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From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 1997 14:55:07 +0100
Subject: TEM: Poisson noise

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Can anyone point me to the publication (or passage in a text book)
that shows that noise in the EM is Poisson-distributed?

Thank You very much in advance.

--
Philip Koeck
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience
Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
Tel.: +46-8-608 91 93
Fax.: +46-8-608 92 90
Email: Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se
http://www_scem.csb.ki.se/pages/philip.html




From: yuhui xu :      Yuhui=Xu%RES%DFCI-at-EYE.DFCI.HARVARD.EDU
Date: Thu, 2 Jan 97 10:34:42 EST
Subject: Re-Posting of EM Tech Position

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The Core Electron Microscopy Facility at Dana Farber Cancer Institute
located in Boston, Massachusetts has a position immediately open for a full
time EM Technician to assist in daily operation of the central research
facility. Requirements include: B.S. or equivalent in life sciences; one to
two years experience working as an EM technician or histology technician;
familiar with scanning and transmission electron microscopy and associated
preparative techniques, including tissue processing, Epoxy resin embedding,
ultrathin sectioning and contrast staining, immunogold staining, and dark
room procedure. Computer knowledge including word processing and data base
programs is required. Cryoultramicrotomy skill is desirable but not
required. Office management skills including filing, ordering and billing are
also helpful. M-F, 40h/W, Salary $20-25K/year with excellent benefit. DFCI is
an equal opportunity Employer. If interested, please send by email resume to
Yuhui Xu, MD,PhD, at the following address: Yuhui_Xu-at-dfci.harvard.edu. Or
contact by telephone at (617)632-5753. Fax (617)632-5165.




From: Cessna-at-hii.hitachi.com
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 97 11:12:00 PST
Subject: Receipt of 12/12/96 11:48 AM message

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Re:Optical Scopes





From: Cessna-at-hii.hitachi.com
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 97 11:12:13 PST
Subject: Receipt of 12/12/96 3:46 PM message

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Re:Unwanted messages





From: Cessna-at-hii.hitachi.com
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 97 11:12:13 PST
Subject: Receipt of 12/12/96 4:38 PM message

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Re:Optical Scopes





From: Scott D. Walck WL/MLBT :      walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil
Date: Thu, 2 Jan 97 15:58:16 -0500
Subject: SAD diffraction pattern analysis of polycrystalline samples

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I'd like to know the ways that people use for analyzing SAD patterns from
samples that are polycrystalline where the patterns are not complete rings and
where there are two or more phases present. I'm interested in techniques
that employ an automated method for determining the d-spacings present.

Currently, I am using a program that takes the digital SAD image and gives a
circularly integrated 1-dimensional pattern that can be directly compared with
X-ray diffraction patterns and either the JCPDS or NIST Crystal Databases. It
works very well for complete rings, but some modifications were necessary for
"spotty" patterns because the integration process doesn't take account of the
geometric problems with more dark pixels in the outer radii. Right now the
software has a couple of options on how to integrate "spotty" patterns, but
they are kludgy.

Please drop me a line and let me know how you do them.

- -Scott Walck

*****************************************************************************
Scott D. Walck, Ph.D. *
Materials Directorate Tel: (937) 255-5791 *
2941 P St Ste 1 Fax: (937) 255-2176 *
WL/MLBT, BLDG 654 Home: (937) 427-1093 *
Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7750 *
*
EMAIL: *
Work: walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil Home: SKAB-Walck-at-worldnet.att.net *
*****************************************************************************





From: Felicity Lawrence :      f.lawrence-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 1997 11:36:06 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Hoffman modulation contrast

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Hello,

I have stumbled across a reference to Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC).
Briefly, the article states that HMC allows 3-D like images. It is possible
to view specimens through plastic dishes (a limitation of Nomarski DIC ?)
and to view thick samples (a limitation of phase contrast).

Can anyone tell me more about this technique please?

Many thanks,
Felicity

Felicity Lawrence

Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
Queensland University of Technology
GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4000
Australia

Ph : 3864 2557
Fax: 3864 5100





From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-czapla.IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 1997 09:09:26 +0100 (MET)
Subject: print color image from Quantimet-570

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Dear Friends,

I have 200 MB colour images from microscopy on the hard disc in the
image analyser Quantimet 570 color. Quantimet save colour images in the
form image file: red, green and blue.

How print this images on the color ?


Krzysztof Jan Hubner

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl}

Foundry Research Institute
Research Materials Department,
Head Structural and Physical Research Laboratory
Zakopianska 73 Call +48 12 605022 ext. 356
30-148 KRAKOW - POLAND Fax +48 12 665478, + 48 12 660870 :-)





From: jeharper-at-amoco.com
Date: 1/2/97 7:36 PM
Subject: Hoffman modulation contrast

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Try:

The Particle Atlas, ed. 2
Volume V
pp. 1155-57

Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Inc.
P.O. Box 1425
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106

This reference is out of print (if memory serves me correctly) but
many light microscopists have the reference. It was being sold at one
time on CD-Rom.

It may be available still at the following:

Microscope Publications Ltd - Products Available from Microscope
Publications Ltd. The Microscope Journal. Books in The Microscope
Series. Other McRI Publications. Return to
McRI Home..
--http://www.mcri.org/McRI_products.html



______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello,

I have stumbled across a reference to Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC).
Briefly, the article states that HMC allows 3-D like images. It is possible
to view specimens through plastic dishes (a limitation of Nomarski DIC ?) and
to view thick samples (a limitation of phase contrast).

Can anyone tell me more about this technique please?

Many thanks,
Felicity

Felicity Lawrence

Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
Queensland University of Technology
GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4000
Australia

Ph : 3864 2557
Fax: 3864 5100





From: klivi-at-jhu.edu (Kenneth JT Livi)
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 1997 10:27:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: SAD diffraction pattern analysis of polycrystalline samples

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Dear Scott and other listers,

Since it is the lack of sufficient numbers of grains and different
orientations that are resposible for spotty ring patterns, our solution has
been to move the sample holder while the diffraction pattern is being
exposed. We move both the X-Y drives and the tilt. This takes some practice
in setting the right exposure time and speed of sample movement, but more
complete rings can be obtained.

Ciao for now,
Ken

} I'd like to know the ways that people use for analyzing SAD patterns from
} samples that are polycrystalline where the patterns are not complete rings and
} where there are two or more phases present. I'm interested in techniques
} that employ an automated method for determining the d-spacings present.
}
} Currently, I am using a program that takes the digital SAD image and gives a
} circularly integrated 1-dimensional pattern that can be directly compared with
} X-ray diffraction patterns and either the JCPDS or NIST Crystal Databases. It
} works very well for complete rings, but some modifications were necessary for
} "spotty" patterns because the integration process doesn't take account of the
} geometric problems with more dark pixels in the outer radii. Right now the
} software has a couple of options on how to integrate "spotty" patterns, but
} they are kludgy.
}
} Please drop me a line and let me know how you do them.
}
} - -Scott Walck

Kenneth JT Livi
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
34th and Charles Streets
The Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland 21218

klivi-at-jhu.edu (e-mail)






From: Heuer Jim P. :      HeuerJ-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 97 07:55:00 PST
Subject: SAD Analysis

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Scott -

I too collect SAD patterns digitally and analyze them live time by searching
the PDF and EDD data. I use a couple of image processing programs to reduce
the data, however, I never do anything automatically since there is often so
much data in a SAD pattern, such as double diffraction or satellite spots.
Therefore, I chose manually which rings or partial rings or spots I want to
contribute to the pattern being searched. Be careful also when interpreting
intensities in the TEM. It can be misleading. For what it is worth ...

Jim Heuer
General Electric Co.
(510) 862-4501
heuerj-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com




From: Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) :      ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 97 14:15:12 EST
Subject: Diffraction question

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Two Comments:

1. Scott, save that question and ask it again in the "Meet the Experts"
Diffraction session at this year's MSA meeting. We are trying something
new to us at MSA (credit to the Society of Vacuum Coaters who've had this
type of session for some time now). We have identified areas in the
physical sciences and separately in the biological sciences where people
occasionally need some answers. Electron diffraction is one of the areas
to be addressed in this year's meeting, chaired by Alwyn Eades. Essentially
we will have an empty room with a slide and transparency projector in place.
Alwyn, and anyone else Alwyn chooses to join him, sits up front, people
come in, take a seat and ask questions. Either Alwyn or someone else in
the room is likely to know the answer. The room is scheduled for an hour.
Your question is exactly what we expect to have asked.

The other two physical science sessions confirmed are 'vacuum' with
Wil Bigelow and 'phys sci specimen preparation' with Reza Alani and me.
We are also considering a session on 'phys sci technologist training'
but haven't firmed this up yet. Joe Mascorro is responsible overall
for the biological side of this and I'm doing the physical side. We plan
to put more detailed info on MSA's WWW server soon.

2. I prefer to manually pick out diffraction spots and partial rings
as belonging to a particular phase in a mixture. I might take a diff pattern
of a specimen that is being translated during exposure to bring more
grains into the aperture to get a better grasp on which phase is which
and some idea of intensities (I know, intensities are unreliable but
in the absence of very strong texture, strong is strong and weak is weak
and this info often helps solve phases)--but I wouldn't try to take d-spacings
from a translated pattern. For accurate d-spacings the entire process
has to have a precision of 1% or better. This is do-able but not easy.
Electronic (video/CCD cameras,...) data collection is marginal at the 1%
precision level in my experience with photographic methods ranging in
precision from "adequate" to "poor." Instrumental techniques, like
making sure your specimen is at the eucentric height and proper lens
focus and adjustment are big factors. Diffraction was actually more
precise in old 5 lens (1960s) TEMs compared to now. Split objective
lenses with condensor minilenses that interact with the field below the
specimen might make for high resolution images and small analysis spots
but they cost the user in terms of diffraction precision. IMHO :-)




From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 04 Jan 97 21:20:36 -0500
Subject: Stereo plotters

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

I have been asked the following question:
-----------------------------------
I am looking for a peice to our old steroplotter it is 1940's model is a
officine galieo made by the galieo company of italy. model number is smg10.
do not know if you know this info but maybe you can stir in right direction
.
----------------------------------
Does anyone have any information about this "galieo company of italy"?
Sounds like this is a real museum piece.

Chuck

======================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
=====================================================




From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 04 Jan 97 21:20:36 -0500
Subject: Stereo plotters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

I have been asked the following question:
-----------------------------------
I am looking for a peice to our old steroplotter it is 1940's model is a
officine galieo made by the galieo company of italy. model number is smg10.
do not know if you know this info but maybe you can stir in right direction
.
----------------------------------
Does anyone have any information about this "galieo company of italy"?
Sounds like this is a real museum piece.

Chuck

======================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
=====================================================




From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Sun, 5 Jan 1997 00:56:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: SAn Francisco Microscopical Society mtg

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The SFMS will meet on Thursday, Jan 9.

7:30 PM
Rockridge Branch, Oakland Public Library
College Ave.

Topic: Video Microscopy

Further info: Call:


Peter D. Barnett - Forensic Science Associates - Richmond CA
pbarnett-at-crl.com VOICE: 510-222-8883 FAX: 510-222-8887






From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Sun, 5 Jan 1997 12:19:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Hoffman modulation contrast

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} Hello,
}
} I have stumbled across a reference to Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC).
} Briefly, the article states that HMC allows 3-D like images. It is possible
} to view specimens through plastic dishes (a limitation of Nomarski DIC ?)
} and to view thick samples (a limitation of phase contrast).
}
} Can anyone tell me more about this technique please?
}
} Many thanks,
} Felicity
}
} Felicity Lawrence

First, let me recommend Slayter & Slayter, "Light and Electron
Microscopy".
(Note: Nomarski=Differential Interference Contrast)
Briefly simplified, with the attendent inaccuracies that implies:
Hoffman Modulation works in a similar way to Nomarski, the major
difference being that Nomarski is based on phase constrast between a
specimen and a reference ray and Hoffman works by "amplitude modulation"
between specimen and reference rays. Nomarski generates its specimen and
reference rays with polarizers, Hoffman does not use polarized light. This
means that Nomarski has troubles with optically active
materials--specimens, plastic petri plates, etc.--whereas Hoffman does not.
I've found that Nomarski seems to work better with thinner
specimens (tho' I have used Nomarski with zooplankton), Hoffman with
thicker, but I've read comments to the opposite. Hoffman does not have the
troubles with convex/concave specimens that Phase Contrast does.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Microscopy
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Felicity Lawrence :      f.lawrence-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 1997 08:36:52 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Summary - Hoffman Modulation Contrast

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I asked for information about Hoffman Modulation Contrast (HMC) and received
the following replies :

1. I used Hoffmann several years ago to view dispersed polyethylene in PET
sheeting for trays. I agree that HMC produces the illusion of 3-D, but to
me the strong advantage was the ability to alter the "amount" of phase
contrast which reduces the "halo" around particles. It seemed to work the
best on multi-phase samples in which the difference between the refractive
index of the phases were too high for phase contrast but too low for
brightfield.

I use to cut my thin section samples by hand, so I do not have thickness
data, but I found the thin samples gave better photomicrographs then thick
samples.
[F.K.]


2. If you have not already, you may wish to look at Hoffman's original
article.
[Hoffman (1977) J Microscopy 110, 205-22.
[D.C.]


3. Try:

The Particle Atlas, ed. 2
Volume V
pp. 1155-57

Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Inc.
P.O. Box 1425
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106

This reference is out of print (if memory serves me correctly) but
many light microscopists have the reference. It was being sold at one
time on CD-Rom.

It may be available still at the following:

Microscope Publications Ltd - Products Available from Microscope
Publications Ltd. The Microscope Journal. Books in The Microscope
Series. Other McRI Publications. Return to
McRI Home..
--http://www.mcri.org/McRI_products.html
[J.H.]


4. Have you tried Zeiss VAREL contrast?
[D.F.]


5. We've used Hoffman illumination to good advantage with semi-thin (0.5 um
) sections of Spurr's resin embedded material (Sex. Plant. Reprod.
9:1-16). When we purchased the objective and condenser, the salesperson
stressed that it was particularly useful for tissue culture observation
with inverted optical scopes. It also gives nice images on wet mounts,
at a considerably lower cost than Nomarski - although in my opinion,
Nomarski is still superior for this purpose. The thickest material we
looked at was probably ca. 10 um (squashes of Arabidopsis
microsporocytes) and they looked good - but no plastic in that case.
I did hear recently that Hoffman's patent is expiring and that the
microscope companies that were originally not interested in his development
are coming out with their "own" versions, so it's hard to tell what will
happen to prices. I think
we paid about $2000 U.S. for a 100X objective and condenser about 5 years
ago. Maybe they're (Hoffman) having a sale now.
[H.O.]


6. The system does indeed work and give DIC like images
through plastic. It is not as good as DIC and from my experience,
definitiey begins to degrade at higher magnification (the 40x lens is
usable, but not great). I have only looked at cells, and not at thick
tissue, so I don't know how suitable it is. Have a dealer bring in the
system and try it out. It is not hard to add to an existing microscope.
It is just a polarizer and a special lens with a polarizer element in it.
I have them listed at 516-484-8882 Modulations Optics Inc. in New York.
Hope this helps- Dave

Hoffmann modulation will allow you to view through plastic dishes.
Neither Hoffmann modulation nor Differential Interference Contrast
(Nomarski) give you 3D views...they are shadow casting methods depending on
contrast generation due to differences in refractive index of different
parts of the specimen.
The reference for Hoffman Modulation is Hoffman, R. 1977. J. Microscp. 110:205.
[N.A.]


7. First let me recommend Slayter & Slayter, "Light and Electron Microscopy".
(Note: Nomarski = Differential Interference Contrast)
Briefly simplified, with the attendent inaccuracies that implies :
Hoffman Modulation works in a similar way to Nomarski, the major difference
being that Nomarski is based on phase contrast between a specimen and a
reference ray and Hoffman works by "amplitude modulation" between specimen
and reference rays. Nomarski generates its specimen and reference rays with
polarizers, Hoffman does not use polarized light. This means that Nomarski
has troubles with optically active materials -- specimens, plastic petri
plates, etc. -- whereas Hoffman does not.
I've found that Nomarski seems to work better with thinner specimens (tho' I
have used Nomarski with zooplankton), Hoffman with thicker, but I've read
comments to the opposite. Hoffman does not have the troubles with
convex/concave specimens that Phase Contrast does.
[P.O.]

Felicity Lawrence

Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
Queensland University of Technology
GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4000
Australia

Ph : 3864 2557
Fax: 3864 5100





From: Alexander Sasov :      sasov-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 15:49:39 +0100
Subject: Summary - Hoffman Modulation Contrast

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Unsubscribe unsubscribe





From: Loudy, David E. :      davidloudy-at-mmd.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 10:16:00 -0600
Subject: USED MICROSCOPE VENDOR

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DOES ANYONE KNOW OF A USED ELECTRON MICROSCOPE VENDOR ON EAST COAST THAT BUYS OLD EM'S
WE HAVE A JEOL 100B FOR SALE
I HAVE SEEN CATALOGS FROM A BUSINESS CALLED "BID SERVICE"
BUT I DIDNT SAVE ANY OF THEM

THANX IN ADVANCE




From: peggy-at-research.nj.nec.com (Peggy Bisher)
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 10:45:55 -0400
Subject: USED MICROSCOPE VENDOR

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The question was asked:


DOES ANYONE KNOW OF A USED ELECTRON MICROSCOPE VENDOR ON EAST COAST THAT
BUYS OLD EM'S
WE HAVE A JEOL 100B FOR SALE
I HAVE SEEN CATALOGS FROM A BUSINESS CALLED "BID SERVICE"
BUT I DIDNT SAVE ANY OF THEM

THANX IN ADVANCE



The "BID Service" phone number is (908) 775-8300.





Margaret E. Bisher

NEC Research Institute
4 Independence Way
Princeton, NJ 08540.
Tel.: (609) 951-2629
Fax: (609) 951-2496
e-mail: peggy-at-research.nj.nec.com








From: DDKJoe-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 12:52:42 -0500
Subject: Re: USED MICROSCOPE VENDOR

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Dear David:

PLEASE STOP SHOUTING!

I have the answer right here.

Bid Service
PO Box 128
Bradley Beach, NJ 07720
1-908-775-8300
1-908-774-1443: FAX
www.bid-service.com
email:bidservice-at-monmouth.com

They have some SEM's in their catalog.

Good luck to you.

Sincerely,
Joe Tabeling
Delaware Diamond Knives
800-222-5143




From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Sun, 5 Jan 1997 12:19:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Hoffman modulation contrast

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} Hello,
}
} I have stumbled across a reference to Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC).
} Briefly, the article states that HMC allows 3-D like images. It is possible
} to view specimens through plastic dishes (a limitation of Nomarski DIC ?)
} and to view thick samples (a limitation of phase contrast).
}
} Can anyone tell me more about this technique please?
}
} Many thanks,
} Felicity
}
} Felicity Lawrence

First, let me recommend Slayter & Slayter, "Light and Electron
Microscopy".
(Note: Nomarski=Differential Interference Contrast)
Briefly simplified, with the attendent inaccuracies that implies:
Hoffman Modulation works in a similar way to Nomarski, the major
difference being that Nomarski is based on phase constrast between a
specimen and a reference ray and Hoffman works by "amplitude modulation"
between specimen and reference rays. Nomarski generates its specimen and
reference rays with polarizers, Hoffman does not use polarized light. This
means that Nomarski has troubles with optically active
materials--specimens, plastic petri plates, etc.--whereas Hoffman does not.
I've found that Nomarski seems to work better with thinner
specimens (tho' I have used Nomarski with zooplankton), Hoffman with
thicker, but I've read comments to the opposite. Hoffman does not have the
troubles with convex/concave specimens that Phase Contrast does.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Microscopy
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************








From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 1997 13:56:42 -0500
Subject: SEM Short Course

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A short course in SEM for biologists will be held at the University
of Florida March 10-13 and again May 5-8. This is for the beginner.
Interested persons should see our WWW site for details.

www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl
*******************************************************
G.W. Erdos, Ph.D. Phone: 352-392-1295
Scientific Director,
ICBR Electron Microscopy Core Lab
218 Carr Hall Fax: 352-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
Home of the #1 Gators
*****
"Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased"
Daniel 12:4





From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      72436.3407-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 14:27:33 -0500
Subject: Hoffman Modulation; Particle Atlas Electronic Edition (8.5K Msg)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Felicity (and Microscopy List):

In response to your inquiry about Hoffman Modulation Contrast
and the kind response by jeharper-at-amoco.com mentioning The
Particle Atlas, I can provide the following information. The
Particle Atlas Electronic Edition (PAE2) is available from
the following suppliers:

MicroDataware
P. O. Box 12755
Berkeley CA 94712
sshaffer-at-microdataware.com

McCrone Research Institute
2820 S. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60616
ndaerr-at-mcri.org
1-312-842-7105 voice
1-312-842-1078 fax

McCrone Accessories and Components
850 Pasquinelli Drive
Westmont, IL 60559
1-708-887-7100 voice
1-708-887-7764 fax

McCrone Scientific Ltd.
McCrone House
155A Leighton Road
London NW5 2RD
UNITED KINGDOM
011 441 71 267-7199 voice
011 441 71 267-3383 fax

If and when I can get problems with my internet service provider
ironed out I will put the MicroDataware web pages, with further
information about the Particle Atlas Electronic Edition, back up
at http://www.microdataware.com. However, for now this site is
not active.

Best of luck with your HMC work. It is an excellent technique for
contrast enhancement, yielding images similar in many ways to DIC.

Although it is a bit lengthy for a posting to a list server, I have
included
full text of the sections of the PAE2 dealing with HMC below. Information
on this excellent technique is sufficiently scarce that I thought many of
the readers of the list might find it, and the literature references,
useful.

Steve Shaffer

Text on Hoffman Modulation Contrast from the Particle Atlas follows:

*****************************************
Chapter 2: Techniques for Particle Characterization
{snip}
R. Hoffman Modulation Contrast

1. Introduction

A common problem in microscopy is object contrast. If the substage
aperture has to be closed in order to see the object, the resolving power
is severely reduced. Particle microscopists often attempt to maintain high
resolution and at the same time enhance contrast by mounting their samples
in Aroclor. This excellent mountant has a conveniently high refractive
index, usually sufficiently
different from the particles to permit use of a full condenser aperture
and, hence, obtain maximum resolution.

Often, however, particle microscopists resort to a contrast enhancement
technique such as darkfield, Zernike phase contrast or Nomarski
differential interference contrast, DIC . Such methods increase the
sensitivity of refractive index measurement besides making all particles
more distinctly visible. On occasion, the mounting medium is not a matter
of choice, and particle contrast cannot then be enhanced by choosing
mountants of very different refractive index. Particles on a membrane
filter, for example, are difficult to see unless the filter structure is
cleared by immersing the filter and particles in a liquid matching the
filter in refractive index. This is seldom the best liquid in which to
study the particles. Counting asbestos fibers, usually chrysotile with
indices near 1.55, is not easily done when the clearing liquid has to have
an index of 1.51. Usually, in this situation, microscopists have turned to
phase contrast to make the fibers easier to size and count.

2. Optics

A new contrast enhancement method with advantages over other methods has
been developed by Hoffman and Gross since the publication of The Particle
Atlas in 1973. Now termed Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC), this new
system can be adapted easily to most microscopes. It enhances contrast
without the halos characteristic of phase contrast and without apparent
loss of resolution. The image, like DIC, is "three-dimensional" and
permits optical sectioning of an object with little or no interference from
detail above or below best focus. Also, like DIC, the effect is
directional, and both detect phase gradients by converting opposite
gradients into lighter or darker images compared to the background. The
means by which this is accomplished is very different, however, for the two
procedures. Nomarski, in his DIC system, uses a modified Wollaston prism
to produce two sheared rays of light, separated by only about 1 micrometer,
passing through the object, introduces interference with resulting darker
borders on the other side. This produces a shadow effect and the
three-dimensional appearance.

Hoffman and Gross, on the other hand, accomplish similar results by quite
different optical principles. Figure 281 shows schematically the component
required to convert a brightfield microscope for modulation contrast. A
system of apertures below the substage condenser is conjugate with a
matching system of apertures in the objective back focal plant. A
full-aperture polarizing filter below the substage apertures permits
variable contrast enhancement. It is essential that the substage apertures
be fitted into a rotatable gliding mount in order to be able to accurately
register their image with respect to a second set of apertures in the
objective back focal (Fourier) plane.

3. Apparatus

The light source and microscope should be arranged for Kohler illumination.
The aperture system below the substage condenser has about one-half its
aperture covered (lengthwise) with a polarizing filter P1 (P2 is also a
polarizer). The modulator has three regions differing in transmittance: D,
1%; G, 15%; and B, 100%. The 15% transmittance G region is not a
polarizing filter.

In practice, the gray region (G) is displaced to one edge of the Fourier
plane, and the dark region (D) lies outside the exit pupil of the
objective. The bright region (B) then fills about 90% of the Fourier
plane. Resolution of the system, approximating lambda/2NAobj. in spite of
the restricted substage aperture, is maximized by off-setting the gray (G)
region to the edge of the exit pupil. When the gray region is centered on
the microscope optical axis, the resolution then approximates
lambda/NAobj.. Removal of the aperture plate permits use of the HMC
objective for ordinary brightfield study.

The system is so simple that many microscopists might consider making their
own apertures; however, this same simplicity also makes professional
conversion relatively low in cost. Note, however, that 3X to 100X
objectives can be fitted for HMC, but each objective to be so used must be
modified; each objective also requires its own substage aperture system.

4. Applications

HMC will be most useful for the biologist who always has contrast problems
with tissue sections (Figures 282 and 286). From a strictly contrast
point-of-view it will still be best to use mounting media having refractive
indices very different from the object; however, when this is impossible,
HMC will be very useful. Even when the indices of object and mount are
quite different, HMC helps in the delineation of fine detail. Forensic
scientists will find it helpful for semen examination and especially for
species identification of spermatozoa by study of their morphological
features. Banding of the sperm head as well as length and diameter
measurement of the neck portions are much easier with HMC. HMC will also
be helpful in enhancing contrast during refractive index measurement by the
immersion method. In short, HMC will be useful as a replacement for phase
contrast because of the better image, and for DIC because it is
considerably cheaper.

Anyone interested in the theory of HMC can refer to the Hoffman and Gross
papers, especially the 1977 paper in the Journal of Microscopy.

Hoffman, R., "The modulation contrast microscopy," Am. Lab. (1978).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "Modulation contrast microscopy," Turtox News,
2-5, (1975).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "The modulation contrast microscope," Nature
254, 586 (1975).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "The modulation contrast microscope," Microscope
23, No. 4, 264 (1975).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "The modulation contrast microscope," Appl. Opt.
14, 1169 (1975).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "The modulation contrast microscope," J.
Microsc. 110, 205 (1977).

Hoffman, R., and L. Gross, "The modulation contrast microscope," Chapter in
Microstructural Science, Vol. IV, E. W. Filer et al., Eds., American
Elsevier, New York, 1977, p. 287.

*****************************************
End of excerpts from the Particle Atlas Electronic Edition




From: Felicity Lawrence :      f.lawrence-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 1997 08:36:52 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Summary - Hoffman Modulation Contrast

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I asked for information about Hoffman Modulation Contrast (HMC) and received
the following replies :

1. I used Hoffmann several years ago to view dispersed polyethylene in PET
sheeting for trays. I agree that HMC produces the illusion of 3-D, but to
me the strong advantage was the ability to alter the "amount" of phase
contrast which reduces the "halo" around particles. It seemed to work the
best on multi-phase samples in which the difference between the refractive
index of the phases were too high for phase contrast but too low for
brightfield.

I use to cut my thin section samples by hand, so I do not have thickness
data, but I found the thin samples gave better photomicrographs then thick
samples.
[F.K.]


2. If you have not already, you may wish to look at Hoffman's original
article.
[Hoffman (1977) J Microscopy 110, 205-22.
[D.C.]


3. Try:

The Particle Atlas, ed. 2
Volume V
pp. 1155-57

Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Inc.
P.O. Box 1425
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106

This reference is out of print (if memory serves me correctly) but
many light microscopists have the reference. It was being sold at one
time on CD-Rom.

It may be available still at the following:

Microscope Publications Ltd - Products Available from Microscope
Publications Ltd. The Microscope Journal. Books in The Microscope
Series. Other McRI Publications. Return to
McRI Home..
--http://www.mcri.org/McRI_products.html
[J.H.]


4. Have you tried Zeiss VAREL contrast?
[D.F.]


5. We've used Hoffman illumination to good advantage with semi-thin (0.5 um
) sections of Spurr's resin embedded material (Sex. Plant. Reprod.
9:1-16). When we purchased the objective and condenser, the salesperson
stressed that it was particularly useful for tissue culture observation
with inverted optical scopes. It also gives nice images on wet mounts,
at a considerably lower cost than Nomarski - although in my opinion,
Nomarski is still superior for this purpose. The thickest material we
looked at was probably ca. 10 um (squashes of Arabidopsis
microsporocytes) and they looked good - but no plastic in that case.
I did hear recently that Hoffman's patent is expiring and that the
microscope companies that were originally not interested in his development
are coming out with their "own" versions, so it's hard to tell what will
happen to prices. I think
we paid about $2000 U.S. for a 100X objective and condenser about 5 years
ago. Maybe they're (Hoffman) having a sale now.
[H.O.]


6. The system does indeed work and give DIC like images
through plastic. It is not as good as DIC and from my experience,
definitiey begins to degrade at higher magnification (the 40x lens is
usable, but not great). I have only looked at cells, and not at thick
tissue, so I don't know how suitable it is. Have a dealer bring in the
system and try it out. It is not hard to add to an existing microscope.
It is just a polarizer and a special lens with a polarizer element in it.
I have them listed at 516-484-8882 Modulations Optics Inc. in New York.
Hope this helps- Dave

Hoffmann modulation will allow you to view through plastic dishes.
Neither Hoffmann modulation nor Differential Interference Contrast
(Nomarski) give you 3D views...they are shadow casting methods depending on
contrast generation due to differences in refractive index of different
parts of the specimen.
The reference for Hoffman Modulation is Hoffman, R. 1977. J. Microscp. 110:205.
[N.A.]


7. First let me recommend Slayter & Slayter, "Light and Electron Microscopy".
(Note: Nomarski = Differential Interference Contrast)
Briefly simplified, with the attendent inaccuracies that implies :
Hoffman Modulation works in a similar way to Nomarski, the major difference
being that Nomarski is based on phase contrast between a specimen and a
reference ray and Hoffman works by "amplitude modulation" between specimen
and reference rays. Nomarski generates its specimen and reference rays with
polarizers, Hoffman does not use polarized light. This means that Nomarski
has troubles with optically active materials -- specimens, plastic petri
plates, etc. -- whereas Hoffman does not.
I've found that Nomarski seems to work better with thinner specimens (tho' I
have used Nomarski with zooplankton), Hoffman with thicker, but I've read
comments to the opposite. Hoffman does not have the troubles with
convex/concave specimens that Phase Contrast does.
[P.O.]

