


On Tue, 8 Nov 1994, Mike Folsom wrote:

} Folks -
}
} A quick question -
}
} I'm trying to embed plant material is some type of matrix that will
} allow me to make fairly thick sections, say 25 - 50 um.
}
} I've used paraffin and the tissue starts to fracture when section
} thickness gets greater than 20 - 25 um. Frankly besides embedding
} the tissue in plastic and then grinding it down I'm not sure
} what else to do.
}
} I'd appreciate any suggestions -
}
} Michael
}
} _______________________________________________________________________________
} M.W.Folsom/Biology/UNM/Albuquerque,NM~87131/505.277.4277/mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu
}
}





From: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au (Stuart McClure)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 14:20:01 +0900
Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide1of3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199503210352.AA02291-at-shrike.adl.soils.csiro.au}
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Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Jay Jerome {jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu}

} Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:52:28 -0500
} From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
} To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide1of3
}
} Subject: Guide to Choosing A CCD Video Camera With New DVC Product Release
} And Digitizer Selection Guide For Benefit of Microscope Users Group
}
} Monochrome Digital And Analog Video Camera Line By DVC Company
} Part 1 of 3 due to capacity limitations of e-mail
} *****************************************************************
} With all due respect: If anyone is offended by a guide to choosing a
} CCD video camera with a new product release that is
} applicable for the users in this group ( HIT YOUR DELETE KEY NOW! )
} There are some users that might appreciate this information.
} (This was done with good intentions) so any providers of negative feedback
} have been given the DELETE KEY OPTION and need not waste net time, thank you.
} Valid questions are appreciated and I will try to answer them relative to
} the volume I receive. Included is list of RS-422 digitizer boards in part 2
} and 3.
} * Please address any inquiry directly to dvcco-at-aol.com, not the main file
} server.
} *****************************************************************
} Dear Microscope Users,
}
} I wish to share some data with you on analog and digital monochrome cameras
} that I thought you might be able to make use of when reviewing your present
} or future camera situation. Some of the below information you might be aware
} of, but others might not. If anyone belongs to other pertinent groups and
} believes this information to be of benefit to that particular group we would
} appreciate you letting us know of them.
}
} Monochrome cameras offer much superior gray level and resolution performance
} along with higher signal to noise specs than the typical color versions.
} Everyone has different needs and the data below is for researchers who have
} decided to utilize the benefits of monochrome cameras. Adding pseudo colors
} to the many more gray levels attainable with a monochrome camera might be a
} option for you, or adding a tunable liquid crystal filter in line with the
} camera for serial Red, Green, Blue could also be a option if accurate
} correlation of the pixel is important. For monochrome applications a
} electronic tunable filter exists that is very selective with 5,7,10,15,20
} ,35 or 50nm band pass filters from 450 to 1050 nm range tunable
} electronically!
} See 2 of 2 for info on tunable filters.
}
} Some things to look for in a research grade monochrome camera are the
} following:
} * The highest signal to noise possible in a real time 30 frames/sec. unit.
} Signal to noise is the ultimate measure of a camera and no amount of
} manipulation, bells and whistles, or 20 different knobs to adjust, will
} change the bottom line which is the amount of gray levels obtainable.
} * No geometric distortion- CCD cameras offer basically no distortion while
} any tube camera gives you distortion in the } 5% range. My opinion is
} that to use a tube camera where a ccd unit could be substituted is just
} qualitative, not quantitative microscopy.
} * No dead pixels on your sensor and lowest pixel variation with no false
} fill-ins of pixels with data from the pixel next to it by use of memory
} circuits due to imperfections in the manufacturing process.
} Different types of CCD cameras have their uses.
} The 2 main types are frame transfer (FT) and interline transfer (IT)
} types for microscopy. CID types are also out there but have uses more in
} machine vision applications.
} Interline transfer sensors have large gaps between the pixels due to the
} construction. They offer 100% fill factor by the use of plastic
} micro lenses that help their sensitivity due to smaller well capacity,
} but still have the ( same smaller wells.) Plastic does not offer good
} performance down in the UV range below 400nm, and have other limitations
} at the near IR range. 1/3 format sensors have even less well capacity
} and I feel are only produced to provide better yields/profit for the
} manufacturers for security applications.
}
} Frame transfer sensors which DVC uses have dynamic range of 70dB to start
} and have no dead pixels and no false fill-ins. The wells are very
} large and the dark current is {30 electrons at 25C, room temperature.
} The pixels are contiguous, or within angstroms of electrical separation.
} Larger wells offer higher signal to noise. Double correlated sample and
} hold circuits built right into the sensor help reduce noise further on
} some frame transfer sensors. Frame transfer units offer one half the
} vertical
} resolution when doing integration and shuttering due the field transfer
} technique used.
} Spectral range with glass face plate attached 400-1100nm. Customers
} doing (laser) work have reported response in the low 200nm range with
} face plate removed and up to 1300nm.
}
} Typical bit vs signal to noise ranges:
} 7 bits = 44dB to technically 50dB but more like 54dB realistically
} 8 bits = 55dB to 61dB or 256 gray levels
} 10 bits = 62dB+ for 1024 gray levels. **10 bits offers 4 times the
} performance of an 8 bit camera.
} * Another words a camera specification of 50dB falls into the 7 bit range
} even though manufacturers and sales people might have you believe
} otherwise. If you have an 8 bit board why not use a 8 bit or higher
} camera.
}
}
}
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stuart G. McClure, | Post small : P.B.#2, Glen Osmond,
CSIRO Division of Soils, | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.
Adelaide Laboratories, | Post large : Waite Rd, Urrbrae,
SA, Australia | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.

Phone: (08) 303-8484 International use +61-8- instead of (08)
Fax: (08) 303-8550
Email: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au (Stuart McClure)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 14:20:13 +0900
Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide2of3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199503210352.AA02295-at-shrike.adl.soils.csiro.au}
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X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 2.0.3
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Jay Jerome {jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu}

} Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:54:20 -0500
} From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
} To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide2of3
}
} DVC Video Camera Guide And Release 2 of 2
}
} Remember, if the camera is on the ragged edge of 8 bit performance and
} you want to add gain for more sensitivity, even the smallest amount of
} gain might put you in the 7 bit range if you we not there already.
} If you have 10 bit capability on your board why not use a 10 bit camera.
} * Also a camera specification of 60dB is not a 10 bit camera only an 8.
} * Also there are many types of noise in a sensor besides thermal noise.
} Cooling a sensor will reduce (thermal noise only) and allow you to
} integrate longer. I would double check the impression some make that
} when a 50db sensor is cooled it offers a better s/n of 10 or 12 bits vs
} just 7.
} The reduction of one type of noise (thermal) is all that cooling
} provides.
} * Other types of sensor noise besides dark current include photon, nyquest,
} shot, gain noise, and flicker noise etc.
} * The signal to noise of the sensor at room temperature is a good measure
} of what you can expect.
} ** Look at the quantum efficiency at the nm range needed.
} ** look at the spectral response of the sensor.
} ** There are different grades of sensors available relative to dead
} pixels and gray level variation on other manufacturers cameras.
} *Digital RS-422 eliminates pixel jitter for sub-pixel accuracy if it is
} needs versus the genlock action between the digitizer board and the
} camera as they try to lock to each other in the RS-170 analog mode.
} *Digital cameras of the higher end variety typically offer 7.5 frames/sec
} vs 30 (real time) or even less depending on the amount of pixels you need
} to process. If you wish to do real time imaging 30fps, 7.5fps will not
} do. Also for fluorescence the shortest duration exposure is preferred.
} * The camera has to have a good performance to cost ratio. At the low end
} there are plenty of security type cameras out there, but will they offer
} you the performance you require.
} * The big point here is that the higher the signal to noise, the quieter
} the signal, the more gain that can be added to the signal/ which adds noise
} as a result, but allows the user to get more sensitivity.
} Thus if you start with the quietest / highest signal to noise obtainable
} the better off you are when trying to get more gray levels with minimum
} sensitivity or more signal to noise allows more gain to be added to achieve
} a set sensitivity far superior to a signal to noise start point less than
} the DVC.
}
} The following features listed below are offered by the DVC camera line:
}
} General Statement: Analog video RS-170 focus
} *Most digitizer boards are typically 8 bits some go higher with digital
} RS-422
} input. With Dc's 10 bits of signal on the analog RS-170 video, this offers
} first of all more top end room for adding more sensitivity and still
} maintaining
} 8 bits/ 256 gray levels for the digitizer board.
} *You will see more digitizer boards with 10 bit capability on the analog
} RS-170
} input. What will you use as a real time 30 frame / sec camera to match that
} feature. With most ( real time ) cameras being in the 7 bit range, they
} would
} better qualify for security applications. There are some 8 bit cameras, but
} they only offer 256 gray levels with not much room to add gain for more
} sensitivity. The DVC camera line offers 10 bits or 1024 gray levels output
} for those boards along with simultaneous digital RS-422 on the digital models
} One of the digitizer boards with a 10 bit analog front end is Mutech. They
} are the only one presently that has that capability for now and others will
} follow soon.
}
} * Very high signal to noise } 62dB at .5 lux at 30fps/ real time
} * Frame transfer 1/2" format sensor with 755 horizontal by 484 vertical
} pixels, or 565 TV lines horizontal by 350 TV lines vertical resolution.
} * The only upgradable research camera with the researchers funding
} limitations in mind using the same high quality sensor on all 3 models.
} Upgradability from the RS-170 analog unit to the dual output 8 bit
} digital or to the dual output 10 bit digital models with RS-170 analog.
} (This allows the camera to grow with the researcher) and his budget.
} See part 3 of 3 next.
}
}
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stuart G. McClure, | Post small : P.B.#2, Glen Osmond,
CSIRO Division of Soils, | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.
Adelaide Laboratories, | Post large : Waite Rd, Urrbrae,
SA, Australia | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.

Phone: (08) 303-8484 International use +61-8- instead of (08)
Fax: (08) 303-8550
Email: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au (Stuart McClure)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 14:20:17 +0900
Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide3of3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199503210352.AA02299-at-shrike.adl.soils.csiro.au}
X-Sender: mcc332-at-shrike.adl.soils.csiro.au
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 2.0.3
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Jay Jerome {jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu}

} Date: Sun, 19 Mar 1995 03:54:55 -0500
} From: DVCCO-at-aol.com
} To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: Video Camera Selection Guide3of3
}
} Video Camera Selection Guide and DVC Product Release 3 of 3
}
} * Sensitivities in the 1x10-4fc range at over 50% video. When other (IT)
} type cameras barely see an image these DVC units are offering a perfect
} image with extra gain to spare and no vertical line noise. Estimate
} performance at about 5-6 ND filter better sensitivity than 768 type
} interline transfer sensors.
} * The only 10 bit digital camera with dual outputs RS-170 & RS-422 and at
} real time video rates! 30 frames per second
} * The only camera that has no sensor board. Sensor is physically mounted
} to the front plate of the camera. Cooling above dew point can then be
} done to have a truly quantitative camera in that temperature of sensor
} can be lowered from room temperature or regulated at a constant
} temperature or our -40C unit can be added.
} * No need to cool the camera in most applications/ save the money.
} * The DVC camera line was designed from the ground up to be a digital
} output camera not a security camera. We use linear well regulated
} multiple voltage linear power supply and solid C-Mounts with a 360
} degree compression ring holding the c-ring firmly in place, not just a
} little set screw that tends to loosen with time and strip out the
} threads.
} * 30dB of additional gain can be added for manual internal adjustable
} operation accessible via a port from outside the camera, or external gain
} and offset, or computer controlled gain! 30dB gain vs the others at 20dB
} because the } 62db performance can fully utilize the 30db range. Where
} with more than 20db on the IT types you just might end up with snow.
} * Many other modifications can be done and our units do not come with AGC
} unless you specify automatics. Automatics are for security cameras.
} DVC will be responsive to your requirements from the end user to the OEM.
} * Glass face plate removal to allow the user to easily go down to 300nm or
} so. Customers with laser applications have reported response in the low
} 200nm range obviously at low quantum efficiencies.
}
} The DVC camera line is excellent for any high signal to noise or low light
} application and in real time!
}
} DVC fits a niche between the too pricey and slow non real time digital only
} video cameras and the security type cameras which don't offer enough of what
} you need. If you like the resolution DVC can offer our flexibility in being
} able to upgrade to the digital models is nice to have.
} If any of you are interested in having a digital camera that works with your
} Silicon Graphics Indy /Indigo 2 or Sun system, let us know.
} DVC cameras are made in the USA and have a two year warranty.
}
} * Three models of monochrome camera which are all upgradable to the DVC-10.
} DVC-0A - RS-170 only with DB-37 connector for remote gain and upgradable
} to the digital output RS-422 versions offering both
} outputs.
} DVC-8 - 8 bit RS-422 digital with RS-170 simultaneously.
} DVC-10 -10 bit RS-422 digital with RS-170 simultaneously.
}
} *** Below you will find a list of RS-422 digitizer boards that are compatible
} to the DVC camera line, others are in the works.
}
} ****** Compatible Digitizers for RS-170 analog monochrome video are any
} manufacturer. RS-170 is standard, typically from a BNC connector.
} Does your board have capability to process RS-170 at 10 bits?
} The DVC analog output will offer this. Remember if running 10 bit analog
} RS-170 to a 8 bit board you will only see 8 bits.
}
} Some of these boards have either 8 bit or 10 bit and higher capability.
} *Compatible digitizers for RS-422 digital video that are
} plug and play with the DVC digital camera line are listed below:
}
} Manufacturer A-Z Platform Board Name/Model
} Alacron IBM Alacron
} Bit Flow IBM/MAC Raptor-VL
} Coreco IBM F-64, OC-500
} Datacube IBM MV-200
} Dipix IBM P-360, XPG-1000
} Epix IBM 4 Meg, Model 12
} EDT SUN S-bus EDT
} Hyperspeed IBM Hyperspeed
} Imaging Technology IBM 15040, AFG, MFG
} Imagraph IBM HI-Def
} Matrox IBM Magic, 1280, 640, L/C
} MuTech IBM 10 bit analog video in
} Precision Digital (PDI) IBM/MAC IMAXX-PCI, SD
} Univision IBM Piranha
}
} Let DVC know if you wish, the following information:
} Which digitizer board you are using or would like to use, or need help on.
} If you have interest in the PCI bus
} IBM, MAC, Sun, or SGI Indy or Indigo2 computer used
} If DVC can help answer some of your technical concerns.
} If your interest is analog or digital or both
} If your interest is in tunable electronically selectable filters call DVC.
}
} *****************************************************************************
} ***New DVC Camera Release estimated 4/95 will be the following:
} Same features as above except now the digital RS-422 can be programmed or
} reprogrammed for the VINO digital bus on the
} ((( SGI- Silicon Graphics Indy/Indigo 2 workstations)))
} Imagine being able to move from SGI to RS-422 digital compatibility
} with simultaneous RS-170 analog video!
} Info on our cameras will be on the SGI Web soon.
} *****************************************************************************
}
} Feel free to e-mail, fax, or call DVC for more information.
} If DVC can not reach you, we can not help you, so we chose to put this info
} on
} the net in hopes of helping anyone that needs it with a cost effective
} research
} grade video camera product that we feel, has a definite focus to this
} microscope group. DVC has heard many of your problems and can be helpful,
} and
} possibly offer a solution. Stay in touch.
}
} Sincerely,
}
} Richard Klotsche
} DVC Company
} e-mail: dvcco-at-aol.com
} phone: (619) 444-8300
} fax: (619) 444-8321
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stuart G. McClure, | Post small : P.B.#2, Glen Osmond,
CSIRO Division of Soils, | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.
Adelaide Laboratories, | Post large : Waite Rd, Urrbrae,
SA, Australia | Sth Australia, AUSTRALIA, 5064.

Phone: (08) 303-8484 International use +61-8- instead of (08)
Fax: (08) 303-8550
Email: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.soils.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 08:36:37 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: embedding media & thick sections .....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

microscopy list {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}

With reference to embedding plant material for thick(ish) sections. We
routinely use LR White (London Resin White acrylic resin for plant
material and can certainly cut sections up to 15-20um. The nice thing
about LR white is that is like the British, tolerant and kind to
specimens and you need only dehydrate to 80% EtOH and still get godd
embedding. You can use all sorts of light microscopy stains on sections
cut from such material.

Greetings from a beautiful spring morning in Cambridge where all the
daffodils are in full bloom along the Backs.

Patrick Echlin

Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences


On Mon, 20 Mar 1995, Glen
Macdonald wrote:

} Well, I was cleaning my email folders on the mainframe and came across
} this postponed message. Here it is, hope it can still be useful.
}
} Regards,
} Glen
}
}
} There is always celloidin, its disadvantages are a lengthy embedding
} process. It produces a lot of shrinkage in animal tissue, the plant
} cell wall should resist gross shrinkage, but there may be vacuolization.
}
} For material that has been stained prior to embedding you might try
} embedding in an epoxy like Pelco's EMBed. You can cut up to 50 microns
} by either a carbide tungsten knive or using a standard steel knife.
} These are real knives, not those disposable blades. You also need a
} solidly built microtome.
} The carbide knife only needs a slow cutting stroke. The steel knife
} needs an extremely slow stroke or you can watch the metal forming the
} knife's edge be ripped away before your very eyes. A small tacking iron,
} like those used for dry mounting photographs, can be clamped on the end of
} the knife with a C-clamp. Heat the knife to about 50 deg. C and the
} plastic will cut more easily.
}
} Glen MacDonald
} Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
} University of Washington
} Seattle, WA 98195
} (206)543-8360
} glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
}
}
} On Tue, 8 Nov 1994, Mike Folsom wrote:
}
} } Folks -
} }
} } A quick question -
} }
} } I'm trying to embed plant material is some type of matrix that will
} } allow me to make fairly thick sections, say 25 - 50 um.
} }
} } I've used paraffin and the tissue starts to fracture when section
} } thickness gets greater than 20 - 25 um. Frankly besides embedding
} } the tissue in plastic and then grinding it down I'm not sure
} } what else to do.
} }
} } I'd appreciate any suggestions -
} }
} } Michael
} }
} } _______________________________________________________________________________
} } M.W.Folsom/Biology/UNM/Albuquerque,NM~87131/505.277.4277/mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu
} }
} }
}
}




From: jyoung-at-nsctoronto.com (James Young)
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 08:57:34 +0500
Subject: NEW Address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

cemerson-at-kean.ucs.mun.ca, dhoyle-at-tic.ab.ca, bray-at-hg.uleth.ca,
beebed-at-ere.umontreal.ca, tyerman-at-cliff.path.queensu.ca,
MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV, Eric Kokko {kokko-at-EM.AGR.CA} ,
jvyoung-at-inforamp.net, lburton-at-cc.UManitoba.CA, asmith-at-aps.uoguelph.ca

We have our own Domain now. My personal address
is jyoung-at-nsctoronto.com

General address for service info and parts and prices is service-at-nsctoronto.com





From: NoahHadas-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 09:58:53 -0500
Subject: Micro-manipulation newsgroup?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I'm a recent subscriber and am wondering if perhaps there is another
listserver that might be closer to my fields of interest, i.e.
micro-manipulation of cellular and sub-cellular particles either via mechanica
l or optical trapping techniques. If anyone knows of a group that is more
involved in these areas, I would appreciate if you could reply to me
directly.