Felicity Lawrence

Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
Queensland University of Technology
GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4000
Australia

Ph : 3864 2557
Fax: 3864 5100






From: tong-at-cebaf.gov (Tong Wang)
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 1997 14:53:07 -0500
Subject: Re: USED MICROSCOPE VENDOR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Of course the Bid Service buys old EM's. I have seen over 6 old SEMs in
their catalog. Otherwise I think you can try CBI(Capovani Brother's Inc.).
Their email and address are:

cbi-at-capovani.com
ph: 518.346.8347
fax: 518.381.9578
704 Corporations Park
Scotia, Ny 12302

Good luck.

Tong


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 6 Jan 1997 15:12:48 -0400
Subject: RE- The Poisson Distrib.

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Subject: Time: 2:55 PM
OFFICE MEMO RE: The Poisson Distrib. Date: 1/6/97

I can recommend two very good sources for information on the Poisson
Distribution.
1. Statistical Analysis in Chemistry & Chemical Engr. by Bennett
& Franklin, John Wiley, 1954, p115 (This is an older book,
but one that is written very clearly and in a very practical
orientation. It covers the basic statistical concepts plus a
thorough treatment of several common experimental design
schemes for analyzing data from complex multi-variable
experiments.)

2. Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences,
by P. R. Bevington, McGraw-Hill, 1969, p.36. This is another
very practical book that deals particularly with the counting
of photons and particles. It also contains algorithms for
(in FORTRAN) for a wide variety of data analysis processes
(deconvoluting spectral data, smoothing, peak area
measurement, etc).





From: Loudy, David E. :      davidloudy-at-mmd.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 16:13:00 -0600
Subject: FW: used microscope vendor

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Message-Id: {199701062114.AA05207-at-gate.mmd.com}

wow this is service
thanx to all the replys for bidservice info
happened to check the web and the right place to start is at
Microworld resource net at http://www.mwrn.com/product/microscope/used.htm
pointed to at least 6-7 companies

sorry joe at ddk about the SHOUT ing
didnt know caps lock was so loud




From: sassaroli-at-msvax.mssm.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 16:47:20 -0500
Subject: Help! Info on confocal attachments for a Zeiss Axiovert IM35

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Colleagues,

I have just setup a microscope system for use with an existing picosecond
pulsed laser to perform time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Currently
we are using an inverted Zeiss Axiovert IM-35 and a photon-counting
photomultiplier to perform spot-measurements. We are considering an
upgrade to the present system to include a confocal scanning attachment in
order to be able to acquire images as well as fluorescence decays. The
laser we are considering is a Ti-sapphire with picosecond/femtosecond pulse
capabilities, so that 2-photon excitation imaging would also be possible.
Could anybody recommend an attachment capable of adding confocal
capabilities to our Zeiss microscope? Any comments, suggestions, warnings,
etc. would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

Massimo Sassaroli, D.Sc.
Dept. of Physiology & Biophysics
Box 1218
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
1 Gustave L. Levy Pl.
New York, NY 10029-6574

e-mail: sassaroli-at-msvax.mssm.edu






From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 12:15:52 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Need advice on video board

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy New Year to you all!

We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM from the pre-digital days. We have been
saving up our pennies to purchase either the Hitachi PCI system (many
pennies) or the GW Electronics Printerface (fewer pennies). We got as far
as getting a great new PC before we ran out of pennies. However, we did
purchase with the FESEM a S-5010 TV Scanning Device, which basically
converts Hitachi's propriatary signal to NTSC, primarily for output to a
VCR. This device does not give the same image as on the CRT, and one has
to use specific accelerating voltages and working distances and read the
magnification off a chart. And the magnification range is very limited,
making it useless for our high mag-high res work. However, I suspect it
could be used as an interim device for grabbing images with the PC. I
have snaked a long cable from it to the Mac and used the Power PC's video
board to get (rather lousy) images. I would now like to get a video board
for the new Pentium and do the same (or better). I don't know video
boards. I am looking for advice! If I could get some digital images for
the price of a video board, I would be thrilled! I promise disgusting
weather reports to all who respond...

Thank you all for being such a friendly and helpful group!

Aloha,
Tina

New Stuff! http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo
Simple SEM animations at-
http://pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo/gif_animations.html
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************







From: rnessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 17:13:49 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM's to be given away

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,
I'll keep this short.
I've been asked to post concerning the availability of two free
TEM's here at the University of Iowa. There is a Siemans 101 and a
Phillips 201. To the best of my knowledge, they are both in operating
condition. For further information, contact Kenneth Moore at
{kenneth-moore-at-uiowa.edu} or phone 319-335-8143.
Thank you.

Randy Nessler
rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu






From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-po.fast.net
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 97 19:44 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergy Responses - A Summary!

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--=====================_852608707==_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


--=====================_852608707==_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="ACRYLATE"

Dear Colleagues -

A month ago I asked for comments and experiences relating to allergic reactions to the use of acrylate embedding media. To date, I have received the following responses. I thank you all for your input.

Have attached the file of responses as direct e-mail seems to be difficult or impossible with my internet connector...

Regards, Don Cox








--=====================_852608707==_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************


--=====================_852608707==_--





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 16:06:00 -1000 (HST)
Subject: re-word video board request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I just began getting replies to my request for advice on video boards for
digital capture from my analog FESEM. Yes, I DO want a high-quality
system - eventually. But until the University recovers from fiscal
insults, I am talking about a SUPER-CHEAP way out. I can get a (not very
nice) NTSC signal from a Hitachi device I already have, so I only want
right now a card to stick in the PC (which is in the same room) for
something like $200 to $400. Like what I can pay for out of my own
pocket. I am still very interested in people's experiences with full
systems, since that is where we eventually want to go, but I'm only trying
to kludge something together for the moment! I will happily take all
opinions on both "real" digital acquisition systems and "kludge"
solutions!

Yeah, I know it's silly to count pennies when I have a $200K 'scope, but
right now even Kimwipes(tm) are at a premium!

However, the weather is glorious today!

Mahalo,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo
http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo/gif_animations.html

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 16:06:00 -1000 (HST)
Subject: re-word video board request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I just began getting replies to my request for advice on video boards for
digital capture from my analog FESEM. Yes, I DO want a high-quality
system - eventually. But until the University recovers from fiscal
insults, I am talking about a SUPER-CHEAP way out. I can get a (not very
nice) NTSC signal from a Hitachi device I already have, so I only want
right now a card to stick in the PC (which is in the same room) for
something like $200 to $400. Like what I can pay for out of my own
pocket. I am still very interested in people's experiences with full
systems, since that is where we eventually want to go, but I'm only trying
to kludge something together for the moment! I will happily take all
opinions on both "real" digital acquisition systems and "kludge"
solutions!

Yeah, I know it's silly to count pennies when I have a $200K 'scope, but
right now even Kimwipes(tm) are at a premium!

However, the weather is glorious today!

Mahalo,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo
http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo/gif_animations.html

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Anders_Th=F6len_=3Ctholen=40fy.chalmers.se=3E?=-at-fy.chalmers.se
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 10:02:52 +0100
Subject: PhD student positions

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TWO PhD STUDENT POSITIONS.

Division for Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
S-412 96 G=F6teborg, Sweden

Two PhD student positions are open in Materials Science/Engineering with the
following contents.

1. CONTACT AND ADHESION BETWEEN SMALL PARTICLES.
Contact and spontaneous adhesion between small particles (10-100 nm) will be
studied with analytical and high resolution electron microscopy. The
spontaneous adhesion between small particles depends on surface forces. The
accompanying stress fields, which are visible in the electron microscope,
give a unique possibility in detail to study the elastic and plastic
deformations which are associated with contact. This effect is very
importannt within areas such a friction, wear, fretting, electrical contacts
and handling of fine powders.

2. NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS. GRAIN BOUNDARIES AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES.
Nanostructured material exhibit many new and interesting properties due to
their extremely fine-grained structure ( { 100 nm). The reduction in grain
size leads to unique mechanical, physical and chemical properties compared
with conventional materials with the same composition. The mechanism behind
the formation and the stability of different nanostructures and the
resulting properties are however poorly understood. The idea with the
current program is to establish a systematic knowledge about the grain
boundary zone in nanostructured materials and their influence on the
mechanical properties. A combination of advanced electron microscope and
analytical methods will be used.

The two projects lie in the boundary area between physics/materials science.
In both projects a Philips CM 200 FEG with Gatan imaging filter, slow scan
CCD-camera, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PEELS will be used.

Qualifications: Master of Science or equivalent within physics/materials
science. A knowledge of electron microscopy is estimated but is not
absolutely necessary. A vivid interest for mathematics is appreciated.

Further information: Professor Anders Tholen,=20
Division for Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SS-412 96 Goteborg, Sweden

tel +46 31 772 3358,
fax: +46 31 772 3224=20
e-mail: tholen-at-fy.chalmers.se =20


=20
=20
=20





From: Dennis B. Barr :      dennbarr-at-eastman.com
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 10:41:30 -0500
Subject: Re: re-word video board request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tina,
I am a microscopist in the research laboratories of Eastman Chemical
Company. Although I haven't had any personal experience with a product
called "Snappy", which is an adapter for NTSC image capture on a PC, it
might be just what you are looking for. In sells for under $200. A friend
of mine at Clinch Valley
College is using one on an AMRAY SEM and is quite pleased.

I just checked out your BEMF pages and they are quite nice! One note,
though. The net address you listed in your note (see copy below) to the IT
list-server left out the "bemf" part.

} Mahalo,
} Tina
}
} http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo
} http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/microangelo/gif_animations.html
}

The address I used was

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo/

Dr. Dennis B. Barr | 333 DDDDD 333 DDDDD
Eastman Chemical Company | 3 3 D D 3 3 D D
Microscopy and Morphology | 3 D D 3 D D
Research Laboratory | 33 D D 33 D D
P.O. Box 1972 | 3 D D 3 D D
Kingsport, TN 37662-5150 | 3 3 D D 3 3 D D
| 333 DDDDD 333 DDDDD
Voice: 423/229-2188 |
E-mail: dennbarr-at-eastman.com | IMAGE IMAGE
FAX: 423/229-4558 |-----------------------------------------------------
(Cross your eyes to see the 3 dimensional image above)





From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 11:35 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergies - A Summary - Part 1

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues -

About a month ago I asked for experiences with allergy experiences when
using acrylate embedding media. I received the responses below. I will be
sending several editions as there are many and I have had difficulties with
my e-mail server...too big a gulp, I guess...

1)
I used Lowicryl for a brief time, while waiting for funding for a cryokit.
I developed a pretty good contact dermatitis/allergic reaction within a few
uses, precluding me using it. Also I found the smell very allergenic (runny
nose etc) Luckily I got the cryokit, and was able to return to a NON
allergenic system (sugar!) very soon. Since then I have been convinced that
the acrylics are bad news..... Good luck with your investigations.

Simon

2)
Their was a program on NOVA that concerned itself with Sick Building
Syndrome. It covered several people in a hospital environment that aquired
hyper-allergies from the gloves and chemicals used. You might want to check
the references that the film used... It was a good..... Check with WGBH in
Boston (PBS Station) for more information on the film.....

I have seen several technicians and operators become sick from the fumes from
roughing pumps and from Freon that is widely used.. Anyone of us could be
next with the wide variety of chemical we use and the increasing amount of
contact we have....

Walter Protheroe

3)
Over the years, I have picked up some sense of the way these different
acrylics seem to act on different persons.

The Lowicryl resins seem to be the worst, and LRWhite (and I thought up
until now, also Unicryl) the least reactive. Technovit I have not had any
knowledge about.

Chuck

Regards, Don Cox
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 11:42 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergies - A Summary, Part 2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues -

About a month ago I asked for experiences with allergy experiences when
using acrylate embedding media. This is the second series..

5)
My predecessor here had a lot of problems using watyer
soluble Durcupan resin. He manifested what we now realise
was contact dermatitis, with skin blemishing, cracking and
peeling. He was also sensitive to the cured blocks, at least
certainly to their dust (we used to cure in ice cube trays and
then cut specimens out with a hacksaw for mounting prior to
ultramicrotomy as routine).

With best wishes - Keith Ryan

6)
Don,
I realize that you asked about acrylic plastics, but just as a note: my
former supervisor in a clinical EM lab had a strong contact allergy to
uncured epoxy plastics. We had to be careful not to leave residue where she
could come in contact with it, she'd break out in blisters in about 15 min.

Doug

7)
have you got this reference? It seems to be a key one referring to several
others:

Tobler, M. and Freiburghaus (1990); Occupational risks of (meth)acrylate
compounds in embedding media for electron microscopy
Journal of Microscopy 160: 291-298

Good luck in your search.

Malcolm Haswell

8)
Don,
I don't know what to tell you except that this allergy is common, I am
severly allergic to Lowicryl, and have been told that if I'm exposed to it
again on my hands, I may lose the use of my hands. It took me 6 months to
get the feeling back in my finger tips, and my fingers were so bad they
were purple black. Also, the fumes from methacrylates etc is of no help to
my chronic asthma.

I usually run into someone with the same problem in the Histology / EM
field where ever I go.

We ordered the only gloves we found impermiable, H-4 Gloves from Monsanto,
but they are very ackward to work in.

Lou Ann

----------------------

Regards, Don Cox
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: PHOBOS11-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 00:41:06 -0500
Subject: Wanted Balzers Electronics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Everyone,

I would like to obtain an old Balzers EVM 052/052 Electron Beam Gun power
supply. I'm also interested in any unused or unwanted Balzers Freeze
Fracture systems or parts.


Best Regards,

Al Coritz




From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 1997 21:29:45 -0800
Subject: Re: Need advice on video board

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Tina,
I'm afraid that the best you will be able to do is a lousy image, no matter
what video board you get. The rapid scan image on any SEM is very poor, that
is why slow scan capture is used for digital imaging.
You wrote:
}
} We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM from the pre-digital days. We have been
} saving up our pennies to purchase either the Hitachi PCI system (many
} pennies) or the GW Electronics Printerface (fewer pennies). We got as far
} as getting a great new PC before we ran out of pennies. However, we did
} purchase with the FESEM a S-5010 TV Scanning Device, which basically
} converts Hitachi's propriatary signal to NTSC, primarily for output to a
} VCR. This device does not give the same image as on the CRT, and one has
} to use specific accelerating voltages and working distances and read the
} magnification off a chart. And the magnification range is very limited,
} making it useless for our high mag-high res work. However, I suspect it
} could be used as an interim device for grabbing images with the PC. I
} have snaked a long cable from it to the Mac and used the Power PC's video
} board to get (rather lousy) images. I would now like to get a video board
} for the new Pentium and do the same (or better). I don't know video
} boards. I am looking for advice! If I could get some digital images for
} the price of a video board, I would be thrilled! I promise disgusting
} weather reports to all who respond...
}
} Thank you all for being such a friendly and helpful group!

Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 11:53 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergies - A Summary, Part 4

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues - Continuing.... You'll never ask again, I'll bet...!

11)
} i do not recall her name off hand, but if you contact rmc,inc
} tucson,arizona,(they probably have a web page) and ask who was their
} biological instructor at their ultra microtomy conference this year in
} oct . I specifically remember, and i was surprised that she repeatedly
} cautioned the group about similar severe allergy-proned
} individual-reactions being rather common. I believe she also may be
} linked to this newsgroup and may reply directly.

I'm that instructor. I don't have any specific medical information; just
the sort of word-of-mouth stories that are appearing here (which I'm saving
for next year's Materials Microtomy course!). I'd appreciate comments from
knowledgable MDs. I know that I read a paper some years ago about similar
reactions to the acrylic resins used to cement metal joints into bone in
orthopaedic surgery...

Caroline Schooley

12)
Hi:
I myself have through the years developed a reaction to acrylates. My
field is polymers and I am frequently in contact with acrylates. The
monomer is the problem not the polymer. Wear gloves and always work in
the hood. If you do get exposed wash or shower as soon as possible. The
reaction is cumulative and becomes worse with each exposure.
Good luck
Olga L. Shaffer

13)
Here at IBM, there is a fairly extensive Industrial Safety and Hygiene
program. In our training classes, it was explained to us that epoxies,
etc., are "sensitizers" as are Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, and Poison Sumac.
Some people may have a reaction on their first exposure. Others may
have a reaction after repeated exposures have "sensitized" them. The
reactions will most likely increase in sevearity with each additional
exposure. There are a few that never show a reaction. I know people
that were never affected by Poison Ivy when they were children, but
had severe reactions when exposed as an adult.

Precautions during use (what we are required to do):
* The resins and hardeners are stored in a vented cabinet.
* Weighing, mixing, and sitting to cure are done in a vented hood.
*** Protective Appearal ***
*** Nitrile Gloves - eg. Nitrilite by Ansell Edmont
Note: Latex gloves were not accepted
* Goggles
* Plastic Chemical Apron

Hi again,

(Please ignore my spelling typo's, it was late last night.)
I meant to mention that the Nitrilite gloves are lightweight surgical
type gloves, and very easy to work in.

Hope this helps.

Darrell Miles
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 11:52 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergies - A Summary, Part 3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues -

About a month ago I asked for experiences with allergy experiences when
using acrylate embedding media. This is the third series..

9)
I have personal experience with methyl methacrylate contact
allergies. Years ago, when I was taught how to embed and section JB-4
(from Polyscienses), I was told that the solutions could cause a poison
ivy-like reaction if I got it on my skin. My teacher, however chose not
to were gloves, so neither did I. After a couple of months of continuous
use, I developed the worst reaction that you could imagine. The fingers
that had been in contact with the liquid form of the acrylic started to
itch and burn, deep inside the flesh. Next, my fingers swelled to the
size of a meaty hotdog and itched like crazy. Any attempt to even touch
then sent sharp pains through my hand. I took antihistamines as soon as
the reaction started and applied ointment for two days before the reaction
was over. After that episode, I accidently touched the solid form once
or twice and scrubbed my hands immediately and at length And took some
more antihistamines. Still, I got a minor reaction that lasted a day
each time.
Now, about 10 years later, I still use JB-4 for alot of our
samples, but I Always were gloves, and glasses when I'm arround it and I
always wipe
down work surfaces when I'm finished for the day. I have not had another
even minor reaction for at least the last 5 years and never one as bad as
the first.
The reactions to these acrylics can be quite painfull, but
many of the other embedding medias available are carcinogenic, with no
early warnings. At least
with this material, I know immediately when I've gotten too careless with my
safety precautions.

Karen Pawlowski

10)
i do not recall her name off hand, but if you contact rmc,inc
tucson,arizona,(they probably have a web page) and ask who was their
biological instructor at their ultra microtomy conference this year in
oct . I specifically remember, and i was surprised that she repeatedly
cautioned the group about similar severe allergy-proned
individual-reactions being rather common. I believe she also may be
linked to this newsgroup and may reply directly. i believe she was
retired and now consulting from her home in the Stanford area. when i can
get to my records i'll try to remember to recover her name and send her
e-mail address. i'm quite bad with names.

Charles J. Day


---------

Regards, Don Cox
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 11:58 EST
Subject: Acrylate Allergies - A Summary, Part 5 - FINAL!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I had difficulty forwarding a very helpful response from Stephen Griffiths
and if it does not go this time I will re-write it....

5)
Hi Don

I have certainly had contact dermatitis from use of Lowicryl K4M. Not an
allergic reaction though.

I discovered, after using K4M with latex or plastic gloves for several years
that Lowicryl penetrates within a few minutes. There are a couple of papers,
I've no doubt you are familiar with them, which dealt with the subject. They
were primarily concerned with "pushing" 4H Gloves but still interesting for
all that.

I have the papers somewhere but couldn't put my hands to them, so I found
the Refs from BIDS, which follow (I think this is technically a breach of
their copyright, but it saves me digging around in boxes for an hour)

****************************************************************************
****************
1) TI: A GLOVE WITH EXCEPTIONAL PROTECTIVE FEATURES MINIMIZES THE
RISKS OF WORKING WITH HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS
AU: TOBLER_M, FREIBURGHAUS_AU
NA: UNIV HOSP ZURICH,DEPT INTERNAL MED,H LAB 8,CH-8091
ZURICH,SWITZERLAND
JN: CONTACT DERMATITIS, 1992, Vol.26, No.5, pp.299-303

2) TI: EXCEPTIONAL PROTECTIVE POWER OF THE 4H GLOVE DEFEATS
OCCUPATIONAL RISKS IN ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY
AU: TOBLER_M, FREIBURGHAUS_AU
NA: UNIV SPITAL ZURICH,DEPT INNERE MED,H LAB 8,CH-8091
ZURICH,SWITZERLAND
JN: JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY-OXFORD, 1991, Vol.163, No.JUL, pp.RP 1-RP
2

****************************************************************************
***************

There is this problem, that using gloves gives a sense of false security.
But the above papers show that penetration occurs very rapidly with ordinary
gloves.

My problem may have arisen from handling improperly polymerised blocks
without gloves during sectioning. The pattern of the dermatitis would seem
to be consistent with that.

I tried 4H gloves. They were doubtless very effective, but difficult if you
were handling small blocks and BEEM capsules. 4H gloves are a bit like
wearing Aluminium foil. Not exactly sensitive!

If your customer absolutely HAS to use acrylics then s/he may find 4H gloves
of some use. Though if it is a real full blown reaction the best thing they
can do is avoid it at all costs, 4H gloves or no 4H gloves.

Eczema or contact dermatitis seems to be the favourite reaction to acrylics.
I don't have to use them at the moment and the condition of my fingers has
improved after three years. However once you get this sort of thing it
never really goes away and can be triggered by agents other than the
original one.

This can have its benefits occasionally as it gets me out of the washing up
at home when I am having a recurrence of the condition. ;)

Regards
Stephen Griffiths

AND FINALLY.....
14)
It would be nice if you'd summarize and post the information you might
receive on this subject. Safety in the laboratory is so important and people
don't always realize (or remember) that.
Thank you very much in advance.
Adriana

-------------

Whew! That's over...!

Regards, Don
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: John Best :      jbest-at-vicon.net
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 1997 07:18:40 -0800
Subject: Re: re-word video board request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tina,

For your short term problem, get a "Snappy" frame grabber. Cheap but
quality per $ spent is very very good. It's also very simple to use,
just plug it into your paralell port.

Check out this site:
http://www.zdnet.com/pccomp/sneakpeeks/snpk1096/snappy.html

Regards, and Happy Scanning,
John.
--
ELMDAS Co. P.O. Box 355, Alexandria, PA 16611
Voice: (814) 669-4474
Our website: http://www.vicon.net/~jbest
Email: jbest-at-vicon.net





From: Buddy Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 13:19:42 EST
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro (sent to confocal list too)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Nathan,

That price for a dual Pentium system seems a bit high. The machine
I'm using now, I put together as a motherboard and hard drive upgrade
to a Gateway 486. It is a dual Pentium (133) PCI-EISA board with 512
K pipelined burst cache and 32 megs of RAM. Nothing around here can
touch it in terms of speed and performance. Price of the upgrade
(which I did myself): about $3200, including Windows NT to support
the dual processor.


-=W.L. Steffens=-
Department of Veterinary Pathology
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Dr. Mark W. Lund :      lundm-at-acousb.byu.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 1997 11:24:16 MST/MDT
Subject: RE: Info on image analyzation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I use a commercial program from a company in your home
town of Bochum, Germany. See their web site at www.tech-inter.com
phone +49 234 30 96 96. The program's name is PicDoc.
best regards
mark

Mark W. Lund, PhD
Director } } Soft X-ray Web page http://www.moxtek.com { {
MOXTEK, Inc. *************************************************
Orem UT 84057 **"Soft x-rays in the 21st Century" conference **
801-225-0930 ** 8-11 January 1997, Midway Utah **
FAX 801-221-1121 ** http://volta.byu.edu/xray/info.html **
lundm-at-xray.byu.edu *************************************************

"Let me commend a great truth to you which has been one of the supports
of my life: 'The Gods send threads for a web begun.' Andrew Carnegie




From: JUKNALIS :      juknalis-at-ARSERRC.Gov
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 1997 08:11:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Stage control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Back in December I asked what X-Y-Z stage controllers were out
there for an inverted scope & mac compatable.

Here's a summary of the replies...

Signal Analytics
Vienna, VA
703-281-3277 $13k
*****************************
New England Affiliated Technologies
620 Essex St.
Lawrence, MA 01841
Tel 508-685-4900
or 800-227-1066
Fax 508-688-8027
$5k
*****************************
Prior Scientific, 800-877-2234
$13k
*****************************
thanks to all who helped.

Joe Uknalis





From: Eric Johnston :      ericdj-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 09:02:07 -0500
Subject: microscope lens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi

I have a strange question. Is there such an animal as a "wide angle" microscope objective, either for fluorescent or light microscopes?

Eric Johnston





From: Eric Johnston :      ericdj-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 10:40:06 -0500
Subject: fluorescent dyes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi

I am interested in fluorescence imaging of single cells. However, these =
cells will be in suspension. The medium will be quiescent and I want to =
disturb the cells as little as possible. To that end, does there exist =
a dye or a technique whereby the dye does not need to be rinsed from the =
medium? =20

Are there other possibilities, such as a fluorescent dye that is =
effective more than a couple hours after the cells have taken it up, or =
slow release of the dye from beads, etc?

I will most likely be doing calcium measurements on mammalian bone or =
smooth muscle cells.

Thanks

Eric Johnston
ericdj-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu




From: Nathan O'Connor :      oconnor-at-ipl.rpi.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 09:09:16 EST
Subject: Sgi and Pentium Pro (sent to confocal list too)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,
I was wondering if anyone read the article about SGI's O2 system
in the Jan 97 issue of BYTE. It compares the single processor
O2 to a dual 200MHz Pentium Pro. The price of the tested SGI
was $8342 while the price of the tested Pentium was $11,432.
The article also quotes that O2 starting prices are below $6000.

The O2 model they wrote about had 128Mb of RAM, 2 2-Gb
hard drives, and a 180MHz clock. The dual Pentium model also
had an extra 16Mb of something called "Intense 3D".

The artice compared OpenGl performance. The dual Pentium
performance was only slightly better (for $4000 more). I wonder
about floating point operations though. I would be surprised
if the dual Pentium could perform more quickly in that area,
based on the Pentium Pro and R5000 (O2's CPU) floating point
specifications I've seen/heard.

I'm wondering what the microscopy community's views are
on the PC vs. UNIX (SGI specifically) issue. Or does anyone
have anymore information on this topic?

Personally, I was really surprised by the article in BYTE even
though it's only an OpenGl comparison. I had heard about
how the dual Pentium Pro's were going to blow the SGI's out
of the water and at a cheaper price. The hardware alone that is
being bundled with this SGI was a shock given past
SGI prices I've seen (in an academic setting).

Nathan

email: oconnor-at-ipl.rpi.edu




From: Hans-Martin Vaihinger :      Hans-Martin.Vaihinger-at-rz.ruhr-uni-bochum.de
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 13:58:58 +0000
Subject: Info on image analyzation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy new year everybody!

We want to start with image analyzation andhave no idea about it, yet.
What we have is a Zeiss Axioplan microscope with a Sony CCD camera
(DXC-101P) attached to it. It has a resolution of 320x350 lines.
There is also a photo camera for slides and negatives.

We need to measure areas in light microscopical sliceseither manually and
automatically by their grey values. An option for 3D reconstruction
would be nice, too.

My questions are now:
1) What further equipment do we need
(frame grabber? better (digital?) camera? PC, MAC,
workstation?)

2) Which software do we need?
(what makes the difference between shareware (e.g. NIH
Image) and expensive programmes to buy for some k$?

3) Is it worth to buy a commercial available complete system?

These questions may be very basic so possibly there is a site to look
for FAQ like this. Which newsgroups cover this topic?

Any suggestions are welcome.

Hans-Martin

**************************************************************
Hans-Martin Vaihinger
Ruhr-University of Bochum
Comparative Endocrinology Research Section
Building ND 5/37
44780 Bochum
GERMANY
*********************************************************
phone ++49 234 700 4329
fax ++49 234 709 4551
email Hans-Martin.Vaihinger-at-RZ.Ruhr-Uni-Bochum.de





From: jan_ringnalda-at-pei.philips.com (jan ringnalda)
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 17:05:28 -0500
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro, also MAC??!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There was also a report about a no-nonsense new Motorola chip, the
X704, which would be a 530 MHz puppy to be fitted into the next
generation MACS. Maybe we can go back to user-friendly systems with
excellent performance... Windows just doesn't quite cut it yet.

Cheers, Jan




From: Nathan O'Connor :      oconnor-at-ipl.rpi.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 17:00:25 EST
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro, also MAC??!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} X704, which would be a 530 MHz puppy to be fitted into the next
What would the cost of a system with that kind of chip, the data bus of an SGI,
and the rest of the accessories be like?

Nathan




From: Nathan O'Connor :      oconnor-at-ipl.rpi.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 97 17:58:51 EST
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro (sent to confocal list too)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} That price for a dual Pentium system seems a bit high. The machine
} I'm using now, I put together as a motherboard and hard drive upgrade
} to a Gateway 486. It is a dual Pentium (133) PCI-EISA board with 512

Are those Pentium Pro chips? That's what they were looking at in the article I
read.

Nathan




From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 12:17:15 GMT+1200
Subject: Electron Beam Gun Power Supply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--IMA.Boundary.541876258
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

I would like to thank Don for posting replies to his query about
sensitivity to acrylics. No, Don, it shouldn't be "Whew! That's
over...!" (I know what you mean), for anyone in the microscopy field
who is exposed to chemicals, radiation, and/or any other hazard - it
should be just the beginning!. I would ask everyone to consider that
we do no know what the long term effects of exposure to many
individual chemicals or combinations of chemicals can have on your
health. Are you willing to risk a terminal illness when it is
relatively easy for you can work in a fume hood and wear personal
protective gear? I would hope not!

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com


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I had difficulty forwarding a very helpful response from Stephen Griffiths
and if it does not go this time I will re-write it....

5)
Hi Don

I have certainly had contact dermatitis from use of Lowicryl K4M. Not an
allergic reaction though.

I discovered, after using K4M with latex or plastic gloves for several years
that Lowicryl penetrates within a few minutes. There are a couple of papers,
I've no doubt you are familiar with them, which dealt with the subject. They
were primarily concerned with "pushing" 4H Gloves but still interesting for
all that.

I have the papers somewhere but couldn't put my hands to them, so I found
the Refs from BIDS, which follow (I think this is technically a breach of
their copyright, but it saves me digging around in boxes for an hour)

****************************************************************************
****************
1) TI: A GLOVE WITH EXCEPTIONAL PROTECTIVE FEATURES MINIMIZES THE
RISKS OF WORKING WITH HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS
AU: TOBLER_M, FREIBURGHAUS_AU
NA: UNIV HOSP ZURICH,DEPT INTERNAL MED,H LAB 8,CH-8091
ZURICH,SWITZERLAND
JN: CONTACT DERMATITIS, 1992, Vol.26, No.5, pp.299-303

2) TI: EXCEPTIONAL PROTECTIVE POWER OF THE 4H GLOVE DEFEATS
OCCUPATIONAL RISKS IN ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY
AU: TOBLER_M, FREIBURGHAUS_AU
NA: UNIV SPITAL ZURICH,DEPT INNERE MED,H LAB 8,CH-8091
ZURICH,SWITZERLAND
JN: JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY-OXFORD, 1991, Vol.163, No.JUL, pp.RP 1-RP
2

****************************************************************************
***************

There is this problem, that using gloves gives a sense of false security.
But the above papers show that penetration occurs very rapidly with ordinary
gloves.

My problem may have arisen from handling improperly polymerised blocks
without gloves during sectioning. The pattern of the dermatitis would seem
to be consistent with that.

I tried 4H gloves. They were doubtless very effective, but difficult if you
were handling small blocks and BEEM capsules. 4H gloves are a bit like
wearing Aluminium foil. Not exactly sensitive!

If your customer absolutely HAS to use acrylics then s/he may find 4H gloves
of some use. Though if it is a real full blown reaction the best thing they
can do is avoid it at all costs, 4H gloves or no 4H gloves.

Eczema or contact dermatitis seems to be the favourite reaction to acrylics.
I don't have to use them at the moment and the condition of my fingers has
improved after three years. However once you get this sort of thing it
never really goes away and can be triggered by agents other than the
original one.

This can have its benefits occasionally as it gets me out of the washing up
at home when I am having a recurrence of the condition. ;)

Regards
Stephen Griffiths

AND FINALLY.....
14)
It would be nice if you'd summarize and post the information you might
receive on this subject. Safety in the laboratory is so important and people
don't always realize (or remember) that.
Thank you very much in advance.
Adriana

-------------

Whew! That's over...!

Regards, Don
********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************


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Seeing the recent posting re Balzers Electron Beam Gun power supply
prompts me to ask this:
I run a 25-year-old JEOL microprobe, with very little chance of ever
getting funds to buy a new replacement.
One of these days the HV and gun filament supply (which uses vacuum
tubes, including, for all the old-timers, a type 807!!!) is going to
up and die, possibly by catastrophe within the tank.
Are there available 3rd-party supplies which I could just graft
in (maybe necessitating the fabrication of a custom cable) in that
event? Is that what the aforementioned Balzers thingummy is?
Anybody got an address for them or for anyone else who makes this
sort of thing?

Happy New Year

Ritchie

Ritchie Sims phone: 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology fax: 64 9 3737435
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand




From: wise-at-vaxa.cis.uwosh.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 1997 17:56:52 +0000
Subject: SEm Image Capture

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks to all who responded to my request about image capture systems. I
have included a sanitized version of all the responses (I removed most
vendors names and the like). I have all the original posts so email me if
anything catches your eye and you need more particulars.

Bob Wise
UW-Oshkosh

******************

I maintain an archive of most of the biologically relavant
postings to this list. You are correct that this has been a hot topic in the
last few months and I have archive it at our web site. Go to the URL listed
at the end of this message and click on the "Tips & Tricks" link. Within
there you will find a section on "Computers" Look at the section titles
"Acquiring Digital Images". Let me know and I can get you the info in some
other way if you need. http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/

***********

We also have the Hitachi/Quartz PCI imaging system. I recall it being
pricey, but we have been satisfied with it. It takes some learning, but is
rather easy to use. It does annotation, some measurements, databases of
sessions, etc. And they allow (even encourage) us to freely distribute their
viewer software. Even though it is of limited capability, it still does
quite a bit.

We do most of our output on a HP 4M Laserjet. At times we wish for better
grayscale rendition. But the PCI allows us to send our images back to the
scope's Polaroid camera if we need to.

***********

We use ImageSlave capture boards which we have fitted to each of our 6
microscopes. They fit in a standard slot in any old PC. They can run in
Windows, but we run ours in DOS. Its so simple. Every time you push the
PHOTO button, the image going to the photo display gets digitised ( putting
in a film is an option, now uncommon with us). All you need to do is give a
filename and the picture is saved to disk. The images are 1024x 1024 x 256
which we find perfectly good enough for our work. They are US $5,000
including software.

***********

One system that I think you ought to take a close look at is SEMICAPS. In
1990, I had one interfaced to my (then) Cambridge S200 SEM and I was very
pleased with the results. At that time, I was also quite impressed by the
customer service elicited by SEMICAPS. I have since moved this system to
my light microscope for image analysis purposes. The SEM now has a new
Link ISIS EDS system which has its own imaging capability. I am sure that
the new SEMICAPS systems are even better, and I would hope that the
customer service is still world class.

**************

The PCI system we sell is easily installed and very easy to learn how to
use.

**************

We are looking into representing a company that makes a powerful,
yet relatively inexpensive PC-based active system that includes the control
board and software, and we can certainly configure it with a PC. We have
access to a passive acq. system also, but I do not yet have much detail on
this one. If you are interested, please feel free to contact me. We also
represent a company who makes a versatile SW product for digital image
archive and databasing, thumbnail viewer, etc. I'd be happy to discuss
these and our new Image Analysis SW, Visilog in more detail, if you are
interested.

**************

I am in a similar position of trying to set up an image capture system from
our SEM also. I have just taken a work transfer, and have the challenge of
setting up an EM/imaging facility where there was none before. Lots of
fun, and something new for me, although I have spent almost 20 years
doing EM, I have never actually been responsible for setting up or running
the lab!!

I am starting to investigate options to get this system set up. It seems that
we already have an image analysis software package (SigmaScan Pro
from Jandel) and a fancy Pentium to run it on. In terms of the actual
capture system for the SEM, I have heard from a number of my
colleagues that the Hitachi PCI system is the best one out there, in their
opinion. It is an entire system, including the computer, which can be
augmented to be used with LM and TEM (for more money of course). It is
expensive ($12.5K CAN) but is apparently worth every penny (we couldn't
afford it). Another company in the US (4pi) sells a PCI system for quite a
bit less money, but you have to supply your own Pentium or Mac
computer. Then there is another approach, which was suggested by John
Mackenzie (North Carolina State University) at one of the courses he
gave, called a "gated Integrator", - I'm not sure of the company who sells
these, but I plan to contact him to find out.

*************

I have seen your request for digital image capture (with annotation, file
storage, printer etc.).
We have just such a system that does all that and some more. We have
developed it ourselves and it runs our Hitachi 2300. It has the features
you list plus automatic contrast setting, image averaging and is also used
with our EDX to obtain element maps. It also captures images from several
of our other instruments (Auger and SIMS systems). If you are interested I
could send you a demo either by email or on a floppy.

**************

We purchased an Hitachi S3200N variable pressure SEM early this year
and have the Quartz PCI system that they sell. It runs on a PC and since I
had been a Mac person up until this I had to learn a few new tricks. With
windows 95 it was not difficult to get going after a short time. This system
only captures images at the photo scan rate so you sit for the same length
of time it takes to expose a Polaroid. You can do both at the same time. One
thing we don't have yet is the option to "play back" a stored image to the
microscopes polaroid camera. We will get this soon.
Once the image is captured it is composed of two files, the image file
in the TIF format, or you can chose from a list of others, and a text file
containing any text associated with the image. It lets you put labels and
arrows and do some measurments. You can also rotate things and crop images.
It does probably most things one needs. It works like some of the drawing or
graphing programs such as Cricket graph or MacDraw. Any labels or text can
be permenantly "burned into" the image but can not be changed once this is
done. This is somewhat important since when you export the image file the
text file must also go along unless it is "burned in". We do work for a
variety of users and they may not always like where or the type of label
applied. This is a minor logistical problem but a pain in the butt with some
of our more "difficult" customers.
One odd thing is that the information bar, with micron marker, at the
bottom of the image and any labels or text added to the image on the
microscope (the 3200 lets you label and measure on its screen, I don't know
if your SEM does this) DO NOT capture very well. The characters are
incomplete. This has something to do with the way the SEMs character
generator produced the letters and figures. They show up fine on polaroids
because during the film exposure all characters in the image field and info
bar are exposed at the end of the scan. I think this scan is repeated
several times to provide complete characters. The PCI system stops capturing
once the scan reaches the bottom of the screen therefore the characters only
get one pass and show up with some missing spots. I explained and showed
this to our Hitachi service engineer and she had never noticed this before
and was going to bring it to the attention of the PCI people. The characters
that PCI generates are very nice and you can change the font and its size as
well as bold or italics.
It can store images as a database, which was too much for me, or like
regular DOS files. I create a folder for each client and folders inside for
various projects or samples from that client. A searchable database is nice
but who has time time figure all that stuff out. I have not evaluated any
other systems and can't comment on them. Over all the PCI system has met our
needs but the problem described above is annoying.

**************

Saw your question on the microscopy listserver and since we have an
Hitachi SEM (S-450LB) with a Quartz PCI frame grabber I thought I
would respond with some comments. The system works very well for
image capture and has considerable versatility. If you have a good
service person for installation it can be set up in an afternoon. The
biggest problem is getting the right computer box as the two boards
are very large. We have a Certified Data pentium computer with four
ISA slots and 3 PCI slots, and the boards just barely fit. Things
like power supplies and fans can get in the way. My recommendation
is to have Hitachi select the computer for you if you are going with
this system.
The data base associated with the frame grabber is quite powerful and
allows a lot of manipulation of images for archiving and processing.
It is not the most user-friendly system and I am still trying to
figure it out. I have many fourth year undergraduate students using
it this semester and teaching them how to run it has been rather
frustrating. Once we develop a consistent methodology for storing
images from a variety of student users, and write up our own manual
things should go easier. The manual that comes with it is written for
someone with a good working knowledge of computers, and should be
scaled down for people like myself.
I looked around for awhile before buying this unit and feel that it
is probably the best passive capture system on the market, although
the Orion system looks interesting as well and may be cheaper. As
far as I can tell both systems do much the same thing, i.e. capture
images at variable resolutions that are easily manipulated, and allow
playback to the photo recording camera (a useful feature). I'm not
sure whether the Orion system comes with a built in data base or
whether you have to purchase a separate one.
I hope this helps you and don't hesitate to write back with more
questions if you have them.

**************

I used thdHitachi PCI system with my S-2500 and loved it. I don't think
there is any other system that works as well.

**************


I have experience with the Hitachi system, which is actually made by Quartz
Imaging and sold by Hitachi. It can be fitted after-market to any SEM of any
make. I have two: one on a Hitachi S-570 (1985) and one on a Hitachi S-2300
(1990). The program, called PCI, runs under Windows 95 and takes any slow
scan image into the computer where you can do anything with it you wish. I
use it on 17-inch monitor, where it shows the image to a whole class like a
11" X 14" blowup. I print to a laser printer and have cut my Polaroid
expenses to about one-third. Everyone likes the ability to put images into
documents with "Edit-Copy", "Edit-Paste".
There are other systems sold, I have seen them but not used them. GW
has one, there is one from Australia and there is one from Europe. I'm sure
others will tell you about them.
I know it is hard to realize now, but after you have one you will
wonder how you managed without.

**************

We sell the Orion system in this country. It, like the Hitach system,
is a passive capture system. i.e. it sync's to the line and frame of the
microscope and digitized the ouput signal. We have customers who have tried
both systems and think that the Orion gives better (less pixel jitter, better
S/N) images). The system can capture any size up to 8kx8k. It averages and
integrates images to reduce noise. A complete system with 1200dpi printer on
a 200MHz Pentium wiht 32 MG RAM sells for about $20,000. We can send you some
sample images and lit if you are interested.

**************

DVC Company offers 10 bit real time analog and digital output CCD cameras
with standard C mount for coupling, and many different frame grabber boards
and software as a system.

**************

Bob - you can get information about the Orion system off of the web at
http:\\www.microscop-uk.org.uk,80/prodir/orion1.html

**************

I had a demostration of PCI image system from Hitachi at my E.M. Unit a
year ago. I was quiet impressed about how easy to capture the image from
my Hitachi S-2500 SEM and replay back to camera for photo quality picture.
Now acturally I just purchased the sytem a week ago. I played around a
bit and found it is even better than what I thought. In the version 4 of
the system , it is more easy to get 3-D image and color the images
capatured from SEM. I plan to introduce it to my clients to use it as
daily research and get instant images on printer or store in a zip drive
100 MB disk in the new year.

**************

E. Fjeld also is a distributor of the SEMICAPS (PC) imaging system. Another
board, DIGISEM, is also available fron the ELMDAS Co. in Alexandria PA.
Contact John Best at:

ELMDAS Co.
P.O. Box 355
Alexandria, PA 16611
(814) 669-4474
http://www.vicon.net/~jbest
jbest-at-vicon.net

A third option is the 4PI system. They now offer both MAC and PC. Contact
Mike Czysz at:

4pi Analysis, Inc.
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534
(919) 489-1757
http://www.4pi.com
czysz-at-4pi.com (I think)
**************







From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 19:22:56 -0600
Subject: Re: Acrylate Allergies - Thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} I would like to thank Don for posting replies to his query about
} sensitivity to acrylics. No, Don, it shouldn't be "Whew! That's
} over...!" (I know what you mean), for anyone in the microscopy field
} who is exposed to chemicals, radiation, and/or any other hazard - it
} should be just the beginning!. I would ask everyone to consider that
} we do no know what the long term effects of exposure to many
} individual chemicals or combinations of chemicals can have on your
} health. Are you willing to risk a terminal illness when it is
} relatively easy for you can work in a fume hood and wear personal
} protective gear? I would hope not!
}
} Damian Neuberger

Has anyone done an epidemiological survey on life expectencies and
causes of death (besides frustration) of microscopists? Life vs Materials?
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Microscopy
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 09:12:44 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro, also MAC??!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

CAN SOME ONE TELL ME , DOES A 530MHz PUPPY HAVE A BYTE ?

HAPPY NEW YEAR

Patrick Echlin
Multi-Imaging Centre
CambridgeOn Tue, 7 Jan
1997, Nathan O'Connor wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} } X704, which would be a 530 MHz puppy to be fitted into the next
} What would the cost of a system with that kind of chip, the data bus of an SGI,
} and the rest of the accessories be like?
}
} Nathan
}





From: Stephen Griffiths :      s.griffiths-at-ucl.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 12:02:36 +0000
Subject: Cheap Stereo Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A colleague wants to purchase a cheap but reasonable quality Stereo=
Microscope.

He doesn't want to spend much more than =A31500 if possible. Is this=
possible?

This is not really my field these days and I am somewhat out of date in my
experience and knowledge.

Does anybody have recommendations from past or present experience of good
value equipment AVAILABLE IN THE UK.

Names of Manufacturers or their Agents would be most useful.

Direct Information from Stereo Microscope Manufacturers or their Agents
would be most wellcome.

TIA

Regards
Stephen Griffiths.

{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Stephen Griffiths e-mail: s.griffiths-at-ucl.ac.uk
Visual Science Department
Institute of Ophthalmology Tel: 0171 608 6914
London EC1V 9EL UK Fax: 0171 608 6850
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}





From: Buddy Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 09:08:24 EST
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro (sent to confocal list too)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Are those Pentium Pro chips? That's what they were looking at in the article I
} read.

Nathan,

The motherboard that I purchased supports Pentium Pro chips, but out
of economics, and at that time a scarcity in that chip, I elected to
go the cheaper route. I'll eventually upgrade to the superfast
chips when the price goes down, but for the time being, this system
is more than adequate for my needs.



-=W.L. Steffens=-
Department of Veterinary Pathology
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia
http://www.vet.uga.edu/wls/steffens.html




From: Terry.R.McCue%650 :      Terry.R.McCue-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 10:16:00 -0500
Subject: Pb in Zn coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings

Can anyone tell me a good way to quantify Pb concentration in a
"galvanized" coating on steel. My understanding is that Pb is
distributed in the coating such that focused micro beam techniques may
have difficulty sampling enough territory to be accurate. We have
SEM/EDS, AES, EPMA, XRF and ICP here in the lab.

Any "tricks" or experience on this matter would be greatly
appreciated.

thanks
Terry R. McCue
Babcock & Wilcox Research
1562 Beeson St.
Alliance, Ohio 44601
Phone: 330-829-7427
Internet: terry.r.mccue-at-mcdermott.com
Fax: 330-829-7831




From: Dennis B. Barr :      dennbarr-at-eastman.com
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 10:40:30 -0500
Subject: Re: Need advice on video board; more questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tina, I saw Mary Mager's comments about rapid (TV) scan giving a poor image
from an SEM. She is right, because the signal-to-noise is much worse at TV
rates.
Now, I have a question. Actually, three questions. (1) Would it be
possible to collect several successive images at TV rates and average them
to improve the signal-to-noise, and thereby obtain a decent image? (2) Can
this be done with a SNAPPY frame-grabber? (3) Is there software which will
do this?
Dr. Dennis B. Barr | 333 DDDDD 333 DDDDD
Eastman Chemical Company | 3 3 D D 3 3 D D
Microscopy and Morphology | 3 D D 3 D D
Research Laboratory | 33 D D 33 D D
P.O. Box 1972 | 3 D D 3 D D
Kingsport, TN 37662-5150 | 3 3 D D 3 3 D D
| 333 DDDDD 333 DDDDD
Voice: 423/229-2188 |
E-mail: dennbarr-at-eastman.com | IMAGE IMAGE
FAX: 423/229-4558 |-----------------------------------------------------
(Cross your eyes to see the 3 dimensional image above)





From: Lesley Smith :      lesleys-at-vet.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 11:33:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

PLease unsubscribe lesleys-at-pobox.upenn.edu

Thanks!




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 12:19:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Need advice on video board; more questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Dennis,

} Now, I have a question. Actually, three questions. (1) Would it be
} possible to collect several successive images at TV rates and average them
} to improve the signal-to-noise, and thereby obtain a decent image?

Yes, we do this with our video-rate intensified CCD. We can also
do a background subtraction, running average, exponential fall-off average
and other processing.

} (2) Can
} this be done with a SNAPPY frame-grabber?

I don't know. Most, if not all, our capabilities are built into
the Perceptics PixelTools 425 Series video capture board.

} (3) Is there software which will
} do this?

NIH Image and others can do the processing. The real-time display
of the processed images at video rates, however, is more difficult. The
Perceptics board does this in our application. I don't know whether the
combination of hardware you want and some processing software can do this.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Michael OKeefe :      Michael_OKeefe-at-macmail.lbl.gov
Date: 8 Jan 1997 11:37:45 -0700
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro, al

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
"Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Co" {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ,
"Nathan O'Connor" {oconnor-at-ipl.rpi.edu}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP/QM 3.0.0



From: Michael OKeefe :      Michael_OKeefe-at-macmail.lbl.gov
Date: 8 Jan 1997 11:37:45 -0700
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro, al

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Reply to: RE} } Sgi and Pentium Pro, also MAC??!!

} Date: 1/7/97 1:48 PM
} From: jan ringnalda

} There was also a report about a no-nonsense new Motorola chip, the
} X704, which would be a 530 MHz puppy to be fitted into the next
} generation MACS. Maybe we can go back to user-friendly systems with
} excellent performance... Windows just doesn't quite cut it yet.

} Cheers, Jan


Thanks Jan,

I was about to spend my money on a mere 500MHz DEC Alpha running Windows
NTwith 512MB RAM, 4.3GB fast-wide SCSI disk and 21" 0.25mm 1600x1200 monitor
. . .

Mike O'K






From: Maoxu Qian :      mxq-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 12:29:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Zip disk problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi there,

One of my zip disk which contains important data was unreadable.
The zip drive is working all right. I tried to call the Iomega com. but
they are hard to reach. Is anyone has experience on this type of problem?
Is any way I can recover some of my data files? Thank you.

****************************
* Maoxu Qian, Ph.D. *
* Dept of MSE, box 352120 *
* University of Washington *
* mxq-at-u.washington.edu *
* (206)543-1514(phone) *
* (206)543-3100(fax) *
****************************





From: Mike Bench :      bench-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 14:41:51 -0600
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I just checked prices of the dual pentium pro systems available from Micron
Electronics. Systems with 2 200Mhz processors can be had from about $3500 and
their most expensive configuration is about $7500. The upgrade to the second
processor from a single processor system is $700. Obviously there are graphics
workstations available with more capabilities and higher prices (probably
including the system compared in BYTE). I checked the prices from Micron because
I own a couple of their computers. If you want more info on similar systems I
suggest you take a look at Intel's web site. They have links to a number of
companies that sell such systems.
Mike

Mike Bench
Characterization Facility
Center for Interfacial Engineering
University of Minnesota
Voice: (612) 624-6590
Fax: (612) 626-7530
e-mail: bench-at-cems.umn.edu





From: Mike Bench :      bench-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 14:41:51 -0600
Subject: Re: Sgi and Pentium Pro

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I just checked prices of the dual pentium pro systems available from Micron
Electronics. Systems with 2 200Mhz processors can be had from about $3500 and
their most expensive configuration is about $7500. The upgrade to the second
processor from a single processor system is $700. Obviously there are graphics
workstations available with more capabilities and higher prices (probably
including the system compared in BYTE). I checked the prices from Micron because
I own a couple of their computers. If you want more info on similar systems I
suggest you take a look at Intel's web site. They have links to a number of
companies that sell such systems.
Mike

Mike Bench
Characterization Facility
Center for Interfacial Engineering
University of Minnesota
Voice: (612) 624-6590
Fax: (612) 626-7530
e-mail: bench-at-cems.umn.edu





From: Larry Ackerman :      mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 12:59:43 -0800
Subject: cell culture embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I embedded tissue culture cells on glass coverslips in EMBed (Epon-like) and
now cannot remove the glass with thermal or mechanical shock.Please let me
know if you have a trick for separating glass from epoxy without destroying
the epoxy. I also have experiments running with plastic substrates but would
like to recover this one sample. Note: the coverslips were coated only with
poly-D-lysine and embedded by inverting a Beem capsule filled with epoxy on
the coverslip. Thanks!
Larry D. Ackerman (415) 476-8751
Howard Hughes Medical Institute FAX (415) 476-5774
UCSF, Box 0724, Rm U426
533 Parnassus Ave. mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
San Francisco, CA 94143





From: Maoxu Qian :      mxq-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 17:35:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: more on zip disk

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------ Forwarded Message begins here ------------

Hi, there,

Several people asked me more information on the problem. Sorry I
didn't say clearly. This is on a MacIIci mation, When insert the zip disk,
it keeps rotating then a click sound and rotating and click sound ...for
long time and in the end, the message cames out as "unreadable disk". I
tried use Norton utility to recover it but Norton did not recognize zip
drive. Is there any utility software can do it? or the disk is physical
damaged? The disk was sitting inside of the drive all the time but due to
reboot, I have to reinsert it and the problem occurred. Any suggestion?
Thank you again.

****************************
* Maoxu Qian, Ph.D. *
* Dept of MSE, box 352120 *
* University of Washington *
* mxq-at-u.washington.edu *
* (206)543-1514(phone) *
* (206)543-3100(fax) *
****************************





From: GREG VAUGHN MARTIN :      gmartin-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1997 20:22:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: cell culture embedding

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On Wed, 8 Jan 1997, Larry Ackerman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I embedded tissue culture cells on glass coverslips in EMBed (Epon-like) and
} now cannot remove the glass with thermal or mechanical shock.Please let me
} know if you have a trick for separating glass from epoxy without destroying
} the epoxy. I also have experiments running with plastic substrates but would
} like to recover this one sample. Note: the coverslips were coated only with
} poly-D-lysine and embedded by inverting a Beem capsule filled with epoxy on
} the coverslip. Thanks!
} Larry D. Ackerman (415) 476-8751
} Howard Hughes Medical Institute FAX (415) 476-5774
} UCSF, Box 0724, Rm U426
} 533 Parnassus Ave. mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
} San Francisco, CA 94143
}
}
Larry --

Our method of last resort is to jam the tip of a dissecting
needle under an exposed edge of the coverslip, then pry up gently trying
to lift the the coverslip off of a near-by region. You end up damaging
some of the specimen this way, but with some luck and careful trimming at
the microtome one can still get some nice areas to section.

Hope this helps, Greg Martin
Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine




From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 18:28:00 -0800
Subject: Re: Pb in Zn coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 10:16 AM 1/8/97 -0500, you wrote:
} Can anyone tell me a good way to quantify Pb concentration in a
} "galvanized" coating on steel. My understanding is that Pb is
} distributed in the coating such that focused micro beam techniques may
} have difficulty sampling enough territory to be accurate. We have
} SEM/EDS, AES, EPMA, XRF and ICP here in the lab.
Dear Terry,
My recommendation would be EPMA with a de-focused beam. Spread the beam to 2
to 5 microns in diameter and sample at least 10 random spots. Be sure to
test the substrate element (i.e. Fe) to track differences in coating
thickness, which will affect apparent Pb concentration. A known standard
would also be very helpful.
Good luck,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 1997 18:37:27 -0800
Subject: Re: Need advice on video board; more questions

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At 10:40 AM 1/8/97 -0500, you wrote:

} Now, I have a question. Actually, three questions. (1) Would it be
} possible to collect several successive images at TV rates and average them
} to improve the signal-to-noise, and thereby obtain a decent image? (2) Can
} this be done with a SNAPPY frame-grabber? (3) Is there software which will
} do this?
Dear Dennis,
Yes, some frame-grabbers can do frame averaging on several successive frames
(I have seen up to six). This is a hardware characteristic of the more
expensive frame grabbers. The TV rate is too fast for software. I don't
think the Snappy has this characteristic. The image must be stable, which TV
rate images on SEM sometimes aren't,a nd of course the resolution will be
limited to the 525 lines of NTSC. I think the Snappy would be a good Light
Microscope solution, but less so for SEM.
Good luck,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: rw9-at-psu.edu (Rosemary A. Walsh)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 03:03:29 GMT
Subject: Re: cell culture embedding

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At 12:59 PM 1/8/97 -0800, Larry Ackerman wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Larry,
Have you tried cooling the glass coverslips on
the surface of a piece of dry ice? It (the coverslip)
usually pops off leaving the embedded cells behind.
Rosemary






From: Mike Gregory :      mgregory-at-pixie.udw.ac.za
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 09:50:56 +0200 (SST)
Subject: purchase of TEM's

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Hi fellow microscopists:

Seasons greetings to TEMists, SEMists & probers. We at the University of
Durban-Westville are planning to purchase a new TEM in the near future.
YThe machines under consideration at the moment are the Philips 208S or
if finances permit Jeol 1010.

To assist with our selection, I would appreciate responses from any of you
with experiences (good or bad) with either instrument. Particular areas
of interest are:
1. Quality control and reliability of electronic and mechanical components.
2. Quality of images at all maginifications and instrument stability.

We are replacing a still functional Philips 301 - any offers!

To avoid cluttering up the list, please contact me at my e-mail address.

Best wishes for 1997

Mike Gregory
EM Unit
University of Durban-Westville
Durban
South Africa




From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 08:59:10 +0000
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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Dear All

I would appreciate suggestions for examining 80 micron
eggs in seawater or distilled water by SEM where the user
wants to compare fresh egg surfaces (therefore cryo?) with
conventionally fixed, dehydrated and critically point dried
eggs.

The idea was to use cryoSEM but there are problems. I
have tried freezing (in ethane) on a thin smear of Tissue Tek
OCT - droplet on stub and then wiped off with cover slip (not
easy in itself?), but the eggs sank, never to be seen again!

I have also frozen them just mounted in a water film, but
some have simply sheared off the standard smooth stub -
should I try poly-L-lysine or super glue?

A separate problem seems to be that while the crustacean
in question is marine/estuarine and the eggs stand fresh
water for a while (therefore for rinsing), even after 3 or 4
distilled water changes I still see a fine, dried layer of
salt over everything. The rinsing is done in a watchglass
and the water was almost completely removed with an
autopipette before refilling.

One idea not tried yet is to place an egg on a millipore filter,
drain on filter paper, place on stub in cryoSEM airlock
cold-stage and freeze in situ. But with or without vacuum?

It seems a crazy world when it is easier to ask internet
friends than it is to search through a bucket a mud and then
do the experiments on the method to use!

Any comments would be appreciated. Take up gardening?

Thanks in advance - Keith Ryan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk
PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++






From: John Turek :      jjt-at-vet.purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 07:53:13 -0500
Subject: Re: cell culture embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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One method we use to remove the glass coverslip is to place the block with
the attached coverslip into hydrofluoric acid. The acid will slowly
dissolve the glass in about an hour. The acid does not dissolve epoxy, and
we have not noticed with the embedded cells.

Regards,


John J. Turek, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Dept. of Basic Medical Sciences
Director, Core Laboratory for Image Analysis
and Multidimensional Applications (CRISTAL)
phone: 317-494-5854
fax: 317-494-0781
email: jjt-at-vet.purdue.edu
web: http://vet.purdue.edu/cristal






From: LHChom-at-po.asm-intl.org
Date: 09 Jan 97 09:16:00 EST
Subject: Suppliers Directory

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Hello to all~
I have recently joined this list, and found all of the discussion very
informative. Since many questions discussed here deal with finding
suppliers, I thought I would let you know of ASM International's online
version of our "testing buyer's guide". It can be found at
http://www.asm-intl.org/testing

The site gives contact details for over 400 companies providing services
related to testing, including microscopy.It is based on information compiled
by the editors of Advanced Materials & Processes, ASM's monthly magazine.

Best wishes for 1997~

Leslie H. Chom LHChom-at-po.asm-intl.org
Information that Goes to Work-from the Materials Information Society
ASM International
http://www.asm-intl.org
(ph) 216-338-5151 Ext 510 (fx) 216-338-4634




From: rpascal-at-emory.edu (Robert R Pascal)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 09:26:53 -0500
Subject: Web Magazine

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Message-Id: {199701091428.JAA21047-at-gabriel.cc.emory.edu}
X-Sender: rpascal-at-pop.service.emory.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Greetings, and best wishes for the New Year.
Volume 2, Number 1, of the PENSEES NOUVELLES is now on line at

http://www.emory.edu/PATHOLOGY/PENSEES

Contents include some medical doggerel, two book reviews (one about
histologic techniques with microwaving, and one on golf), and the
continuation of the review of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail courses.

I hope that you will enjoy it.

Sincerely,
Robert R. Pascal, M.D.






From: george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca (George Braybrook)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 08:28:48 -0700
Subject: Re: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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To look at surfaces of small samples, roughening the stub surface
with fine sandpaper will help keep the ice on the stub during cryo, but we
went into overkill and machined a slight "well" in the surface of the stub
and then roughed it up. To get a cross sectional view, we drill several
small wells (1/16 in.dia x 1/8 in. deep) in the stub. Overfill the wells
(this can be tricky) with a high concentraion of sample in water leaving a
slight droplet (protruding meniscus) of sample protruding above the well.
Sometimes a little vaseline on the surface will help keep the droplets from
running together. Freeze and shear off the droplets.

For the dry eggs, we would use about a dozen (pelco #16079)
adhesive tabs stuck on the surface of a clean glass slide. Dissolve these
into 20 ml chloroform. Place a drop or two of this solution on the surface
of the stub (or coverslip for a smoother background surface), spread evenly
and drain the excess with the corner of a kimwipe. This usually produces a
very thin layer of adhesive strong enough for samples up to a few hundred
microns.

As for the salt on the surface after 3 or 4 washes, not much help
I'm afraid, just a thought. Is there a mucosal surface layer that the
distilled water is drawing the salt out of ?? If so, they might need an
EDTA treatment first to remove mucus. Then again, this mucus might be the
surface you need to see??? This might be a case of "a rock and a hard
place", but sucessful cryo should tell you what is on the surface if you
can get a fracture through an egg.


Hope this is helpful.