Thanks,

Noah




From: Greg Begin :      GREGB-at-sales.lmt.com
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 10:47:41 CST6CDT
Subject: Help finding Mr. Harold Kelly (Del if unknown)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My appologies for clouding the Net with this traffic.

I have been attempting to get info to the following person,
if you can help, thank you in advance.

Person: Mr. Harold Kelly
address on the top of email: dy {hkelly-at-sgi73.wwb.noaa.gov

That is all I have on this person.

Thank you for your understanding and help on this.

Greg Begin - gregb-at-sales.LMT.com
3-21-95




From: greggk-at-acad.winthrop.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 12:52:05 -0500
Subject: Histology course idea

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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WINTHROP UNIVERSITY Electronic Mail Message
Date: 21-Mar-1995 12:50pm EST
From: Kenneth Gregg
GREGGK
Dept: Biology
Tel No: 803-323-2111

TO: Remote Addressee ( _smtp%"microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov" )






WINTHROP UNIVERSITY Electronic Mail Message
Date: 21-Mar-1995 11:31am EST
From: Kenneth Gregg
GREGGK
Dept: Biology
Tel No: 803-323-2111

TO: Remote Addressee ( smtp%"microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov" )



Greetings,
My guess is that many members of the list teach a histology course at the
University level. I would like some comments on a method of teaching the
laboratory section of histology which we are considering. We find that many
students are rapidly bored when looking at tissue/organ sections in the light
microscope. They also seem to lack the ability to know when they have acquired
an acceptable level of expertise. As an antidote to this we are kicking around
the following idea -- and we would like to know if any members of the list have
tried similar approaches, and with what success?

We are thinking about having individual students prepare
computer-assisted-instruction lessons on topics such as epithelial tissues,
liver structure, etc. We would like to have the students prepare a hypertext
program for each topic. They would integrate the hypertext with captured images
from their light microscope observations as well as scanned diagrams and
electron micrographs which they could obtain from texts or photographs.
Students would be very much engaged in their own productions and could study
lessons prepared by other students. These programs could be used and improved
in subsequent years by other students. They could also be made available for
other institutions.

If you prefer, you may respond to me personally at
Greggk-at-Winthrop.edu

Thank you.





From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 16:49:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: query regarding light microscopy automation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are seriously interested in purchasing a setup for our Nikon Diaphot
that could be used for the following:
o quantitation of very low level fluorescence-- sensitive and linear
o but also useful for critical Nomarski applications such as microtubule
motility assays
o automation of filter wheels for multiple probes or fluorescence / phase
contrast image collection
o automation of stage moving, for instance for making mosaics automatically
or being able to move back to a specific field
o maybe Z motor and deconvolution, although the are not our main concerns
o ESSENTIAL: we are a multi-user facility so we need ease of operation

We are considering a Photometrics or Princeton Instruments cooled CCD camera.
We have looked at Oncor Imaging, I.P. Lab and have spoken to other
companies. For hardware, we have called companies that offer individual
parts (e.g. just the filter wheels) and, of course, have checked out Ludl.
We love NIH-Image, but want something does not require a large amount of
macro or other programming to get the hardware to work; basically, we want
plug and play.
Any suggestions or "stay away from this product at all costs" comments on
parts of systems or whole systems would be appreciated.
Thanks-
Michael Cammer
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu






From: Weislaw Jablonski :      wis-at-lab.csl.utas.edu.au
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 09:02:43 +1100
Subject: titanium in living tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there,
Could you help me with the problem of delineation of titanium in bone and
soft tissue.Any information and/or references would be a great help to me.
Study will involve the use of both SEM and EPMA, possibly FTIR as well.
Thank you all, Wis Jablonski , Email W.Jablonski-at-csl.utas.edu.au




From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Saturday, April 1, 1995
Subject: San Francisco Micro. Soc. Meeting 4/1/95

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Place: Convene at Forensic Science Associates in Richmond,
Conclude at Oakland PD. (See contact information below for
reservations, maps, car pooling, and further details.)

Time: Convene by 10:00 am, Adjourn by 5:00 pm

Summary: This promises to be a most informative and interesting
meeting as we hear from some of the Bay Areas foremost
forensic microscopists, see some of the latest technology in
microscopy, and hear about some interesting forensic
applications of microscopy.

Agenda:

Forensic Science Associates, 10:00 am. Stephen A. Shaffer of
MicroDataware will introduce the topic of forensic science
in general and forensic microscopy in particular. Peter D.
Barnett of Forensic Science Associates will then discuss two
interesting cases involving forensic microscopy, and also
the role of the consulting (i.e., non-government)
microscopist in forensic cases. Pete will discuss cases
involving questions of ballot marking and alleged surgical
mistakes revealed by fibers in the nose! We'll conclude at
FSA by 11:30 or 11:45.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, 1:00 pm. After a brief
break for lunch at a Deli in Walnut Creek, we'll re-convene
at the ATF Laboratory where we will divide into two groups
to cover separate topics with two speakers. John Murdock
will explain and demonstrate the use of comparison
microscopy in firearms identification. John is the former
Director of the Contra Costa County Crime Laboratory and
also teaches criminalistics locally. He is an excellent
speaker and promises a fascinating discussion. Also at ATF,
we will meet with Robert Thompson who will demonstrate a new
technology for automated comparison microscopy. This
technology may revolutionize firearms work in criminalistics
laboratories by screening cases and suggesting most
promising comparisons for the human microscopist to perform.
We will adjourn from ATF by 2:30 to proceed to the Oakland
Police Department.

Oakland Police Department, 3:00 pm. At OPD, Diane Bowman will
discuss the use of microchemical testing procedures for the
identification of illicit drugs and narcotics, showing both
the utility and the beauty of these procedures for the rapid
identification of controlled substances. Mary Gibbons,
Director of the OPD Lab, will discuss a fascinating case
where microscopic particles of spray paint, identified and
compared by microscopy, were instrumental in unraveling a
suspect's story, leading to solution of a homicide. We will
aduourn from OPD by 5:00 pm.

At both ATF and OPD, each of our sub-groups will take turns with
each of the speakers so we all get to hear all of the
topics. Each topic will be covered in a presentation of
approximately 45 minutes duration.

Reservations Required!!! Because of the limited space available
within the microscopy labs we will visit, it may be
necessary to limit the number of people who attend. No more
than 20 can be accommodated so call Steve Shaffer ASAP to
reserve your space, receive maps to the locations, and to
coordinate with others on car pooling to the three sites we
will visit.

Contact: Stephen A. Shaffer at the numbers below. Don't delay,
call right away!

************************************************************
* Stephen A. Shaffer * Publishers of The Particle Atlas *
* MicroDataware * on CD-ROM. Developers of custom *
* 2894 Tribune Avenue * image and database software for *
* Hayward CA 94542-1637 * laboratories, specializing in *
* 1-510-582-6624 voice * light and electron microscopy. *
* 1-510-582-6624 fax * Email inquiries invited. *
* sshaffer-at-microdataware.com *
************************************************************





From: R.G.White-at-sci.monash.edu.au (Rosemary White)
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 10:08:05 +1200
Subject: Re: embedding media & thick sections .....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Plant material can also be embedded in butyl methyl methacrylate and
sectioned up to 20 um. Stick the sections down to glass slides with
polyethylenimine. The resin is removed with acetone before antibody
staining, but you don't need to remove it if staining with something small
and water-soluble like aniline blue.

____________________________________________________________
Rosemary White __ /
Department of Ecology _/ \__/ \
and Evolutionary Biology / \
Monash University / Australia \
Clayton, Victoria 3168 \ ____ /
phone 61-3-905 5670 \_/ \_*_/
fax 61-3-905 5613 __
email r.g.white-at-sci.monash.edu.au \/





From: Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 1995 15:17:09 PST
Subject: Usage "Tracking" Programs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {1995Mar21.151709.2878643829-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (microscopy)

Subject: Time: 2:10 PM
OFFICE MEMO Usage "Tracking" Programs Date: 3/21/95
Hi everybody!
Does anyone have any usage tracking programs, or know where they might be
obtained? I am especially interested in a DOS program that is compatible
with Meridian software. Does anyone have any experience using tracking
programs? I am also interested in programs that are compatible with HP
and Macintosh acquisition/analysis software for flow cytometers (primarily
Becton Dickinson.)
Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
much!

__________________________________________________________
Kris Kavanau Internet:
kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu
Manager, Lab for Cell Analysis Telephone: 415-476-2631
Division of Molecular Cytometry FAX: 415-476-8218
University of California
San Francisco, CA 94143
__________________________________________________________








From: Charles Garber
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 07:43:48 EST
Subject: Titanium in living tissue [Question from Weislaw Jablonski on 3/21]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Charles A. Garber, PH. D. * EMC.Ver #2.10P ] --

SPI Supplies

For TEM examination, we using the following procedure:

1] Pick up the unstained sections on a silicon dioxide coated TEM grid,

2] Gently etch (e.g. 10 seconds) the now supported section in a barrel
geometry reactive etcher (for example, the SPI Model Plasma Prep II)
using oxygen as the etching gas, which will immediately etch away all
traces of the organic matrix, leaving the inorganics dispersed, in
their original locations, on the silicon dioxide support film. Usually
these residues form a ghost type of outline of original cell shapes. I
don't know what bone might look like if etched this way.

The reason for the silicon dioxide support film is that it will not be
etched by the oxygen plasma, where as any kind of organic or
carbonaceous support film would otherwise be etched away.

The reason for the etching to remove the organic part of the sample is
to reduce to almost zero the Bremstrahlung radiation, thereby
increasing greatly the lower detection limits.

3] We have always found the TEM to be better for doing this kind of
analysis than SEM/EDS, mainly because of the higher resolution
possibilities.


Let me know if you would need further information. The making of the
silicon dioxide coated grids requires a bit of art but they are not all
that difficult to make, so long as you are patient.

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D.
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA

Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
e-mail: sp-supp-at-cerf.net






From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 09:32:57 -0500
Subject: EM TECH POSITION

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The following position is available at the Johns Hopkins U. School of Medicine:

Electron Micrscopy Technician/19 hrs/wk PART-TIME:

Position will be responsible for semi- and ultra-thin sectioning on
glass and diamond knives. Standard grid prep and staining of sections;
maintenance
of electron gun parts (polishing cleaning etc.). Replenising of photo- and lab
chemical stocks, care of peripheral equipment and other related duties.
College degree, BS or equivalent and minimum two years experience.
Special
skills/knowledge of diamond knive use and maintenance, routine EM lab
operations.

All interested candidates should contact:
Lou Cote
(410) 955-0519
Job # M.3531.94

or

Mike Delannoy
(410) 955-1365





From: Maggy Piranian :      maggy-at-sparky2.esd.mun.ca
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 13:31:51 -0330 (NST)
Subject: Re: Usage "Tracking" Programs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kris et al,
I use DIRECT ACCESS from Fifth Generation Systems. It keeps track of the
time, reqires a pssword and has the option of also requiring a project name.
This forces the issue with people who think it's better for me to chase
down their grant number then for them to remember, and makes billing much
easier. We also keep a log book for people to record problems and i modify
billings accordingly. When I came here this was already installed on the
XRD computer so I did no comparative shopping, & I don't know what else
is out there. Their address is
FIFTH GENERATION SYSTEMS INC
10049 n. Reiger Rd
Baton Rouge LA 70809
(504) 291-7221

Maggy Piranian
Memorial U of Newfoundland

On Tue, 21 Mar 1995 Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu wrote:

} Subject: Time: 2:10 PM
} OFFICE MEMO Usage "Tracking" Programs Date: 3/21/95
} Hi everybody!
} Does anyone have any usage tracking programs, or know where they might be
} obtained? I am especially interested in a DOS program that is compatible
} with Meridian software. Does anyone have any experience using tracking
} programs? I am also interested in programs that are compatible with HP
} and Macintosh acquisition/analysis software for flow cytometers (primarily
} Becton Dickinson.)
} Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
} much!
}
} __________________________________________________________
} Kris Kavanau Internet:
} kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu
} Manager, Lab for Cell Analysis Telephone: 415-476-2631
} Division of Molecular Cytometry FAX: 415-476-8218
} University of California
} San Francisco, CA 94143
} __________________________________________________________
}
}
}
}
}




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 11:30:37 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Sad News for the MSA Community

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

We regrettably learned Monday, of the untimely death this last
Saturday of Mort Maser an individual whose efforts and contributions
to the Microscopy Community here in the US are well known and
valued by many of us.

Mort will be certainly missed and may I speak for the entire MSA
family in expressing our condolences to his family and friends.
For those of you who are interested I have gotten some details
concerning a memorial for Mort and detail those below.

..Nestor

-----------------------------------------------------------

In memory of Mort, his family is establishing the Morton D Maser
Scholarship Fund. Contributions can be sent to: Larry Maser,
P.O. Box EM, Woods Hole, MA 02543. Please designate your gift
to the Morton D Maser Scholarship Fund.

Memorial services celebrating Mort's life are being planned for the
summer months. Details will be announced as they are finalized.

---------------------------------------------------------------

Morton D "Mort" Maser, President of Woods Hole Educational
Associates, and Executive Secretary to Council of both the
Microscopy Society of America and the Histochemical
Society, died on Saturday, March 18, 1995 at the age of 60.

He earned his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1955,
and his Ph.D. in biophysics from the University of Pittsburgh in
1962. He held research and faculty positions at the Mellon
Institute, Harvard University, the Millard Fillmore Hospital,
Northeastern University, Creighton University, and the Marine
Biological Laboratory.

He developed roughly 100 short courses in electron microscopy and
related fields for scientists and technicians, and made more than
50 contributions to peer-reviewed publications on electron
microsopy and related topics.

He was a member of several professional societies including
serving as Chair of EMSA's Education Committee; past President,
Director of the New England Society for Electron Microscopy; the
American Association for the Advancement of Science; American
Society of Cell Biology; and the International Society for
Stereology.

His research has spanned the sciences from electron microscopical
techniques, to computer sciences, to software systems.

He is survived by his wife, Naomi, children Larry of Forestdale,
Massachusetts and Jill, of Philadelphia, and grandson, Benjamin.

-------------------





From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 13:06:15 -0500
Subject: Information wanted: Flatbed transparency scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

X-Sender: t456b15-at-rds163
Message-Id: {v01510101ab9615dcdabe-at-[163.243.13.93]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Folks'

I was following the discussion on flatbed scanners with great interest, but
I need to find some vendors to request additional information. The
following units were mentioned: Umax PowerLink
AGFA Arcus
Perkin-Elmer
and
Optronics

Does any one have address, phone number or E-mail address for these or
other vendors?

Thanks for the assistance....Frank


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 14:41:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: replacement for lactophenol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

X-NUPop-Charset: English

In message Mon, 20 Mar 95 14:23:11 EST, forbes-at-cip.org.ec writes:
We would greatly appreciate
} suggestions on other ways to clear and fix this tissue that do not
} involve lactophenol or other products which require special
} disposal facilities, which currently do not exist in Quito.
*******

We routinely use 1 M NaOH to clear flowers to check in vivo pollen growth
after Aniline Blue staining (for fluorescence). You might also want to try
a clearing protocol specifically designed for fungal infected leaf tissue
such as the one in the following publication:

AU HIGNIGHT-K-W. MUILENBURG-G-A. VAN-WIJK-A-J-P.

TI A CLEARING TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING THE FUNGAL ENDOPHYTE ACREMONIUM- SP

IN GRASSES

SO BIOTECH HISTOCHEM

68 (2). 1993. 87-90.

JT BIOTECHNIC & HISTOCHEMISTRY.

KW FESTUCA-ARUNDINACEA FESTUCA-OVINA LOLIUM-PERENNE BRIGHT FIELD

MICROSCOPY ANALYTICAL METHOD

AB Leaf tissue of tall fescue Festuca arundinacea Schreb., hard fescue

Festuca ovina L., red fescue Festuca rubra L. and Perennial ryegrass

Lolium perenne L. was stained with rose Bengal or aniline blue to

detect the presence of the fungal endophyte Acremonium sp.. Specimens

were cleared using methyl salicylate, an optical clearing agent, and

viewed using bright field microscopy. Tissue was preserved as dried

tissue or stored in 70% aqueous ethyl alcohol before staining and

clearing. Tissue was observed at 2, 4 and 12 weeks following clearing

to check for stain retention. Staining with rose Bengal was inferior to

aniline blue when followed by the clearing agent methyl salicylate.

Fungal mycelia stained lighter with rose Bengal and were more difficult

to detect than mycelia stained with aniline blue. The results

illustrate the usefulness of combining staining and methyl salicylate

clearing for detecting fungal endophytes.

___________

Good Luck!

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: nina allen :      allen-at-wfu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 1995 16:56:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: query regarding light microscopy automation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you tried calling Universal Imaging (you mentioned some of the other
competitive companies). They are at 610-344-9410. Their new metamorph
system will do just about everything you requested...and works well with
a cooled CCD.
Nina Allen




From: Strucural Biology Unit :      MICROSCOPY-at-SBSNOV1.AUCKLAND.AC.NZ
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 10:03:42 GMT+1200
Subject: RE:35mm film in TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Date sent: Mon, 27 Feb 1995 09:30:43 -0500 (EST)
} From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
} Subject: RE:35mm film in TEM
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

} We use Eastman motion picture film (5302 fine grain release
} positive film) in Philips EM300 in the past and currently in
} Zeiss EM902 without any problem.
}
} Ann Fook Yang

We use copex PET10 in our CM12 and 301. It doesn't outgase much, is
very thin so is easy to handle and has not sprocket hole to interfere
with the images (depending onthe format).

Terry





From: fskarl
Date: Wednesday, March 22, 1995 1:06PM
Subject: Information wanted: Flatbed transparency scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Folks'

I was following the discussion on flatbed scanners with great interest, but
I need to find some vendors to request additional information. The
following units were mentioned: Umax PowerLink
AGFA Arcus
Perkin-Elmer
and
Optronics

Does any one have address, phone number or E-mail address for these or
other vendors?

Thanks for the assistance....Frank


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 09:46:25 -0500
Subject: EM TECH POSITION

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: EM TECH POSITION
}
} The following position is available at the Johns Hopkins U. School of Medicine:
}
} Electron Micrscopy Technician/19 hrs/wk PART-TIME:
}
} Position will be responsible for semi- and ultra-thin sectioning on
} glass and diamond knives. Standard grid prep and staining of sections;
maintenance
} of electron gun parts (polishing cleaning etc.). Replenising of photo- and lab
} chemical stocks, care of peripheral equipment and other related duties.
} College degree, BS or equivalent and minimum two years experience.
Special
} skills/knowledge of diamond knive use and maintenance, routine EM lab
operations.
}
} All interested candidates should contact:
} Lou Cote
} (410) 955-0519
} Job # M.3531.94
}
} or
}
} Mike Delannoy
} (410) 955-1365
}





From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 09:51:36 -0400
Subject: Cy5 &Cy3 background staining?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Friends,
As you all may remember, I was having crossing over problem between
FITC & Rhodamine. I followed the suggestion that some of you gave me and
used Cy5 (1.4 mg/ml) 1:100 and 1:400 and Cy3 (1.4 mg/ml) same dilution. I
did a control and I got a lot background staining. Any suggestion?
My next step will be to check my filters as some of you suggested.
Nichole Dutton suggested that before applying primaries antibodies
to block for nonspecifics with 20% horse serum solution, and use 1% bovine
serum albumin in my diluents. Nichole, I'd like further information on
this.
Dave, also suggested using different blocking reagent (BSA, milk,
gelatin, serum.) I'd like to learn more about this possibility, Dave.
Thanks,
Ciprian

__________________________________________________________
Ciprian Almonte
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology E-mail: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
3200 Henry Ave. Voice: (215) 842-4081
Philadelphia, PA 19129 Fax: (215) 843-9082
__________________________________________________________







From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 11:09:55 EST
Subject: Re: Information wanted: Flatbed transparency scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Frank,
There was a used Perkin-Elmer scanner available, which I heard about
from the microscopy list. I don't remember the company name, since we didn't
have the money to get the scanner. They sent me a write-up with specs, but I
don't know whether I still have it. Perhaps you or Nestor can search the ar-
chives for the posting. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: David Hwang-RA2169 :      david_hwang-ra2169-at-aprdlgtr.sps.mot.com
Date: 23 Mar 95 11:27:24 U
Subject: Position Available for FIB

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Message-Id: {9503231732.AA19857-at-mogate}

REGARDING Position Available for FIB Engineer
Position available for a FIB engineer to join a team working on process
development and failure analysis of ULSI circuits in Motorola, Advanced
Products Research and Development Laboratory, Austin, Texas. The engineer will
be responsible for the setup and operation of a focused-ion-beam facility. The
candidate must have hands-on experience on FIB. Qualified candidates please
send resumes to

ra2169-at-email.mot.com

or mail to

David Hwang
Motorola
APRDL, K-10
3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard
Austin, TX 78721







From: Lata Prabhu 512-356-7894 :      Lata.Prabhu-at-SEMATECH.Org
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 11:51:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: FIB TECHNIQUES

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MR-Received: by mta GATEV3; Relayed; Thu, 23 Mar 1995 12:19:38 -0600 (CST)
Alternate-recipient: prohibited
Disclose-recipients: prohibited


Hi,
I am a TEM sample prep technician and is currently preparing
samples by self supportive dimpling, tripod and acid etch(mainly
for planview)techniques. I am interested in new methods out there
being developed and used successfully. Is anyone out there
preparing samples using FIB(Focus Ion Beam) as a tool.We have used
it once in a while to thin our samples prepared with the wedge
technique in the past, but would like to know more.We own a FEI800,
but is currently used extensively for SEMs. Also any tips,and/or
problems to avoid, associated with the sample prep(especially in
the milling dept.) are most welcome. Most of my contamination
problem occurs in the ion-milling process.
Thanks,
Lata Prabhu







From: Lata Prabhu 512-356-7894 :      Lata.Prabhu-at-SEMATECH.Org
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 1995 14:45:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: returned message

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Message-Id: {9503231940.AA07932-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}


Just checking to see if the message is getting through, my earlier
one bounced back,
Lata





From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 23 Mar 1995 13:23:56 -0800
Subject: Rotary shadowing of protein

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Message-ID: {n1416157433.59430-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Hello all- I am looking for recommendations for evaporation material used in
rotary shadowing of proteins. I am referencing the text "Electron Microscopy
in Molecular Biology", a practical approach; ed. by Sommerville and Scheer.
The method described uses a Balzers electron beam gun to evaporate
tungsten/tantalum. We do not have such a gun but plan to use a standard
thermal evaporation.
Anyone out there have experience/recommendations for evaporation metal,
e.g., platinum, tungsten, palladium, carbon/platinum for finer grains?

Thanks,
Doug Davis
EML Berkeley
(510) 642-2085
doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu





From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 23 Mar 1995 15:09:49 -0800
Subject: Job Vacancy Listing

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Message-ID: {n1416151173.33639-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 2:52 PM
OFFICE MEMO Job Vacancy Listing Date: 3/23/95

Job opening: Staff Research Associate II
Electron Microscope Laboratory
University of California at Berkeley
$29,200 per annum, 80-100% appointment
Job listing #03-345-30/SL
closing date: 4-14-95
Contact the Office of Employment
Room 7-G
2200 University Ave., Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-1011 general info

Operate and maintain an SEM. Train users in SEM technique, including specimen
preparation. Learn operation of JEOL 9000 freeze-fracture machine and train
and supervise others in its use. Prepare samples for immunoelectron
microscopy (TEM) and occasionally supervise TEM users. Operate cryofixation
equipment for EM sample preparation . Train users in darkrom technique and
supervise use of lab computers. Qualifications: Experience in cryofixation
and immunocytochemical methods. General laboratory skills (preparation of
buffer solutions, operating pH meters etc.). Familiarity with using computer
programs (word processing, spreadsheets). Familiarity with electronic
equipment and its routine maintenance. Darkroom experience. Ability to work
independently.

Personnel will not send out job applications. If the applicants cannot come
to the personnel office to pick up an application they can send a:

1. Cover Letter referencing the job number (03-345-30)
2. Resume

The cover letter and resume should be mailed to:

University of California Berkeley
Berkeley Campus Employment Office
Room 7-G (Ground Floor)
2200 University Ave.
Berkeley, Ca. 94720







From: Lackhlan Ritchie :      etpsemra-at-zonk.geko.com.au
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 13:18:15 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Please UNsubscribe us

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Please UNsubscribe us for this mailing list.
Thank you.




From: IAN HALLETT :      ihallett-at-marccri.marc.cri.nz
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 15:33:33 GMT+1200
Subject: Insect gut fixation

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A message forwarded from my colleague Paul Sutherland

Has anyone got a good fixation method for insect gut tissue which has
a thick peritrophic membrane. At present I am using 2%
paraformaldehyde, 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M phosphate buffer pH
7.2 and a post fix in 1% osmium tetroxide. With this fix the
microvilli are not well preserved.


Ian Hallett


Ian Hallett
HortResearch
Mt Albert Research Centre
Private Bag 92 169
Auckland, New Zealand
Fax 64-9-815 4201
Telephone 64-9-849 3660




From: Mike Gregory :      mgregory-at-pixie.udw.ac.za
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 09:09:21 +0200 (SST)
Subject: ATP-ase for LM and TEM

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We are trying to localise enzyme sites (ATP) on the plasmalemma of salt
glands in halophytic grasses. Has anyone out there got a method(s) for
ATP-ase at the LM level for glut. fixed tissue already embedded in
historesin. Also, methods for ATP-ase in samples for TEM.

Thanks

Yogis






From: Fangl-at-fpms.fpms.ac.be
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 15:18:14 +0100
Subject: help

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Hi, does anyone know FTP site for program of electron diffraction analysis ?
Thanks for your help!
L.FANG




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 12:36:55 EST
Subject: Re: Rotary shadowing of protein

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Dear Doug,
I suggest you look up articles by R.P. Apkarian. He has a Cr coating
method which produces extremely fine grains. He told me of a detailed paper
submitted to Scan. Microsc. Intl. which should have come out in 1994. I have
a few of his papers, but not that one. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Dennis Lazof :      dlazof-at-email.unc.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 14:02:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Rotary shadowing of protein

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Please UNsubscribe me.

Thanks.




From: samso-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 1995 17:19:03 EST
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe





From: MED_SCU-at-FRCU.EUN.EG
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 1995 10:35:56 +0000 (O)
Subject:

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First Intarnational Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in Research in Differcent Fields of Sciance
September 1995
Ismailia - Etap

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt

Special Topics of the conference:
1- Role of EM in diagnostic virology.
2- Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cylulogy and urinary atones.
3- Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic
conditions).
4- X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metalllurgical,
mineralogical, and biological.
5- Scanning EM of plants, animal, ineccts, and mineral material.
6- Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic
electron diffraction patterns.
7- Skin pathology by EM.
8- Morphological ldentification of antigens by EM.
9- Different low temperature methods for biological EM.
10- Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM.

There will be an equipment exblbition in conjunction with this
meeting. Registration for foreigners will be US $ 150 inclusive of
full board during the time of the meeting.
For further information, contact the organizar:
Prof, Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscvpe Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt
Fax: (20) 64- 329478 ( phone and Fax number)
Fax: (20) 64- 333318 ( Phone and Fax number)

Massage from: sayed Mersal





From: Abdel-Salam Al-Drouby :      WMMAA-at-cardiff.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 1995 14:06:25 GMT
Subject: Is there a list digest?

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Hello,

Could someone please tell me how I can get a digest i.e. daily of the
emails sent on this list, if there is one.

Thank you,

Abdel

Abdel-Salam Al-Drouby
Dept of Medical Microbiology
University of Wales College of Medicine
Heath Park
Cardiff
CF4 4XN
Tel 744724




From: Gary Login :      glogin-at-bih.harvard.edu
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 1995 12:49:40 -0500
Subject: Re: Insect gut fixation using microwave methods

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Microwave irradiation has been shown to enhance the penetration of aldehyde into
insect and plant tissues and to improve fixation of these specimens for LM and
EM. Five references follow:

1. Lindley VA: A new procedure for handling impervious biological specimens.
Microsc Res Tech 21:355, 1992

2. Smid HM, Schooneveld H, Meerloo T: Microwave fixation of water-cooled insect
tissues for immunohistochemistry. Histochem J 22:313, 1990

3. Heumann HG: Microwave-stimulated glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide fixation
of plant tissue: ultrastructural preservation in seconds. Histochem 97:341, 1992

4. Login GR, Dvorak AM: Methods of microwave fixation for microscopy. A review
of research and clinical applications: 1970-1992. Prog Histochem Cytochem
27/4:1, 1994

5. Login GR, Dvorak AM: The Microwave Toolbook. A Practical Guide for
Microscopists. Boston, Beth Israel Hospital Press, 1994, 184








In message {7247D4029F-at-marc.cri.nz} "IAN HALLETT" writes:
} A message forwarded from my colleague Paul Sutherland
}
} Has anyone got a good fixation method for insect gut tissue which has
} a thick peritrophic membrane. At present I am using 2%
} paraformaldehyde, 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M phosphate buffer pH
} 7.2 and a post fix in 1% osmium tetroxide. With this fix the
} microvilli are not well preserved.
}
}
} Ian Hallett


GRL
glogin-at- bih.harvard.edu
Beth Israel Hospital - Department of Pathology
Telephone: 617-667-2034
Fax: 617-667-8676





From: Doug ext. 2470 :      bray-at-hg.uleth.ca
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 1995 19:18:55 MST
Subject: Recording CRT for Hitachi S-500

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Dear Listserver Audience:
The tektronix image recording crt (Current # CRTC818P4S) on our Hitachi S-500
scanning EM is no longer functional. We have temporarily replaced it with a
high resolution monitor, however this is not satisfactory due to the smaller
image. Effort at expanding the image have resulted in some edge distortion and
a loss of resolution.
Does anyone out there have a replacement tube that they wish to sell? If so,
please contact me at:

BRAY-at-HG.ULETH.CA

Thanks,
Doug Bray




From: Doug ext. 2470 :      bray-at-hg.uleth.ca
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 1995 20:14:55 MST
Subject: Recording CRT for Hitachi S-500

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Dear Microscopy Listserver Audience:
The tektronix image recording crt (#CRTC 818 P4S) on our Hitachi S-500 scanning
EM is no longer functional. We have temporarily replaced it with a high res.
monitor, however this is not satisfactory due to problems associated with the
small image produced by the shorter yoke on this crt. Attempts at expanding
the image electronically have resulted in some edge distortion and an unaccept-
able level of resolution loss.
Does anyone out there have a replacement crt of this type? If so, please
E-mail me at:
Bray-at-hg.uleth.ca

Thanks,
Doug Bray




From: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu (Kovacs Kristsf)
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 08:53:22 -0500
Subject: Upgrading old EDS systems

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Dear Friends,

We have an 18 years old EDAX EDS system. The MCA and computer is slow and
unreliable. Does anybody has information on upgrading old EDS systems by
replacing the multichannel analyser and computer with an IBM PC or MAC? We
would like to keep it as cheap as possible.

Thanks!

Kris

Kristof Kovacs
Central Laboratory
University of Veszprem
Veszprem, P.O.Box 158
H-8201 Hungary
Phone: +36-(88)-421684
Fax: +36-(88)-426016
e-mail: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu





From: Keith Moulding :      MCMOULDK-at-usthk.ust.hk
Date: 27 Mar 1995 17:31:16 +0800
Subject: Re: upgrading old EDS systems

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Hello,

Yes, you can upgrade old EDS systems. There is a program called WinEDS.
Coupled with a plug in board for your PC, your detector and pulse
processor you get a Windows based quantitative system.

Sorry I do not have the address of the person who wrote/design the
system, however I will try and track him down (he is in Australia).

This may take a few weeks.


Keith Moulding
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
HKUST
MCPC,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon
Hong Kong.

FAX (852) 2-358-2451.




From: waheeschen-at-dow.com (Bill Heeschen 517-636-4005 Materials/ASL)
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 09:21:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Upgrading old EDS systems

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Kris:

I would suggest a call to 4-pi analysis. Their product line emphasizes
upgrading existing EDS systems and works with NIH Image and DTSA (and others)

4-pi analysis
3500 Westgate Dr. Suite 403
Durham, NC 27707-2534
USA


phone:
Mike Sczyz
(919) 489-1757

fax:
(919) 489-1487

electronic mail:
go4pi-at-applelink.apple.com



Bill
==========================
Bill Heeschen/Analyt. Sci.- Mat. Char. -----
1897-F Building / The Dow Chemical Co. --- ---
Midland, MI 48667 U.S.A. --- D O W ---
phone: (517)636-4005 fax: (517)636-5453 --- ---
Email: waheeschen-at-dow.com -----
========================== R




From: jmcgee-at-lunatic.er.usgs.gov (Jim McGee)
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 10:10:20 -0500
Subject: Re: upgrading old EDS systems

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The WinEDS system described by Keith Moulding is designed and marketed by
Paul Thomson:
Thomson Scientific Instruments
216 Drummond Street, Carlton, 3053,
Victoria, Australia
phone (03) 663 2738.
fax (03) 663 3680

I had the opportunity to demo this system at the New Orleans MAS/MSA. It
is an impressive package. This is not an endorsement, just a personal,
scientific opinion.

Jim McGee


U.S. Geological Survey
Reston, VA 22092





From: mullerw-at-rmslab.rockefeller.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 10:23:19 EST
Subject: Sending messages

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Dear Colleagues:

This is a test. I tried to resend a message to this address and it was retu
returned by the Rockefeller mail director. I couldn't resend it. Let's see if
this gets out.

Bill Muller





From: tvoiles-at-unlinfo.unl.edu (Todd Voiles)
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 10:35:44 -0500
Subject: EDS Upgrades

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Message-Id: {199503271600.RAA27751-at-gate.sbbio.be}

Does anybody know how much the WinEds costs?