Cheers
:)
George
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3
Canada
ph: 403-492-5746
fax: 403-492-2030






From: Ya Chen :      ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 09:45:41 -0600
Subject: Re: more on zip disk

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Hi, there,
}
} Several people asked me more information on the problem. Sorry I
} didn't say clearly. This is on a MacIIci mation, When insert the zip disk,
} it keeps rotating then a click sound and rotating and click sound ...for
} long time and in the end, the message cames out as "unreadable disk". I
} tried use Norton utility to recover it but Norton did not recognize zip
} drive. Is there any utility software can do it? or the disk is physical
} damaged? The disk was sitting inside of the drive all the time but due to
} reboot, I have to reinsert it and the problem occurred. Any suggestion?
} Thank you again.
}



Maoxu,

Rebooting after computer crash can damage the important directory/b-tree
area on disk. I do have experience of this kind of damage. The damage
didn't recover by Norton Utility. Now I always take the disk out before
rebooting. After rebooting, insert and eject it, then insert it again. Now
it works normally.

Ya Chen


Ya Chen

*** My email address has been changed to: ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu ***
=========================================================================
\ / Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR)--

\ / __ an NIH Biomedical Research Resource TEL : 608-263-8481
\/ / / University of Wisconsin-Madison FAX : 608-265-4076
/ / / 1675 Observatory Drive #159 Email1:ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
/ /__/_ Madison, WI 53706 Email2:chen-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
=========================================================================
IMR WWW Home Page: http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr.html






From: John Best :      jbest-at-vicon.net
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 11:37:18 -0800
Subject: Re: Need advice on video board; more questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,

I agree wholeheartedly with Mary Mager on the suitability of Snappy for
SEM. I'd only recommend them in two cases, as I've discussed with some
of you privately.

1. Where there is absolutely no money for a better solution AND the user
has lots of time to attempt offline averaging solutions AND the samples
aren't very demanding.

2. Where the SEM has built in frame averaging capability AND the only
application for the instrument is simple photographic documentation.

I think Tina fits into catagory one. I'm basing this partially on the
images at her website. If a large percentage of her work is at very low
magnification, stability becomes less of an issue and she has the
possibility to average images off-line.

--
ELMDAS Co. P.O. Box 355, Alexandria, PA 16611
Voice: (814) 669-4474
Our website: http://www.vicon.net/~jbest
Email: jbest-at-vicon.net





From: Pearl Yip :      yip-at-maxwell.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 97 12:20:44 EST
Subject: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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Dear Fellow Microscopists:
We are considering of installing an Automatic Liquid Nitrogen
Filling System for our SEM. The only source we came across is VBS
Industries, Inc. I wonder if any of you would like to share with me your
experience with any automatic LN2 filling system. Are they dependable? Are
there other sources that sell similar type system? Any feed back will be
greatly appreciated.

Pearl W. Yip
Rome Lab
yip-at-maxwell.rl.plh.af.mil




From: Linda Iadarola :      Linda.Iadarola-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 9 Jan 1997 12:29:00 -0500
Subject: Metrizamide gradients

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Metrizamide gradients 1/9/97 12:27 PM

Does anyone know what buffer is used to make a metrizamide gradient?

Thanks in advance for help.
Linda Chicoine
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale University
New Haven, CT USA





From: Linda Iadarola :      Linda.Iadarola-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 9 Jan 1997 12:26:14 -0500
Subject: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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Message-ID: {n1359309338.38124-at-QuickMail.Yale.edu}

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TEM specimen holder cleaning 1/9/97 12:24 PM

Is there a best way to clean the specimen holder on the TEM? How do most people
clean their holders?





From: Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) :      ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 97 12:34:34 EST
Subject: Auto LN Fillers

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Message-Id: {199701091748.LAA02352-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}

There was a long thread on this subject in the early days of the listserver.
Perhaps it resides in Nestor's or the Florida archives??

I put in my comment that I would never have auto LN fillers again.
We had them on TEMs and SEMs in the 70s and early 80s and they all
failed catastrophically. (I guess there is no simple, benign failure
mode when the possibility of emptying a large LN cow over an
instrument and into an unoccupied room exists)!

Long term reliability under extreme temperature excursions seemed
to be the problem.

However, to be fair, we are talking 20+ year old technology. This is
the wonderful 90s...

Ron




From: jacobb-at-mh1.lbl.gov (Jacob Bastacky)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 10:54:18 -0800
Subject: Re: cryoSEM of eggs

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Keith,

One way to examine your marine eggs would be to use the high-pressure
freezer to freeze a suspension of washed eggs in distilled water (a roughly
200 micrometer thick plug, 1000 or more micrometers in diameter). Then
fracture, etch, and coat as for a TEM replica but use the cryoSEM to look
at the rough surface of the fracture. By regulating the amount of etch you
could see the surface of the egg as well as cross-sections of the layers of
the walls. Paul Walther's articles on double layer coating may be
helpful.

Jacob

Jacob Bastacky, M.D.
Room 116 Donner Laboratory
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-lbl.gov
University of California Phone: (510) 486-4606
Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750






From: GANTZ-at-med-biophd.bu.edu
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 12:58:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: cell culture embedding

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Dear Larry:
We've had consistent success removing cover slips from
Epon capsule-embedded monolayers with a combination of the
methods mentioned by Gib and Greg. We dip the epon block
with attached glass or plastic fragments into liquid nitrogen
(block can already be attached to chuck). Then using a razor
blade gently pry up the rapidly-warming fragment. Sometimes
it takes a couple of cooling/warming cycles to obtain sufficient
area.
Don Gantz
Boston Univ Med School
gantz-at-med-biophd.bu.edu




From: Donna Jacobs :      jacobs-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 13:38:01 -0600
Subject: Open Position for a Research Electron Microscopist

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Please post the attached ad for a Research Electron Microscopist as soon as
possible. If you have any questions, please call me at (217) 244-2944, fax
(217) 244-2946.


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Materials Research Laboratory

RESEARCH ELECTRON MICROSCOPIST


The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is seeking
an experienced electron microscopist as a staff member in the Center for
Microanalysis of Materials. The Center is a major research facility with
eight electron microscopes as well as instruments in surface microanalysis,
x-ray diffraction and other analytical techniques.

The person will work mainly on STEM and TEM but should have experience and
the flexibility to work on other techniques if needed. The Center has six
TEMs. We are particularly interested in hiring a person with experience in
working with field emission TEMs. The Center currently has a VG HB 501 and
is expected to purchase a new FEG-TEM soon. The person appointed will have
primary responsibility for these instruments. Experience in EDX or EELS is
also important. The main responsibility of the position would be to
facilitate the research of approximately 100 users yearly on TEM and STEM.
There will also be ample opportunity to carry out interactive research in
the facility with the wide range of research programs.

This position requires a Ph.D. with at least three years experience with
electron microscopes. Salary is commensurate with experience and
qualifications.

This is a regular full-time appointment with standard university benefits.
The person appointed should be able to begin work between June and August,
1997. In order to ensure full consideration, applications must be received
by March 15, 1997. Please send letter of application, resume, and names and
addresses of three references to J. A. Eades, c/o Donna Jacobs, University
of Illinois, Materials Research Laboratory, 104 South Goodwin Avenue,
Urbana, Illinois 61801, phone (217) 244-2944. For technical information,
call J. A. Eades at (217) 333-8396.

The University of Illinois is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity
Employer.

Donna Jacobs
MRL Administration
University of Illinois
104 South Goodwin Avenue
Urbana, Illinois 61801
Phone (217) 244-2944
Fax (217) 244-2946
email - jacobs-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu





From: Ya Chen :      ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 13:44:46 -0600
Subject: Re: Wanted Balzers Electronics

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} } Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 00:41:06 -0500
} } From: PHOBOS11-at-aol.com
} } Subject: Wanted Balzers Electronics
} } To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} } Status: RO
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hi Al,

We do have a new Balzers EVM-052 E-beam gun power supply. Would you please
give us an offer.

Have a nice day.

Ya Chen


Ya Chen

*** My email address has been changed to: ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu ***
==========================================================================
Cryo/SEM Coordinator
Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR)-- III M M RRRRRR
an NIH Biomedical Research Resource I M M M M R R
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1675 Observatory Drive #159 I M M R R
Madison, WI 53706, USA I M M R R
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FAX : 608-265-4076 III M M R R
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IMR WWW Home Page: http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr.html






From: Ya Chen :      ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 14:56:07 -0600
Subject: Re: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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} Dear All
}
I would appreciate suggestions for examining 80 micron
eggs in seawater or distilled water by SEM where the user
wants to compare fresh egg surfaces (therefore cryo?) with
conventionally fixed, dehydrated and critically point dried
eggs.
} .....

} I have also frozen them just mounted in a water film, but
} some have simply sheared off the standard smooth stub -
} should I try poly-L-lysine or super glue?
}
........

} A separate problem seems to be that while the crustacean
} in question is marine/estuarine and the eggs stand fresh
} water for a while (therefore for rinsing), even after 3 or 4
} distilled water changes I still see a fine, dried layer of
} salt over everything. The rinsing is done in a watchglass
} and the water was almost completely removed with an
} autopipette before refilling.
}
}
} Thanks in advance - Keith Ryan
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
} Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England
}
} e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk
} PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



Keith,

Here is my 2 cents.

1. Coating of poly-L-lysine do help the sample adhere to substrate.

2. Did you have tried freeze-substitution followed by either fast-freezing
again, freeze-drying, cryo-coating, and cryo-SEM observation, or
dehydration, critical point drying, and SEM observation at RT?

3. I agree with George Braybrook's comment that there is a mucous layer on
the egg surface.

With best wishes!

Ya Chen


Ya Chen

*** My email address has been changed to: ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu ***
=========================================================================
\ / Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR)--
\ / __ an NIH Biomedical Research Resource TEL : 608-263-8481
\/ / / University of Wisconsin-Madison FAX : 608-265-4076
/ / / 1675 Observatory Drive #159 Email1:ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
/ /__/_ Madison, WI 53706 Email2:chen-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
=========================================================================
IMR WWW Home Page: http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr.html






From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: 1/9/97 8:59 AM
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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Hi Keith,

It occurred to me that to be sure that your treatments did not introduce any
artefacts on the egg surface you might try a Wild (Leica) Elsam accoustic
microscope. I'm not very familiar with them but there is the potential (at
least) to look at them in seawater or other isotonic solution.

Just a thought,

Geoff Avern
Australian Museum

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear All

I would appreciate suggestions for examining 80 micron
eggs in seawater or distilled water by SEM where the user
wants to compare fresh egg surfaces (therefore cryo?) with
conventionally fixed, dehydrated and critically point dried
eggs.





From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: 1/9/97 8:28 AM
Subject: Re: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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Mime-Version: 1.0

Hi George,

I was interested to see your reference to removing mucus with EDTA. Would
you be so kind to offer a little more info on this. We are starting to do
more work on cilial tracts on the head tentacles of micromolluscs for one
of our malacologists and often have problems with mucus.

Cheers,

Geoff Avern
Microscopy Laboratories
Australian Museum
Sydney, Australia


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________

As for the salt on the surface after 3 or 4 washes, not much help
I'm afraid, just a thought. Is there a mucosal surface layer that the
distilled water is drawing the salt out of ?? If so, they might need an
EDTA treatment first to remove mucus. Then again, this mucus might be the
surface you need to see??? This might be a case of "a rock and a hard
place", but sucessful cryo should tell you what is on the surface if you
can get a fracture through an egg.


Hope this is helpful.

Cheers
:)
George
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3
Canada
ph: 403-492-5746
fax: 403-492-2030






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 17:31:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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} We are considering of installing an Automatic Liquid Nitrogen
} Filling System for our SEM. The only source we came across is VBS
} Industries, Inc. I wonder if any of you would like to share with me your
} experience with any automatic LN2 filling system. Are they dependable? Are
} there other sources that sell similar type system? Any feed back will be
} greatly appreciated.
}
Dear Pearl,
Our automatic LN2 controllers are from Torr Vacuum, Inc. We have
had several disasters: 1) The LN2 source--a very large tank about 200 m
from our lab--would occasionally run dry; then the solenoid would over-
heat. Usually it would open, but occasionally it would fuse and draw
current until someone noticed (see #3). 2) The filler shut-off failed
on the system attached to our EDS detector. LN2 poured into and over
the dewar until the outer bottle deformed and ice formed all over the in-
side and outside of the system. We had to warm up everything, dry every-
thing out and re-form the outer bottle--it had a concave bottom originally,
but was convex after the disaster. Luckily, everything worked out well,
and the detector is still functioning a decade later with its specified
resolution. 3) For some reason--not an empty LN2 tank--the solenoid on
the line on the 200 kV TEM fused and heated the plastic foam insulation
starting a fire. The fire was, fortunately self-limiting; the event
occurred after hours on a Friday before a holiday weekend and was not
discovered until the next Tuesday.
We have not lost any expensive equipment, but there was certainly
the potential for such losses. I don't think our problems were the fault
of Torr Vacuum; they seem to be inherent in automatic LN2 systems. If you
can avoid such systems, I would reccommend you do so. Good luck--especi-
ally if you must use them.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 17:36:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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} Is there a best way to clean the specimen holder on the TEM? How do most people
} clean their holders?
}
Dear Linda,
We put our stage tips in a plasma cleaner for ~20 min. That seems
to get the petrified grease off, and the method can be used on all tips,
not just those constructed of a single piece of metal. It works on our
tilt-rotation tip (mostly aluminum), our double-tilt tip (mostly stainless
steel) and our aperture holders (phosphor bronze).
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Ming Chen :      mingchen-at-gpu.srv.ualberta.ca
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 16:09:29 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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On 9 Jan 1997, Linda Iadarola wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} TEM specimen holder cleaning 1/9/97 12:24 PM
}
} Is there a best way to clean the specimen holder on the TEM? How do most people
} clean their holders?
}
}
I normally use Q tip with a little bit of Wenol to clean the holder first.
Then use Kimwipes to rub over entire surfce. Sonicate the holder in the
acetone bath for 10 min and once again in the fresh acetone bath for
another 10 min. After that use air gun to dry it. That is all I do.

***********************************************
* Ming H. Chen, PhD *
* Medicine/Dentistry Electron Microscopy Unit *
* University Of Alberta. *
* Edmonton, Alberta, Canada *
***********************************************








From: Laszlo Veto :      VetoL-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 18:52:43 -0500
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM -Reply

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** High Priority **

Keith,

My recommendation would be to use a mixture of Tissue-Tek and carbon
dust (from carbon rod sharpener) paste on your cryo-stub. In this
mixture the eggs will not sink fast, therefore will have time to carry out
the freezing process.
I have great LTSEM results using this mixture with unfixed single cell
culture and bacteria.

The separate problem about the fine layer of salt, (if the osmatic change
is all right!) use larger amount of distilled water to rinse for longer time.

Good luck,

Laszlo J. Veto
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis
Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre
AAFC
vetol-at-em.agr.ca







From: Laszlo Veto :      VetoL-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 12:46:10 -0500
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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** High Priority **

Keith,

My recommendation would be to use a mixture of Tissue-Tek and carbon
dust (from carbon rod sharpener) paste on your cryo-stub. In this
mixture the eggs will not sink fast, therefore will have time to carry out
the freezing process.
I have great LTSEM results using this mixture with unfixed single cell
culture and bacteria.

The separate problem about the fine layer of salt, (if the osmatic change
is all right!) use larger amount of distilled water to rinse for longer time.

Good luck,

Laszlo J. Veto
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis
Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre
AAFC
vetol-at-em.agr.ca







From: rick-at-pgt.com (Rick Mott)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 97 18:28:05 EST
Subject: What journal is this?

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Hi, Folks --

I'm in a twisty little maze of references, all different.

Can anyone tell me the full name of Phil. Mag.?

Thanks in advance,

Rick Mott
rick-at-pgt.com






From: rick-at-pgt.com (Rick Mott)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 97 18:28:05 EST
Subject: What journal is this?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi, Folks --

I'm in a twisty little maze of references, all different.

Can anyone tell me the full name of Phil. Mag.?

Thanks in advance,

Rick Mott
rick-at-pgt.com






From: John Posthill :      jbp-at-es.rti.org
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 18:21:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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On Thu, 9 Jan 1997, Pearl Yip wrote:
} Filling System for our SEM. The only source we came across is VBS
} Industries, Inc. I wonder if any of you would like to share with me your
} experience with any automatic LN2 filling system. Are they dependable? Are
} there other sources that sell similar type system? Any feed back will be
} greatly appreciated.

I agree with Ron and Bill, they are not dependable. Anything that has
moving parts or electronics is not dependable. If you must keep something
cold all the time (much better than temp cycling, IMHO), I recommend that
you design and build a large LN dewar that keeps the thing cold that you
periodically refill every few days or so - much like a dewar for an EDS
detector. There are companies out there that will work with you on this
if you don't have the facilities to build your own.

Good Luck!
John Posthill




From: Laszlo Veto :      VetoL-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 20:28:59 -0500
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM -Reply

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** High Priority **

Keith,

Excellent cryo-fracture images of single cells can also be produced,
using the Tissue-Tek/Carbon mixture. (My earlier note) It is also a good
adhesive, especially on the rough cryo-stub surface. George had very
good ideas on cryo-stub surface preparation.
This mixture also fractures well, exposing ALL inner surface of the
fractured eggs "embedded" in it. I hope it will work well for you.

Regard,

Laszlo

Laszlo J. Veto
Electron Microscopy & Image Analysis
Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, AAFC
Ph: 250-494-7711
e-Mail: vetol-at-em.agr.ca

PS. Will we meet in Tirol again?





From: Paul.Fischione-at-internetmci.com
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 1997 19:32:45 -0500
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM -Reply

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-- [ From: Paul E. Fischione * EMC.Ver #2.3 ] --

Linda Iadarola requested information on cleaning TEM specimen holders. A
commonly used technique is to polish with a metal polish such as Wenol or
Pol then either wipe or rinse in methanol. Extreme care does need to be
taken to avoid trapping the polishing paste in the crevices of the holder.
Also, depending on the type of specimen holder, ultrasonic cleaning must
NOT be used since the potential exists to weaken or break epoxy bonds
(particularly in the case of cyro holders).

Another possibility is to plasma clean the holder. Most of the
contamination resident on holders is organic (hydrocarbon). An air or
oxygen/argon plasma is quite effective in reducing this contamination. The
plasma creates disassociated oxygen which chemically combines with the
carbonaceous material and reduces it to CO, CO2 and H2O. Depending on the
ion energies used, cleaning can occur without adversely effecting the
specimen holder.

Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to e-mail me
directly.

Best regards,

Paul E. Fischione

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc is the manufacturer of the Model 1400
Plasma Cleaner.




From: gerry_nas-at-antdiv.gov.au (Gerry Nash)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 14:42:25 +1000
Subject: Seal teeth

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G'day everybody and Happy New year!
Would any of you kind electron microscopists have looked at the growth
rings in seal teeth or any mammalian teeth, please? And how did you do
that? And is there a relationship between the ratio of cementum and dentine
to the age of the mammal?
Thank you kindly
Cheers
Gerry nash

Ms Geraldine Nash
Electron Microscopist

EM Unit
Australian Antarctic Division
Channel Highway
Kingston
Tasmania 7050
Australia Ph: + 61 03 62 323 322 Fax: + 61 03 62 323 351






From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1997 21:54:48 -0600
Subject: Re: What journal is this?

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} I'm in a twisty little maze of references, all different.
}
} Can anyone tell me the full name of Phil. Mag.?
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Rick Mott

Philosophical Magazine?
Your nearest university library should have a reference work that
lists periodical names and official abbreviations. "Should" because there
*is* such a thing, and they ought to have it.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Microscopy
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Jim Darley :      p&s-at-ultra.net.au
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 16:59:27 +1100
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

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Keith Ryan wrote:
Dear All

I would appreciate suggestions for examining 80 micron
eggs in seawater or distilled water by SEM where the user
wants to compare fresh egg surfaces (therefore cryo?) with
conventionally fixed, dehydrated and critically point dried
eggs. . . . .
*************************************
You have two major problems:
Sticking and retaining the processed eggs onto a substrate prior to coating and
earlier, removing all traces of salt from the eggs
.
You could try poly-l-lysine. The old technique, which works well for
specimens of that size range, is a drop of a sticky solution onto a
substrate. After solvent evaporation a very thin "permanently" sticky layer
remains.
The solution is prepared by dissolving the gum of clear sticky tape
in chloroform overnight. Push a couple of meters of tape into a small jar
and add about 50 ml of chloroform. If you require a very clean background
the solution can be millipore filtered.
If some low power images are needed, than freshly cleaved mica gives
a very clean background. At zero tilt, the mica is very dark in secondary mode.

Removing salt from marine specimens can be very difficult. Leaving
the specimen for a lengthy period in water, even after fixation, may damage
structures. An appropriate concentration of ammonium acetate provides the
right molarity and the aqueous (or ethanol) solution leaves no residue.
Others have referred to mucous which may or may not be removed. EDTA
fell out of favour as a decalcifier some time ago. For the same reasons I
would prefer a broad spectrum enzyme. I used a snail enzyme many years ago
for removing mucous, but your local biochemist should be able to advise.
Hope this is some help with this difficult problem.
Happy New Year
Jim Darley
Probing & Structure (Microscopy Supplies & Accessories)
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia

Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
A great microscopy site: http://www.ultra.net.au/~pns/





From: christian ragaru :      ragaru-at-cnrs-imn.fr
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:52:54 +0200
Subject: register form

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Please,
can you tell me how i can participate to this helpfull Newsgroup ?
Thanks
Christian
(student preparing a Microscopist PhD in Nantes University ) .




From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:48:01 +0000
Subject: Re: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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} Dear Fellow Microscopists:
} We are considering of installing an Automatic Liquid Nitrogen
} Filling System for our SEM. The only source we came across is VBS
} Industries, Inc. I wonder if any of you would like to share with me your
} experience with any automatic LN2 filling system. Are they dependable? Are
} there other sources that sell similar type system? Any feed back will be
} greatly appreciated.
}
} Pearl W. Yip
} Rome Lab
} yip-at-maxwell.rl.plh.af.mil

Pearl,

As others have said, these systems do seem to unreliable and considering
the value of the equipment they are attached to, I would not trust them. I
would even be wary about LN2 level alarms - they seem to be reliable, but
do you really want to have the safety of perhaps 500k dollars or more of
equipment depending on one?

Anyway, what is the problem with a regular manual schedule of re-filling?

You don't actually say what you are filling with LN2.

If it is an EDX detector, I would suggest that if you are really concerned,
you should have a routine for users to disconnect the HT from the detector.
Then if the detector should run dry, there is no risk of damage (although,
to be honest, I have, more than once, had an EDX detector go dry while the
HT was on and survive apparently unharmed, but I don't recommend anyone
trying it). However, this might require that you allow the detector to
restabilise following reconnection of the HT.

If you are filling LN2 traps on the vacuum system, then I would caution you
about running them continuosly anyway - over a period of time this will
actually degrade your vacuum. All cold traps should be allowed to warm to
room temperature at least once a week and the vacuum stabilise. If not, you
will gradually get a build up of ice and other contaminants on the traps
which, eventually will outgas at a sufficient rate to contaminate your
system.

Regards,
Larry Stoter






From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:47:25 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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Linda Iadarola wrote:

}
} TEM specimen holder cleaning 1/9/97 12:24 PM
}
} Is there a best way to clean the specimen holder on the TEM? How do most
} people
} clean their holders?

Don't :)

No part of a specimen holder that goes into the vacuum of a TEM needs to
be, or should be touched by dirty fingers (or anything else). If you follow
appropriate handling procedures, in the majority of cases, holders do not
need cleaning.

They may often 'look dirty' but this is usually some sort of oxidation and
doesn't cause any problems in the TEM. Unless a particular specimen rod is,
without question, causing contamination problems when you do microanalysis
or microdiffraction, and the problems really are only apparent with that
specific rod, then 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'.

Certainly, there should be no necessity for a regular cleaning routine and
in general, I have never cleaned holders for which I have had
responsibility. The only exceptions are the external O-ring seal on the
barrel and the jewel bearing on the tip.

Having said that, problems do occur. Simple holders (single tilt) can
usually be cleaned successfully by ultrasonic in a solvent, rinse in
distilled water and warm air blow dry. However, more complex holders may be
almost impossible to clean fully - it is difficult to fully penetrate all
the crevices and internal spaces effectively and solvent/ultrasonic may
weaken or damage expoxy joints and seals. Plasma discharge is pretty
effective, but again is unlikely to fully penetrate internal spaces -
although if you have serious contamination in an internal space then
whoever is responsible probably needs introducing to a few of life's
realities - try to find an old HT tank for them to clean!

Whatever the problem, don't use wehnol or similar abrasive metal polishes -
if it needs something that powerful to remove the dirt, then it wasn't a
problem to start with - but it may be after you have filled the crevices
with metal polish.

Minor contamination of holder tips by specimens can sometimes be a problem.
Usually, this can be cured by leaving the holder, without a specimen, in
the TEM contiuosly for a long period - say a weekend - and it will pump
clean.

The only exception to all the above is cryo-holders. They frequently get
horribly dirty. Often, however, it is only the tip region that is the
problem. If you don't have access to a suitable plasma system, then just
the tip can be suspended and ultrasoniced in a solvent - also, check with
the manufacturer regarding cleaning. You may find that you have to start by
removing the worst with wooden cocktail sticks. You will avoid the worst
problems if you can get users to remove specimens from the holders while
still frozen.

Regards,
Larry Stoter

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
United Kingdom
---------------------------------------------------------------






From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:47:29 +0000
Subject: Re: What journal is this?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} } I'm in a twisty little maze of references, all different.
} }
} } Can anyone tell me the full name of Phil. Mag.?
} }
} } Thanks in advance,
} }
} } Rick Mott
}
} Philosophical Magazine?
} Your nearest university library should have a reference work that
} lists periodical names and official abbreviations. "Should" because there
} *is* such a thing, and they ought to have it.
} Phil
}
} &&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
} Philip Oshel
} Microscopy
} Station A
} PO Box 5037
} Champaign, IL 61825-5037
} (217)244-3145 days
} (217)355-3145 evenings
} oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
} *** looking for a job again ******************

But beware that there are Phil. Mag. A and Phil. Mag. B. I don't know when
each issue was split into two, but is was some time ago.

Regards,
Larry Stoter






From: Simon Watkins :      swatkins-at-pitt.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 97 08:12:12 -0500
Subject: Post doc; microscopy of muscle

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-- [ From: Simon Watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the department of cell
biology at the University of Pittsburgh. This position within the Muscular
Dystrophy Research Center and Imaging Center will be focussed toward using
microscopy to study the dystrophin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle, the
ultimate goal being to optimize therapeutics (gene delivery) currently under
development within the center. Initially the project will use live cell,
confocal, and EM methods to study the expression, and deposition of
components of the dystrophin cytoskeleton (dystrophin, sarcoglycans,
dystroglyans and the ECM) and their role in the development and maintenance
of muscle fiber structure. This position is funded for 3 years

This position requires a Ph.D.and experience in microscopy (the specific
field is unimportant) This is a regular full-time appointment with standard
university benefits

The University of Pittsburgh is an equal opportunity employer

Please respond by e-mail to swatkins-at-pitt.edu


--
-------------------------------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D
Associate Professor
Director SBIC
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
tel 412-648-3051
fax 412-648-2004
-----------------------------------------------




From: Leon A. Metlay :      lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:39:43 -0500
Subject: Re: What journal is this?

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Rick Mott asked:

} Can anyone tell me the full name of Phil. Mag.?

From the University of Rochester online card catalog:

} } TITLE: The Philosophical magazine.
} } IMPRINT: London, Taylor & Francis, [etc.]
} }
} } Library has:
} } RHEES/Stack Q1 .L847
} } v.1 (1798)-v.68 (1826); n.s. v.1 (1827)-v.11 (1832); ser.3 v.1 (1832)-v.37
} } (1850); ser.4 v.1 (1851)-v.50 (1875); ser.5 v.1 (1876)-v.50 (1900); ser.6 v.1
} } (1901)-v.50 (1925); ser.7 v.1 (1926)-v.38 (1947)
} } POA/Pper Q1 .L847
} } ser.7 v.39 (1948)-v.46 (1955); ser.8 v.1 (1956)-v.36 (1977)

Hope this helps,

Leon


--
Leon A. Metlay, M.D.,Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Rochester Medical Center Phone: (716) 275-5691
P.O. Box 626 Fax: (716) 273-1027
Rochester, NY 14642 lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
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"Most ass drivers are evil, most camel drivers are decent, most sailors are
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From: allardlfjr-at-ornl.gov (Larry Allard)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 10:20:23 -0500
Subject: LN fillers

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Our disaster story:

The filler for an LN trap over the DP on our JEOL 2000FX TEM malfunctioned,
and a tank of LN2 emptied out all over the diffusion pump. The microscope
shut down, luckily valving the column off from the DP. The water lines
froze, including the water in the baffle at the top of the pump. This
caused the baffle to crack, and when it warmed up again, the pump and
reservoir tank flooded with water. The next morning the microscope was
found in the OFF condition, and, no problem being evident, was simply
restarted. This caused an emulsion of DP oil and water to be sucked into
the rough pump, which *was* evident, and the machine was immediately turned
off. The damage was done however, and a complete teardown and cleaning was
necessary, taking a couple of weeks.

So if you use a filler system, be sure to provide a way to funnel LN away
from the microscope, in the event that the solenoid fails to close properly
and the tank empties.






From: Blackwood, Andy :      ablackwood-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 97 10:28:01 -0500
Subject: What Is NACLA?

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-- [ From: Blackwood, Andy * EMC.Ver #3.0 ] --

10 January 1997

Microscopists, at least in the U.S., may want to learn a new acronym. On 7
January I attended a forum at the National Institute for Standards and
Technology which started the process to form NACLA, the NAtional Council for
Laboratory Accreditation. While it is in its early infancy, this group is
seen as a way to resolve the current crisis in laboratory accreditation,
which affects more of the members of the microscopy listserver than one
might imagine.

Those of you in academic institutions can now lean back, relax and have a
good laugh at the expense of the rest of us. The academic world learned
long ago that accreditation was a good idea, but it was only going to work
if the standards were set high enough and the process was rigorous enough
that the results were acceptable to everybody involved. The result is
mutual recognition of accreditations done by various bodies, some based on
regional associations and others by national groups which derive from
various professions. The result is a system that works pretty well.

For three different groups of laboratories, however, accreditations are not
mutually recognized, for a variety of reasons. Much of the time of the
forum was devoted to describing the problems of testing, analytical and
calibration laboratories (medical and environmental laboratories have whole
additional layers of problems) operating within manufacturing organizations
and doing product-related analytical work, operating as independent
laboratories or operating within the Federal government. The crisis is that
laboratory folks are spending so much time dealing with duplicate
accreditation visits that there is little time left to get any work done.
Approximately 150 different organzations in the U.S. accredit laboratories.
The current record is a laboratory that holds 102 separate accreditations
from various levels and agencies of government, different industrial users
of laboratory data and several accreditation associations. Each of these
accreditations requires that an audit be conducted, ranging from submission
of duplicate documents to be analyzed in the same way to on-site visits
taking several days.