Seems to be a great disparity between the other packages I've looked at :

DTSA $800 and quirky
Flame $7000 and Fast


Anybody know of any pakages somewhere in the middle?
Center for Materials Research and Analysis
Central Facility for Electron Microscopy
University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Todd Voiles
tvoiles-at-unlinfo.unl.edu





From: BARRY PYLE :      umbbp-at-msu.oscs.montana.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 10:04:30 MST
Subject: Fluorescent in situ hybridization/Bacteria

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I am trying to do fluorescent in situ hybridization with bacteria directly on
Nuclepore polycarbonate membrane filters, and need to omit the alcohol series
that is usually included in these protocols. Does anyone have any F.I.S.H.
protocol that does not include the alcohol series? It doesn't need to be a
membrane filter method. I am, however, interested in any F.I.S.H. membrane
filter protocols. What types of membranes work best?

Thanks, Barry Pyle, Montana State University - Bozeman.




From: RYERSEJS :      RYERSEJS-at-SLUVCA.SLU.EDU
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 14:06:37 -0600 (CST)
Subject: INSECT GUT FIXATION

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I don't know how thick you mean for the peritrophic membrane, but
I've had good results by injecting fixative into the gut lumen and letting
it work awhile before dissecting the gut out in fixative solution. This works well for lep guts. The fixative etc is described in Ryerse et al, Tissue and
Cell, 24:751-771 1992. See discussion of preventing midgut cell surface
blebbing on p 768 by injecting fix directly into the gut lumen. Good luck.
Jan Ryerse, Pathology, St. Louis University Med School, St. Louis, MO





From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 09:38:14 PDT
Subject: Re: Upgrading old EDS systems

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950327093814.384-at-vanlab.paprican.ca}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Hi,
For an economic EDX system set up to utilize your existing detector, I
suggest you contact the following:

Dapple Systems, Sunnyvale CA , (408) 733-3283
They supply a PC or Mac based system which I believe is passive
only( ie. does not take control of the beam)

4pi Analysis, Inc. Durham NC , (919) 489- 1757
They supply a Mac or Power Mac based system (with beam
control?)

I have only read their brochures not used the systems, but I think they
are worth a look.

Good luck,
Laurie

Kristsf Kovacs wrote:
}
} We have an 18 years old EDAX EDS system. The MCA and computer
is slow and
} unreliable. Does anybody has information on upgrading old EDS
systems by
} replacing the multichannel analyser and computer with an IBM PC or
MAC? We
} would like to keep it as cheap as possible.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Kris
}
} Kristof Kovacs
} Central Laboratory
} University of Veszprem
} Veszprem, P.O.Box 158
} H-8201 Hungary
} Phone: +36-(88)-421684
} Fax: +36-(88)-426016
} e-mail: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu
}
}

______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: mullerw-at-rmslab.rockefeller.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 1995 11:25:10 EST
Subject: Position available

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Dear Microscopy colleagues:

A fully-funded position is available in my laboratory for a postdoctoral
fellow or an advanced EM technician who can work independently.
I am looking for someone with experience in thin sectioning of mammalian
tissue culture cells and tissues. Specifically, this project involves immunoEM
analysis by post-embedding procedures (e.g. Lowicryl or L.R. White) and/or
ultrathin frozen sectioning.
I am an Associate Professor at The Rockefeller University in New York.
For those of you who may not know, Rockefeller is located in one of the best and
safest areas of New York City. With neighboring Cornell Medical School and
Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, this is one of the most scientifically exciting
communities to work in. Subsidized housing is available across the street, and
child care is available on campus.
My laboratory is studying endothelial adhesion molecules and their role
in inflammation. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach using techniques
of cell biology, immunology, molecular biology, and biochemistry. We have
identified and cloned two unique adhesion molecules concentrated in the inter-
cellular borders between endothelial cells. These are PECAM-1 (CD31) and the
endothelial-specific cadherin, cad5 (VE-cadherin). Our lab has shown that PECAM
is required for the migration of leukocytes through the endothelial junctions
during inflammation. The project involves determining the ultrastructural
distribution of these proteins along the endothelial junctions in vitro and
in vivo. (We have also cloned the corresponding mouse PECAM and cad5.) We
believe that part of the function of these molecules is determined by their
distribution along the membrane.
This would be an excellent oppportunity for someone trained in electron
microscopy to further his/her skills as well as to learn new techniques of
molecular biology and immunology. Our group interacts well and often, so that
everyone can benefit from the others' knowledge and skills.

Interested parties should send a letter along with a C.V. to the address
below. For specific questions or more details, please fax (212) 327-8875. I
look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

William A. Muller, MD, PhD
Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology
Box 176
The Rockefeller University
11230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021-6399


P.S. Thanks to Chris Jeffries and Jeanne Barker for helping me connect to this
listserver.




From: PRING :      richard.pring-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 04:19:50 -0600
Subject: embedding plant material

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X400-Received: by mta bottom.ctd.anl.gov in /PRMD=ANL/ADMD= /C=US/; Relayed;
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I have problems in embedding two types of material, one is developing oil seed
rape pods in order to look at changes leading to pod shatter. Even after
several days in 100% Spurr resin, the centre of the section, which often
comtains the developing seed, remains soft and falls out when sectioning.
Similarly, in a study on the infection of rubber leaves by colletotricum spp.,
when sectioning infected material the sections split along the leaf surface.
Any ideas on overcoming these problems? I routinely use Spurr hard resin and go
through propylene oxide after ethanol dehydration. I have also tried holding
the specimens at 45C in the moulds for 24h before raising the temperature to
65C for full polymerisation. I have tried LRWhite with no improvement

Richard pring-at-lars.bbsrc.ac.uk




From: Jan Coetzee EM Univ Pretoria :      JANC-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 14:51:03 GMT+2
Subject: Re: embedding plant material

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Richard Pring mentioned:
} I have problems in embedding two types of material, one is developing oil
} seed rape pods in order to look at changes leading to pod shatter. Even
} after several days in 100% Spurr resin, the centre of the section, which
} often comtains the developing seed, remains soft and falls out when
} sectioning. Similarly, in a study on the infection of rubber leaves by
} colletotricum spp., when sectioning infected material the sections split
} along the leaf surface. Any ideas on overcoming these problems? I routinely
} use Spurr hard resin and go through propylene oxide after ethanol
} dehydration. I have also tried holding the specimens at 45C in the moulds
} for 24h before raising the temperature to 65C for full polymerisation. I
} have tried LRWhite with no improvement

Very often the failure to infiltrate material adequately with resin is
due to inadequate fixation and not to inadequate resin infiltration.
Especially when processing oily samples it is necessary to fix {very} well to
destroy all membrane semi-permeability and to stabilise the lipids. Going
to extremes during the fixation may lead to substandard structural
preservation, but may be the only way to adequately infiltrate the sample.
One such overkill schedule is: Fix material 24h at 40deg C in 2.5%
glutaraldehyde, then postfix for another 24h in several changes of
osmium, also at 40deg C (take due care during this step). Dehydrate in
acetone, use a few prop. oxide rinses and embed in your standard resin.
Other methods (adding Malachite Green to aldehydes in DMSO) are also known
and may very well work.
All these methods have in common that they are not optimal as far as
structural preservation is concerned, but sometimes they may be the only ones
that will result in thin sections.
Richard's second problem, that of the adhesion of the resin to the leaf
surface is a result of the wax layer on the leaf surface forming a parting
layer between the leaf and the resin. One solution is to use an epoxy
formulation that is not as easily parted from cuticular waxes - Quetol may be
a possibility.











Jan Coetzee
Unit for Electron Microscopy Tel:+27-12-420-2075
University of Pretoria Fax:+27-12-342-1738
Pretoria Internet:janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
0002 South Africa




From: USRND::U096585 U096585 27-MAR-1995 10:15
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 08:20:09 -0500
Subject: Re: Upgrading old EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings Kristof...

I have a an old Kevex EDS system hooked up to an "old" Cameca MBX
microprobe....both about 15 years old. I've recently replaced the multi-
channel analyzer with a 4pi processing system and a Mac computer. The 4
pi system costs around $6,000 and is easy to incorporate into many
different EDS systems.

The 4 pi is relatively cheap, it's efficient and easy to operate and is
capable of interfacing with many different EDS systems. Not only can it
generate very nice EDS spectra through DTSA, it does an excellent job
imaging elementally specific X-ray transitions. The quality of these
EDS maps is close to that of the digital WDS maps that we generate on
our SX-50 microprobe. It's really quite impressive.

If you are interested, I would be happy to FAX you some information on
the 4 pi system as well as some EDS images we have generated using that
system. Just let me know....

or here's 4 pi info:

4 Pi Analysis, Inc.
3500 Westgate Dr., Suite 403
Durham, NC 27707-2534
Tel: 919-489-1757
FAX: 919-489-1487

e-mail
go4pi-at-applelink.apple.com

Good Luck and best regards

Cary Black
Microscopist
The Dow Chemical Co.

ckblack-at-dow.com
517-636-5760




From: Giles John E Jr :      giles_john_e_jr-at-space.honeywell.com
Date: 28 Mar 1995 09:05:57 U
Subject: SEM: Thermal Printers

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Has anyone had experience with long term storage of images from a thermal
printer (Codonics, Seikosha, etc.)? I have noticed that the images start to
fade away after exposure (months) to fluorescent lights. I have been told that
this will happen even when they are protected from exposure to light. Any
suggestions for storage or other experience would be appreciated.

John Giles
Honeywell Space Systems
(813) 539-2270
(813) 539-3630 Fax
e-mail: jegiles-at-space.honeywell.com




From: OSRAM Sylvania :      osiit9-at-epix.net
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 18:14:05 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re:Thermal print storage problems

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Message-Id: {199503281401.PAA03757-at-gate.sbbio.be}

John,

We've had a Seikosha thermal printer for 4 years and still have some of
the first images printed with it saved. The images have faded slightly
from gray to brown, but you can only tell if you hold next to a new
print. The best storage for them is in a binder or folder that is stored
in a closet or file cabinet. As long as they aren't exposed to drastic
variations in heat they should store for long periods of time with
minimal fading.


Gail Meyers
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC
(717) 268-5340




From: Heinz Hemken :      hhemken-at-cell.cinvestav.mx
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 13:36:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Upgrading old EDS systems

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Just out of curiosity, what is an EDS system?

------------------------------------------------------------------
Heinz Hemken
Departamento de Biologia Celular, CINVESTAV-IPN
http://cell.cinvestav.mx/bchh.html





From: gkrichau-at-unlinfo.unl.edu (Gary Krichau)
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 15:19:18 -0500
Subject: Subscribe microscopy

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Subscribe microscopy Gary Krichau

Gary Krichau

Central Facility for Electron Microscopy
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
___________________________________________





From: JOHNA-at-SCI.WFEB.EDU
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 09:49:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: PLP fix

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Dear Michel,

PLP fix recipe can be found: Nakane, Paul K., 1975. Recent progress in the
peroxidase-labeled antibody method. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 254:203-211.

There also is an abstract in the Abstacts of thr 13th Annual Meeting of
ASCB by McLean and Nakane - # 418 on page 209a.

It's a good fixative for the preservation of both antigenicity and
ultrastructure.

Good Luck,

JOHNA

___________________________________________________
| |
| John G. Aghajanian, Ph.D. |
| Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology |
| 222 Maple Avenue |
| Shrewsbury, MA 01545-2737 |
| |
| Tel: 508 842-8921 ext. 147, 161 |
| Fax: 598 842-9632 |
| JOHNA-at-sci.wfeb.edu |
| |
|_________________________________________________|





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 17:03:18 -0600 (CST)
Subject: EDS is.....

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EDS is the abbreviation for

Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, which is probably more
correctly called X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS)
but various other rearrangements of the letters exist in
the literature (EDXS,...)

It is an analytical methodology in which a solid state semi-conducting
detector (either Si or Ge based) is used to measure the energy distribution
of X-rays emitted from a specimen. The X-ray's may be excited by
some sort of probe (usually a focussed beam of electrons, ions,
or photons). The "Spectrum" is then displayed on a graphical output
device (read computer screen) and the relative intensity of
the measured characteristic X-ray peaks, analyzed to determine
the relative elemental composition of the material.

Any good text book on Scanning Electron Microscopy or Electron
Probe Microanalysis (published within the last 10 years or so
will have a chapter or two on the subject).



Nestor....
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.






From: xxie-at-lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu (Xiaogang Xie)
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 18:34:22 -0600
Subject: Re: Upgrading old EDS systems

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An article about 4pi system for EDS was published in SCANNING Vol.
14, 233-240 (1992). The title is:

Mac X-ray: The NIST 'DTSA' program and the 4pi analysis board.

one of the authors is:
David C. Joy
EM lab
U. of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996-0810

Our lab also installed both the 4pi spectral engine boards and the
4pi scanning interface box. We have been enjoying NIH Image and several
other programs in playing the SEI, BEI, and X-ray mapping.

Xiaogang

****************************************
* Xiaogang Xie *
* Department of Geology and Geophysics *
* Louisiana State University *
* Baton Rouge, LA 70803 *
* Office (504)388-2240 *
* Fax (504)388-2302 *
****************************************






From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 11:51:28 -0500
Subject: curing resin summary

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As promised, following is the summary of responses received from my
question, "How many of you have your curing ovens vented to a hood?".

From a total of 11 responses, one containing knowledge of two others,
there were only two who were not curing their resins in, or venting their
ovens to a hood. Both are making provisions to do so. Nine actually place
their ovens in the hood while two are vented to the hood.
There was only one reference sited...that being an article in the
Proceedings of the RMS Vol. 16, pp. 265-270, 1981.
Most of us seem to subscribe to the "just to be sure" school of reason.
I attempted to thank each of you who responded individually, but I
think that I may have lost one of you. So let me say now....thank you very
much.

Sandra Zane
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 1995 10:19:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: PLP fixative reference/recipe

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The original paper on PLP was McLean and Nakane 1974, J Histochem
Cytochem 22:1077-1083. Also see Pino 1984, Stain Technol. 59:307.

Some of the most impressive uses of PLP came out of Marilyn
Farquhar's lab. If I remember correctly the ICC that Farquhar/Brown did
utilized PLP, and would be a good source of method. For example, see:
Cell 36:295(1984). PNAS 81:5135 (1984). JCB 106:1863 (1988). Meth Cell
Biol 31:553 (1989).

Good luck.

A. Kent Christensen
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
{akc-at-umich.edu}

---------------------------------

On Mon, 27 Mar 1995, Michel Deschuyteneer wrote:

} I would greatly appreciate the reference and/or the recipe for the
} Paraformaldehyde - Lysine - Periodate (PLP) fixative.
} Thank you very much in advance.
}
} Regards,
} Michel.
} Michel Deschuyteneer deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
} Scientist - Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} SmithKline Beecham Biologicals
} Rue de l'Institut, 89 - B1330 Rixensart, BELGIUM
} Tel: +32-2-656 9290 Fax: +32-2-6568113
}
}
}
}




From: Chris Varga :      chris-at-lis.rch.unimelb.edu.au
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 13:37:35 +1000
Subject: Re: TEM: PLP fixative reference/recipe

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Please unsubscribe!





From: Dr. Molnar Peter :      MOLNARP-at-lib.dote.hu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 11:26:06 GMT+0100
Subject: subscription request

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From: Richards, P, Peter :      RETEP-at-anat.uct.ac.za
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 14:09:14 SAST-2
Subject: Re:Diamond Knives

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Message-Id: {m0rttW7-0009hbC-at-uctmail2.uct.ac.za}

To Everyone out there:

Just doing a quick survey as to the price of Diamond microtomy knives.

Could anyone who has bought one recently tell me what the
going cost is for a diamond 5mm ultramicrotyomy knife is, in $ or
pounds sterling?

Thanks in advance

Peter
_______________________________________________________________


-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
-at- -at-
-at- Peter D. G. Richards -at-
-at- Dept Anatomy and Cell Biology -at-
-at- UCT Medical School -at-
-at- Observatory -at-
-at- 7925 -at-
-at- RSA -at-
-at- Tel: 021-406 6285. -at-
-at- Internet: retep-at-anat.uct.ac.za -at-
-at- -at-
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-




From: ckblack-at-dow.com (U096585)
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 08:21:17 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS system upgrades

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Greetings Kristof...

I have a an old Kevex EDS system hooked up to an "old" Cameca MBX
microprobe....both about 15 years old. I've recently replaced the multi-
channel analyzer with a 4pi processing system and a Mac computer. The 4
pi system costs around $6,000 and is easy to incorporate into many
different EDS systems.

The 4 pi is relatively cheap, it's efficient and easy to operate and is
capable of interfacing with many different EDS systems. Not only can it
generate very nice EDS spectra through DTSA, it does an excellent job
imaging elementally specific X-ray transitions. The quality of these
EDS maps is close to that of the digital WDS maps that we generate on
our SX-50 microprobe. It's really quite impressive.

If you are interested, I would be happy to FAX you some information on
the 4 pi system as well as some EDS images we have generated using that
system. Just let me know....

or here's 4 pi info:

4 Pi Analysis, Inc.
3500 Westgate Dr., Suite 403
Durham, NC 27707-2534
Tel: 919-489-1757
FAX: 919-489-1487

e-mail
go4pi-at-applelink.apple.com

Good Luck and best regards

Cary Black
Microscopist
The Dow Chemical Co.

ckblack-at-dow.com
517-636-5760





From: u096585-at-mdanl3.md.dow.com (U096585)
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 08:21:17 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS system upgrades

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Greetings Kristof...

I have a an old Kevex EDS system hooked up to an "old" Cameca MBX
microprobe....both about 15 years old. I've recently replaced the multi-
channel analyzer with a 4pi processing system and a Mac computer. The 4
pi system costs around $6,000 and is easy to incorporate into many
different EDS systems.

The 4 pi is relatively cheap, it's efficient and easy to operate and is
capable of interfacing with many different EDS systems. Not only can it
generate very nice EDS spectra through DTSA, it does an excellent job
imaging elementally specific X-ray transitions. The quality of these
EDS maps is close to that of the digital WDS maps that we generate on
our SX-50 microprobe. It's really quite impressive.