Underlying this mess are several types of problems, including the fact that
different agencies accredit to different standards, the conflicting
requirements of different laws and regulations, the lack of trust among
accreditors and the vital nature of laboratory data for issues affecting
health and safety. What I learned at the forum is that the problems of
duplicate accreditations and redundant requirements that I see in an
independent analytical laboratory are similar to problems experienced by
laboratories in government, even within the same agency.

Is this an issue for microscopists? I think it is. Some of us are already
well familiar with accreditation programs affecting anyone who does analysis
by light or electron microscopy for asbestos. Others are trying to figure
out how to deal with ISO 9000, which is intended for organizations that
produce goods and services, but not really focused on laboratory operations.
The organizers of NACLA are working to develop a system which will have all
laboratory accreditations traceable to a single, international standard,
probably similar to the present ISO Guide 25. They are also trying to
resolve the present conflicting roles of NIST in laboratory accreditation,
where NIST is at the same time accrediting accreditors, operating an
accreditation system and operating calibration laboratories which should be
accredited. At the same time, they are working to make all accreditations
traceable to the Federal government through NIST in order to make them
acceptable internationally. Finally, they are working to create a system in
which various accreditation agencies recognize each other, probably because
the accreditors themselves have been accredited by a process of peer review.

NACLA is just beginning, but microscopists should be aware that it is coming
and, along with it, an increasing probability that each of our laboratories
will be going through some sort of a standardized accreditation process.

I'm not aware that the proposal to develop NACLA is available on the web,
but it should be available from NIST. If there are any questions, I'd be
happy to try to answer them.

Andy

Andrew W. Blackwood, Ph.D.
Structure Probe, Inc.
P.O. Box 656
West Chester, PA 19381-0656
Ph: 1 610 436 5400
FAX: 1 610 436 5755
e-mail: ablackwood-at-2spi.com
WWW: http://www.2spi.com






From: klivi-at-jhu.edu (Kenneth JT Livi)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 10:17:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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Paul wrote:
} Another possibility is to plasma clean the holder. Most of the
} contamination resident on holders is organic (hydrocarbon). An air or
} oxygen/argon plasma is quite effective in reducing this contamination. The
} plasma creates disassociated oxygen which chemically combines with the
} carbonaceous material and reduces it to CO, CO2 and H2O. Depending on the
} ion energies used, cleaning can occur without adversely effecting the
} specimen holder.

Can Be cups be cleaned in plasma systems without damage?

Larry wrote:

} Certainly, there should be no necessity for a regular cleaning routine and
} in general, I have never cleaned holders for which I have had
} responsibility. The only exceptions are the external O-ring seal on the
} barrel and the jewel bearing on the tip.

Does your experience include AEM in high resolution FEG's? We are about to
purchase a 300 keV FEG and would like to know how critical specimen and rod
cleanliness is.

Ciao for now,
Ken

Kenneth JT Livi
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
34th and Charles Streets
The Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland 21218

klivi-at-jhu.edu (e-mail)






From: george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca (George Braybrook)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:26:57 -0700
Subject: mucus removal

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Hi Geoff,

Jim Darley is right about the EDTA, we tried it many moons ago
(memory is the first thing to go!!) but found 1500 NF units/ml ovine
hyaluronidase in millipore filtered seawater was better, for spermatoza at
least. (D. G. Atwood et al,1975, Journal of Microscopy, vol 103, pp. 259 to
264.)
I'll send you a reprint if you like!

"Others have referred to mucous which may or may not be
removed. EDTA
fell out of favour as a decalcifier some time ago. For the same reasons I
would prefer a broad spectrum enzyme. I used a snail enzyme many years ago
for removing mucous, but your local biochemist should be able to advise."

Cheers
:)
George
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3
Canada
ph: 403-492-5746
fax: 403-492-2030






From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 11:01:29 -0500
Subject: Frame Grabbers

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An issue which I have not seen mentioned in the responses to this thread is
the video bandwidth of the SEM amplifiers. SEM's are not (in general)
designed to obtain quality images at TV rates, and the amplifiers are not
usually capable of passing information at a high enough rate. This is quite
separate from the noise issue, and no amount of frame averaging can correct
the problem.

A way you can see this is to turn the electron beam off, turn up the PMT
voltage until you can see noise pulses, then grab a single frame at TV rate.
If you look closely, you will see that the noise pulses are not spots, but
short lines. As an approximation, you can never get finer horizontal detail
in your image than the length of these lines.

The demonstrations you will see by board vendors showing how their boards
clean up a noisy image are just fine, but remember that they are using high
quality CCD video cameras as the image source, and high bandwidth
amplifiers, with the noise artificially enhanced, for their demonstrations.

As people have commented, one can get a useful image by frame-averaging a TV
rate signal, but (in most cases, at least) don't expect it to have the same
quality as a slow-scan image.


Tony Garratt-Reed.




****************************************************
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** **
** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed **
** Room 13-1027 **
** Center for Materials Science and Engineering **
** Massachusetts Institute of Technology **
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****************************************************
****************************************************
** **
** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed **
** Room 13-1027 **
** Center for Materials Science and Engineering **
** Massachusetts Institute of Technology **
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue **
** Cambridge, Massachsetts 02139-4307 **
** U. S. A. **
** **
** Phone: 617-253-4622 **
** Fax: 617-258-5286 or 617-258-6478 **
** **
****************************************************
****************************************************






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 12:32:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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} Can Be cups be cleaned in plasma systems without damage?
}
Dear Ken,
Yes. I'd be careful where the pump exhaust is vented, however.
The presence of Be dust in the exhaust is a possibility (at least in
theory), and that is *very* toxic. The particles would likely be in the
submicron range, and therefore easily inhaled. I'd think it unlikely
that a Be cup with a smooth surface would be etched too readily. Does
anyone else on the list have other info?
}
} Does your experience include AEM in high resolution FEG's? We are about to
} purchase a 300 keV FEG and would like to know how critical specimen and rod
} cleanliness is.
}
No, I have no experience with FEG instruments. I'd think the limiting
factor would be how a dirty rod affects the vacuum. If you are interested in
looking at specimens which have clean surfaces, the contamination would also
be a major concern.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Brendan Foran :      bforan-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 97 13:30:50 -0500
Subject: journal abbrev. WEB-resource

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A nice resource for checking full journal titles from standard abbreviations can
be found at Chemical Abstracts WEbsite:
...its also nice cause they have the CODENs in the list and with Netscape or
Internet explorer, one can type "command-f" to find the abbreviation of
interest.
This has all CAS-journals, which is most of the good ones...
its at:

http://info.cas.org/sent.html

I recommend bookmarking it..

as Martha might say "it's a good thing."

Brendan Foran

_____________________________________________________________________
Brendan J. Foran Ph.D. ...currently just a "Post-Doc"

Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
2125 H.H. Dow building
The University of Michigan phone:(313)-763-4196
2300 Hayward Street fax: (313)-763-4788
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 bforan-at-umich.edu
_____________________________________________________________________





From: Michael A. Fremarek :      3IZHKD2-at-CMUVM.CSV.CMICH.EDU
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 97 15:31:40 EST
Subject: Employment in EM

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Bill Mason responded to an inquiry regarding Kodak digital cameras:


We have used a number of digital cameras, including Kodak. The Kodak cameras
are not really so suitable for image analysis of the type you mention because
they are really on 8 bit cameras as standard (256 grey levels), so have limited
dynamic range.

I though that the following from Kodak's Readme file that comes with the latest
driver download might be helpful especially since it seems to say that the data
for their DCS 420/460 cameras are12 bit images:

"When the "12 bit Acquire" checkbox on the driver is checked, the driver will
acquire the image data into Photoshop Version 2.5 or higher with 12-bit
resolution per color. The file size is doubled and the acquire time is
slightly longer. If the "12 bit Acquire" checkbox is unchecked, the acquire
module passes 8-bit image data back to Photoshop.

Kodak's DCS cameras capture image data with a 12-bit analog to digital
converter. Photoshop supports a 16-bit per pixel mode, however Kodak calls the
new driver feature "12 bit acquire" so that we will never mislead customers
into thinking that we use a 16-bit analog to digital converter.

Our DCS drivers that run on Macs and PCs maintain this 12-bit resolution
through the image processing path. Early versions of Photoshop required acquire
modules to reduce the image data resolution to 8-bits per pixel per color just
before passing the image data back to Photoshop. Photoshop Version 2.5 or above
allows acquire modules to provide the image data with either 8 or 16-bits per
pixel per color. Adobe calls these 24-bit and 48-bit RGB Color modes." Any and
all copyright notices may apply to the preceeding excerpt.

I have no financial interest in nor am I recommending use of
Kodak,Photoshop,Mac etc.

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com


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Dear MSA listserver subscribers,
I am a graduate student (master's) trained in EM. I was wondering if
anyone could tell me what range of starting yearly salary I should expect.



Thank you in advance,



Michael




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: 10 Jan 97 16:22:37 EST
Subject: Plasma Cleaning TEM Holders

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear Colleagues:

I have read, with interest, all of the discussions concerning cleaning of TEM
specimen holders. As has been mentioned, plasma cleaning has been determined to
be a highly effective means to remove organic contaminants from both a specimen
and a specimen holder. Significant work has been done in quanitfying the
effects of Plasma Cleaning since Dr. Nestor Zaluzec at Argonne National Lab
received his patent on the technique.

I am quite sure that there will be some lively discussions at the MRS Meeting in
San Francisco during the TEM Specimen Preparation Symposium. If you'd like to
get a jump start on the discussion, I can refer you to two articles on Plasma
Cleaning that may be of interest:

1) "Simultaneous Specimen & Stage Cleaning for Analytical Electron Microscopy",
Microscopy Today October 1996. Volume 96-8, Page 16, by yours truly. This is
a very general discussion of the process.

2) "Reactive Gas Plasma Specimen Processing for Use in Microanalysis & Imaging
in Analytical Electron Microscopy" by Nestor Zaluzec. This is a preprint of a
paper to be presented at MSA in Cleveland this coming August. This paper
provides parameters for processing and gives quantified data concerning the
effects of plasma cleaning.

I can provide you with copies of both papers if you have an interest. You may
also be interested in reading Dr. Zaluzec's patent (#5,510,624). I can also
send you a copy of that if it is of interest.

If you have an interest in subscribing (IT'S FREE!) to Microscopy Today, you
should send an e-mail request to Don Grimes at MicroToday-at-aol.com. It is a fine
publication and I highly recommend it to all microscopists. I have no financial
interest in Microscopy Today - I'm just a faithful reader!

DISCLOSURE
I must also point out that South Bay Technology does license this tachnology
from Argonne National Lab pursuant to the above mentioned patent. We also
produce a plasma cleaner which is designed to clean specimens and holders so we
have a vested interest in making you aware of the technique.

Please address your requests to my attention.

Best regards-

David Henriks TEL: 800-728-2233 (toll-free in USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. 714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: 714-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com
http://www.southbaytech.com

Manufacturers of Precision Sample Preparation Equipment and Supplies for
Metallography, Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.





From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 21:54:47 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM specimen holder cleanin

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X-Sender: teknesis-at-sdps.demon.co.uk
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} Larry wrote:
}
} } Certainly, there should be no necessity for a regular cleaning routine and
} } in general, I have never cleaned holders for which I have had
} } responsibility. The only exceptions are the external O-ring seal on the
} } barrel and the jewel bearing on the tip.
}
} Does your experience include AEM in high resolution FEG's? We are about to
} purchase a 300 keV FEG and would like to know how critical specimen and rod
} cleanliness is.
}
} Ciao for now,
} Ken
}
} Kenneth JT Livi
} Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
} 34th and Charles Streets
} The Johns Hopkins University
} Baltimore, Maryland 21218
}
} klivi-at-jhu.edu (e-mail)

Kenneth,

I have done a lot of AEM, up to 300kV although not on FEGs. However, much
of this has included EELS which will pick up C contamination more easily
than any other method. Specimen rod cleanliness is important but I guess
the point I was trying to make is that you shouldn't get it dirty in the
first place! In general, and with proper care I believe that cleaning the
specimen rod is unnecessary.

I assume you are not talking about UHV at the specimen - if you are, then
the whole question of cleanliness is a different order of magnitude. If you
are talking about UHV at the specimen, then probably Nestor is the person
to comment on this.

Specimen cleanliness is a somewhat different issue and there are certainly
some specimen prep procedures, and types of specimen that can lead to
contamination problems. For example, there are some pretty gungey mixes
around for electrochemical thinning - I used to put plenty of glycerol into
one of my favourite mixes for stainless steel - these need carefully
removing from specimens. Also, dirty ion beam thinners make pretty good
fine grain carbon coaters. Be careful.

Regards,
Larry Stoter






From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 21:54:42 +0000
Subject: Re: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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} At 08:48 10.1.1997 +0000, you wrote:
}
} } If it is an EDX detector, I would suggest that if you are really concerned,
} } you should have a routine for users to disconnect the HT from the detector.
} } Then if the detector should run dry, there is no risk of damage (although,
}
} Hello Larry,
}
} I would not give people the idea that you can let an EDS detector warm up
} while connected into the microscope. This is true especially with detectors
} with window. The dewar is pumped down to its ultimate vacuum by a chemical
} sorption pump. If you let the detector warm up the pressure in the vacuum of
} the dewar gets worse than that inside the microscope. The window fitting
} does not normally like this direction of pressure difference and the result
} may be your window (Be or polymer) blowing out into the microscope. At least
} Tracor recommends to remove the detector before warming it up and again
} cooling it down before installing to the microscope.
}
} Regards,
} Jouko

I certainly wouldn't suggest anyone try warming up EDX detectors, on or off
the microscope, without first talking to the manufacturer regarding
warming/cooling procedures. However, from personal experience of Be window
detectors, they can survive warming up while on a TEM column, so if it does
happen to you (and you are responsible), try cooling it down again, before
you cut your throat :)

With UTW detectors, you probably won'tt be so lucky.

Regards,
Larry Stoter

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
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---------------------------------------------------------------






From: rick-at-pgt.com (Rick Mott)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 97 19:48:45 EST
Subject: Thanks all

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Hello again --

Thanks for all the pointers to Philosophical Magazine. Much
appreciated.

Unfortunately, I'd already discovered the highly obscure
publication Philosophy of Magic. After the obligatory
puff of greasy black smoke, I find myself in the form
of a large green frog. You have no idea how complicated
it is typing this with webbed fingers...

On the bright side, my debugging skills seem to have
improved markedly.

Thanks again,

Rick

"On the Internet, nobody knows you're a frog."






From: MelanieOwl-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 20:08:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Automatic Liquid Nitrogen Filling System

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VBS is the only automatic LN2 filling system I have seen commercially,
although there may be others. However, you might want to design your own
system, using cryogenic solenoid valves and sensors, and providing LN2 from
cylinders. It is fairly inexpensive to do this. I can send you information
on a system we built and used in our lab for some time, if you are
interested. I presented a poster on this system at the 1994 MSA meeting and
the description in included in the Proceedings from that meeting.
One problem we ran into with our system is that we did not have a failsafe
mechanism to shut the system off when the cylinder ran out of liquid. The
result was that nitrogen gas would continue to fill the dewar and eventually
would blow out the remaining liquid. I think this can be remedied by making
some changes to the system.
Regards,
Melanie A. Behrens
Texaco, Inc.
P.O. Box 509
Beacon, NY 12508
914-838-7261
behrema -at- Texaco.com or MelanieOwl -at- aol.com




From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 21:11:38 -0800
Subject: Re: Seal teeth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Gerry,
I have looked at the growth rings in human (child's) teeth, and the dark
marks left by early stress events. I felt that light microscopy gave a
better view of the dark marks, but examining the teeth was not difficult. I
just gold-coated and examined as usual. I did not try to determine any
ratios. I do believe that there is some shrinkage, due to dehydration and
cryo would be a more rigorous way to go.
Good luck,
Mary
At 02:42 PM 1/10/97 +1000, you wrote:

} Would any of you kind electron microscopists have looked at the growth
} rings in seal teeth or any mammalian teeth, please? And how did you do
} that? And is there a relationship between the ratio of cementum and dentine
} to the age of the mammal?
} Thank you kindly
} Cheers
} Gerry nash
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: caa3045-at-ritvax.isc.rit.edu (Ciprian Almonte)
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 1997 00:41:10 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Looking for job

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Fellow Microscopists,
I'm looking for a full time position in a research or imaging=
facility lab. =20
I have a BS in Biology and I'm currently persuing a second BS in biomedical=
photography with a concentration on photomicrography, and digital imaging. =
I'll be graduating on February. You can view my resume at http://www.isc.=
rit.edu/~caa3045

My photography, computer skills, research and laboratory experience is=
varied. During the summer of 1992, I conducted research on the effects of=
hexadecane on genetic variability of nestmate recognition in honey bees at=
the University of Colorado at Boulder. During the summer of 1993, as part=
of a research program sponsored by the Medical College of Pennsylvania, I=
characterized chloride channels in the human colonic cell line T84 using=
the patch-clamp technique.=20

My research technician position from January '94 thru June '95 at the=
Medical College of Pennsylvania expanded my range of skills. I conducted=
experiments on the structural change of F-actin and ankyrin in the=
cytoskeleton of lymphocyte using the confocal microscope and various immuno=
cytochemistry techniques. The result of this project has already been=
published in the journal of Membrane Biology 147, 283-294. In addition, I=
used the patch clamp technique to investigate bile duct cells from Cystic=
Fibrosis patients, and characterize fibroblast cells (NIH3T3).
=20
Also, my position at the Ocular Cell Transplatation Laboratory at the=
University of Medcine and Dentistry of New Jersey involved digitizing and=
capturing images of the retina, create plates for publication, and created=
and maitained the laboratory's website. I am presently the webmaster for =
Spectra Services. =20

In addition to my science background the Biomedical Photographic=
Communications Department at RIT has exposed me to many computer skills =
and medical photography techniques. I have hands on experience on fundus=
photography, stereo photography, and I am familiar with the fluorescein=
angiogram techniques. In addition, I am experience with many formats of=
films processes, black-and-white, and color printing, photomacrography,=
photomicrography, darkfield, brightfield, nomarski, phase-contrast,=
polarizing, Rheinber, SEM,fluorescence, and confocal microscopy. =20

Also, I have a great interest and experience in digital photography,=
multimedia, and computer in general. I have hand on experience with the=
window platforms and Macintosh computer (Macintosh major area of strenght).=
I am proficient in many imaging and multimedia production softwares such=
as photoshop and Multimedia Director, QuarkXpress, Adobe Illustrator, and =
Adobe Premiere. In addition I have work experience with HTML and Lingo=
programming. =20

My career objective is to become an expert in a wide variety of imaging=
enhancing, analysis softwares and equipments and become very=
knowledgeable in the area of microscopy (Confocal, TEM and SEM.) And create=
interesting interactive multimedia pieces conveying scientific=
informations. If you have access to the internet you can view my resume=
and some of my images in my web site at http://www.isc.rit.edu/~caa3045
=20
If you think I may contribute to your department or if you need=
further information please send me an e-mail to "caa3045-at-rit.edu" or "alm=
onte-at-medcolpa.edu"
Thanks,

--Ciprian
Have fun and keep the sun on your back and a smile on your face.
__________________________________________________________
Ciprian A. Almonte
Rochester Institue of Technology
Biomedical Photographic Communications
Rochester, NY 14623-5603

Visit my web site at http://www.isc.rit.edu/~caa3045/
__________________________________________________________






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 1997 12:20:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Job Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The UC Berkeley Electron Microscope Lab is looking for and EM Tech. What
follows is the job announcement.

Staff Research Associate II (PSS 1)
Electron Microscope Laboratory
$30,200/ year starting salary
Job number: 12-411-30/SL
Closing date: 1/31/97

Operate and maintain a TEM, Bal-Tec High Pressure Freezing Machine, and
JEOL 9000 Freeze-fracture machine. Train students, staff, and other users
in TEM technique, including sample preparation. Operate cryofixation
equipment for EM sample preparation. Train users in darkroom technique.
Learn and apply new techniques as appropriate.

Qualifications: Experience in electron microscopy, especially TEM sample
preparation techniques and cryotechniques. Effective communication skills.
Experience with TEMs and related equipment. Experience with specimen
preparation techniques for TEM. General Lab skills such as preparing
buffer solutions and opreating pH meters. Experience with electronic
equipment and its routine maintenance. Darkroom experience. Ability to
work independently.

If you are interested please contact the UC Berkeley Employment Office.


UC Berkeley Employment Office
Room 7-G (Ground Floor)
2200 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-1011 general line
(510) 643-9421 TTY for disabled








From: Mr L Scott :      SCOTT-at-getafix.utr.ac.za
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 1997 11:52:26 +0200
Subject: RCPT: TEM powder prep - THANKS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Confirmation of reading: your message -

Date: 12 Dec 96 17:29
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Subject: TEM powder prep - THANKS

Was read at 9:52, 12 Jan 97.





From: Scott Miller :      smiller-at-umr.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 1997 12:47:14 -0600
Subject: Epoxy for TEM cross sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a specimen preparation problem which some of you on the list may be=
able to help me with.

I have been using M-BOND 610 to prepare my TEM cross-sectional samples with=
great success, but I am now worried that the elevated temperature curing=
(200C for two hours) is annealing the thin films I am examining(I am=
looking at copper thin films on a quartz substrate, which I sandwich=
between wafers of silicon for the cross sections). Has anyone had any good=
experiences using a room temperature adhesive for cross-sections which will=
be tripod polished and briefly ion milled?


F. Scott Miller
Electron Microscope Lab smiller-at-umr.edu
University of Missouri-Rolla =20
223 McNutt Hall voice: 573 341 4727
Rolla, MO 65409 USA fax: 573 341 6934






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 1997 13:38:31 -0500
Subject: Plasma Processing of Specimens for TEM/STEM/AEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ken etal .....

In my ~20+ years of experience, all specimens contaminate to
some degree (some slow, some fast) in the microscope. I've
seen this in every instrument (TEM, STEM, SEM) I have used from
W, LaB6 to FEG instruments, UHV or not. In modern TEM/STEM
instruments the majority of this contamination is specimen
and stage borne as the manufacturers have generally improved
their vacuum systems over the years so that their contribution
is small to neglegible.

In the specimen borne regime, the magnitude of the contamination
is a function of the sample (metallic, semiconductor,
organic, ....) , it's preparation method (electrochemical, chemical,
microtoming, ion milling...), the microscope, the probe and probe
current. Plus a number of other less well controlled factors.

Rather than draw this out into a very long dicussion, it suffices
to say that when critical small probe work is being done,
I plasma process my specimens and stage before microanalysis
especially in LaB6 and FEG systems. Or if I determine
after an experiment starts that the specimen is begining to
contaminate, then I remove the sample and the stage from the
microscope and process them off-line and then resume to work.
The effectiveness of this processing depends upon the gas,
pressure, and power of the plasma but is dramatic in
most situations. I have been able to minimize/remove
specimen borne contamination to a level where I can operate
for ~ 8+ hours without significant contamination. Of course,
when it reappears (usually now due to the microscope) the
specimen is just "reprocessed" and I can continue working.
Unfortunately, once surface hydrocarbons are removed you may find
out that your sample exhibits electron sputtering in the microscope
:-( . This is an effect which we calculated and showed would happen if the
conditions are right back in 87 (Zaluzec & Mansfield in Proc. AEM-87).
Adding back a very thin layer of spectroscopically pure carbon
sometimes cures this problem, with minimal contamination
effects.

I also routine apply this process to stages which have Be cups. If
you operate under the correct plasma conditions you
will NOT sputter/etch material from or onto the stage. This only
occurs when the power level of the plasma is too high
and you enter the etching or "ashing" regime.

Generally I would recommend a power level of ~ 5-10 W,
pressure ~200 mT, processing time ~ 5 min and a 2 stage
cleaning. First using pure Argon, followed by pure Oxygen.
I have experimentally found that this always produces the best
results. In addition, the temperature rise under these
conditions is less than 5 C, so specimen/stage heating is
almost never a problem.

As per the rules of the Microscopy Listserver. I should point
out that all the commerical suppliers (SPI, SBT, EAF)
of TEM specimen/stage plasma cleaning technology are licensees
of a US Patent, which was issued to my employer
Argonne National Lab and ANL obviously has some financial
interest in that patent and this methodology.

Cheers...
Nestor






From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 12:19:20 +1000
Subject: Looking for Sue Barnes...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Would anyone have an email address for Sue Barnes from the EM lab of
The Natural History Museum, London?

Thanks in advance,

Geoff Avern
Microscopy Laboratories
Australian Museum
Sydney, Australia




From: Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) :      ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 97 09:03:49 EST
Subject: Epoxy for TEM cross sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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SCOTT, TURN THAT OVEN DOWN! (Pardon me, I don't often shout.)

Curing M-Bond 610 at 200C for 2 hours is waaaayyyyyy overkill.
The instruction bulletin that comes with M-Bond suggests 125 to 160C for
two hours, and remember that's for bonding strain gauges to steam boilers!

We never exceed 70C. If we are gluing a specimen on to a grid by
clamping the specimen in self-closing tweezers and then inserting
tweezers+grid in an oven we cure for 2 hours. (If the glue is still
soft (rare) we'll add another hour). If we are curing the specimen to
a grid on a glass slide on a hot plate at 70C we find 10 to 15 minutes
to be adequate. Remember to put a pan of water in the oven to keep
the humidity up during curing!

For temperature sensitive parts we have experienced no problems
curing at 30, 40, etc degrees up to 70C. Room temperature curing
M-Bond takes overnight. Paul Albarede, France's premiere tripod
polisher, routinely cures M-Bond overnight at room temperature, he
tells me--arguing that the differential contraction of the Cu grid
and the specimen leads to stress being put on the thin specimen
when the Cu grid and specimen cool off after bonding at temperature.
You can see this with Si if you cure at too high a temperature: the
flat polished specimen ends up with a wavy edge like curly
lasagna pasta.

Scott: Don't change epoxies, lower the temp!

Ron




From: Eric Steel :      eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 09:47:19 -0500
Subject: Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

NIST-NIH Desktop Spectrum Analyzer (DTSA) Spring 1997 Workshop

A three-day intensive Workshop on NIST-NIH Desktop Spectrum Analyzer (DTSA)
will be held at NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland, March 26-28, 1997. DTSA is
a software platform for electron-excited energy-dispersive
and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry developed by Fiori, Swyt, and
Myklebust for Macintosh computers. The Workshop will cover practical
aspects in utilizing DTSA, including spectrum processing (background and
peak interference removal), quantitative analysis for bulk and layered
specimens (matrix corrections, including the comprehensive CIT-ZAF
resource), analytical electron microscope quantitation for thin foils
(Cliff-Lorimer sensitivity factor method), generation of X-ray spectra from
first principles, and development of analytical strategy through "desktop"
simulations. Attendance at the DTSA Workshop is free, but is limited to 25
attendees.

For reservations and/or information, contact Dale Newbury at
dale.newbury-at-nist.gov or telephone 301-975-3921. fax 301-417-1321

Note: DTSA is a software program sold through NIST's Standard Reference
Data Program and we therefore have a very small financial interest in the
product.


Eric B. Steel, Leader e-mail: eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Microanalysis Research Group Office: 301-975-3902
N.I.S.T. FAX: 301-216-1134
Bldg. 222/Rm A113
Gaithersburg MD 20899





From: David P. Bazett-Jones :      bazett-at-acs.ucalgary.ca
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 97 8:03:21 MST
Subject: job opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Please post the following advertisement for an academic position at The
University of Calgary for a Structural Biologist/Microscopist.



STRUCTURAL BIOLOGIST


The University of Calgary Department of Anatomy invites applications for a
fulltime academic position as a structural/cell biologist. This position offers
an excellent opportunity for independent and collaborative research with
other structural biologists employing technologies such as magnetic
resonance spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in the university-wide structural
biology group, and for access to the University s Microscopy and Imaging
Facility, comprising state-of-the-art electron and computer-based light
microscopies. Duties will also include undergraduate teaching and graduate
student supervision.

Qualifications include a PhD or equivalent, at least two years of
postdoctoral experience, and a proven record of excellence in a research
program which includes the development of advanced imaging techniques.
Researchers particularly encouraged to apply are those with interests at the
cellular or molecular level in an area complementing activities of a Faculty
of Medicine research group such as Cancer Biology, Molecular &
Developmental Biology, Joint Injury & Arthritis, etc. More information is
available at http:/www.ucalgary.ca/~resoff/index.html.

The successful candidate must compete successfully for salary and
establishment grant support from the Alberta Heritage Foundation for
Medical Research and/or the Medical Research Council, and will have 75%
of time protected for research.

In accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, priority will be
given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada. The
University of Calgary is committed to Employment Equity.

Please submit a curriculum vitae and statement of research and goals, and
arrange for three letters of reference to be sent directly, by February 15,
1997, to:


Dr. D.P. Bazett-Jones
Department of Anatomy
The University of Calgary
3330 Hospital Drive N.W.
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
T2N 4N1





From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 12:04:37 EST
Subject: 80 micron marine eggs & cryoSEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Keith and fellow microscopists,

Tony King of VG Microtech in the UK (who produce a cryo-SEM, the Polaron
LT7400) had some additional comments which he asked me to pass along:

} } } My recommendation would be to use a mixture of Tissue-Tek and carbon
} } } dust (from carbon rod sharpener) paste on your cryo-stub. In this
} } } mixture the eggs will not sink fast, therefore will have time to carry out
} } } the freezing process.

Tony replies:
Try tissue tek smear (with carbon dust on a Dry colloidal graphite base;
this absorbs the tissue tek bulk and holds the samples in place.

} } } I have great LTSEM results using this mixture with unfixed single cell
} } } culture and bacteria. The separate problem about the fine layer of
salt, } } } (if the osmatic change is all right!) use larger amount of
distilled water } } } to rinse for longer time.

Tony replies:
} Use Osmium vapour to semi-fix the cells before plunging into water.
} Osmotic shock is then reduced to minimum.

} Regards,
}
} Tony King
} Product specialist
} VG Microtech/ Polaron range
}
} Tel: +44 (0)1825 746251
} Fax: +44 (0)1825 768343
}
} E&OE
}

Best regards,
steven E. Slap
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu (Kim DeRuyter)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 09:16:51 -0900
Subject: Subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: beebed-at-ere.umontreal.ca (Dwight Beebe)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 13:56:14 -0400
Subject: Surf Clams

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Good afternoon,
I've been asked by a student about possible fixation protocols for
the analysis of Spisula solidissima (surf clam) larval development by SEM.
The protocol she has been using has resulted in considerable shrinkage.
She is fixing the material in 4% paraformaldehyde in buffered "sea water".
She was unable to give me the exact reference at the time, but said it was
by Longo. Any and all input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.


Dwight Beebe E-mail: beebed-at-ere.umontreal.ca
Institut de recherche en biologie vegetale Voice: 514-872-4563
Universite de Montreal FAX: 514-872-9406
4101, rue Sherbrooke est
Montreal, Quebec H1X 2B2
Canada
"Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana"






From: Diana_Papoulias-at-nbs.gov (Diana Papoulias)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 13:19:10 -0700
Subject: searching for a stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking for a stain called "Crossmon trichome" (this may have
been misprinted in the reference). Can anyone help me locate a
supplier? I have tried the obvious big chemical supply companies.

TIA,

Diana_Papoulias-at-nbs.gov
573 875 5399 xt 1902 (tel)
573 876 1896 (fax)




From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 15:09:16 -0500
Subject: Tissue autofluorescence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To the Microscopy List,
I've got some 30 um thick frozen dog pituitary sections which are
showing
punctate autofluorescent staining (in both Fitc and Rho channels), without
antibodies. Does anyone have suggesstions on reducing this annoying
autofluorescence, specific concentrations, time and temps would be appreciated.

Thank you

Mike D





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 1997 20:31:22 -0800
Subject: Re: Epoxy for TEM cross sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Scott,
I have used high-strength epoxy (24 hour, not 5 minute hardening time) to
prepare cross-sections of ion-implanted Gallium Arsenide. We were waiting
for the M-610 to be delivered. It is slow but does not raise the temperature
much in the thin layers. I had the shop make a small, parallel-jawed vise
with teflon-lined jaws to clamp the sample in. These samples were dimpled,
then ion-milled.
At 12:47 PM 1/12/97 -0600, you wrote:

} I have a specimen preparation problem which some of you on the list may be
able to help me with.
}
} I have been using M-BOND 610 to prepare my TEM cross-sectional samples with
great success, but I am now worried that the elevated temperature curing
(200C for two hours) is annealing the thin films I am examining(I am looking
at copper thin films on a quartz substrate, which I sandwich between wafers
of silicon for the cross sections). Has anyone had any good experiences
using a room temperature adhesive for cross-sections which will be tripod
polished and briefly ion milled?
}
}
} F. Scott Miller
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: lkerr-at-mbl.edu (Louis Kerr)
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 1997 10:57:07 -0500
Subject: Summer Technician Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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1/97
SUMMER MICROSCOPY TECHNICIAN
POSITION AVAILABLE

A three month (June, July, and August) position is open for a microscopy
oriented technician at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA.
We would like to attract someone with some knowledge of biological
preparative techniques and experience in laser scanning confocal
microscopy, TEM, SEM, and/or LM.

The technician will assist in the Central Microscopy Facility. The
technician's duties will be to check out incoming investigators in the
usage of our equipment and then to supervise its continuing usage and to
perform contract work for investigators. This may include fixation,
embedding, sectioning, scope use, darkroom work, etc. The technician will
also provide routine maintenance.

This is a short term and scientifically rewarding position. Salary will be
in the $7 to $9/hour range. Housing may be available to rent through MBL.

For more information, including a more detailed position description,
please contact Louis Kerr at: MBL, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543.
Telephone, 508-289-7273; or at Email: lkerr-at-mbl.edu.
Please apply to: Human Resources, MBL, 7 MBL Street,
Woods Hole, MA 02543. or resume-at-mbl.edu.

An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer/ Non-smoking workplace.

Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu






From: Lee Wagstaff :      wagstal-at-hayes.cvg.baxter.com
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 97 8:24:11 PST
Subject: For Sysop-new e-mail address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Nestor,

Please change my address to: wagstale-at-baxter.com

Sorry to hit you all with this but I'm one of those blockheads who did'nt
keep the comprehensive instructions sent out numerous times by Nestor.





From: fams-at-holonet.net
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 14:11:56 +0400
Subject: SCANNING 97

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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SCANNING 97-Monterey, California, April 19-22

Session Topics:

Advances in confocal and related optical microscopies

Applications in Marine Science

Automated diagnostic microscopy

Biological Applications

Biomaterials

Cell surface labeling techniques

Cryo-SEM
Electron/Instrument interaction modeling
Low pressure SEM

Food Structure and Functionality

Forensic Applications

Image Analysis

Low-voltage, high resolution theory and practice

Materials Applications

Pharmaceutics

Polymer microscopy and microanalysis

Scanning probe microscopies AFM/STM

Semiconductor devices

NEW SHORT COURSES

ABSTRACT DEADLINE FEBRUARY 10, 1997

FOR DETAILED INFORMATION SEE: WWW.SCANNING-FAMS.ORG






From: Rex Hess :      r-hess-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 1997 14:00:29 -0500
Subject: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are looking for a powerful software to catalog, store and reteive
images. We prefer something that is compatible with both PC and the MAC.
Any suggestions?


__________________________________________
Rex A. Hess, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
Director, Center for Microscopy and Imaging
University of Illinois, Veterinary Biosciences, 2001 S. Lincoln, Urbana,
IL 61802-6199
217-333-8933; FAX 217-244-1652; email: r-hess-at-uiuc.edu
homepage-- http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/HomePages/rhess/hesspage.html




From: John G. Aghajanian, Ph.D. :      johna-at-SCI.WFBR.EDU
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 1997 15:43:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Negative scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello folks,

We are contemplating digitizing our darkroom and seek any thoughts you might
provide on scanners and printers. This is primarily an EM lab so we would
be scanning standard 3.25" X 4.0" EM negs. and 4" X 5" Polaroid SEM negs.

We are considering multiformat film scanners, specifically the Nikon
LS-4500AF and the Polaroid Sprintscan 45, and flatbed scanners, specifically
the Microtek ScanMaker III and the UMax PowerLook 11.

Do you have any recommendations for neg. scanner vs flatbed scanner? Of the
models listed, does anyone have any experience - good or bad?

We have also thought about the Leaf MicroLumina and understand that it is
excellent. Is the MicroLumina's performance worth the price differential?

As far as a printer, we're basically set for dye-sub. printers but would
like to get a laser printer for "routines". I've pretty much narrowed it
down to the Lexmark OptraR plus with about 32 meg. of memory. Does this
sound reasonable? Got any other recommendations.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. TIA for your help.

John

John G. Aghajanian, Ph.D.
Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research
222 Maple Avenue
Shrewsbury, MA 01545
Phone: 508 842-8921 ext. 147
Fax: 508 842-9632
email: johna-at-sci.wfbr.edu





From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 14:09:19 -0400
Subject: RE: Cleaning spec holders

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This is a rather important process that should be done very carefully. I
devoted several pages to discussing methods for cleaning parts for vacuum
systems in my book 'Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy' p.69-74.
If you are using the standard top-entry type of holder, cleaning
should be straightforward - scrub it thoroughly with Tilex Soap Scum
Remover, rinse with hot running water, sonicate in a strong detergent
solution, rinse with hot tap water, rinse with reagent grade isopropyl
alcohol, dry with a gas blaster.
If you are using a side entry stage you can use essentially the same
procedure, but you must then be careful to avoid getting the solutions
inside the holder if it is one that has provisions for manipulating the
specimen. Often, enough cleaning can be done to get rid most contamination
problems by sonicating just the end of the holder in isopropyl alcohol,
then drying with a blaster. The latest method for these holders is Plasma
Discharge Cleaning, and Southbay Technologies markets a device that is
specially designed for this purpose.
W. C. Bigelow (bigelow-at-umich.edu)

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 14:08:55 -0400
Subject: RE:Cleaning EM Parts

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There are many reasons for NOT using grease-base polishes for cleaning
parts to be inserted into the interior of high vacuum sysstems (See Vacuum
Methods in Electron Microscopy, Portland Press, pp. 69-74). Basically,
this is the equivalent of taking a bath in a mud puddle. One principal
reason for cleaning is to remove hydrocarbon materials from the surfaces of
the parts, and so it makes no sense at all to use a greasey material to do
the job. In addition, as noted by others, the grease and abrasive materials
are likely to get embedded in cracks and crevice and then not be completely
removed, whereupon they will act as a very effective source of
contamination.
Very effective cleaning can usually be accomplished simply by
thoroughly scrubbing with one of the many modern detergent solutions
formulated for use in the electronics inductry (see above reference) or
with Tilex Soap Scum Remover (available in most supermarkets), rinsing with
running hot tap water, ultra sonic treatment in a warm detergent solution,
rinsing again with hot tap water, rinsing with reagent grade isopropyl
alcohol, and drying with a gas blaster. If you find you need an abrasive
in the initial stage to remove stubborn deposits (or if you feel you must
enhance the surface finish) try using a bit of Comet Cleaner (the kind
formulated for use on plastic tubs and showers, which wont seriously
scratch most metals) and then rinsing with hot water, before the initial
scrubbing step. This procedure involves no solvents other than water and
isopropyl alcohol (a common constituent of rubbing alcohol, and therefor
perfectly safe to use) and so no expensive or complicated safety procedures
are necessary, and it usually does the job quite nicely.
The Tilex Soap Sum Remover will even remove silicone oils from most
metal surfaces, and I have also used it to remove spots of various kinds
from clothing, grease spots from carpets and auto seat covers, and
semi-dried paint from my hands after painting. Needless to say, it works
great for its intended purpose of cleaning bathtubs, wash basins, shower
curtains and shower tiles. (No commercial interest, it is just very handy
stuff to know about)
W. C. Bigelow (bigelow-at-umich.edu)

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Dana Dunkelberger :      danad-at-CLS.BIOL.SC.EDU
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 1997 11:42:06 EST
Subject: Need used EDX detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm looking for a used EDX detector to interface to a Hitachi 2500
SEM, to use while upgrading the original Kevex Delta 3 Quantum
system. Geometry is more important than make or model, but Kevex with
or without thin window would be best. Please e-mail me with any
possibilities and price.




From: Damian_Neuberger_at_RLT013-at-ccmailgw.mcgawpark.baxter.com
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 14:26:18 -0600
Subject: EDXS Ca in Histosections

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From cold and snowy Chicago - Hi.

A colleague asked if I could do EDXS for calcium deposits on the
surface and/or in cells of histosections that are mounted, stained and
coverslipped. It would mean removing the coverslip and mounting
medium, and then get the surface really clean without loss of the
region of interest (no pun intended). Is this the method to use or is
there a better one and what would be the specifics of the method. Has
anyone done this before? All I know is that the sections were stained
with some sort of silver-type stain that is nonspecific for calcium
but if present will show up as a dark body. The sections were not
counterstained. Is there too much calcium in the glass that I
wouldn't be able to see the particles against the background?

Thanks for any suggestions, they will be most appreciated.

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com




From: James J. McGee :      mcgee-at-epoch.geol.sc.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 10:25:39 -0500
Subject: SEM-EDS

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A colleague here needs a used EDS detector, preferably Kevex, to fit a =
Hitachi 2500 SEM. He
tells me those that fit the Hitachi 2300-2400 models might also work. I =
also need one or both of the video boards for a Kevex 8000 analyzer. =
Anyone have some spares?

*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*
James J. McGee (jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Dept. of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina (803) 777-6300 (Office)
Columbia, SC 29208 (803) 777-6610 (Fax)






From: edb-at-chem.psu.edu (Ed J. Basgall)
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 17:24:14 -0500
Subject: Re: catalog images

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----- Begin Included Message -----

We are looking for a powerful software to catalog, store and reteive
images. We prefer something that is compatible with both PC and the MAC.
Any suggestions?


__________________________________________
Rex A. Hess, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
Director, Center for Microscopy and Imaging
University of Illinois, Veterinary Biosciences, 2001 S. Lincoln, Urbana,
IL 61802-6199
217-333-8933; FAX 217-244-1652; email: r-hess-at-uiuc.edu
homepage-- http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/HomePages/rhess/hesspage.html

----- End Included Message -----


Rex,

I use Aldus Fetch as a cataloging program for my Power PC. The images can
be worked on with Photoshop on either PC or Mac. Image transfer
is usually accomplished by ftp from one computer to another over a network.
Others whom I know use it also like it.

Ed Basgall, PhD
Res Assoc
Dept. of Chemistry
Surface Analysis Group
Penn State Univ.
181 Materials Res. Inst. Bldg
University Park, PA 16802




From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 17:42:43 -0600
Subject: Re: Surf Clams

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} I've been asked by a student about possible fixation protocols for
} the analysis of Spisula solidissima (surf clam) larval development by SEM.
} The protocol she has been using has resulted in considerable shrinkage.
} She is fixing the material in 4% paraformaldehyde in buffered "sea water".
} She was unable to give me the exact reference at the time, but said it was
} by Longo. Any and all input would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
}
} Dwight Beebe E-mail: beebed-at-ere.umontreal.ca

Have you tried (all together now) HMDS? [Hexamethyldisilizane].
I've had success with this with nudibranch veligers. Use a: 100% EtOH (3X
washed)=} 3:1-1:1-1:3=} 100% HMDS (3X wash) change, drain off excess leaving
specimens covered, and dry at 60 C. Do *everything* in a fume hood!
But then soft little zooplankters like to shrink anyway. If you
have access to one, you might be better off looking at fixed or fresh,
hydrated specimens in an ESEM or variable-pressure scope tricked up to suck
in water vapor; frozen hydrated specimens in a cryoSEM would be the other
way to go.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: nina_allen-at-ncsu.edu (Nina Allen) (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 19:06:50 -0500
Subject: postdoc available

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I hope you can post this postdoc position. Nina Allen


CALCIUM SIGNALING AND GRAVIPERCEPTION IN PLANTS

NCSU-NSCORT Postdoctoral Fellowships

Cell Biology-Imaging: POSTDOCTORAL POSITION is available immediately for
the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in
gravitational biology. This is an opportunity to join a dynamic group of
12 project leaders and 5 postdocs studying the effects of altering calcium
homeostasis on plant responses to gravity. The group is taking an
integrated approach involving molecular, cellular, biochemical and
physiological techniques. The specific project involves monitoring early
changes in cellular calcium either by calcium ratio imaging and/or
electrophysiology. Applicants do not require prior experience in plant
biology but the calcium imaging applicant must have experience in calcium
ratio imaging, image analysis, and microinjection. Electrophysiologists
should have experience with either vibrating probes or patch clamping
techniques as well as microinjection and computer analysis and be willing
to collaborate with colleagues in the NSCORT as well as the National
Vibrating Probe Facility at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole,
Massachusetts. Send curriculum vitae and names of three references to :
Nina Stromgren Allen, Department of Botany, North Carolina State
University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7612. Fax: 919-515-3436. Email:
nina_allen-at-NCSU.EDU. NCSU is an Equal Opportunity Employer.




Nina Stromgren Allen
Department of Botany
Box 7612
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7612
Phone: 919-515-8382 (Office), 515-3525 (Lab), 515-2727 (Department Secretary)
Fax: 919-515-3436






From: Paul Baggethun :      baggeth-at-sms.emse.fr
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 04:15:15 --100
Subject: CCD camera for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear scientists,

We are contemplating to buy a slow scan CCD camera for recording TEM CBED
Kikuchi patterns and authomatically index them using Hough transform
(amongst other things). This is to be part of a fully automated crystal
orientation measurement facility, where "large" sample areas may be measured
without user interaction.

The equipment is to be installed on a CM200. A 16 bit resolution is
preferable (or eaven neccessary?). Are there anyone in the community who
would like to share their experience on this matter with us? Any comments /
advice will be grately welcomed.

Yours sincerely,
Paul Baggethun.

=============================
P.Baggethun (post-doc)
Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne
Centre SMS
158 Cours Fauriel
F-42100 SAINT-ETIENNE, CEDEX 2
FRANCE
=============================





From: simon watkins :      swatkins-at-pop.pitt.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 22:52:05 -0500
Subject: Re: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: simon watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --

Hi Folks, On the subject of image databasing raised by Rex Hess

We have had a lot of success using an inexpensive though very neat package
called thumbs plus, you can down load it from any of the usual share ware or
windows sites. It catalogs, does thumbnails, keywords, some basic image
processing, works with a whole bunch of file formats, and in our case
perhaps most importantly allows offline cataloging. we use CD's as our
primary archive. This package provides a nifty offline catalog in which the
CD title is seen which may be expanded to the entire directory structure
together with thumbnails of the images. Older versions of the package got
kind of slow with big databases (} 10K images) the current incarnation seems
to remain pretty speedy even when loaded up with about 200 CDs plus
continual updates of a large stack of networked drives. We are pretty happy
with the package having tried several of the expensive, and inexpensive
solutions

--
========================================
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Structural Biology Imaging Center
Scaife 840
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261

tel: 412-648-3051
fax: 412-648-8330
=========================================






From: simon watkins :      swatkins-at-pop.pitt.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 22:51:45 -0500
Subject: Immersion oils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: simon watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --

Hi Folks:

THis is a bit of an old saw but has anyone done a comparison of the
currently available immersion oils wrt autofluorescence. Our light
microscope platform is diverse (Zeiss, Nikon, Olympus) and slides etc travel
from scope to scope which would lead to disastrous contamination problems if
each 'scope had its own oil. We have been hanging on to Zeiss oil up to now
, simply because we had a large bottle of the stuff. I have been a little
unhappy with the levels of autofluorescence recently (prior to contamination
) and was looking for a change. Any ideas?

Simon

--
========================================
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Structural Biology Imaging Center
Scaife 840
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261

tel: 412-648-3051
fax: 412-648-8330
=========================================






From: R Touaitia :      r.touaitia-at-unn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 97 16:35:00 PST
Subject: looking for a TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear colleagues,

We are interested in buying a used TEM+EDX system. If you have, or know
anyone who has one for sale, please send me a private email (we are willing
to pay for the shipment).

Many thanks.

Redha Touaitia
School of Engineering
University of Northumbria at Newcastle
Newcastle Upon Tyne
NE1 8ST
UK
Tel : +44-191-227 36 14
email: r.touaitia-at-unn.ac.uk




From: R Touaitia :      r.touaitia-at-unn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 97 16:18:00 PST
Subject: This is a test, please ignore

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 08:05:16 -0500
Subject: RE: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Regarding Dr. Watkins mention of Thumbs Plus...

I concur wholeheartedly. Thumbs Plus is fast, easy to learn, easy to
use, flexible....buy it. Our R&D comuting department is considering the
network-licensed version as a standard platform for image cataloging, in
place of Microsoft Access and other high-power databases. AND for all
you NIH Image users, a Mac version is planned.

Cerious Software can be found on the web at:
http://cerious.catalogue.com/index.html


I have no financial or other interest (other than hoping the product
continues to improve) in Cerious Software.
-------------------------------------------------
Harold J. Crossman
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: (508) 750-1717
E-mail: crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com

Our web sites: www.sylvania.com
www.siemens.com
--

"Crossman, Harold" {crossman-at-osi.SYLVANIA.com}





From: I.MacLaren-at-BHAM.AC.UK (Ian MacLaren)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 09:57:41 +0000
Subject: FE-SEM job opening

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Dear all,
I have been asked to put the following job announcement on the listserver.

} Electron Microscopy Postdoctoral Position
} Rutgers University
}
} The Ceramics Department at Rutgers University is seeking a postdoctoral
} associate with an electron microscopy background. The candidate should be
} interested in breaking new ground in the characterization of multicomponent
} powder mixtures using a fully digital FE-SEM coupled with position-tagged
} spectroscopy (PTS). PTS is a novel EDS method that can provide interaction
} volumes as small as 50 nm and full spectrum scans within each pixel. The
} candidate will work within a research group focused on understanding the
} relationship between powder characteristics and the experimental and
} theoretical achievable level of homogeneity in powder mixtures. Microscopy
} work will be correlated with a state of the art mixedness simulation model
} known as the concentric shell model of mixedness. The candidate should be
} able to work within a team that has strong theoretical as well experimental
} orientations. Candidates should demonstrate their ability to conduct
} cutting-edge research in microscopy as well as effectively communicate with
} others. The position is immediately available with a highly competitive
} salary dependent on the candidate's qualifications and includes full health
} care benefits. Candidates should submit their curriculum vitae, three
} letters of reference, relevant publications and their anticipated starting
} date by February 15, 1997 to:
}
} Richard E. Riman
} Department of Ceramics
} Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
} P.O. Box 909
} Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909
}
} 908-445-4946
} 908-445-6264 (fax)
} riman-at-erebus.rutgers.edu


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ian MacLaren, Tel: (44) (0) 121 414 3447
IRC in Materials for FAX: (44) (0) 121 414 3441
High Performance Applications, email: I.MacLaren-at-bham.ac.uk
The University of Birmingham, http://sun1.bham.ac.uk/I.MacLaren/
Birmingham B15 2TT,
England.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++






From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 14:07:01 +0000
Subject: Microscopy Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS is widely circulated among microscopists in the UK,
Europe and the USA. Our editorial articles cover a broad spectrum of
applications, techniques and instrumentation in all branches of microscopy
and related analytical methods.

As I posted a few months back, we intend to start a "Questions and Answers"
feature. Originally this was scheduled to appear in our January issue, but
for various reasons was delayed. It will now appear in the March issue.

If you have any technical or scientific questions in the field of
microscopy and related analysis that you would like to put to a large,
expert readership, please e-mail them to me.

Regards,

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
United Kingdom
---------------------------------------------------------------






From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-bgsm.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 09:18:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Add my vote to everyone elses regarding thumbs plus. Bang for buck, we
have not found anything better.


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-bgsm.edu *
**************************************************************





From: DON_STEELE-at-CCKRDC.CA.ALCAN.CA
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 09:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re[2]: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am also in the search for an image archiving solution. I've played
with several packages that work nicely as a "local" solution, but need
to expand the scope to include accessability (and searchability) via
our corporate intranet.

Specifically, is anyone aware of, or have experience with, an ODBC
complient application which will run on an NT based server, that has
an API to NETSCAPE? The local input application should be PC or MAC,
and should handle multimedia as well as still images.

Thanks in advance,

****************************************
Don Steele Steele-at-KRDC.INT.Alcan.Ca
Alcan International
Kingston Research and Development Centre
(613) 541 - 2145
****************************************






From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 07:18:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Immersion oils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Simon

I did do a test of immersion oil autofluor and found Nikon to be the
lowest.

Bob
Morphology Core
U of Washington

On Wed, 15 Jan 1997, simon watkins wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} -- [ From: simon watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --
}
} Hi Folks:
}
} THis is a bit of an old saw but has anyone done a comparison of the
} currently available immersion oils wrt autofluorescence. Our light
} microscope platform is diverse (Zeiss, Nikon, Olympus) and slides etc travel
} from scope to scope which would lead to disastrous contamination problems if
} each 'scope had its own oil. We have been hanging on to Zeiss oil up to now
} , simply because we had a large bottle of the stuff. I have been a little
} unhappy with the levels of autofluorescence recently (prior to contamination
} ) and was looking for a change. Any ideas?
}
} Simon
}
} --
} ========================================
} Simon C. Watkins Ph.D.
} Associate Professor
} Director, Structural Biology Imaging Center
} Scaife 840
} University of Pittsburgh
} Pittsburgh PA 15261
}
} tel: 412-648-3051
} fax: 412-648-8330
} =========================================
}
}
}





From: Neal Nicklaus :      nnicklaus-at-nova.sarnoff.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 10:14:47 -0500
Subject: Re: catalog images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I concur with Simon's opinion below. I've been using a couple of versions
of ThumbsPlus for over a year. In addition to making image databases, I use
it to review my work at the end of the day. In combination with an Epson
color ink jet printer (e.g. Stylus Pro or 500) I can perform a "sanity"
check on my recent data in a very inexpensive manner.



} Return-Path: {Microscopy-request-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Errors-To: Microscopy-request-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} X-Sender: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
} Date: Wed, 15 Jan 1997 22:52:05 -0500
} To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} From: simon watkins {swatkins-at-pop.pitt.edu} (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
} Subject: Re: catalog images
} Errors-To: Microscopy-request-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Neal Nicklaus
Senior Scientist
SEQ Limited

Voice: 609-452-6033 Ext. 13
Fax: 609-452-5955
email nnicklaus-at-seq.sarnoff.com





From: Simon Watkins :      swatkins-at-pitt.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 97 10:23:19 -0500
Subject: follow up on thumbs plus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Simon Watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --

I have had a few requests for a location for thumbs plus, you can download
the demo from www.cerious.com

thanks

Simon

--
-------------------------------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D
Associate Professor
Director SBIC
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
tel 412-648-3051
fax 412-648-2004
-----------------------------------------------




From: howard-at-cshl.org (Tamara Howard)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 11:43:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM;acrylic embedding

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Probably a no-brainer :)...does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can
stain agar blocks for embedding in LR White? So I can find them again in
the final block? So far I've only tried Toluidine Blue - didn't work. I
have some Coomassie-agar in the works right now, but it is clearing, too.
Multiple suggestions are MORE than encouraged...because I'll ultimately
need something that will stain the agar without messing up my antigens.
Sigh.
Thanks!
Tamara
CSHL, NY






From: Gerald Harrison :      jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 11:30:39 -0500
Subject: Liposome preparation

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Hello Microscopy ListServer subscribers,

We would like to know if anyone can suggest methods for preparing
liposomes for SEM imaging other than those requiring freeze-fracture or
other cold-stage techniques. Specifically, are there other methods for
drying/preparation of a liposome suspension that can avoid dissolving the
liposomes in the process.
******* ******* *******
A similar request was posted on this listserver by a Donna Turner
{dturner-at-bcm.tmc.edu} on 12/20/96. The question was:

"I need information regarding processing for thin-sectioning of
liposomes. These samples are used for Cyclosporin A treatment (inhalation)
of lung tumors. I will also be using negative staining. Suggestions please!"

Thanks for any help with either of these questions -- Gerald Harrison






From: knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu (David Knecht)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 11:49:01 -0600
Subject: formalin and formaldehyde

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Can someone please enlighten me as to the difference in theory and practice
between formalin and formaldehyde (presumably made up as a buffered
solution) for tissue fixation. Dave

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
U-125
Storrs, CT 06269
Knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu






From: Lucio Mulestagno :      luciom-at-NEWTON.UMSL.EDU
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 12:22:19 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: catalog images

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Hi All,
I recently got a software package for pc that is called "PAX IT". I
haven't fully investigated all it's capabilities, but it seems like a very
user friendly and well organized software. I am not sure about the MAc/Pc
transfer, but you could ask them
Midwest Information systems - tel. 847 455 0450.

cheers

Lucio


Dr.Lucio Mule'Stagno
MEMC Electronic Materials Inc University of Missouri -St.Louis
Silicon Materials Research Group Physics Dept.,
501 Pearl Dr., 8001 Natural Bridge rd.,
St.Peters, St.Louis
MO 63376 MO 63121
tel: 314 279 5338 314 516 5931/3
fax: 314 279 5363 314 516 6152
email: lmulestagno-at-memc.com luciom-at-newton.umsl.edu

On Wed, 15 Jan 1997, Ed J. Basgall wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} ----- Begin Included Message -----
}
} We are looking for a powerful software to catalog, store and reteive
} images. We prefer something that is compatible with both PC and the MAC.
} Any suggestions?
}
}
} __________________________________________
} Rex A. Hess, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
} Director, Center for Microscopy and Imaging
} University of Illinois, Veterinary Biosciences, 2001 S. Lincoln, Urbana,
} IL 61802-6199
} 217-333-8933; FAX 217-244-1652; email: r-hess-at-uiuc.edu
} homepage-- http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/HomePages/rhess/hesspage.html
}
} ----- End Included Message -----
}
}
} Rex,
}
} I use Aldus Fetch as a cataloging program for my Power PC. The images can
} be worked on with Photoshop on either PC or Mac. Image transfer
} is usually accomplished by ftp from one computer to another over a network.
} Others whom I know use it also like it.
}
} Ed Basgall, PhD
} Res Assoc
} Dept. of Chemistry
} Surface Analysis Group
} Penn State Univ.
} 181 Materials Res. Inst. Bldg
} University Park, PA 16802
}





From: slc6-at-lehigh.edu (Sharon Coe) (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 13:14:09 -0500
Subject: Post Doc Postion at Lehigh University

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POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
Lehigh University

A post doctoral research associate position is available in the Department of
Materials Science and Engineering at Lehigh University. The appointment is
initially for one year, renewable for a second year. It involves an
analytical electron
microscopy study of boundary segregation in commercial aluminum alloys. A
PhD in materials science and engineering with strong AEM background (X-ray
and EELS) is essential: VG experience is highly desirable.

Please send resume and names and addresses of three referees to:

Dr. David B. Williams
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18015

Lehigh University is committed to recruiting, retaining, and tenuring women
and minorities.




Sharon L. Coe
Department of Materials Science & Engineering
5 East Packer Avenue
Lehigh University
Bethlehem, PA 18015
610/758-5133
e-mail: slc6-at-lehigh.edu






From: Brian Gorman :      bgorman-at-umr.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 13:47:01 -0600 (CST)
Subject: microtome ID

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I could use some help on identifying an ultramicrotome recently acquired
from our life sciences department. Unfortunately, the previous owners
did not have the instruction book for the instrument or any clue on how
to use it. It was made by Cambridge and I believe the model is a Huxley
ultramicrotome. I do have the serial number (sort of) written on the
side of the instrument. Any help with locating the manufacturers or an
instruction book would be greatly appreciated.

Any references on techniques for using the microtome with
ultra-hard materials and composites would also be appreciated. Am I
going to h-e-double-hockey-sticks for using a life sciences microtome in
materials science?

Thanks,

Brian Gorman
Graduate Research Assistant
University of Missouri - Rolla
Dept. of Ceramic Engineering
225 McNutt Hall
Rolla, MO 65409

bgorman-at-umr.edu




From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 13:55:35 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM;acrylic embedding

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Tamara,
We have been able to stain agarose (as well as some plant tissue)
very well with fast green. Best results are to stain when the tissue is in
100% etoh. You can make a very concentrated solution of fast green (around
7% I think) and add a few ul per ml to the vial containing samples. This
staining survives subsequent infiltration into methacrlate resins very
well.
Trouble is, if you are going through acetone, fast green is really
not to solulble in acetone. I have not found a very good stain to use with
acetone dehydrations, although Alizarin red isn't bad.
Hope this helps,
Tobias

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 13:55:35 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM;acrylic embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tamara,
We have been able to stain agarose (as well as some plant tissue)
very well with fast green. Best results are to stain when the tissue is in
100% etoh. You can make a very concentrated solution of fast green (around
7% I think) and add a few ul per ml to the vial containing samples. This
staining survives subsequent infiltration into methacrlate resins very
well.
Trouble is, if you are going through acetone, fast green is really
not to solulble in acetone. I have not found a very good stain to use with
acetone dehydrations, although Alizarin red isn't bad.
Hope this helps,
Tobias

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Tom Phillips :      tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 14:44:00 -0500
Subject: Re: formalin and formaldehyde

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"Can someone please enlighten me as to the difference in theory and practice
between formalin and formaldehyde (presumably made up as a buffered
solution) for tissue fixation. Dave"

formalin is made by bubbling formaldehyde gas thru water until saturation
(37% w/w or 40% w/v). Many (all?) commercial formalins contain 6-15%
methanol to prevent polymer formation. Even with the methanol, polymers
form over time. The different polymers presumably mean "different"
fixation reactions are occuring. The formation of formic acid over time
can cause the presence of "formalin pigment" due to reaction with hematin
in blood rich tissues. Electron microscopists never (or virtually never)
use formalin and use instead freshly depolymerized paraformaldehyde (heat
granules to 60 C but not hotter, with stirring, then add a drop or two of 1
N NaOH - if you need a detailed protocol, e-mail me and I will send you
one). One of the most common questions I get asked is whether it will make
any difference in someone's LM immunocytochemical study to use freshly
depolymerized formaldehyde as opposed to formalin. I am sure in many cases
it will not make a difference but that there are undoubtedly examples where
it does make a difference. I always make my formaldehyde fresh the day I
use it.