If you are interested, I would be happy to FAX you some information on
the 4 pi system as well as some EDS images we have generated using that
system. Just let me know....

or here's 4 pi info:

4 Pi Analysis, Inc.
3500 Westgate Dr., Suite 403
Durham, NC 27707-2534
Tel: 919-489-1757
FAX: 919-489-1487

e-mail
go4pi-at-applelink.apple.com

Good Luck and best regards

Cary Black
Microscopist
The Dow Chemical Co.

ckblack-at-dow.com
517-636-5760

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From: Leonard Radzilowski :      lrg8037-at-uxa.cso.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 09:50:22 -0600 (CST)
Subject: unsubscribe

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From: Heinz Hemken :      hhemken-at-cell.cinvestav.mx
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 09:06:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: EDS system upgrades

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Thanks to all who have explained to me what EDS is. I got several
enlightening and courteous replies. This is a great list and a great
community!

Keep up the rich info stream!

------------------------------------------------------------------
Heinz Hemken
Departamento de Biologia Celular, CINVESTAV-IPN
http://cell.cinvestav.mx/bchh.html





From: bdgranby-at-student.wisc.edu (ben granby)
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 12:01:02 -0500
Subject: userlist

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From: bdgranby-at-student.wisc.edu (benjamin granby)
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 12:01:16 -0500
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Please add me to your mailing list. Thank You.





From: bdgranby-at-student.wisc.edu (Ben Granby)
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 12:02:47 -0500
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From: bdgranby-at-students.wisc.edu (Benjamin Dov Granby)
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From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 14:55:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: SEM Short Courses for Materials Scientist

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This request is for a colleague:

He is using SEM for industrial applications (various analyses of Clay,
paints, paper, etc). They are looking for a good short course on SEM in
materials science. The dates of both the Lehigh and McCrone courses will
not fit into their schedule. I know of a course at Univ Michigan which I
told them about. Are there any others?-
Thanks for any help you can render.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************





From: Lalonde Sylvie :      lalonds-at-ERE.UMontreal.CA
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 11:47:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LM.methacrylate resin.removal and UV polymerization

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Hi folks,

I am trying to do in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on
glycol methacrylate-embedded wheat pollen. The reason I am using that
resin, despite its uglyness to work with, is that the infiltration of
pollen is very good and the overall morphology seems to be well
preserved. But to gain a better access to the target in the tissue I
would like to remove the resin after sectionning. The resin was
polymerized with benzoyl peroxide at 55C. Is there a way to remove it
without affecting antigenicity of the tissue???

If I cannot remove the glycolmethacrylate, I am planning to use a mixture
of butyl and methyl methacrylate with a polymerization under UV.
According to litterature, I can remove it with acetone. Some people use
benzoin, others use benzoin ethyl ether; what is the difference between
the two? Can I use bezoyl peroxide instead? I know that UV polymerization
can lead to inconsistancy in the polymerization, is the use of a 4W placed
on top of the specimen at a distance of about 10 cm could be good?

Since I do not subscribe to this group could you send me directly any
suggestions you may have.

Thanks in advance

Sylvie Lalonde
lalonds-at-ere.montreal.ca







From: Dwight Beebe :      beebed-at-ERE.UMontreal.CA
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 12:20:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LM: fluorescent probes for ER

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Greetings:
I'm interested in using fluorescent probes to clarify the
relationship between certain cellular structures, specifically the ER and
what I believe to be vacuoles. Some of my colleages have suggested that
the vesicles I believe to be vacuolar in origin may be dilated ER. In
looking for likely probes I've found refences in the Molecular Probes
handbook to DiIC (a long-chain carbocyanine) and Rhodamine B as
ER-specific dyes. However, the cited references are based on experiments
on animals. Ideally, I would like to use two probes that will
discriminate between ER and vacuoles. Does anyone have experience with
these dyes or could someone point me towards some references? I'm
working with leaf tissue, specifically cells with the minor veins.
Many thanks in advance.

Dwight Beebe
IRBV, Dept. de sciences biologiques beebed-at-ere.umontreal.ca
Universite de Montreal Voice:514-872-4563
4101, rue Sherbrooke est FAX:514-872-9406
Montreal, PQ H1X 2B2 Canada








From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 13:11:13 -0400
Subject: LM: fluorescent probes for ER

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Dear friends,
Thanks for your responses. As you all may remember I was having
some crossing over problem between FITC and Rhodamine-that's what I
thought... My problem seems to be autoflorescense, yeah that simple and
basic, I just overlooked it.
I just looked at the neurons with just plain solution, they
flouresce beautifully under the rhodamine filter, and slightly under the
FITC filter and no fluorescence under the Cy5 filter. Also, I had a control
(no antibodies present) which I fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and used 3%
normal goat serum as blocking reagent. This control flouresce better under
the FITC filter than under the Rhodamine filter, the opposite of the
control without fixative. It does not flouresce under the Cy5 filter.
Also, I did a control with CY5 and Cy3. Again the cells flouresces
under the FITC and rhodamine Filters but not under the CY5 filter.
So my solution seems to stay away from FITC, and rhodamine. Any
suggestion on how I can better solve my autoflourescence problem will be
appreciated. Thanks again for your responses.
Your friend,
Ciprian

__________________________________________________________
Ciprian Almonte
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology E-mail: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
3200 Henry Ave. Voice: (215) 842-4081
Philadelphia, PA 19129 Fax: (215) 843-9082
__________________________________________________________







From: Eric Wang :      ewang-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 17:27:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: SEM Short Courses for Materials Scientist

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X-Sender: ewang-at-mead2.u.washington.edu


There is a very good SEM short course given by Botany department of
university of washington in Seattle. This course covers various subject
and the scheduel is flexable. The instructor of the course is Barbra Reine.

Tel # for Botany Department: (206) 543-1942




On Wed, 29 Mar 1995, Jay Jerome wrote:

} This request is for a colleague:
}
} He is using SEM for industrial applications (various analyses of Clay,
} paints, paper, etc). They are looking for a good short course on SEM in
} materials science. The dates of both the Lehigh and McCrone courses will
} not fit into their schedule. I know of a course at Univ Michigan which I
} told them about. Are there any others?-
} Thanks for any help you can render.
}
}
} Jay Jerome
} **************************************************************
} * aka: W. Gray Jerome *
} * Dept. of Pathology *
} * Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
} * Medical Center Blvd *
} * Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
} * 910-716-4972 *
} * jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
} **************************************************************
}
}




From: Kittel Agnes :      kittel-at-kokiux.koki.hu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 09:30:06 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: subscription reguest and a guestion

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If someone knows, please, write me, which type of NCAM antibody can work
for post- embedding method? (Araldite 6005 or Epon resin is used and pre
embedding I have made an enzyme histochemical reaction. Fixation :
paraformaldehyde- glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer)
Thanks!
Agnes Kittel






From: H2993Pec-at-huella.bitnet
Date: 30 Mar 95 09:56:46 +0100
Subject: Subscription request

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Subscription request





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-halia.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 1995 22:27:56 -1000 (HST)
Subject: C evaporation for EDS

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Both my lab and another lab here in Hawaii have Denton DV-502 vacuum
evaporators. My evaporator is perfectly fine for my needs; I can
carbon coat Formvar grids or prepare pure carbon substrates for TEM.
The other lab, however, wants to carbon coat for SEM, with and without
EDS. Their problem is that they cannot get the carbon to evaorate long
enough to get a thick enough coating, and neither can I on my
instrument. We both have the same spring-steel (?) driven carbon rod
holders (which differ from the gravity-fed system in the very old Denton
in still another Hawaii lab and also from the coiled spring feed on the
non-adjustable holders). The problem seems to be that there is
enough resistance somewhere that everything heats up like crazy, the
moveable parts expand enough to get stuck, and the whole feed process
stops until the unit cools down or blows a fuse, whichever comes first.
This has happened with old holders, brand-new ones, and everything else
I have been able to devise. Has anyone else had and oversome this
problem? Any hints and tips will be appreciated!

Mahalo and aloha,
Tina Weatherby Carvalho
Biological EM Facility
University of Hawaii





From: ddd-at-techunix.technion.ac.il (dd)
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 12:53:55 +0200
Subject: Light scrambler for HBO lamp

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We need information on where to get a light scrambler for homogeneous
illumination -to couple an HBO light source to a Zeiss microscope for
fluorescence work. Sources, FAX numbers, price ranges -any information
would be highly appreciated.
dd




Daniel Dagan,
Dept. Biophysics and Physiology,
Faculty of Medicine, Technion,
Israel Institute of Technology,
POBox 9697
Haifa 31096
ISRAEL

Tel: 972-4-295566
Fax: 972-4-533183
e-mail: ddd-at-techunix.technion.ac.il






From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 08:05:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Autofluorescence problems

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From your description, it sounds like you need quenching rather than
more blocking. Blocking uses miscellaneous protein to block non-specific
protein-binding sites in the tissue, but doesn't actually deal with
autofluorescence. Quenching uses reducing agents such as ammonium
chloride or sodium borohydride to reduce double bonds in the tissue, which
are usually the main source of autofluorescence. Try the following: make
up a fresh 1% solution of sodium borohydride in distilled water (careful,
borohydride is toxic), and leave a few drops of it on your sections for
about 10 minutes early in your immunocytochemical run (before the primary
antibody step). This should reduce the inherent autofluorescence in your
tissue.

A. Kent Christensen, Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology, University of Michigan Medical School, {akc-at-umich.edu}

------------------------------------

On Wed, 29 Mar 1995 almonte-at-medcolpa.edu wrote:

} Dear friends,
} Thanks for your responses. As you all may remember I was having
} some crossing over problem between FITC and Rhodamine-that's what I
} thought... My problem seems to be autoflorescense, yeah that simple and
} basic, I just overlooked it.
} I just looked at the neurons with just plain solution, they
} flouresce beautifully under the rhodamine filter, and slightly under the
} FITC filter and no fluorescence under the Cy5 filter. Also, I had a control
} (no antibodies present) which I fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and used 3%
} normal goat serum as blocking reagent. This control flouresce better under
} the FITC filter than under the Rhodamine filter, the opposite of the
} control without fixative. It does not flouresce under the Cy5 filter.
} Also, I did a control with CY5 and Cy3. Again the cells flouresces
} under the FITC and rhodamine Filters but not under the CY5 filter.
} So my solution seems to stay away from FITC, and rhodamine. Any
} suggestion on how I can better solve my autoflourescence problem will be
} appreciated. Thanks again for your responses.
} Your friend,
} Ciprian
}
} __________________________________________________________
} Ciprian Almonte
} Medical College of Pennsylvania
} Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology E-mail: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
} 3200 Henry Ave. Voice: (215) 842-4081
} Philadelphia, PA 19129 Fax: (215) 843-9082
} __________________________________________________________




From: Richard Lee :      richard_lee-at-qmgate.anl.gov
Date: 30 Mar 1995 11:38:54 -0600
Subject: Formation of geodes

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11:35 AM 3/30/95

Does anyone know the mechanism of geode crystal formation in the midwest? And
why do some geodes contain oil?

I have an Idea!




From: BILL RHOTEN :      RHOTEN-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 13:31:05 +1100
Subject: test mess, as in test message

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From: xxie-at-lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu (Xiaogang Xie)
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 12:48:35 -0600
Subject: an introductary paper about 4pi system

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A message about an article regarding the 4pi system sent out couple of
days ago was bounced back. The paper was published in SCANNING Vol. 14,
233-240 (1992). The title is:

Mac X-ray: The NIST 'DTSA' program and the 4pi analysis board.

One of the authors is:
David C. Joy
EM lab
U. of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996-0810

Our lab has installed both the 4pi spectral engine boards and the
4pi scanning interface unit. We have also been enjoying NIH Image and
several other programs in playing the SEI, BEI, and X-ray mapping.

Xiaogang

****************************************
* Xiaogang Xie *
* Department of Geology and Geophysics *
* Louisiana State University *
* Baton Rouge, LA 70803 *
* Office (504)388-2240 *
* Fax (504)388-2302 *
****************************************






From: Self :      MUSOM01/RHOTEN
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 13:31:05
Subject: test mess, as in test message

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------- Forwarded Message Follows -------

How was the test mess?Microscopy BBS




From: Dennis Shubitowski :      dennis%odin-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 14:51:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Formation of geodes

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Errors-To: {dennis-at-odin.morph.med.umich.edu}



On 30 Mar 1995, Richard Lee wrote:

} Does anyone know the mechanism of geode crystal formation in the midwest? And
} why do some geodes contain oil?

According our resident geologist, geodes form when percolating waters
precipitate into hollow cavities. Whatever happens to be carried with the
water is deposited in layers into the cavity (this includes oil).


Dennis








From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 14:51:31 -0600 (CST)
Subject: liposomes

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Does anyone have a protocol for visualization of liposomes?
I would like to be able to thin section for TEM. Should anything be seen
at the LM level?

thanks,
Joyce Craig




From: xxie-at-lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu (Xiaogang Xie)
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 12:06:43 -0600
Subject: advises about filament needed

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Advises about W filament needed:

1. Has anyone made comparison about the performance, life time, and
potential contamination between new filament and rebuilt one. The prices
are four times difference.
2. Which company supplies better batch of filaments. This information may
mail to me directly if you feel it may offend some one.
3. Last year, we had a batch of new filaments that tend to form thin film
of metal sticking on the tip of the filament, though the heating
temperature was low (with slightly large distance between filament and the
cap, and the heating current is limited by a stopper). Is this a problem
due to impurity of filament? Any idea?

Thanks for any input.

Xiaogang

****************************************
* Xiaogang Xie *
* Department of Geology and Geophysics *
* Louisiana State University *
* Baton Rouge, LA 70803 *
* Office (504)388-2240 *
* Fax (504)388-2302 *
****************************************






From: xxie-at-lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu (Xiaogang Xie)
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 12:44:57 -0600
Subject: Re: C evaporation for EDS

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Tina:
In our lab, the DV-502 is used for C coating SEM and Microprobe
samples for EDS and WDS works.

1. The length and size of the reduced C rod are important factors for the
coating thickness. The coarser C rod does not only supply more C but also
support longer reduced C rod. However, coarser C rod needs higher current
to reach the evaporation temperature, hence it might hit some limits of the
machine, like burn the fuses. This has to be balanced.
2. You also need to properly control the heating current during
evaporating. Specially, you need quickly bring the current back to some
position where evaporation can last longer at the very beginning when the
evaporating starts.

Xiaogang

****************************************
* Xiaogang Xie *
* Department of Geology and Geophysics *
* Louisiana State University *
* Baton Rouge, LA 70803 *
* Office (504)388-2240 *
* Fax (504)388-2302 *
****************************************






From: kayton-at-ohsu.edu (Robert Kayton,MAC,CROET)
Date: Thu Mar 30 17:12:16 PST 1995
Subject: TEM: Gold particle counting

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Message-Id: {m0ruVG4-0007AdC-at-stjohns.ohsu.edu}
Message-Version: 2
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

I have colleague that needs help setting up an automatic computer based method
to count gold particles on TEM micrographs. He has NIH image, a good
Macintosh and can import digital images but is having difficulties getting
accurate counts of the gold particles. If anyone has experience with this
please let me know.

Bob Kayton
kayton-at-ohsu.edu




From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 30 Mar 1995 16:28:16 -0800
Subject: Re: C evap for EDS

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Message-ID: {n1415541637.55689-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}
"Tina Carvalho" {tina-at-ahi.pbrc.hawaii.edu}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP-QM 3.0.2

Subject: Time: 4:13 PM
OFFICE MEMO RE} C evap for EDS Date: 3/30/95

Tina- check your ceramic insulators through which the rod holder slides.
If the ceramic gets enough carbon or metal on it, it creates a conductive
pathway which corrupts your normal electrical flow and sends current through
the metal parts of the electrode instead of the carbon rod. Could explain the
hot metal and blown fuses from over-amping the system. This can even melt
some of the smaller metal parts.
Cleaning the ceramic is tough because of the porous surface and chances are
the ceramic will crumble from the excessive heating when you dissassble the
holder. Suggest you order some new ones from Denton and keep some spares.
Have you tried the carbon yarn yet? Works well, never sparks or arcs,
heavier thicknesses can be produced by reducing the source to target distance.
Last time I checked, Denton had the best price. -Doug





From: VanderWood-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 1995 01:37:10 -0500
Subject: Re:C evap for EDS

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We have done a comparison study of rods from different sources, and found
some to be unworkable for SEM/EDS coating in our 502. Rather than belittle
the ones that don't work, I can recomment those from Ladd. Hope this helps.

Tim VanderWood
MVA, Inc.




From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 30 Mar 1995 09:49:11 -0800
Subject: Denton evap

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Message-ID: {n1415565559.16197-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}
"Tina Carvalho" {tina-at-ahi.pbrc.hawaii.edu}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP-QM 3.0.2

Subject: Time: 9:28 AM
OFFICE MEMO Denton evap Date: 3/30/95

Tina- We have a 502A with turbo. One thing to check immediatly is the
ceramic insulators which the electrode holder slides through. In the past,
repeated applications of heavy coatings will eventually create a conductive
surface coating on these parts and current through the carbon rod will be
reduced as it flows along this alternate pathway. In extreme cases, carbon
will not evaporate and metal parts of the electrode will actually begin to
melt. Good thing your fuses are blowing rather than your top. The insulators
are tough to clean because of the porous surface and you may find that they
crumble to dust when you remove them due to the heating they have been
subjected to. It's good to have a few extras around as this is a chronic
problem.
Have you tried the carbon yarn yet in the Denton? It is impossible to
blowout/arc as with the rods and is much more controllable, just evaporate
until it burns through. Heavier coatings can be acquired by reducing the
distance from the source. Look out for metal contamination of the yarn if you
evaporate shadowing metals; it shows up as tiny electron-dense spots on you
substrates. Use the shutter to protect the unused yarn on the bobbin. You
can get the yarn directly from Denton for the best price; e-mail me if you
need info. -Doug





From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 10:44:55 PDT
Subject: SEM: Carbon Evaporators

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950330104455.320-at-vanlab.paprican.ca}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Hello,
We are intending to purchase a carbon evaporation unit for coating
SEM/EDX samples . We have received quotes for 6 systems but have
narrowed the choises to the following on the basis of cost:
Denton 502A
Ladd
Edwards 306
The price range for these units is $24,000-$35,000 in Canadian dollars.
We are very tight for money (of course) but do not want to buy a unit
which will give us continuous headaches with overheating, jamming of
the carbon rod feed mechanism or having to evacuate several times in
order to recoat because enough carbon could not be applied the first
time.
If you have experience with any of these units, either positive or
negative, I would appreciate hearing your comments. If you have any
experience with using 1/4" rods vs. 1/8" rods or "reduced section"
versus conically tipped rods, please pass it along.

I was all set to make a purchase before I read the recent comments on
the listserver.
Thanks very much for any assistance.
Laurie


______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 14:35:52 PDT
Subject: EDX Contacts

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950330143551.320-at-vanlab.paprican.ca}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Hi,
I am trying to wrap up a summary of referances on EDX and require
some information:
1) Has the book from MAS entitled "X-ray Spectrometry in Electron
Beam Instruments" by Dave Williams and Dale Newbury actually been
published yet and if so, is there a phone number for orders?

2) Is anyone familiar with an EDX upgrade system from "Aptec"? I
believe it is located somewhere in Ontario, Canada but I am not sure if
the name I have is a company or product name. Contact # ?

3) When and where is the next International Congress on Electron
Microscopy (ICEM) and what is a contact number for information?

4) When and where is the next International Conference on X-ray
Optics and Microanalysis (ICXOM) and what is a contact # for info?

I will be making a summary of the information I have gathered on EDX
available shortly. Thanks for any assistance.
Laurie

______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: Robert Kayton,MAC,CROET :      kayton-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 1995 07:04:20 -0800
Subject: TEM: Gold particle counting

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Reply to: RE} TEM: Gold particle counting
Hi Bob,
Your colleague may be suffering from low contrast images. Try acquiring or
scanning in the images with greater contrast range. The contrast of the images
should be such that the black gold particles should be black (an extreme gray
level) and everything else in the image should be a different gray value
(mid-gray to white). For the images that are already digitized try doing a
"Sharpen" or an "Unsharp Masking" operation on the image.

Sincerely,

George McNamara
Universal Imaging Corporation
--------------------------------------

I have colleague that needs help setting up an automatic computer based method
to count gold particles on TEM micrographs. He has NIH image, a good
Macintosh and can import digital images but is having difficulties getting
accurate counts of the gold particles. If anyone has experience with this
please let me know.

Bob Kayton
kayton-at-ohsu.edu







From: Jose.Feijo-at-bio.fc.ul.pt (Jose Feijo)
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 1995 16:44:18 +0000
Subject: Confocal Red line/immuno-labeling in plant tissue

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Message-Id: {9503311445.AA01865-at-dnagel.bio.fc.ul.pt}
X-Sender: bjfeijo-at-skull.cc.fc.ul.pt
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I there:
One of our users has plans to look at entire styles and to do some immuno
labeling of the stylar channel proteins. He wants to get rid of embedding
and/or freeze-sectioning so he figured confocal would be the answer. Among
others, I antecipate some problem with self fluorescence coming either from
chlorophyls and/or lignins. One way around these would be to use the red
line of the Kr-Ar (we have a MRC-600). So, does anyone has experience on
working with secondary antibodies (in this case against chicken) labeled
with red excitable fluorophores in plant tissues? What may the major
drawbacks in this kind of preparation?
Any help would be highly appreciated.


___________________________________________________________
Jose A. Feijo
Dept. Biologia Vegetal, Fac. Ciencias Lisboa
Ed. C2, Campo Grande, P-1700 LISBOA, PORTUGAL

t. + 351.1.7500069 fax + 351.1.7597716
e.mail Jose.Feijo-at-bio.fc.ul.pt
URL: http://www.fc.ul.pt/departs/biologia_vegetal/ejf.html
___________________________________________________________





From: Brian J. Zande :      bz0c+-at-andrew.cmu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 1995 11:04:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: New home for SEM

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Message-ID: {IjT2UcW00iV_A3idsG-at-andrew.cmu.edu}

The Carnegie Mellon Research Institute (a division of Carnegie Mellon
University) is trying to find a new home for a 13 year old ISI SS-40
SEM. If anyone out there is interested please send mail to me at
bz0c+-at-andrew.cmu.edu

Thanks
Brian




From: Beth Trend :      trend-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 1995 15:06:07 -0600
Subject: TEM: Cryo tem of colloids

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} From the Characterization Facility at the University of Minnesota

MASTER CLASS

Cryo-TEM of Colloidal Materials

=A5 Specimen Preparation

=A5 Cryo-Transfer to the Electron Microscope

=A5 Low-Electron Dose Image and Diffraction Pattern Recording on Film

=A5 Image-Processing and Analysis of Digital Cryo-TEM Images


May 18-20, 1995

Intended Audience

This Master Class is intended for any materials scientists or process eng=
ineers =

working with biological or colloidal materials. This class will explore t=
he use =

of the technique of cryo-transmission electron microscopy to probe the =

microstructure of these samples in the vitrified, hydrated state at resol=
utions =

around 1 nm. Previous TEM experience, although welcome, is not required.=



Description

The lectures will introduce the basics of cryo-transmission electron micr=
oscopy,
including sample preparation and microscopy techniques. Applications to s=
pecific
biological and colloidal materials=D5 samples will be demonstrated, and =

complementary characterization techniques will be described.

The details of sample preparation, focussing on vitrification parameters =
and =

transfer to the microscope, will be described and demonstrated. Imaging =

techniques and interpretation, artifact identification, and quantitative =

analysis will also be covered.

Supervised hands-on laboratories demonstrating the techniques that were =

introduced in the lectures will be interspersed throughout the class. Po=
ssible =

topics include: low dose imaging of soft latex particles; low dose imagi=
ng of =

phospholipid vesicles; image processing of cryo-TEM images using NIH Imag=
e and =

Digital Micrograph; CEVS sample preparation; and video-enhanced light mic=
roscopy
of colloidal materials.

Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to select an appr=
opriate
cryogen, prepare vitrified thin films of colloidal specimens, transfer th=
ese =

specimens to the microscope, and record images free from artifacts caused=
by =

electron beam damage.

Registration

For more information, reply to Beth Trend, trend-at-cems.umn.edu


Instructors

Frank Booy is a Senior Staff Fellow, National Institute of Arthritis =

Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. =
As a =

special expert in electron microscopy, he has worked in the field of =

cryo-electron microscopy of biological materials since 1978, at the CNRS =
in =

Grenoble, France, the European Molecular Biological Laboratory in Heidelb=
erg, =

Germany, and the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen in the Netherlands. Dr. Boo=
y is =

particularly involved in the use of cryo-electron microscopy and 3-D imag=
e =

reconstruction techniques to localize the proteins that make up the =

nucleocapsids of herpes simplex virus.


John Minter, a Research Associate in the Analytical Technology Division o=
f the =

Eastman Kodak Company, is the technical group leader of the Quantitative =
Colloid
Microscopy Group. Minter=D5s group applies cryo-TEM and electron crystall=
ography =

to the study of photographic colloids. During 1990, he was an Industrial =
Fellow =

at CIE collaborating with Professors H. Ted Davis and L. E. Scriven to st=
udy =

surfactant morphology and crystal precipitation by cryo-TEM. He is curren=
tly an =

Adjunct Professor at CIE and Industrial Co-chair of the CIE Characterizat=
ion =

Facility Advisory Committee.

David P. Siegel is a Senior Scientist in the Research & Development Dept.=
, =

Procter & Gamble Co. His general interest areas are membrane biophysics =
and the
physical chemistry of biologically relevant lipids. Dr. Siegel is partic=
ularly =

interested in the mechanisms of biomembrane fusion and of lamellar-to-inv=
erted =

phase transitions in phospholipids. Since 1991, he has used cryo-TEM and=
=

time-resolved cryo-TEM to image intermediates in these processes.

Schedule

Thursday May 18 =

8:00 a.m. Registration =


8:30 Lecture I: Introduction to Cryo-TEM
=A5 Basics steps in cryo-TEM
=A5 Biological and colloidal problems that can be solved using c=
ryo-TEM =

=

10:15 Lecture II: Sample Preparation, Vitrification, Storage, and Trans=
fer to =

the Microscope
=

Lunch =


1:00 p.m. Lab Session - Shepherd Labs

Dinner

7:00-10:00 Lab Session continues as needed
=


Friday, May 19

8:00 Coffee =


8:30 Lecture III: Imaging in Cryo-TEM
=A5 Operation of Electron Microscope
=A5 Recognizing the good samples to examine
=

10:15 Lecture IV: Image interpretation, processing, and analysis
=A5 Artifacts - a rogue's gallery
=A5 Quantitative analysis

11:45 Discussion Session

Lunch

1:00- 6:00 p.m. Lab Session - Shepherd Labs


Saturday, May 20

9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Optional Laboratory Session - Students' samples





____________________________________________________________________=
___
Beth Trend trend-at-cems.umn.edu (faster) or btrend-at-maroon.tc.=
umn.edu
Coordinator, Characterization Facility University of Minnesota
Center for Interfacial Engineering =

100 Union St SE Room 187 phone 612-624-1365 fax 612-626-7530=

Minneapolis, MN 55455 =






From: Brian J. Zande :      bz0c+-at-andrew.cmu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 1995 12:08:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: new home for ISI

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Message-ID: {cjT3Pka00iVG44Uk17-at-andrew.cmu.edu}

The Carnegie Mellon Research Institute (a division of Carnegie Mellon
University) is trying to find a new home for a 13 year old ISI SS-40
SEM. If anyone out there is interested please respond to me at
bz0c+-at-andrew .cmu.edu

Thanks,
Brian




From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 1995 08:58:29 -0500
Subject: Microscopy Events

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In our newsletter, Microscopy Today, we attempt to publish monthly an
on-going summary of ALL microscopy events (conferences/meetings, schools,
training sessions, etc.) in the U.S. - plus major international events.
A no-charge listing includes:
Dates
Title
Sponsor/Organizer
Location
Contact/Tel/Fax
We will consider longer write-ups and ask for an article contribution to the
newsletter, rather than money, for the effort.
The newsletter is mailed only to those who have requested copies - at no
charge currently to some 8,000 microscopists in the U.S., Canada and the U.K.
Unfortunately we must charge a modest subscription for other international
readers.
We invite your no charge event listing - or request for a subscription.
Regards,
Don Grimes, Editor





From: Juranyi Zsolt :      juranyi-at-kokiux.koki.hu
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 1995 15:53:26 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Subscription request

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We would be obliged if you informed us about the specifications
(including ISBN codes) of those books/atlases/workbooks which were
published for students in the field of ULTRASTRUCTURAL HUMAN PATHOLOGY in
the last ten years.
Could you recommend for us some?
Thank you in advance,sincerely yours

Szabolcs Viragh and Evelin Orso





From: MED_SCU-at-FRCU.EUN.EG
Date: Sun, 02 Apr 1995 10:28:59 +0000 (O)
Subject:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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First Intarnational Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in Research in Differcent Fields of Sciance
September 1995
Ismailia - Etap

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt

Special Topics of the conference:
1- Role of EM in diagnostic virology.
2- Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cylulogy and urinary atones.
3- Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic
conditions).
4- X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metalllurgical,
mineralogical, and biological.
5- Scanning EM of plants, animal, ineccts, and mineral material.
6- Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic
electron diffraction patterns.
7- Skin pathology by EM.
8- Morphological ldentification of antigens by EM.
9- Different low temperature methods for biological EM.
10- Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM.

There will be an equipment exblbition in conjunction with this
meeting. Registration for foreigners will be US $ 150 inclusive of
full board during the time of the meeting.
For further information, contact the organizar:
Prof, Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscvpe Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt
Fax: (20) 64- 329478 ( phone and Fax number)
Fax: (20) 64- 333318 ( Phone and Fax number)

Massage from: sayed Mersal





From: tsi-at-werple.mira.net.au (Thomson Scientific:Paul Thomson)
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 12:25:04 +1000
Subject: Newsgroup subsciption

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Please subscribe us to this newgroup.





From: MED_SCU-at-FRCU.EUN.EG
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:38:39 +0000 (O)
Subject:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


First Intarnational Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in Research in Differcent Fields of Sciance
September 1995
Ismailia - Etap

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt

Special Topics of the conference:
1- Role of EM in diagnostic virology.
2- Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cylulogy and urinary atones.
3- Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic
conditions).
4- X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metalllurgical,
mineralogical, and biological.
5- Scanning EM of plants, animal, ineccts, and mineral material.
6- Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic
electron diffraction patterns.
7- Skin pathology by EM.
8- Morphological ldentification of antigens by EM.
9- Different low temperature methods for biological EM.
10- Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM.

There will be an equipment exblbition in conjunction with this
meeting. Registration for foreigners will be US $ 150 inclusive of
full board during the time of the meeting.
For further information, contact the organizar:
Prof, Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscvpe Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt
Fax: (20) 64- 329478 ( phone and Fax number)
Fax: (20) 64- 333318 ( Phone and Fax number)

Massage from: sayed Mersal





From: szabop-at-bmeik.eik.bme.hu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 17:21:52 +0100
Subject: Subscription request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 08:22:29 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Subscription request

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Dear Szabolcs and Evelin,
I have several recommendations for you (though I'm sorry I don't have the
ISBN codes handy). I would recommend the Journal: Ultrastructural
Pathology. I would also recommend becoming a member of the
Ultrastrucural Pathology Society. This society has among its members
some of the "giants" in this field. To join, or inquire for more
information please contact:

Claire M. Payne, Ph.D.
Secretary, Ultrastructural Pathology Society
University of Arizona
Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology
1501 N. Campbell
Tucson, AZ 85724
USA

Books:

Diagnostic Ultrastructure of Non-Neoplastic Diseases (1992),
Papadimitriiou, Henderson and Spagnolo,
Churchill Livingstone, Pub.

Diagnostic Electron Microscopy: A Text/Atlas (1988), Dickerson,
Igaku-Shion, Pub.

Ultrastructural Appearances of Tumors (1986), Henderson, Papadimitriou,
Coleman, Churchill Livingstone, Pub.

Diagnostic Ultrastructural Pathology (????) Dvorak, Monahan-Earley, CRC
Press

Ultrastructural Pathology of the Cell and Matrix (1988) Ghadially,
Butterworths, Pub.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I hope its a start.

Doug Cromey
************************************************
On Sat, 1 Apr
1995, Juranyi Zsolt wrote:

} We would be obliged if you informed us about the specifications
} (including ISBN codes) of those books/atlases/workbooks which were
} published for students in the field of ULTRASTRUCTURAL HUMAN PATHOLOGY in
} the last ten years.
} Could you recommend for us some?
} Thank you in advance,sincerely yours
}
} Szabolcs Viragh and Evelin Orso
}
}


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: JONES-at-KRDC.INT.ALCAN.CA
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:01:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 12:42:40 -0400
Subject: Re: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I see several folks trying to subscribe to the Fatfree list using the wrong
address. This is the subscription address: FATFREE-REQUEST-at-HUSTLE.RAHUL.NET

To join, send e-mail to the subscription address using one of the following
subjects:
ADD to join as a regular member
ADD DIGEST to join as a digest member

Hope this helps.

At 12:01 PM 4/3/95, JONES-at-KRDC.INT.ALCAN.CA wrote:
}
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 13:12:17 EDT
Subject: Re: SEM: Carbon Evaporators

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Dear Laurie,
We have an old Ladd and a couple of home-made evaporators. The Ladd
has been here longer than I (15 years), gets heavy use, and still works just
fine (we just use it for coating grids, etc., so your mileage may vary). We
use the 1/8" rods narrowed to ~1 mm (reduced section). I have coated objects
from barely visible to very dark in one shot. BTW, a piece of paper folded
so that one part shadows the other allows the color of the carbon to be fol-
lowed relatively easily once one gets the hang of it. Any bell jar can, of
course, be combined with the evaporating system (power supply, rod holder,
etc.), so if you have the pumps available, you might save some $ by buying
parts. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Rebecca K Siegel-Wasserman :      SIEGELWA-at-AC.GRIN.EDU
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 13:31:02 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: unsubscribe

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please unsubscribe me
siegelwa-at-ac.grin.edu




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:48:06 EDT
Subject: Re: advises about filament needed

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Dear Xiaogang,
We have used both new and rebuilt W filaments, and have found the re-
built ones to be at least as good as the new ones--in some ways better. The
rebuilt ones we bought were from EBTEC (I am only a customer & have no finan-
cial interest). The advantages of EBTEC's designs are 1) the connection of
the hairpin to the posts is better than on some other designs, and 2) they have
"regular" and "sharp" tips. The regular tips give a nice bright beam, and the
sharp ones give a smaller source size. The intensity per unit area for the
sharp tips is about the same as that for the regular tips, so the total inten-
sity is less; however, the coherence is better, so for diffraction with radia-
tion-sensitive specimens, the sharp tips are very good.
We routinely preheat our filaments before mounting them in the Wehnelt
cylinders. I don't know what the thin film you find sticking to your filaments
is, but maybe preheating will help. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Steve Miller
Date: 03 Apr 95 14:19:25 EDT
Subject: Carbon evaporation

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With 20 years of experience in servicing DV502's the most common problems I
have encountered with carbon evaporation are:

1. Early units did not have a braided conduction wire between the moveable
collet and the frame for sure current conduction. The fix for this is get
the braid and drill/tap holes for fastening. If this is a problem, contact
Denton to send it in for upgrade.

2. All versions work well with reduced section rods (approx .7mm diameter),
pointed rods vary in conduction from start to finish and when the size
nears the full 2mm the current can well go over 50 amps. I find reduced
section rods will evaporate between 20-30 amps.