Tom




Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)






From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 15:55:32 -0800
Subject: formalin and formaldehyde

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Dear David:

Formaldehyde is a gas that is bubbled through water to give a
37-40% solution (saturated) sold as "formaldehyde". One part of this to
nine parts water gives "formalin" or "10% formalin" (which is really
3.7 to 4.0% formaldehyde). When one makes a paraformaldehyde fixative
it is often 4g paraformaldehyde per 100 ml of buffer.

Geoff (mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu)
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (908)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-.umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 16:09:33 -0800
Subject: staining agar for embedding

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Dear Tamara:

I seem to recall using dilute eosin, slightly acidified to
keep it from leeching out, to stain agar blocks prior to embedding.
Don't know what it might do to antigens, though.

Geoff (mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu)
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (908)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-.umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 16:31:19 -0500
Subject: Botanist Possition Open

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I know that this isn't specifically Microscopy but there may still be
some strong interest.

Please send any questions or replies directly to john Vankat not
myself.


John Vankat wrote:
}
} Assistant Professor, Botany
} Miami University-Middletown
}
} The Department of Botany at Miami University seeks applicants for a
} tenure-track position on the Middletown campus beginning August 1997.
} Duties include teaching (occasionally at off-campus facilities)
} introductory undergraduate lecture and laboratory courses in Botany
} and participating in interdepartmental courses in biology. Other
} responsibilities include service appropriate to the Regional Campus
} mission and development of a scholarly program that involves
} undergraduates. Position requires Ph.D. in Botany or closely related
} discipline and experience in and commitment to undergraduate teaching
} and advising. Send letter of application, one page statement of
} teaching philosophy, description of teaching experience, curriculum
} vitae, and three letters of recommendation to Dr. John L. Vankat,
} Search Committee Chair, Department of Botany, Miami University,
} Oxford, OH 45056. Review of applications begins February 3, 1997.
} Phone: (513) 529-4200; Fax: (513) 529-4243; e-mail:
} JLVANKAT-at-MIAMIU.MUOHIO.EDU
} Miami University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race,
} color, religion, national origin, disability, age or sexual
} orientation in its employment policies.




From: drazbaj-at-ATHENE.HH.RI.CCF.ORG (Judy Drazba)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 17:05:30 -0500
Subject: Refractive Index Mismatch

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This message has also been posted to the confocal listserver.

Dear fellow microscopists,

Can someone enlighten me on the potential pitfalls of RI mismatch
between coverslip and immersion oil. I am working with someone who must
grow his cells on Aclar coverslips (RI = 1.435). We are mounting the
specimens in Vectashield (RI = 1.4577) and are using Zeiss oil (RI =
1.515). We are trying to do confocal reconstructions of fluorescently
tagged (FL and RH) mineral aggregates in these cultures (approx. 10-20
um} thick) to visualize their substructure. To do this we are using 100X
oil
immersion lens at Zoom 4 on a Leica TCS-NT confocal. What sorts of
aberrations could I expect in the reconstructed images?? Should I use an
oil with a lower RI?
A related question: Most of the fluorescent specimens I work with
have glass coverslips and are imaged with oil immersion objective lenses
(consistent RI), but are mounted in Vectashield (Lower RI) or similar
anti-photobleach medium. What problems does this pose for confocal
imaging??

Thanks,

Judy Drazba, Ph.D. (drazbaj-at-athene.hh.ri.ccf.org)
Confocal Microscopy Facility, NC-3
The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
9500 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44195-5001
Office (216)445-3760
FAX (216)444-7927






From: Peter Jordan :      emsi-at-pe.net
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 14:31:27 -0800
Subject: Used Zeiss 10 TEM

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Looking to buy used Zeiss 10 TEM, working or not working condition.
Leave E-mail message at emsi-at-pe.net or call 909 694-1839.
Peter Jordan




From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 18:05:55 -0600
Subject: Re: formalin and formaldehyde

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Can someone please enlighten me as to the difference in theory and practice
} between formalin and formaldehyde (presumably made up as a buffered
} solution) for tissue fixation. Dave
}
Formaldehyde is a gas which, when dissolved to a final concentration of 40%
in water, is termed formalin. Typically, commercially prepared formalin
contains "stabilizers" such as methanol or calcium carbonate (chalk) which
slow down the polymerization of the aldehyde groups. Formalin at 4-10%
aqueous (buffered or unbuffered) may be suitable for preserving bulk
specimens (chunks of liver, whole brains, etc) and may be suitable for
preserving tissues for histological studies by light microscopy. For
highest quality (ultrastructural studies, for example), it is best to
prepare the formaldehyde by depolymerizing paraformaldehyde using a
combination of heat and aldehyde (such as KOH). I can provide details, if
you need this. Usually, one prepares an 8-10% aqueous solution of
formaldehyde and then mixes this with a double strength buffer (phosphate
buffer at pH 7.4 for mammalian tissues, for example) to obtain a buffered
formaldehyde solution. Many buffers may be used and I can forward more info
if you need it.



####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4402
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 1997 14:16:06 -1000 (HST)
Subject: How much to teach biol. TEM?

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Due to policy and politics, our EM facility does not teach biological TEM
"from scratch" (although we do teach SEM from scratch). We require users
of most of our instruments to have had a course or prior experience.
Right now there is no other place to learn TEM in our island state, and
there is some pressure on us to teach several people. I am completely
willing and able. However, in order to deal with the situation, we need
to be able to 1) estimate about how much it would cost to train someone
(or, more likely, a group of 4) to try to cover our actual costs and/or 2)
where could these people go to take a short/intensive course (say, 3-5
weeks) and how much would that cost? There have been discussions here
before about mixing new EM students with hard-core research interests. Up
until now I've managed to keep it from being a problem, but now I am
soliciting advice!

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo Text coming soon!
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: Jim Darley :      p&s-at-ultra.net.au
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 15:53:34 +1100
Subject: Immersion oils

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-- [ From: simon watkins * EMC.Ver #2.5.02 ] --

THis is a bit of an old saw but has anyone done a comparison of the
currently available immersion oils wrt autofluorescence. . . .
Simon
=========================================
We supply the full range of Cargille immersion oils. Cargille know very well
the properties of their oils and different grades are available for
different purposes. Sufficient details for most people can be found in our
on-line catalogue on page
I1.
The most commonly used oil is type B, which has "ideal" optical properties
at average viscosity "low" auto-fluorescence. Type DF has "ideal" optical
properties, "very low" auto-fluorescence but is a little more expensive.
Type FF has "zero" auto-fluorescence with good (imperfect) optical
properties at the same price as the DF.
Labs using fluorescent and normal light microscopes and do not have several
litre requirements of immersion oils annually may be best advised to use the
DF type only. If they, however, require zero auto-fluorescence than it would
be best to mark the bottles clearly and keep separate supplies.

As stated, we have a (small) interest in immersion oils.
Jim Darley



Probing & Structure (Microscopy Supplies & Accessories)
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia

Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
A great microscopy site: http://www.ultra.net.au/~pns/





From: Neelima Shah :      shahn-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 08:11:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM;acrylic embedding

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I am presuming you have some sort of tissue in the agar blocks. I have
been using agar to encapsulate the tissue ( in most cases suspended
cells). If you stain the agar with 1% eosin B (prepared in 100% alcohol)
for about 5 to 10 mints and then rinse in 100% alcohol and then start the
infiltration with LRWhite. I have had no problems so far with tissue
loosing the antiginicity. If you need more details contact me.

--
--Have a nice day--
Neelima





From: Walter A. Mannheimer :      wamann-at-metalmat.ufrj.br
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 11:21:57 EST3EDT
Subject: image archiving

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Fellow microscopists, just an addition to the image archiving
discussion:
I use a similar program
Graphic Workshop from Alchemy Mindworks, Beeton ON Canada LOG 1AD
www.mindworkshop.com
I had previously looked at the demo. version of Thumbsplus, and found
it very similar, having purchased one, found no reason to migrate.
Does anyone have a comment on relative capabilities?
I am not connected with, or have any interest in either company.
greetings to all from 37 oC (100 oF) Rio de Janeiro.
Prof.Walter A.Mannheimer
Metallurgy and Materials Engineering
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
POBox 68505 21945 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Voice +5521 280-7443 (Dept.office) +5521 590-0579 (direct)
Fax +5521 290-6626 Email: wamann-at-metalmat.ufrj.br




From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 08:53:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: formalin and formaldehyde

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On Thu, 16 Jan 1997, David Knecht wrote:

} Can someone please enlighten me as to the difference in theory and practice
} between formalin and formaldehyde ...
}
A saturated aqueous solution of formaldehyde contains (nominally) 37%
formaldehyde. Such a solution is referred to as a 100% formalin solution.
(A 10% formalin solution would contain ~3.7% formaldehyde.)

The presence or absence of other components (such as buffers) is
irrelevant, other than affecting the final concentration of formaldehyde.
}
Cheers.

Don
______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
The College of New Jersey * fax: (609) 771-2674
Trenton, NJ 08650-4700

(* formerly Trenton State College; please note our new name)





From: Cheri Owen :      cowen-at-cmb.biosci.wayne.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 09:24:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM;acrylic embedding

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Tamara,

We use Osmium to stain culture cells in agar, before we embed, then you
can cut out the most concentrated area of cells to put in plastic.

Cheri Owen
Detroit Neurotrauma Institute
Detroit, Mi
(313)577-4648

On Thu, 16 Jan 1997, Tamara Howard wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Probably a no-brainer :)...does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can
} stain agar blocks for embedding in LR White? So I can find them again in
} the final block? So far I've only tried Toluidine Blue - didn't work. I
} have some Coomassie-agar in the works right now, but it is clearing, too.
} Multiple suggestions are MORE than encouraged...because I'll ultimately
} need something that will stain the agar without messing up my antigens.
} Sigh.
} Thanks!
} Tamara
} CSHL, NY
}
}
}





From: Buddy Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 09:03:47 EST
Subject: Re: TEM;acrylic embedding

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I needed to stain agar several years ago. Rather than stain it, I
found it better to incorporate a colored microsuspension into it.
Blue dextran works fine...its used to visualize the solvent front in
column chromatography and gel filtration. Its a high mw
polysacharride, much like agar and is virtually innocuous. Sigma
carries it.



-=W.L. Steffens=-
Department of Veterinary Pathology
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia
http://www.vet.uga.edu/wls/steffens.html




From: Tom Phillips :      tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 10:20:28 -0500
Subject: Re: formalin and formaldehyde

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} }
} A saturated aqueous solution of formaldehyde contains (nominally) 37%
} formaldehyde. Such a solution is referred to as a 100% formalin solution.
} (A 10% formalin solution would contain ~3.7% formaldehyde.)
}
} The presence or absence of other components (such as buffers) is
} irrelevant, other than affecting the final concentration of formaldehyde.
} }


I am afraid I strongly disagree with this statement. Some buffers can
precipitate Ca2+ ions (e.g., PO4). The lack of Ca2+ in the fixative is
well known to affect preservation. Some buffers with free amine groups can
interact with the fixative. The presence of alcohol or other preservatives
in commercial formalins could be expected to cause differences in
immunoreactivity in some instances. I have seen some commercial formalin
stocks that contained fluorescent impurities (tho this may have been
contamination by users).

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)






From: Neal Nicklaus :      nnicklaus-at-nova.sarnoff.com
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 12:07:53 -0500
Subject: Re: image archiving

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I have also used Graphics Workshop. I like to use it more for
"manipulating" images. In that respects, use it as competition for
commercially available graphics packages like Corel. I use Thumbs Plus
primary for image databases (thumbnail subdirectories and contact sheets),
archiving and quick looks at my data. I find Thumbs Plus to be much faster
and easier to use for those operations.



At 11:21 AM 1/17/97 EST3EDT, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Neal Nicklaus
Senior Scientist
SEQ Limited

Voice: 609-452-6033 Ext. 13
Fax: 609-452-5955
email nnicklaus-at-seq.sarnoff.com





From: Paul.Fischione-at-internetmci.com
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 12:18:58 -0500
Subject: Fwd: Re: TEM specimen holder cleaning

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-- [ From: Paul E. Fischione * EMC.Ver #2.3 ] --

I would like to further the discussion on plasma cleaning, the need to
clean specimen holders, and cleaning Be holder components. In the past I
have found it extremely beneficial to pre-clean the TEM specimen holder
from the vacuum o-ring to the tip. Although no one admits to touching the
specimen holder, it does occur. In fact, after a few minutes of plasma
cleaning, fingerprints become quite apparent on the specimen holder. I've
also seen o-ring grease wind up on the shoulder of the rod.

In addition, specimen holders are often times stored in less than ideal
conditions and surface contamination becomes inevitable. A recommended
solution is to store the specimen holder under vacuum (oil-free) when not
in use.

Another cause of specimen holder contamination is from adhesives which
adhere to the specimen holder's clamping mechanism. Plasma cleaning with
the clamping mechanism open is quite effective in removing this
contamination. With the plasma flow being multi-directional, even hard to
access areas of the specimen holder are cleaned.

The Be situation raises a much larger issue when discussing plasma. All
types of plasma are not equal. Depending on the plasma generation system,
high energy (} 100 eV) ions can be created. At this level, ion impingement
results in the sputtering of the specimen, specimen holder, plasma chamber
walls, and electrodes, if they too are immersed in the plasma.

The critical need for applying plasma to TEM specimens is to produce a
plasma of sufficiently low energy so that it is below the threshold
required to break a molecular bond (approximately 35 volts). One
acceptable means of generating low energy ions is with a high frequency,
inductively coupled plasma, whereby the electrodes are located external to
the plasma chamber. As long as the ion energy is sufficiently low, plasma
cleaning can occur without the risk of sputtering Be.

We have conducted measurements on the ion energies in our plasma cleaner
and found them to be, under given conditions, in the 12-15 eV range, well
below the sputtering threshold. In this energy range, a chemical reduction
of the carbonaceous material occurs without altering the material's
structure.

I hope that this information is helpful. Do not hesitate to contact me
directly with any specific questions.

Kind regards,

Paul E. Fischione

E.A. Fischione is the manufacturer of the Model 1400 Plasma Cleaner and
Vacuum Storage Containers.





From: Buddy Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1997 12:57:45 EST
Subject: Re: microtome ID

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To Brian Gorman:

It sounds like you've come across an old gravity-powered Huxley
microtome. The specimen arm was lifted (and advanced) by a lever.
When released, gravity pulled the arm down its cutting stroke, the
speed of which was controlled by a variable oil-filled dashpot.
Friction on the block-face had to be kept at a minimum so that it
would not overcome the falling arm. You were limited to a very small
block face and very thin sections. I suspect that it might have
trouble with hard materials. If its all there, it should work,
because it only had about 2 moving parts.



-=W.L. Steffens=-
Department of Veterinary Pathology
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia
http://www.vet.uga.edu/wls/steffens.html




From: samuelsson.sj-at-pg.com
Date: 17 Jan 97 10:38:00 -0500
Subject: Re. TEM-Liposomes

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Gerald,

Years ago I processed synaptosomes for thin section EM by "packaging" them
in tiny agar tubes; I would try to do the same with your liposome preps.

Start with a 5% agar solution at ~60 degrees; thin down if tube walls are
too thick. Dip a glass micropipet (type used for hematocrits) into the
agar, cool over ice and slide the agar off the pipet with your fingers onto
a cool wax sheet (sitting on ice). Cut the tube into bits ~0.5 cm long.
Put a drop of your material onto the wax, pick up the tube and fill by
touching to the drop. Seal with just-molten agar; trim off the "dumbbell"
ends with a razor and process the filled tubes as you would a piece of
tissue. Issues are the finding the right concentration of agar to yield
some tension in the walls of the tube but yet thin enough for good
permeability. Temperature may be tricky with liposomes.

Steve Samuelsson
samuelsson.sj-at-pg.com




From: BobCat54-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 1997 17:55:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: WANTED: MONOCULAR HEAD or ADAPTER for ZEISS GFL

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WANTED: MONOCULAR HEAD or ADAPTER (that will fit INSIDE the binocular
eye-piece tube) for CARL ZEISS GFL microscope to enable me to set up for
microphotography. Adapter must be able to take a standard T-mount for a 35mm
camera. Hopefully, you have an item of this sort gathering dust and can let
it go at a very low price (plus shipping). Thank you. E-mail:
bobcat54-at-aol.com




From: Andrew Kuczynski :      102137.1277-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: 18 Jan 97 17:42:44 EST
Subject: EM Jobseeker

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,
I'm looking for a full time technician position in a EM lab. I possess
an appropiate educational background that match most of requesting in regard
to the employment at EM laboratory. I have an EM Technician Certificate
(1 yr. postgraduate program at Seneca College, Toronto, Canada)+ M.Eng.
degree from Technical Academy of Agriculture, Faculty of Zootechny, Olsztyn,Poland.
In addition, the EM program from Seneca College, Toronto gave many students untill
closing hands on experience and theoretical knowledge in operation of TEM-SEM
including all related techniques of biological specimen preparation essential
to subsequent EM observation.
My career objective is to become one of you with wide variety of preparation
techniques in a biological field of EM.
$ Any assistance you might be able to offer will be greatly appreciated
or you need the further information about me just replay for this message.
FOR ALL OF YOU I WISH A HAPPY & PROSPEROUS 1997!
Andrew Kuczynski
E-mail: 102137,1277-at-compuserve.com
***************************************************************************
"While my name maybe is foreign to you, our language is the same and our
backgrounds are similar."
***************************************************************************




From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 16:14:11 GMT+1200
Subject: Diff pump oil--Identification

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Dear all

I'm about to open up for the first time the diff pump in the carbon
coater which I inherited as a going concern some 8 years ago. I
suspect that the fluid in it is silicone, possibly DC 704, the one
thing I do know is that it'll be pretty dirty. Does anyone know an
infallible way to test very used diff pump fluid to ascertain
whether it is a silicone or not?


cheers

Ritchie

Ritchie Sims phone: 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology fax: 64 9 3737435
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand




From: dfox-at-primenet.com (.)
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 1997 23:08:43 -0500
Subject: Image Intensity

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Hello,

I am trying to find a way to measure and compare the relative intensity
or brightness (?) of images (photomicrographs) of fluorescent labeled
cells.

I have NIH Image as well as Photoshop and Excel. Would it be possible to
make these types of measurements using these programs ? Is there another
program you would recommend ?

What I am doing more specifically, is labeling cells at different
micromolar concentrations of the fluorescent marker PKH26, then putting the
cells into tissue culture flasks. I will then take slide photographs os the
the flasks under magnification and fluorescent illumination at different
points in time to assess the falloff in flurescence. I have the capability
of making scans of the slides.

Thank you very much for your time,

David Fox, MD

**************************
David Fox, MD
Fellow in Vascular Surgery
Loyola University Medical Center

dfox-at-primenet.com
***************************






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 1997 23:40:11 -0500
Subject: TEM Stage Storage

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Colleagues...

For over 15 years now I have stored stages in slightly
over pressurized dry Nitrogen environment using the N2 gas
which vents off of LN2 tanks here at ANL. The N2 is directed into
a simple plexiglass storage boxes with simple seals on the doors.
These can be purchased from all the standard Microscopy Supply
Houses. It is my experience that vacuum storage is rarely necessary
and I've never seen documented evidence to show vacuum storage
of TEM stages reduces contamination.

Having said this I do store a few stages in mild vacuum, but for
very different reasons. The exception here, are some old Gatan LN2 & LHe
stages
we have here at ANL, which use microscope vacuum to achieve insulation.
These (very) old models evacuated an outer insulating chamber
of the cooling dewar by pumping on it via the microscope column
using a small hole judiciously placed on the "column side of the o-ring seal".
Leaving these stages in air always increases the pump down time when
the stage is inserted into the microscope, presumably due to water vapor
collecting in the chamber. Gatan has since redesigned their
stages to remove this problem, however, I still use these stages
as they continue to work. In this case the stages are stored
in a simple chamber pumped down to ~ 10 mT using any
RP. They are leaked back to ATM using N2 to make sure H2O vapor
does not collect in the insulating dewar. I have never seen evidence
of contamination of specimens which can be attributed to the
stage being stored in a standard RP system, when the RP is properly
operated. Of course, if you screw up and backstream oil into
the system then all bets are off, however, that is a simple
thing to avoid by good laboratory practice.


My 2 cents worth.


Nestor






From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 08:50:12 +0000
Subject: Diff pump oil--it's laugh time!

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Dear Ritchie and all

A short anecdote re. coating unit diff pumps.

Our old Edwards 12E6 from 1966 was overhauled,
upgraded etc. in 1981 and charged with 100 ml Edwards
Silicone 704/F4. It reaches 1x10-4 torr during a normal day
and 1x10-5 torr when cryo activities are going on. It is used
for cleaning jobs and carbon filming. Not great maybe but
the figures have held constant since the beginning. A while
ago I intended opening it up again (it used to be an annual
event pre-1976 with my predecessor) but on his retirement,
time became more precious.

I intended opening it up a few years ago because a young
technician came and said 'Keith, I think something might be
wrong with the coating unit because there is smoke coming
out the back' !! It turned out that the system was pumping in
hi-vac mode and she had opened the air inlet! It was oil mist
and I guessedthat the oil charge had by then disappeared.
But no, it still runs. You've pricked my conscience! But those
old units run and run!

With best wishes

Keith Ryan
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

Tel: ++44 1752 633294 (international)
01752 633294 (national)
Fax: ++44 1752 633102 (international)
01752 633102 (national)
e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk
PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From: Sara Prins :      SPrins-at-csir.co.za
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 16:42:28 +0200
Subject: Single crystal gold

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Hi All
For teaching purposes to show simple diffraction patterns and tilting
thereoff, as well as to demonstrate twinning we chose the old route of
preparing thin (20nm) gold crystal by by evaporating firstly Ag then Au
on air cleaved NaCl at 400 to 450 degrees C (10-5 torr).
We experience a few problems to get reproducible crystals:
1. Sometimes the Ag surface turn whitish in stead of silver.
2. The Ag does not completely dissolve in nitric acid (various
concentrations tried...).

Can somebody help or refer me to literature on the subject or maybe
suggest other routes for simple preparation of such demonstrating foils?

Thanks in advance

Sara Prins
Surface and Structure Analytical Services
Division for Material Science and Technology
CSIR
PO Box 395
Pretoria
0001, South Africa
+27+12+8413974
sprins-at-csir.co.za




From: Leon A. Metlay :      lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 11:51:51 -0500
Subject: Re: formaldehyde & cancer

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Philip Oshel asked:

} I recently received the following request from a non-microscopist
} colleague:
}
} } Do you have any current information about formaldehyde & cancer?
} } We're looking for publications/documentation

Here're the most recent refs from a lit. search I did a while ago:

Authors
Anonymous.
Title
Formaldehyde. [Review]
Source
IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans.
62:217-375, 1995.

Authors
Hansen J. Olsen JH.
Title
Formaldehyde and cancer morbidity among male employees in Denmark.
Source
Cancer Causes & Control. 6(4):354-60, 1995 Jul.

Authors
McLaughlin JK.
Title
Formaldehyde and cancer: a critical review. [Review]
Source
International Archives of Occupational & Environmental Health.
66(5):295-301, 1994.

Authors
Sterling TD. Weinkam JJ.
Title
Mortality from respiratory cancers (including lung cancer) among workers
employed in formaldehyde industries [see comments].
Source
American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 25(4):593-602; discussion 603-6,
1994 Apr. Comment in: Am J Ind Med 1995 Feb;27(2):301-5

Authors
Marsh GM. Stone RA. Esmen NA. Henderson VL.
Title
Mortality patterns among chemical plant workers exposed to formaldehyde
and other substances [see comments].
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 86(5):384-6, 1994 Mar 2.
Comment in: J Natl Cancer Inst 1994 Oct 19;86(20):1556-8

Authors
Gardner MJ. Pannett B. Winter PD. Cruddas AM.
Title
A cohort study of workers exposed to formaldehyde in the British chemical
industry: an update.
Source
British Journal of Industrial Medicine. 50(9):827-34, 1993 Sep.

Authors
Partanen T.
Title
Formaldehyde exposure and respiratory cancer--a meta-analysis of the
epidemiologic evidence.
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 19(1):8-15, 1993 Feb.

Authors
Luce D. Gerin M. Leclerc A. Morcet JF. Brugere J. Goldberg M.
Title
Sinonasal cancer and occupational exposure to formaldehyde and other
substances.
Source
International Journal of Cancer. 53(2):224-31, 1993 Jan 21.

Authors
Marsh GM. Stone RA. Henderson VL.
Title
Lung cancer mortality among industrial workers exposed to formaldehyde: a
Poisson regression analysis of the National Cancer Institute Study.
Source
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal. 53(11):681-91, 1992 Nov.

Authors
Marsh GM. Stone RA. Henderson VL.
Title
A reanalysis of the National Cancer Institute study on lung cancer
mortality among industrial workers exposed to formaldehyde.
Source
Journal of Occupational Medicine. 34(1):42-4, 1992 Jan.

Authors
Holmstrom M. Lund VJ.
Title
Malignant melanomas of the nasal cavity after occupational exposure to
formaldehyde [see comments].
Source
British Journal of Industrial Medicine. 48(1):9-11, 1991 Jan. Comment
in: Br J Ind Med 1993 Aug;50(8):767-8

Authors
Partanen T. Kauppinen T. Hernberg S. Nickels J. Luukkonen R.
Hakulinen T. Pukkala E.
Title
Formaldehyde exposure and respiratory cancer among woodworkers--an update.
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 16(6):394-400, 1990
Dec.

Authors
Blair A. Saracci R. Stewart PA. Hayes RB. Shy C.
Title
Epidemiologic evidence on the relationship between formaldehyde exposure
and cancer. [Review]
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health. 16(6):381-93, 1990
Dec.

Authors
Blair A. Stewart PA. Hoover RN.
Title
Mortality from lung cancer among workers employed in formaldehyde
industries.
Source
American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 17(6):683-99, 1990.

Authors
Boysen M. Zadig E. Digernes V. Abeler V. Reith A.
Title
Nasal mucosa in workers exposed to formaldehyde: a pilot study.
Source
British Journal of Industrial Medicine. 47(2):116-21, 1990 Feb.

I hope these have what your colleague is looking for.

Leon


--
Leon A. Metlay, M.D.,Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Rochester Medical Center Phone: (716) 275-5691
P.O. Box 626 Fax: (716) 273-1027
Rochester, NY 14642 lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/smd/pathres/URPLM.html
"Most ass drivers are evil, most camel drivers are decent, most sailors are
saintly, the best among physicians is going to Gehenna, and the best of
butchers is a partner of Amalek" -R. Judah, in Mish. Kidd. 4:14






From: ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L.D.Marks)
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 10:59:15 -0600
Subject: PC Compatible PEELS interface

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Considering the current, and potential future state of Apple computers,
I wonder how many people out there would be interested in a PC compatible
interface for a Gatan PEELS. I am not trying to sell one, would like
one myself; the target is that if a number of other people are interested
in might be possible to push harder various companies to market such an
interface.

Please email me if you are interested.




From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 19:50:56 +0000
Subject: Re: Single crystal gold

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} Hi All
} For teaching purposes to show simple diffraction patterns and tilting
} thereoff, as well as to demonstrate twinning we chose the old route of
} preparing thin (20nm) gold crystal by by evaporating firstly Ag then Au
} on air cleaved NaCl at 400 to 450 degrees C (10-5 torr).
} We experience a few problems to get reproducible crystals:
} 1. Sometimes the Ag surface turn whitish in stead of silver.
} 2. The Ag does not completely dissolve in nitric acid (various
} concentrations tried...).
}
} Can somebody help or refer me to literature on the subject or maybe
} suggest other routes for simple preparation of such demonstrating foils?
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Sara Prins
} Surface and Structure Analytical Services
} Division for Material Science and Technology
} CSIR
} PO Box 395
} Pretoria
} 0001, South Africa
} +27+12+8413974
} sprins-at-csir.co.za

Can't help with the gold, but I'd recommend molydenum oxide for similar
uses, and it's a lot easier to prepare. Slowly heat a molybdenum strip or
length of wire in air until a white smoke comes off. Wave a grid through
the smoke. That's it - the grid is covered in molydenum oxide crystals, of
various sizes, some twinned. Nice, easy single crystal diffraction patterns
and you can use the specimen to calibrate the rotation relationship between
the image and diffraction pattern.

Regards,
Larry Stoter






From: ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L.D.Marks)
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 15:18:49 -0600
Subject: PC Compatible PEELS interface - clarification

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Before I am completely swamped by emails, I am not talking about a
sophisticated and expensive system that controls the microscope as
well as the PEELS (i.e. the EMiSPEC system) but something a little
more modest that only controls the PEELS, and does not cost $50K !
/




From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 18:54:09 -0400
Subject: DP pumps & oils

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I too would be interested in knowing a simple way to distinguish among the
common types of diffusion pump oils. One way to tell if you have a
silicone oil might be to smear a bit of it on a metal stub and run an EDX
spectrum of it to see if it contains Si (Maybe it would be better to burn
some in a platinum or tungsten boat and examine the ash for Si). However,
there is undoubtedly someone out there who will know a simpler method.

It is true that diffusion pumps will often perform at an acceptable level,
even after thay have been savagely mistreated. However,after a diffusion
pump has been run for any significant period of time without proper cooling
water,or after exposure to air at high pressures, or after failure of the
mechanical backing pump, the oil in it is likely to have been depleted,
oxidized, and/or thermally degraded enough so that the pump no longer
performs optimally, and is highly likely to exhibit an abnormally high
level of backstreaming. (See 'Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy', p
214-220 for a detailed discussion.) The silicone and perfluorinated
polyphenyl ether oils are the most resistant to such degradation, the
polyphenyl ether oils are pretty good, while the synthetic ester and
hydrocarbon fluids are much less so (p. 180-188). In any event, it is best
to service a pump as soon as possible after such a potentially damaging
event has occurred, just to minimize the liklihood that the vacuum system
will become seriously contaminated with degraded pump oil.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 19:39:56 -0400
Subject: RE:Plasma cleaning

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I wish to offer a correction and apology for my sin of omission.

In some comments I made over this Listserver a few days on methods for
cleaning TEM specimen holders ago I stated that, "The latest method method
for these holders is Plasma Discharge Cleaning, and Southbay Technologies
markets a device that is specially designed for this purpose". Insofar as
I know this statement is correct (except that the name should be 'Southbay
Technology'); however, I have been reminded that the method was developed
by Nestor Zaluzec and patented by Argonne Nat'l. Lab., and that two other
companies also market Plasma Cleaning devices: namely, SPI Supplies and E.
A. Fischione. This was an oversight on my part, caused in part by the fact
that I was a bit loose in the wording of my comments, but also because I
apparently don't keep very up-to-date on the latest developments in the
marketplace for EM supplies (with my luck, two or three other companies are
probably also in the buisness by now, and so I'll be off again).

In any event, I have no commercial interest in this matter, and was not
trying to offer information prejudicially favoring any particular company
over any other. I've been involved in the field of electron microscopy for
so long that I have friends in most companies associated with the field,
and so my intention is to remain as unbiased as possible. I'll try to be
more careful henceforth.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Frik Koch :      FKoch-at-csir.co.za
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 08:18:52 +0200
Subject: subscribe

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From: Maite.Caldes-at-cnrs-imn.fr
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 10:26:58 +0200
Subject: subscribe

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unsubscribe




From: Lesley Suzanne Bechtold :      lsb-at-aretha.jax.org
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 12:41:31 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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Colleagues

Can anyone help these guys? Reply directly to them.