3. If the fuse is blown, often the fuse is replaced with a standard fuse.
The correct fuse would be a ceramic type ABC fuse which is more tolerant
and safer when it blows.

4. With reduced section rods if evaporation is continued past the reduced
section you get the same overcurrent as with pointed rods.

5. Unfortunately there is a lot of variance in the way carbon is made into
rods. You will see a variance of color, brittleness, ash formation (from
some filler!). Only buy small quantities of any type until you find one
that is good.

Obviously constant pressure on the rods during evaporation is essential.
The leaf spring used for pressure can be easily abused by pulling it
straight back to put in carbon rods. A better way of displacing it is to
push it down for loading the carbon rod. If there is poor tension you
really have to remove the spring and reform it to put more pressure on the
rod.

7. If all of this doesn/t help, call the company and GET HELP, there is no
reason to put up with poor performance, all parts and advice are available.
The phone at Denton is 609-439-9100.

For any more detailed discussions you may contact me at Integrated
Microsystems, Inc. 708-698-4210, fax 708-696-2541 or email.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:37:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Enough of Egyptian Announcement

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Colleagues...

I don't want to sound like I'm beating down
the Egyptian meeting. But we've had multiple
postings of that announcement for the last few weeks.
I think we've had enough. Unfortunately, they
are from different sources every time. So I cannot
touch base with one person/organization and
ask them to stop. So as a general announcement

Please cease posting this announcement until
there is a significant change!

Thanks...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.








From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:18:39 +0800PST
Subject: diamond knives

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I remember seeing a request in the last few weeks about diamond
knives. We are about to purchase one and are looking for suppliers
and any thoughts on who makes the best diamond knives. I seem to
remember the last time I bought one that the best were from Dupont or
Diatome(?) but can't remember exactly which. Is that still true.?
Any help greatly appreciated.

Yours
Mark Elliott PhD




From: Heinz Hemken :      hhemken-at-cell.cinvestav.mx
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 16:17:19 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Enough of Egyptian Announcement

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I've had a similar problem with this list that I haven't had with others.
My postings get to the list, but somewhere out there multiple copies
bounce off servers and come back over a period of days. Not being a UNIX
guru, I have no idea why this is.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Heinz Hemken
Departamento de Biologia Celular, CINVESTAV-IPN
http://cell.cinvestav.mx/bchh.html

On Mon, 3 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} Colleagues...
}
} I don't want to sound like I'm beating down
} the Egyptian meeting. But we've had multiple
} postings of that announcement for the last few weeks.
} I think we've had enough. Unfortunately, they
} are from different sources every time. So I cannot
} touch base with one person/organization and
} ask them to stop. So as a general announcement
}
} Please cease posting this announcement until
} there is a significant change!
}
} Thanks...
}
} Nestor
} Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.
}
}
}
}




From: Andreh Khachatouri :      usd14716-at-interramp.com
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 22:01:06 -0800
Subject: Fixatives In electron microscopy

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X-Mailer: InterCon TCP/Connect II 2.1.2
Mime-Version: 1.0
Message-Id: {9504032201.AA06079-at-usd14716.interramp.com}

I am working with sea urchin eggs and would like to have pictures of untreated
eggs plus treated eggs ( with DTT and alpha-amylase) with SEM and TEM. Iam not
sure what fixatives are appropriate for SEM and TEM . Please help me.





From: Andreh Khachatouri :      usd14716-at-interramp.com
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 22:09:38 -0800
Subject: Fixatives in Electron microscopy

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X-Mailer: InterCon TCP/Connect II 2.1.2
Mime-Version: 1.0
Message-Id: {9504032209.AA38846-at-usd14716.interramp.com}

I would like to know what fixatives to use to have pictures of sea urchin eggs
for SEM and TEM. Thanks





From: Stephan Helfer :      STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 13:20:55 BST
Subject: Subscription to AMC microscopy mailing list

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Dear Dr Zaluzek

I have tried in vain to contact you both using
Zaluzek-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov and listserver-at-....; I hope I'm getting
through this time.

Could you please add my name and Email address to the AMC
microscopy mailing list.

Thanks very much

Yours sincerely


Dr Stephan Helfer, SSO
Mycologist

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Inverleith Row, EDINBURGH EH3 5LR,
Scotland UK

email STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
phone: +44 (0)131 552 7171 ext 280
or +44 (0)131 459 0446-280 (direct digital VoiceMail line)
fax: +44 (0)131 552 0382




From: Fangl-at-fpms.fpms.ac.be
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 17:36:42 +0200
Subject: Re: Microscopy Research and Technique, Guest Editors

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Dr. Johnson: WOuld you mail me already existed topical set about material sc
science structure. Thanks!
FANG L.




From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:35:35 EST
Subject: Sea Urchin Eggs

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To Andreh Khachatouri:

I did a considerable amount of TEM and SEM on urchin eggs a number of
years ago. As I recall, the fixative giving the best results was
something like 2% Glut. in seawater followed by osmium post-fixation. For
references, see Byrd and Eppel, and Belisle and Byrd from the period of
1974 to 1979. Sorry I can't be more specific.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:55:02 -0400
Subject: apology for error

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Good Morning Microscopists,
Yesterday morning after observing several folks trying to subscribe to
this list using the wrong address and some folks attempting to do the same
with another list, I thought I would be helpful. Well....I somehow got my
wires crossed and it seems that a great many of you now know how to join
that other list.
Please accept my apologies and I promise that I shall never again
attempt to be helpful on a Monday morning. (Hopefully, I provided a chuckle
for some of you.) Sandra
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 07:50:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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Mark,
I have had good luck, good quality and quick turn around from Micro
Engineering (409)291-6891. My purchases were only resharpennings of old
DuPont knives, but the price was good and so was the quality. Some of
the folks I work with now will only buy Diatome diamond knives.
Hopefully that means that almost any major manufaturer will have some
high quality knives available.
Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: Suichu Luo :      SUICHU-at-utkvx.utk.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 14:52:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: subscribe

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Dear Sir:

Would you please send me the information.

Thanks a lot.

Suichu Luo




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 16:59:52 -0700
Subject: Freeze-Fracture Short Course Announcement

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Message-Id: {v01510103aba78b8dbca6-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The Electron Microscopy/Imaging Center at Colorado State University will be
offering a 5 day Short Course in Freeze-Fracture Techniques this summer.
In addition to comprehensive lectures, state-of-the-art instruments will be
available for hands-on training in the laboratory.

For more detailed information, please visit our World Wide Web site at URL:
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/emic/homepage.html, or contact me
directly (not to this list) for an email copy of the announcement.


John
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/faculty/chandler.html






From: Ann-Fook Yang :      YANGA-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 16:48:21 -0400
Subject: Re:Diamond knives

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Mark Elliott asked about diamond knives.
Du Pont sold their diamond knife business to Delaware Diamond
Knives, Inc. years ago. I don't know the further development.
We have several users here; all use Diatome knives and all are
satisfied with their knives. One of the users sent a Diatome
diamond knife, which had been resharpened by a competitor, back to
the Diatome factory for resharpening several years ago. Diatome
would not touch it because it was not one of theirs, although the
boat was. The diamond was of lower quality. This indicates their
high standard of quality.
There may be other good diamond knives in the marketplace, but you
can't go wrong with a Diatome knife. BTW I have nothing to do
with the Diatome except using their knives.

Ann Fook Yang





From: erich-at-ento.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 00:09:54 +1000
Subject: McIlvaine's Buffer

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Message-Id: {9504050210.AA08736-at-spider.ento.csiro.au}

Dear All,
Does anyone have a recipe for McIlvaine's Buffer which I'm told is for pH3
to pH6 and is used for amylase assays? Many thanks,
Eric Hines





From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:29:07 EST
Subject: diamond knives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To Mark Elliot:

For the past 12 years, I have been dealing exclusively with
MicroEngineering Inc. who make the Microstar diamond knife. I have no
interest in this company other than the fact that they make a high
quality, affordable product. In the rare cases when I have received a bad
one, I have had a replacement by the next day or 2. Pricewise, I would
have difficulty justifying any other brand to my procurement department.
Again, this is no sales pitch, but just the way its been with my lab which
buys or resharpens 1 or 2 knives a year.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: SUSAN R. SESACK :      SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:10:15 EDT
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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} From: {MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca}
} Organization: UBC Pulmonary Research Lab
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:18:39 +0800PST
} Subject: diamond knives
} Priority: normal

} I remember seeing a request in the last few weeks about diamond
} knives. We are about to purchase one and are looking for suppliers
} and any thoughts on who makes the best diamond knives. I seem to
} remember the last time I bought one that the best were from Dupont or
} Diatome(?) but can't remember exactly which. Is that still true.?
} Any help greatly appreciated.
}
} Yours
} Mark Elliott PhD
}

Mark,

I have always used Diatome diamond knives, as did the lab where I was
trained. They are of superior quality and can be sharpened as often
as needed, for life. Other companies sometimes limit the number of
sharpenings that they will guarantee. I also have always had
exceptional help and service from Stacey Kirsch who heads the US
division of Diatome. She can be reached at 800-523-5874 for current
pricing and additional information.

S.
sesack-at-bns.pitt.edu
Susan R. Sesack
Dept. Neuroscience
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260




From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 13:52:02 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Seminar of California Association of Criminalistics

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CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF CRIMINALISTS
MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

The California Association of Criminalists (CAC) is holding
its 85th Semi-Annual meeting on May 10-13, 1995, at the Walnut
Creek Marriott in Walnut Creek, California. The Contra Costa
County Sheriff's Department Criminalistics Laboratory will be
hosting this meeting.

The program is shaping up fast. Some of the subjects planned
include: the Integrated Ballistics Identification System
(IBIS), computer animation in casework, retrieving secured data
in cases of computer crime, and bite mark analysis in the case
of a mountain lion attack. This is also our last call for
papers so this is your chance to share your latest project or
most interesting case. Both your technical notes and innovative
research are welcome. For an abstract form contact Rich Schorr,
voice (510)646-2455 or fax (510)646-2913.

Workshops planned include: A Computer Workshop for Cyber-
phobes (Everything You Ever Wanted To Do But Were Afraid To
Admit You Didn't Know How), Practical Applications of GCMS
In a Crime Laboratory Environment, a Glock Armorers Course,
DNA Users Group Meeting and a Polaroid Film Product Workshop.

For more information or to receive a registration package
contact Karen Sheldon, Contra Costa County, Sheriff-Coroner's
Department, 1122 Escobar St., Martinez, CA 94553, voice (510)
646-2455 or fax (510)646-2913.






From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 16:38:16 +1100
Subject: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Message-Id: {v01510100aba7d3b2b765-at-[139.80.120.150]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
(we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
in plant nodule formation.
We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
processing. I think plunge freezing with a KF80, cryosubstituting the cells
using perhaps 2% OsO4 in methanol would be good, followed by conventional
dehydration and embedding in epoxy. Conventional room temperature fix
methods use glutaraldehyde/ruthenium red/OsO4 in various concentrations to
fix and stain the extracellular material but from the pictures I've seen I
suspect much of the material has still been lost.

Is cryoprotection of the sample necessary? If I lightly fix then infiltrate
in sucrose or some other protectant I'm a bit worried we'll start washing
the polysaccharide away, if I don't then the cells (which will be a small
scraping of colonies off the plate surface) could be ice damaged.
If I don't use ruth. red as a stain will the material still be visible -
even if present?
I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who has had experiance of similar samples.

Regards,
Richard E

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254

"The southernmost electron microscope unit in the world"






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 12:59:30 EDT
Subject: Re: pointed filaments

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Dear John,
You asked about specific improvements in capabilities vs reduced life-
times for pointed filaments in use with radiation-sensitive specimens. First,
let me say that we experienced no reduction in lifetime. Since, with proper
design, a pointed filament can be saturated at a lower current, this is not
too surprising. In my work--as opposed to nearly everyone else I know--I often
try to get rid of electrons. For EDX and crystallography I operate at the low-
est setting for wehnelt bias, a maximally excited first condenser lens, and a
small-bore condenser aperture. If I use a more intense beam for EDX, the dead-
time of my system and my beam spot both get larger. For crystallography, I
scan the specimen using low beam currents to avoid damage during the time I am
not recording (damage during recording is inevitable). Furthermore, when I
scan in diffraction mode, I want the beam size to be the same as the selected
area, so that, again, every electron incident on the specimen is of some use.
Bearing these facts in mind, the smaller beam size from a pointed fil-
ament reduces the brehmsstrahlung radiation from the condenser aperture and
other sources within the column and increases the signal-to-noise ratio and
spatial resolution for microanalysis (not that my spatial resolution is too
good; with a high-voltage EM and thick sections, the analysis volume will
never be small). Exposure of unexamined areas of a specimen is crystallography
is harder to characterize; however, given that scanning the specimen, tweaking
the position and adjusting the beam, etc. take only a few percent of the expo-
sure recorded on film, and that often several ED patterns can be taken from
the same selected area, there would seem to be little effect on the data. It
must be remembered that the ultimate, irreducible limit to the data obtainable
is set by damage to the specimen and that the higher-resolution reflections are
the most sensitive to this damage. Once again, it is the smaller size of the
beam which is beneficial. Additionally, the ED pattern is better when the ob-
jective lens is focussed (although, in the HVEM, this is not too critical),
and focussing can be accomplished very rapidly using minimum contrast, which
works better with a more coherent beam.
I have not done quantitative comparisons between regular and pointed
filaments for either case, so I can't give you specific figures of merit, but
I can tell you that the beam is visibly smaller and the interference fringes
are noticably more prominant with the pointed filament. I also have no idea
whether any of these considerations are specific to 1.2 MV electrons, although
I wouldn't think so.
Another occasional consideration is that heating and charging effects
are minimized at low beam currents, so the pointed filaments are more specimen-
friendly in this way also.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Ann-Fook Yang :      YANGA-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Wed, 05 Apr 1995 12:23:37 -0400
Subject: Re:Diamond knife quality

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Message-ID: {1452822F0179AEAA-at-ggpl.arsusda.gov}

I mentioned in my last message about DIATOME would not touch the
knife which had been resharpened by a competitor. I should have
made it clear that "the diamond was of lower quality" was a direct
quote from a sales rep.

Ann Fook Yang





From: South Bay Technology, 73531,1344
Date: 05 Apr 95 12:18:19 EDT
Subject: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

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---------- Forwarded Message ----------


I POSTED THIS MESSAGE SEVERAL WEEKS AGO AND RECEIVED NO RESPONSE. I THOUGHT I'D
GIVE IT ANOTHER TRY JUST IN CASE THERE WAS A DELIVERY PROBLEM.

RE: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

Dear Microscopists-

I was wondering if anyone out there knows what happened to the Polaron line of
products. I am particularly curious about some of their embedding resins such
as the Polabed 812.

Thanks for your help!

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu (R. Howard Berg)
Date: Wed, 05 Apr 1995 08:22:09 +0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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Richard Easingwood writes:

} Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
} I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
} polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
} (we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
} in plant nodule formation.
} We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
} processing.

Cryofixation would be a good way to go. Why not freeze sub in
osmium/acetone, embed in epoxy, as normal, and then do a PAS stain on
sections? The osmium and normal poststains are unlikely to stain all the
polysaccharides. It would be interesting to find out if freeze
substitution in ruthenium red/acetone would work (i.e., would the RR
penetrate?).


R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Biology Department
University of Memphis
Memphis, TN, 38152
E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457







From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 10:42:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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Message-Id: {9504051952.AA10641-at-esds01.es.dupont.com}

Continuing the diamond knife theme, I have been using Diatome knives
for many years, and have been impressed with their quality and reliabity.
But in the commercial exibits at the Cell Biology meetings in San
Francisco last December, I became aware of diamond knives being made in
the Netherlands by Drukker International, B.V., an old dutch diamond firm
(dating from 1906). The descriptions sounded quite impressive, including
"superb wetting behavior". A 3 mm blade knife costs $2500. Or you can
use their "exchange program" = if you send them an old diamond knife (any
manufacturer, any condition), you will receive a new 3 mm Drukker knife
for $1750 (if the new knife isn't shipped within two weeks, then you get
it free). The U.S. distributor is Harris Diamond Corporation, 100 Stierli
Court, suite 106, Mount Arlington, N.J. 07856, tel (201) 770-1520, fax
(201)770-1549. I don't know anything about the company other than
spending a few minutes at their booth at the meetings and receiving a nice
brochure. If I had plenty of money and were buying a diamond knife today,
I would probably buy Diatome, but I thought EM people would want to be
aware of the Drukker knife, which could be very good.




From: richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Lander)
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 10:10:16 +1200
Subject: SEM of microcapsules

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To listserver people,
Many thanks for the replies to my problem.
We found that putting the Microcapsules between 2 squares of double sided
tape and tearing them apart, left a good idea of the internal structure.
Pretty simple really! This was adequate for what the user was wanting and
they were pleased with the results. So pleased, they have decided to bring
back about 80 samples!

rich.

*****************************************************************
* Richard Lander *
* South Campus Electron Microscope Unit *
* c/- Pathology Department *
* Otago Medical School *
* P.O. Box 913 *
* Dunedin *
* N.Z. *
* *
* Tel. National 03 479 7301 International 64 3 479 7301 *
* Fax. National 03 479 7254 International 64 3 479 7254 *
*****************************************************************






From: David Garrett :      DGARRETT-at-gab.unt.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 08:32:17 CST6CDT
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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} From: "W.L. Steffens" {STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu}
} Organization: College of Vet. Med
} To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Date sent: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:29:07 EST
} Subject: diamond knives
} Priority: normal

} To Mark Elliot:
}
} For the past 12 years, I have been dealing exclusively with
} MicroEngineering Inc. who make the Microstar diamond knife. I have no
} interest in this company other than the fact that they make a high
} quality, affordable product. In the rare cases when I have received a bad
} one, I have had a replacement by the next day or 2. Pricewise, I would
} have difficulty justifying any other brand to my procurement department.
} Again, this is no sales pitch, but just the way its been with my lab which
} buys or resharpens 1 or 2 knives a year.
}
} -=W.L. Steffens=-
} College of Veterinary Medicine
} University of Georgia
}
MicroEngineering is now known as Micro Star Technologies.
Contact: Cathy Zimmerman (800)533-2509, E-mail US3SNQ7N-at-IBMMAIL.COM
***************************************
David Garrett "DGARRETT-at-GAB.UNT.EDU"
University of North Texas
Dept. Biological Sciences
(817)565-3964 Fax (817)565-4136
***************************************




From: Jim Stanley :      jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 08:54:14 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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Although, its been a while since I've polished aluminum. My initial
impression is you have way too many steps. I'd go from 600 grit to 5
micron, to 1 micron, perhaps the .25 micron and then the colloidal. I
also remember that cerium oxide paste gave better results. (probably not
the greatest idea from a saftey and envirnomental standpoint) THe key to
fine polishing of aluminium is to keep the steps to a minimum and the
length of time at each step to a minimum. There may be a sure bet way of
polishing aluminium....but I found it a real pain.

On Tue, 4 Apr 1995 IE09-at-VM.ACS.UNT.EDU wrote:

} We are currently trying to polish aluminum samples (7075). Before we etch
} them, we are trying to get a 0.05 micron finish. The grinding/polishing
} sequence is: 600 grit, 800 grit, 1200 grit, 3 micron diamond paste, 1 micron
} diamond paste, 0.25 micron paste, 0.05 colloidal silica. Everytime we go from
} the 1 micron step to the 0.25 micron step scratches appear....
}
} We have been using Allied High Tech Spec-Cloth polishing pads. Doeas anyone
} have suggestions to get to the final two steps without introducing scratches?
}
} I do not really understand why they get scratched so easily when the finer
} pastes are used.
}
} Should these samples be stored in a dessicator to prevent oxidation? I have
} never worked with Al, and therefore would appreciate any suggestions.
}
} Patrick Diehl
} Center for Materials Characterization
} University of North Texas







From: IAN HALLETT :      ihallett-at-marccri.marc.cri.nz
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 14:44:38 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

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} Date: 05 Apr 95 12:18:19 EDT
} From: South Bay Technology {73531.1344-at-compuserve.com}
} To: Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
} Subject: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812


} I POSTED THIS MESSAGE SEVERAL WEEKS AGO AND RECEIVED NO RESPONSE. I THOUGHT I'D
} GIVE IT ANOTHER TRY JUST IN CASE THERE WAS A DELIVERY PROBLEM.
}
} RE: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812
}
} Dear Microscopists-
}
} I was wondering if anyone out there knows what happened to the Polaron line of
} products. I am particularly curious about some of their embedding resins such
} as the Polabed 812.
}
} Thanks for your help!
}
} David Henriks
} South Bay Technology, Inc.
} 1120 Via Callejon
} San Clemente, CA 92673
}
} TEL: 714-492-2600
} FAX: 714-492-1499

David

I am not sure about specific products but the fate of Polaron goes
Polaron was sold to BioRad who sold it to Fisons. By contacting a US
rep of Fisons you may get more info, although the unit may have been
sold to Thermo Instruments as part of the Fisons scientific
instrument division sale.

As far as Polabed goes a number of suppliers have similar alternative
to EPON 812.

Ian Hallett



Ian Hallett
HortResearch
Mt Albert Research Centre
Private Bag 92 169
Auckland, New Zealand
Fax 64-9-815 4201
Telephone 64-9-849 3660




From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 22:08:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: RE: Daughters at Work Day

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On Wed, 5 Apr 1995, B.A. wrote:

}
} We (DuPont CR&D Analytical) have hosted girls in our lab for the past 2 years
} on Take Your Daughters to Work Day and have set up several demonstrations using
} materials we thought would be familiar to the girls. Lots of parents bend the
} rules and bring quite small girls as young as 6, so be prepared.
}
My High School teacher wife read this over my shoulder and asked me to
remind everyone who has these types of event to have them in the summer
so that the students won't miss school. Teachers who try to do a good
job for classrooms of 25 to 35 students, cannot tailor their lessons to
meet the demands of students who take days off for going to work with mom
or dad, and similar things can can just as easily be done during school
vacation periods.





From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 05 Apr 95 12:53:02 EDT
Subject: OM Polishing of Al

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Patrick-

It is difficult to pinpoint the exact cause for the scratches, but there are a
few things you may want to check.

1) What size are the scratches that you see? Are they significantly larger than
the 1u scratches you are trying to remove? Perhaps you are getting an
agglomeration of .25u particles if they are not properly wetted and dispersed in
the paste. Have you used this same .25u paste before without trouble? Perhaps
you should try a diamond suspension that has more uniformly dispersed particles.

2) Is your sample mounted in epoxy? If so, perhaps particles are emedding in
the epoxy from a previous polishing step.

3) If your sample is not embedded in epoxy, perhaps the particles are embedded
in the mounting wax or trapped inside the polishing fixture.

I don't think your cloth would be a problem. What you are using is the same as
our Fine Rayon cloth and that is what I would recommend for what you are doing.
I assume that you are using a fresh cloth when you reach this stage. Of course,
oxidation could be the problem, but I have never had that problem so it doesn't
seem likely to me.

Something else you may want to consider is trying Colloidal Alumina for the
final polishing stage instead of Colloidal Silica. I understand that it can
produce a better finish on softer metals. Of course, I understand you are
having the problem before the colloidal silica, but it may be something to
consider when you get to that point.

Of course, I would be pleased to supply you with a sample of the diamond
suspension or the colloidal alumina if you would like to give that a try. I
would also be interested to hear any suggestions you get from other people and
ultimately your determination of the problem. I wish you good luck in figuring
it out and I encourage you to contact me if I can be of any help.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499







From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 00:01:31 EDT
Subject: Diamond knives

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-- [ From: Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. * EMC.Ver #2.10P ] --


Further continuation of the diamond knife theme::

1] I have heard essentially good things about the Drukker company.
The only negatives I have ever heard came from Drukker competitors.

2] The Drukker people at the ICEM 94 in Paris and at MSA in 94 had in
their exhibit both a video demonstration showing some purported
advantages of their knife, because of the hydrophilic nature of the
knife, over other knives. The advantage supposedly was that the
sections come off more smoothly and with less vibration, e.g. slipping
and sliding down the edge of the blade. At the ICEM 94 in Paris, the
Drukker booth attracted some of the largest crowds.

Can anyone comment as to whether they have actually seen the
hydrophilic edge to be a unique advantage, above and beyond diamond
knives generally and therefore worth spending extra money?

Further with regard to Drukker, it is my understanding that they more
or less "own" the world wide business for diamond scalpel blades used
for radial keratotomy procedures being done by ophthamologists. They
are now trying to apply their expertise gained from the surgical
instruments end of the business to ultramicrotomy.

3] The "talk" seems to center around foreign made diamond knives.
There are some excellent US made knives (e.g. MicroStar and DDK) and
again, standing in our exhibit booths at the various meetings, I don't
detect any unhappiness among their customers either. As a group, they
do seem to be "happy campers". But as the US dollar stays weak
relative to European currencies, those campers are going to have
another reason to be "happy": They are going to be saving money.


Charles A. Garber
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES/STRUCTURE PROBE, INC.
PO BOX 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (610) 436-5400
(800) 242-4774 [USA only]

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com






From: ychen-at-macc.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 11:59:43 -0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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Message-Id: {25040512580307-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}


} Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
} I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
} polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
} (we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
} in plant nodule formation.
} We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
} processing. I think plunge freezing with a KF80, cryosubstituting the cells
} using perhaps 2% OsO4 in methanol would be good, followed by conventional
} dehydration and embedding in epoxy. Conventional room temperature fix
} methods use glutaraldehyde/ruthenium red/OsO4 in various concentrations to
} fix and stain the extracellular material but from the pictures I've seen I
} suspect much of the material has still been lost.
}
} Is cryoprotection of the sample necessary? If I lightly fix then infiltrate
} in sucrose or some other protectant I'm a bit worried we'll start washing
} the polysaccharide away, if I don't then the cells (which will be a small
} scraping of colonies off the plate surface) could be ice damaged.
} If I don't use ruth. red as a stain will the material still be visible -
} even if present?
} I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who has had experiance of similar samples.
}
} Regards,
} Richard E
}
} Richard Easingwood
} South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
} Otago Medical School
} PO Box 913
} Dunedin
} NEW ZEALAND
}
} Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
} Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254
}
} "The southernmost electron microscope unit in the world"


You can try the method devoloped in Mueller's Lab, ETH, Switerland by using
a capillary tube.
"High-pressure freezing of cell suspensions in cellulose capillary tubes",
J. Microscopy 175, 34-43 (1994).






Ya Chen

=========================================================================
\ / Assistant Researcher-Cryo/SEM Coordinator TEL : 608-263-8481
\ / __ Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR) FAX : 608-265-4076
\/ / / University of Wisconsin-Madison
/ / / 1675 Observatory Drive #167 Email:YChen-at-macc.wisc.edu
/ /__/_ Madison, WI 53706 Email:chen-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
=========================================================================






From: Veronique Buschmann :      bushman-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 11:37:30 +0200 (METDST)
Subject: subscribe

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Please, subscribe : sci.techniques.microscopy
Thank you in advance.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Veronique Buschmann email: bushman-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
EMAT phone: +32 3 218 02 46
University of Antwerp
-----------------------------------------------------------------





From: Tayloe :      tayloe-at-ptbma.usbm.gov
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 14:13:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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Patrick,

I am not familiar with the Allied Spec-Cloth polishing cloths you are
using, nor have I polished 7075 Al (to my knowledge), but here is some
suggestions for ya to do with as ya see fit:

Using Buehler products, grind on grits 320, 400, 600, and 800;
polish on:
1. 6 micron diamond paste [water-based] on Texmet,
2. 1 micron diamond paste [water-based] on either Texmet or Metcloth,
3. either (a) 1 micron Cerium Oxide solution on Mastercloth -or-
(b) .5 micron Chrome Oxide solution on Mastercloth, then
4. .05 micron Mastermet [colloidal Silica] on Mastercloth.

Few hints:
- make sure new cloths are used, and that before their use, you "beat"
down the fibers on the Mastercloth by using a dummy/blank sample or such;
- if using a ultrasonic to help in cleaning, this may dislodge particles
that will then add scratches in later steps;
- use very warm water and -much- soap to clean the samples between each
step. I use my thumb to very gently rub and clean the sample surface;
- use of a dessicator is highly recommened to help slow oxidation and to
keep samples cleaner for further examination;
- takes much time and is -very- frustrating, but experiment with the
above and other recipes to get what works best for you;
- have not done much myself, but don't overlook electropolishing if such
can be used in your case;
- for me, water-based diamond pastes seem to "cut" better for rough
polishing, whereas oil-based seem to produce a smoother, cleaner finish;
- if get frustrated, quit if can for awhile, and attack the sample(s)
later on - have found myself that a recipe that works wonders one day
seems to suck later, but then seems to work great again! The joys of
hand-polishing!! oh boy...

Hope this is somewhat helpful. Good luck,
-Rob
disclaimer: [once again] am not affiliated nor have any financial
interest in any products mentioned or used
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
| tayloe-at-ptbma.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''





From: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu (R. Howard Berg)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 08:04:31 +0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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} You can try the method devoloped in Mueller's Lab, ETH, Switerland by using
} a capillary tube.
} "High-pressure freezing of cell suspensions in cellulose capillary tubes",
} J. Microscopy 175, 34-43 (1994).
}
} Ya Chen
}
Does anyone know of a US Supplier of dialysis tubing in the dimensions
specified in Mueller's paper (about the diameter of a capillary tube)?


R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Biology Department
University of Memphis
Memphis, TN, 38152
E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457







From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:11:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Newsgroups

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 12:02:31 -0400
Subject: Re: ECHO Usenet

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Message-Id: {199504061559.LAA14193-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}

In article {3lsfh6$51e-at-newsbf02.news.aol.com} , campbell36-at-aol.com
(Campbell36) wrote:

} Is the Miscroscopy listserv still being echoed to this newgroup? I would
} appreciate any info regarding this or the usenet address and instructions
} on how to subscribe.
}
}
} Thanks...Jim Campbell

OK, here is the scoop.
The output of the Microscopy Mailserver at Argonne National Laboratory is
no longer being automatically forwarded to the Newsgroup
Sci.Techniques.Microscopy. The reason for this is that DEC closed down
the gateway I was using to forward the mail to the newsgroup. I do not
know where there is an alternative gateway and would like to know.
So, PLEASE, PLEASE, IF YOU KNOW HOW TO FORWARD A MAILING LIST TO A
NEWSGROUP THEN LET ME KNOW.

Also, if you know how to forward the newsgroup content to a mailing list
then please also let me know.
I know that we would have to parse the messages to prevent things being
sent in infinite loops, but it should be doable.

Please do not send messages to Nestor Zaluzec asking him how to do this,
he does know either!

Many thanks to whoever can help us.

--
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html




From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:11:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: ESEM

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 12:13:20 -0400
Subject: Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy User Tips

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Message-Id: {199504061610.MAA15723-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}


Hi there,

At the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Users Group Meeting in Monterey CA this last weekend, it was suggested that we keep a list of Tips, Hacks and Frequently Asked Questions about ESEM.
We have started to compile the list and I am soliciting input from the rest of the user community.
Please send anything you think might be applicable to me at the address below (email only please).

By The Way:
When we say ESEM people think mostly of the ElectroScan instrument. We are not talking exclusively about ElectroScan. We know that Topcon, Hitachi and JEOL (at the very least) make elevated pressure SEMs and all users of those instruments are encouraged
to reply too.

In fact since Hitachi calll their instruments "Variable Pressure SEMs", Topcon call theirs "Wet SEMs" and JEOL call theirs "Low Pressure SEMs", I propose that we call the generic instruments "Lousy Vacuum SEMs". Trouble is, LVSEM is JEOL's accronym! If
anyone has a better idea let me know.


--
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html




From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:12:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: bacteria cryosubstitutio

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 6 Apr 1995 09:53:27 -0700
Subject: Re: bacteria cryosubstitutio

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Message-ID: {n1414960321.97812-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 8:01 AM
OFFICE MEMO RE} bacteria cryosubstitution Date: 4/6/95

to: Richard Easingwood
subj: cryosubstitution of bacteria

Richard- We have had some success with preserving the polysaccharide layer in
bacteria without the use of ruthenium red. A post-doc here custom-constructed
a growth chamber which allowed the growth of the bacteria on a filter
substrate. The idea was to examine the compaction of the bacteria under
different osmotic stresses without actually being immersed in the culture
media.
A small paper disc of cigarette paper was placed on the supporting filter
substrate and the bacteria were allowed to grow on top of it. The paper was
then removed and propane-jet frozen in an RMC MF 7200 device.
After a freeze-substitution regime using 1% osmium/0.1% UA in acetone, the
sample was allowed to slowly warm to RT, then embedded in Epon/Araldite 502
epoxy and sectioned on a diamond knife. Overall preservation was excellent.
I am aware of the preservative nature of RR on the polysaccharide layer but
we were surprised to see a great deal of extracellular matrix between the
cells without it. I am not sure what the mechanism of staining was in this
case, but I think it is significant to consider the possible mechanical loss
of the matrix due to processing/handling.
We have not repeated the experiment with the addition of RR to the
freeze-sub media so I do not yet have a comparison.

Regards,

Doug Davis
EML, 26 Giannini Hall
UC Berkeley 94720
(510) 642-2085
doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu





From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:16:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: T lymphocytes immunohistochemistry

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From: FRANCISCO J HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ :      fjhblazq-at-fox.cce.usp.br
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 07:27:04 -0300 (BST)
Subject: T lymphocytes immunohistochemistry

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I'm studying lymphocytes in the bovine skin and I need some
information.

Please, does anyone have information about the identification of
T-lymphocytes subsets (T-helper and T-cytotoxic) in paraffin sections?
I mean, it is possible or it only can be done in cryostat sections.

I will be very grateful for any help.
=============================================================================
Francisco Javier Hernandez Blazquez |
Universidade de Sao Paulo - Faculdade de | e-mail fjhblazq-at-fox.cce.usp.br
Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos | Voice: 55 195 616122 r. 265
Departamento de Ciencias Basicas/Histologia| r. 268
Av. Duque de Caxias Norte, 225 CP 23 | Fax: 55 195 611689
CEP 13630-000 Pirassununga (Sao Paulo) |
BRAZIL |
==============================================================================





From: ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L.D.Marks)
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 12:12:58 -0500
Subject: PC control of SEM

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I am interested in suggestions for a PC board to control an FEI
electron gun that is being used as a SEM.

Laurie Marks.




From: tivol-at-orkney.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Apr 1995 10:02:03 EDT
Subject: RE: Newsgroups

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Dear John,
I don't know how to forward mailservers to newsgroups or vice versa,
but I'll bet Dave Kristoferson (sp?), who moderates the bionet newsgroups,
does. Good luck; sorting this out will save a lot of people a lot of mailbox
room.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 14:50:52 -0400
Subject: VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING

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GREETINGS,

I HAVE BEEN ASKED TO DO SOME VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING. THE
INTERESTED PARTIES ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE VIRAL CONCENTRATION FOR
CALIBTRATION OF OTHER ASSAYS SUCH AS 260/280 RATIOS AND HPLC.

I HAVE DONE SOME READING ON THE SUBJECT BUT WOULD APPRECIATE ANY
ADVICE ON WHICH TECHNIQUES ARE BETTER.

THANK YOU.


BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ
201-579-4343
201-579-4211 (FAX)
E-MAIL: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING.PLOUGH.SPRINT.COM






From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:15:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Diamond knife discussion

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From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 16:18:07 -0400
Subject: Diamond Knife Discussion

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