Nestor

-----------



please re-subscribe me at my new address. Thanks.





From: Susan Danielson :      sdaniels-at-post.its.mcw.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 12:19:13 -0800
Subject: flat molds for microwave embedding

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Hi all,

Two questions:

1) We would like to contact Beverly Giammara for some help and
information regarding her publications on flat molds for embedding tissue
using the microwave. If any one has any information on how to contact
her we would greatly appreciate it.

2) To any one else doing microwave embedding

We are a lab that deals with muscle and nerve samples. We would like to
use our new microwave to embed the tissue in resin (Spurr's or LR White).
We tried Beem capsules but were unable to orient the tissue properly for
sectioning with our MT2-B. I have seen reference made to the use of
flats molds in the microwave and wonder if any one has any experience or
suggestions they could share with us.

Thanks in advance

Christine Brantner and Susan Danielson
Muscle/Nerve Lab
Froedtert Hospital
Milwaukee WI




From: Rick L. Vaughn :      RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 11:16:24 -0600
Subject: lazer printers for routine EM

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We are interested in which lazer printers people have had experience
using for routine biological EM images. Our images are captured with a
Kodak Megaplus 1024x1024. We would also use the printer for LM,
anatomical line drawings, AR of gells etc. We are considering the
Lexmark Optra R+ 1200 dpi. Thanks for your help.

Rick L. Vaughn
EM Research Facility
Dept. Cell Biology & Anatomy
Univ. Neb. Med. Ctr.




From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 10:10:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: SEM sample storage

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OK Kiddies, put on your thinking caps!

The question of the day is:


What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
sputter coated)?


Thanks in advance (I just figured out that's what TIA means).


Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
ELectron Microscope Lab






From: Jacky Larnould :      larnould-at-mnet.fr
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 19:35:49 +0100
Subject: Asbestos counting

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Hi everybody,
And specially people working on asbestos.
I would like to know which method is used in the other countries (USA UK
Canada Germany....) to determine the concentration
of asbestos in atmosphere.
By method I mean when a laboratory receive a filter from a suspected place
do they use a TEM or SEM for counting fibers and how?
Do they use electron diffraction or EDS to determine the nature of asbestos?
Thank you very much for the answers.
==========================================================
Jacky Larnould
tel 33 (0)4 67 72 28 26
fax 33 (0)4 67 79 54 90
email larnould-at-mnet.fr





From: Bill Swaim :      swaim-at-yoda.nidr.nih.gov
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 13:54:28 -0500
Subject: SEM of collagen matrix

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Does anyone have any experience with SEM of reconstituted rat tail collagen
matrix? The collagen is laid down onto glass coverslips and then cells are
plated on top of the matrix. I am interested in the collagen more than the
cells, but can't get any definition of fibers. In some areas there is some
definition, but the majority of the surface seems compacted with little or
no definition. I have tried a variety of preparation conditions including
different fixatives as well as cpd vs. freon for drying. The latter seemed
to produce the best results, but there is still little definition of the
matrix.
I have sputtered for different times, but I still seem to have a problem of
charging that eventually burns the sample no matter what kV I use. Does
this
sound like a preparation problem, an imaging problem, or both? Any help
would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
Bill Swaim






From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 14:24:26 -0400 (AST)
Subject: LM and/or TEM- plant cell necrosis

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Hi,
I am looking for any publications which contain micrographs of plant
cell necrosis. I am specifically interested in sclerenchyma cells,
but any papers on necrosis would be helpful. Thank you.
Debby LeBlanc

Please email to dleblanc-at-upei.ca




From: peggy-at-research.nj.nec.com (Peggy Bisher)
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 14:25:40 -0400
Subject: Re: lazer printers for routine EM

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}
} We are interested in which lazer printers people have had experience
} using for routine biological EM images. Our images are captured with a
} Kodak Megaplus 1024x1024. We would also use the printer for LM,
} anatomical line drawings, AR of gells etc. We are considering the
} Lexmark Optra R+ 1200 dpi. Thanks for your help.
}
} Rick L. Vaughn
} EM Research Facility
} Dept. Cell Biology & Anatomy
} Univ. Neb. Med. Ctr.


We use the Lexmark Optra RX printer in our lab for routine image printing
and we are very happy with it. We are a materials lab here but I think you
would be happy with it for your biological images as well.

Good Luck,

Margaret E. Bisher

NEC Research Institute
4 Independence Way
Princeton, NJ 08540.
Tel.: (609) 951-2629
Fax: (609) 951-2496
e-mail: peggy-at-research.nj.nec.com











From: Zara Weng-Sieh :      ZWeng-Sieh-at-hdwy.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 11:48:00 -0800
Subject: hiring SEM operator/technician

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Immediate opening available- SEM operator or technician
Location- Headway Technologies, Inc. Milpitas, CA (Silicon Valley)

Contact- Zara Weng-Sieh
(408)934-5507 (phone)
(408) 934-5654 (fax)

Responsibilities include performing failure analysis using SEM/EDS.

Headway Technologies, Inc. manufactures magneoresistive heads used in
disk drives.




From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molecular.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 97 14:55:00 PST
Subject: Jeol 840 SEM

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To the SEM World,

I have a JEOL 840 SEM that was purchased in 1986, and we are
considering putting it up for sale. I would like some feed back on what
this instrument might be worth or what you a potential buyer would offer if
interested.

The scope has both SE and BSE detectors, plus a PGT System III X-Ray
detector. The scope is currently in operation and has been under service
contract with Jeol for the last 5 years., Overall it is in excellent
condition.

Please respond directly to me and not this list either by e-mail, phone or
fax.

Thank you.

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / E.M. Core Facility
Dept. of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

jgoodhouse-at-molecular.princeton.edu

tel: 609-258-5432 Fax: 609-258-5323





From: Bob_Citron-at-cc.chiron.com (Bob Citron)
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 12:22:33 -0800
Subject: DP Oils

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Hi All;

It would seem to me that the simplest way of determining if silicone oil is
in the diffusion pump (as opposed to something else?) is to take an
Infrared scan - silicone oil has very distinctive absorption bands in the
"fingerprint" region of about 1450 - 700 wavenumbers. Examples can be
found in just about any IR reference book. One could also monitor the
quality of the oil by taking an initial IR and periodically checking
subsequent spectra against it.

Regards,

-Bob
**********************************
Bob Citron
Chiron Vision
555 W. Arrow Hwy
Claremont, CA 91711
USA
PH: (909)399-1311
Email: Bob_Citron-at-cc.chiron.com
**********************************




From: Melvyn Tockman :      MTOCKMAN-at-PHNET.SPH.JHU.EDU
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 15:02:57 -0500
Subject: LM, FM - Single fluorescent/transmitted light chromogen

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Hi,

We have been using a red new fuschin/alkaline phosphatase reaction
to tag a cytoplasmic protein. It transmits light maximally at 600 nm,
and fluoresces with a rhodamine cube.

We are looking for similar dual-function chromophores to label
cytoplasmic proteins and nucleotides.

Any ideas?





From: Gary R. Login :      glogin-at-bidmc.harvard.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 15:59:52 -0400
Subject: Re: flat molds for microwave embedding

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Susan Danielson writes:
} 1) We would like to contact Beverly Giammara: Her email address is
} {bgiammara-at-magnum.mco.edu}

} 2) To any one else doing microwave embedding:
} We are a lab that deals with muscle and nerve samples. We would like to
} use our new microwave to embed the tissue in resin (Spurr's or LR White).
} We tried Beem capsules but were unable to orient the tissue properly for
} sectioning with our MT2-B. I have seen reference made to the use of
} flats molds in the microwave and wonder if any one has any experience or
} suggestions they could share with us.


RESPONSE-
There are two approaches in the literature for microwave accelerated curing
of resins: 1) Giammara's approach for flat embedding molds and 2) Giberson
and Demaree's approach for Beam Capsules.

My suggestion for flat embedding molds is to start with 50% power for 15
minutes (100% will definately give you disappointing results). Also when
using flat embedding molds, allow your blocks to cool for 15 minutes before
removing them from their molds, and vent your microwave oven during curing.

I highly recommend using an appropriately sized water load for your oven
during microwave curing in flat embedding molds (otherwise there is simply
too much energy in a microwave oven and specimen damage from over heating
will result). In addition, microwave curing in an uncalibrated microwave
oven is very tricky and usually results in disappointing results (e.g.,
incomplete curing of blocks). Simple tools that you can make and a
detailed description of how to use them to CALIBRATE YOUR MICROWAVE OVEN
are published in the The Microwave Tool Book.


When curing resins in BEEM capsules, they are placed IN a water bath-
temperature never exceeds 100 =B0C and curing times are ~ 75 minutes. See
the reference by Giberson RT, Demaree RS, Jr: Microwave fixation:
understanding the variables to achieve rapid reproducible results. Microsc
Res Tech 32:246, 1995

Detailed information regarding curing times of various resins in a
microwave device can be found in:
1. Giammara B. Microwave embedment for light and electron microscopy using
Epoxy resins, LR White, and other polymers. Scanning 1993;15:82-87.

2. Login GR, Dvorak AM. The Microwave Toolbook. A Practical Guide for
Microscopists (Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1994). The book contains a
table of curing times for resins tested.

Please contact me if you have additional questions and I will respond
directly to you.

Dr. Gary R. Login
Dept. Pathology
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
330 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02215

phone: 617-667-2034
fax: 617-667-8676

e-mail: glogin-at-bidmc.harvard.edu






From: Gary R. Login :      glogin-at-bidmc.harvard.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 16:04:09 -0400
Subject: Re: flat molds for microwave embedding

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Susan Danielson writes:
} 1) We would like to contact Beverly Giammara: Her email address is
} {bgiammara-at-magnum.mco.edu}

} 2) To any one else doing microwave embedding:
} We are a lab that deals with muscle and nerve samples. We would like to
} use our new microwave to embed the tissue in resin (Spurr's or LR White).
} We tried Beem capsules but were unable to orient the tissue properly for
} sectioning with our MT2-B. I have seen reference made to the use of
} flats molds in the microwave and wonder if any one has any experience or
} suggestions they could share with us.


RESPONSE-
There are two approaches in the literature for microwave accelerated curing
of resins: 1) Giammara's approach for flat embedding molds and 2) Giberson
and Demaree's approach for Beam Capsules.

My suggestion for flat embedding molds is to start with 50% power for 15
minutes (100% will definately give you disappointing results). Also when
using flat embedding molds, allow your blocks to cool for 15 minutes before
removing them from their molds, and vent your microwave oven during curing.

I highly recommend using an appropriately sized water load for your oven
during microwave curing in flat embedding molds (otherwise there is simply
too much energy in a microwave oven and specimen damage from over heating
will result). In addition, microwave curing in an uncalibrated microwave
oven is very tricky and usually results in disappointing results (e.g.,
incomplete curing of blocks). Simple tools that you can make and a
detailed description of how to use them to CALIBRATE YOUR MICROWAVE OVEN
are published in the The Microwave Tool Book.


When curing resins in BEEM capsules, they are placed IN a water bath-
temperature never exceeds 100 =B0C and curing times are ~ 75 minutes. See
the reference by Giberson RT, Demaree RS, Jr: Microwave fixation:
understanding the variables to achieve rapid reproducible results. Microsc
Res Tech 32:246, 1995

Detailed information regarding curing times of various resins in a
microwave device can be found in:
1. Giammara B. Microwave embedment for light and electron microscopy using
Epoxy resins, LR White, and other polymers. Scanning 1993;15:82-87.

2. Login GR, Dvorak AM. The Microwave Toolbook. A Practical Guide for
Microscopists (Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, 1994). The book contains a
table of curing times for resins tested.

Please contact me if you have additional questions and I will respond
directly to you.



Dr. Gary R. Login
Dept. Pathology
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
330 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02215

phone: 617-667-2034
fax: 617-667-8676

e-mail: glogin-at-bidmc.harvard.edu






From: wise-at-vaxa.cis.uwosh.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 15:09:21 +0000
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

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We have an Hitachi SEM that uses threaded stubs. On the suggestion
of Kevin Cronyn (Hitachi Sales) I bought plastic hinged-lid boxes (about 4"
x9") from one of the EM suppliers and cut pieces of plexiglass to fit in
the bottom. I then drilled and threaded 32 holes in the plexiglass and ran
short (~1/2") bolts up through the holes. The thread size is the same as
for the Hitachi stubs so you just screw the stubs down on the bolts and set
the whole unit in the plastic box. I put one longer (~1") screw in the
middle to act as a handle for getting the plexiglass out of the box. I
seem to recall that it came to about $20 in supplies for each box as well
as two hours of drilling and tapping a bunch of little holes. I can send
more details if you are interested.
For short-term student use I give them petri plates with
double-sided tape in the bottom. Stubs are placed on the tape and stick
pretty well. You can get up to 10 or so stubs in one standard Petri dish.

YWIA

Bob


Robert R. Wise
Plant Physiologist and Director, UWO Electron Microscope Facility
Department of Biology
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Oshkosh, WI 54901
(414) 424-3404 tel
(414) 424-1101 fax
wise-at-uwosh.edu






From: simkin-at-egr.msu.edu (Benjamin - Simkin)
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 16:13:45 -0500
Subject: monte carlo program wanted

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Can anyone out there direct me towards a decent monte carlo electron-
specimin interaction modeling program? I'm looking for electron path,
BSE energy and directional information. Provided that the code is in either
fortran or C++ (or basic, I guess), I will be able to make minor modifications
if the program(s) are not precisely suited to these uses.
thanks,
Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)





From: Sally E Burns :      burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 17:47:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: SEM sample storage

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HI
We store coated SEM samples in pumped out desiccators.


Sally Burns
Center for Electron Optics
Michigan State University




From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 16:32:14 EST
Subject: Re: flat molds for microwave embedding

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Dear Christine and Susan, and fellow microscopists,

A good introduction to Beverly Giammara's work with microwave embedding can
be found in Chapter 23 of The Microwave Cookbook for Microscopists, by Kok
and Boon, entitled "Microwave Exposure and Epoxy-resin Embedding for EM."
This book is available through Energy Beam Sciences.

We also have a bibliography of papers relating to this subject at our World
Wide Web site (http://www.ebsciences.com).

Using the method developed by Giammara, Spurr or LR White resin
polymerization can be done in about 30 minutes in a laboratory microwave.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 18:05:50 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

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} What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
} sputter coated)?
}
Best way we have found is to use storage boxes provided by SPI, EMS or
Pella (clear plastic boxes) and place in either a glass desiccator or
zip-lock bag with desiccant. The boxes offer the advantages: numerically
labeled for specimen ID, hold the specimens tightly so that they will not
spill out if inverted or tipped.

A cheaper alternative is to take some 1/2" plexiglass and drill a series of
holes that will allow the stubs to fit. A dab of sticky tab will adhere the
stub to the plexiglass. If one attaches small legs, the plexiglass panels
may be stacked on top of each other. This may then be desiccated.

Cheapest yet, someone (EMS or Pella or SPI) makes some paper boxes (like
"pill boxes" of olden days) that you can write on.

Good luck.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4402
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 17:46:39 -0800
Subject: Re: monte carlo program wanted

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Dear Ben,
The program Electron Flight Simulator will do all that and some other neat
things besides. You will find references in any Microscopy Today or the
Exhibitors Bulletin of the last MSA meeting and there is a Web site. It
costs about $480 and runs on a PC. Other than that, David Joy is the writer
of most of those programs, and should be able to help you with a free version.
You wrote:
} Can anyone out there direct me towards a decent monte carlo electron-
} specimin interaction modeling program? I'm looking for electron path,
} BSE energy and directional information. Provided that the code is in either
} fortran or C++ (or basic, I guess), I will be able to make minor modifications
} if the program(s) are not precisely suited to these uses.
} thanks,
} Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 12:16:42 +1000
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

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Hi Paula,

Here at the museum our SEM samples are frequently from registered
specimens from the collections and are often the type specimens of new
species. Our stubs are, therefore, stored "in perpetuity" like the
rest of the collections. Years ago I asked some questions regarding
conditions for permanent storage but there wasn't much info
forthcoming apart from the usual methods. For what it's worth, here
are some of my observations on stubs 15-20 years old.

The oldest stubs in our museum have been stored in large (~300mm
diam.) glass petri dishes, stuck down on double-sided sticky tape.
These petri dishes are kept in stacks of three in glass dessicators
(with silica gel) which are sealed with petroleum jelly. Most of them
are still good for the SEM - the bad ones are attributable to poor
preparation (and subsequent degradation) rather than storage
conditions. Others have used disposable plastic 110mm dishes,
however, this is not so space-efficient.

I guess that low humidity and constant temperature are the important
factors. I've thought (comments please) that it might be worth
replacing the air with an inert gas as well.

We then looked at perspex cabinets with shelves. None were to our
liking (usually too few shelves and too expensive) so we designed our
own for a person who wanted to produce them for his supply shop.

Originally we had planned for a stackable perspex cabinet (340mm wide,
280mm deep, 260mm high) with O-ring in the door, full-length side
hinge, roller clips to provide pressure on the O-ring, gas exchange
taps (pump inert gas in through one and air out the other) and 10
shelves which held 1,760 stubs. Unfortunately, supply of parts and
costs for materials and labour, on what was only ever going to be a
small run, meant considerable changes and the result can only be
called a very efficient dust cabinet (still stores 1,760 stubs!).
With monthly changes of silica gel it works as a dessicator.

Any supply houses interested in bringing this design to fruition?

Geoff Avern
Microscopy Laboratories
Australian Museum
Sydney, Australia

P.S. Paula, please say hello to Carole Hickman (Palaeontology) if you
see her.




From: richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Lander)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 15:26:42 +1200
Subject: EM Cooling system

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Question on behalf of Allan Mitchell:

I am presently reassessing the anti-corrosion/anti-microbial growth
additive to use in our two EM cooling systems. The questions that I am
having difficulty in finding answers to are;

1)What are the properties of water that cause corrosion in the electron
microscope? Is it the pH, water contents or both?

2)What is the best pH for EM cooling systems?

3)Has anybody used the Coalite Chemicals product 'Phylatol' in their EM
cooling systems?

Thanks in advance.



Allan Mitchell

Please send replies to: allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz






From: Sanford Simon :      simon-at-rockvax.rockefeller.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 22:31:48 -0500
Subject: EM Cooling system

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Does anyone know of any critiques comparing/contrasting the various
commercial & shareware packages for microscopy such as Metamorph,
Metafluor, NIH Image, Axon Image Workshop, Global Image, Image Tools (Un.
of Texas), etc.?

Is this the appropriate forum for such a comparision, or does it exist
elsewhere?
Thanks,
Sandy Simon


Sanford M. Simon
Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics
Box 304
Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10021
(212) 327-8130 (voice)
(212) 327-8022 (fax)
simon-at-rockvax.rockefeller.edu (e-mail)

"Well I ain't often right, but I've never been wrong
It seldom turns out the way it does in the song,
Once in awhile you can get shown the light
in the strangest of places if you look at it right..."

Jerry Garcia.





From: Manuela Palatsides :      manuelap-at-petermac.unimelb.edu.au
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 16:41:34 +1100
Subject: EM Cooling system

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OK Kiddies, put on your thinking caps!

The question of the day is:


What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
sputter coated)?


Thanks in advance (I just figured out that's what TIA means).


Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
ELectron Microscope Lab


Hi Paula,

We store our specimens in a specimen storage cabinet that we bought from
Agar Aids. We keep dessicant in it and we change it periodically.

Manuela





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 1997 19:57:35 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

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On Tue, 21 Jan 1997, Paula Sicurello wrote:

} What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
} sputter coated)?


My first thought was "In peanut butter jars with dessicant, of course!"
because that's what I just told my new SEM class and what I tell everyone
else. Our main concern here in Hawaii is humidity, and I insist that all
samples be held over dessicant for some time before going into our field
emission SEM. Most of us put our pin-style stubs in commercially
available boxes and find that, once sputter coated, they will then store
*indefinitely* over dissicant. The identification and procurement of
suitable jars is a serious subject here, especially now that many brands
of peanut butter are now available only in plastic jars with a
thin, styrofoam-like seal, driving us to other snacks that come in jars
with the requisite rubber ring in the lid. Jellies and pickles and other
fluid items frequently come in jars with wide mouths, allowing room for
insertion of fingers to retrieve sample storage boxes. Mayonnaise jars,
alas, do not have the rubber ring in the lid. Canning jars are popular
among our customers with active grants to pay for them. Be warned,
however, against using jars which may have strong residual scents; kim
chee jars are a no-no. Avoid, too, jars which have contained spaghetti
sauce or other tomato-based products as some strange mungy stuff likes to
grow in them even after being subjected to multiple runs in the
dishwasher. I have not attempted to autoclave them.

Tupperware brand storage boxes work well for a fair period of time; other
brands do not seal well enough to keep indicator dessicant from
indicating. My Tupperware lady thinks I'm nuts. She may be right.

Jars of all shapes and sizes full of stub boxes pile up in our facility
until I run down their long-lost owners or shove them in their campus mail
boxes. I can't help you with that problem!

If the question is, rather, how does one keep the stubs upright and
undamaged if they are the type that does not fit snugly in comercially
available storage boxes, or one can't afford said boxes, I am of less
help. I like to encourage my customers and students to be creative (I
have an interesting collection of boxes designed to hold glass knives, for
example). I have not yet tried to see if 1/8" pin-type stubs fit in the
holes of pipettor tip boxes. Hitachi screw-on stubs are such a pain that
I made an adaptor to hold pin-type stubs before I took delivery of the
'scope. I remember that you have an ISI DS-130, but I don't remember the
stub type.

Last week I looked at some stubs of unknown origin that had been knocking
around in a petri dish in a desk drawer for at *least* 12 years. I put
them over silica gel for a day and popped them into the 'scope without
further coating and found some wonderful cultured cells that looked just
great!

I'd rather be in the lab than home with this cold. (It's raining in
Hawaii.)

Tina

MicroAngelo soon admitting gender and changing to MicroAngela
http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: BOECHAT JEAN-MARC MSM CV111 CH :      jean-marc.boechat-at-chma.mhs.ciba.com
Date: 22 Jan 1997 09:36:49 +0100
Subject: RE: SEM sample storage

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What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
sputter coated)?

We have chosen the expensive way by storing the samples in a vacuum cabinet.
The vacuum is not very good (rough pumping) but sufficient to prevent damages
of the sputtered layer, water vapor uptake and/or oxidation of the samples.
As our (Philips) stubs have a pin underneath, we have drilled holes in the
cabinet's shelves. This way the samples are fairly secured when you move the
shelves. This storage is meant for samples we might want/need to put back in
the microscope. Once they are no longer current, we have a large drawer with
a rubber foam (neoprene) layer in which we've drilled holes too so that the
pin stubs will fit. It works very well and if you reference your shelves and
drawers, you might even be able to actually find old samples back: -).

Have a nice day


J.-M. Boichat e-mail: jean-marc.boechat-at-chma.mhs.ciba.com
EM LABS
Ciba Research Center phone:++41264356979 fax:++41264356907
P.O. Box 64
1723 Marly 1
Switzerland Disclaimer: Nobody in this company ever mind what I say why
would they start now!






From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 09:05:53 -0500
Subject: SEM sample storage

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Message-Id: {1.5.4.32.19970122140553.006bd218-at-biotech.ufl.edu}
X-Sender: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Light Version 1.5.4 (32)
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

For short term storage we have used several of the methods already
described, depending on the state of our budget at the time. For extended
storage of samples that you really don't expect to ever look at again but
someone insists that you archive, we have taken to using the commercial
storage box placed in a seal-a-meal bag with some charged silica gel. The
bag is evacuated and sealed for storage on a high shelf in the lab. The
indicator in the silica gel shows that it is still dry after three years.
*******************************************************
G.W. Erdos, Ph.D. Phone: 352-392-1295
Scientific Director,
ICBR Electron Microscopy Core Lab
218 Carr Hall Fax: 352-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
Home of the #1 Gators
*****
"Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased"
Daniel 12:4





From: BOECHAT JEAN-MARC MSM CV111 CH :      jean-marc.boechat-at-chma.mhs.ciba.com
Date: 22 Jan 1997 15:15:40 +0100
Subject: RE: SEM sample storage

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

What is the best way to store SEM samples (those already on stubs and
sputter coated)?

We have chosen the expensive way by storing the samples in a vacuum cabinet.

The vacuum is not very good (rough pumping) but sufficient to prevent
damages
of the sputtered layer, water vapor uptake and/or oxidation of the samples.

As our (Philips) stubs have a pin underneath, we have drilled holes in the
cabinet's shelves. This way the samples are fairly secured when you move the
shelves. This storage is meant for samples we might want/need to put back in
the microscope. Once they are no longer current, we have a large drawer
with
a rubber foam (neoprene) layer in which we've drilled holes too so that the
pin stubs will fit. It works very well and if you reference your shelves and
drawers, you might even be able to actually find old samples back: -).

Have a nice day


J.-M. Boechat
e-mail: jean-marc.boechat-at-chma.mhs.ciba.com
phone:++41264356979 fax:++41264356907

EM LABS
Ciba Research Center
P.O. Box 64
1723 Marly 1
Switzerland

Disclaimer: Nobody in this company ever mind what I say why
would they start now!







From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 22 Jan 1997 09:08:04 EST
Subject: Image Capture, Process and Print

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Message-Id: {199701221421.IAA02325-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


Yes, we're interested in SW for image capture process and print.
Please include image capture cards.

Right now, we're hung up with micro-channel bus computers and old
IBM Video Capture Adapter cards. The greatly restricts the
choices. We use Perfect Image/2 to capture, but we have to save
the images and open them with Paint Shop Pro in order to anotate
and print them. Our Lexmark Optra 4049 gives us nice 1200 dpi
prints on plain paper. This system is complicated to use, but
works. We may try to get ISA bus machines and new capture
cards if it looks worthwhile.

Please tell us where there might be comparisons of cards and sw
packages for SEM and light optics image work. TIA,

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca (George Braybrook)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 07:53:19 -0700
Subject: Re: lazer printers for routine EM

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X-Sender: gbraybro-at-pop.srv.ualberta.ca
Message-Id: {v01530500af0bd632a4ef-at-[129.128.54.177]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

} We are interested in which lazer printers people have had experience
} using for routine biological EM images. Our images are captured with a
} Kodak Megaplus 1024x1024. We would also use the printer for LM,
} anatomical line drawings, AR of gells etc. We are considering the
} Lexmark Optra R+ 1200 dpi. Thanks for your help.
}
} Rick L. Vaughn
} EM Research Facility
} Dept. Cell Biology & Anatomy
} Univ. Neb. Med. Ctr.


Hi Rick and Everyone,
We have used the Lexmark Optra R printer in our lab for routine
image printing for about 1 1/2 years and we WERE very happy with it.
Recently, the high voltage regulator broke down and cooked a couple of
toner cartridges. After talking to my refiller guy (been very knowledgable
for years), it seems there is a longevity problem with these printers!!
Several of his Lexmark clients have have opted (no pun intended) for
another brand of printer. At this point he swears at them rather than by
them. But, this is one man's opinion, and before I condem them completely,
I would like to know if anyone else (or how many) has experienced this.


Cheers
:)
George
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3
Canada
ph: 403-492-5746
fax: 403-492-2030






From: jeanne_barker-at-merck.com (Jeanne Barker)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 09:48:24 -0500
Subject: Adipocyte staining

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Subject: Time:4:51 =
PM
OFFICE MEMO Adipocyte staining =
Date:1/21/97

Dear Microscopists,

We are beginning a series of experiments that will include labeling of =
adipocytes for light microscopy, followed up by electron microscopy. =
Preliminary experiments show that adipocytes are very autofluorescent, so =
I was wondering if it is better to do immunoperoxidase staining when =
working with these cells. If anyone is familiar with working with =
adipocytes, and can give me any advice on which way is best to label =
these cells, or if one block was found to be superior over another, I =
would appreciate the information very much.

Thank-you,
Jeanne
Jeanne_Barker-at-Merck.com





From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 22 Jan 1997 09:48:29 EST
Subject: Monte Carlo Models

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


I've got a set of these models on my FTP site, and everyone is
welcome to them. I worked with Dave Joy in the mid '80's to
convert these from Apple basic to IBM Basic. Later I took them
from CGA to VGA resolution. They're compiled Quick Basic. The
source code is not included, since I'm concerned about someone
changing the code and effecting the validity of the results.

The site is;

users.aol.com/dking99/private

The file names are;

MCVGAPAK.EXE self unpacking file
MCVGAPAK.DOC Instructions

Let me know if you get them, how you like them, suggestions, etc.

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 10:24:21 -0500
Subject: RE: lazer printers for routine EM

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Message-Id: {c=US%a=_%p=SYLVANIA%l=RD_EXC1-970122152421Z-3297-at-da-exc1.sylvania.com}
"'george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca'" {george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca}

We have a Lexmark Optra Lxi well. It is installed on the network. I
don't know how many people use it, but about a year ago, it was plugged
in and turned on. The only maintenance I know has been to fill it with
consumables.


-------------------------------------------------
Harold J. Crossman
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: (508) 750-1717
E-mail: crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com

Our web sites: www.sylvania.com
www.siemens.com
--

"Crossman, Harold" {crossman-at-osi.SYLVANIA.com}






From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 10:24:21 -0500
Subject: RE: lazer printers for routine EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have a Lexmark Optra Lxi well. It is installed on the network. I
don't know how many people use it, but about a year ago, it was plugged
in and turned on. The only maintenance I know has been to fill it with
consumables.


-------------------------------------------------
Harold J. Crossman
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: (508) 750-1717
E-mail: crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com

Our web sites: www.sylvania.com
www.siemens.com
--

"Crossman, Harold" {crossman-at-osi.SYLVANIA.com}






From: Debbie Cassout :      DCASSOUT-at-TVMDL.TAMU.EDU
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 09:28:58 -0600
Subject: direct count of viral particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
I need to count virus particles/ml of several viral suspensions with the
viruses ranging in size from 20nm - 100nm. I need something quick and
easy to give me a rough idea of the numbers. I've found some general
information using polystyrene latex particles to do this, but I'd like to get a
detailed protocol if anyone has one.
1. Do I need to get different sized latex particles for each virus size?
The smallest latex I've found so far is 85nm.
2. Does anyone have a source for the latex? The companies I've called
use them for mag. calibration and couldn't tell me how many particles/ml
they contained.
3. Can I spray my sample on my grid with a nebulizer or should I drop it
on? If I can spray it on, will I alter my count because of the extra water
and PTA I'll be using?

Thanks for your help.
Debbie Cassout
TVMDL
e-mail : dcassout-at-tamu.edu
fax: (409) 862-7047




From: Weiland, Hasso :      Hasso.Weiland-at-alcoa.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 10:27:51 -0500
Subject: Charge Contrast Microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Can somebody please explain what Charge Contrast Microscopy is? I found
this technique mentioned in a paper related to the analysis of ceramics,
using a FEG-SEM. I was not successful in finding a description of this
technique in my standard textbooks on microscopy or any of the
microscopy related web-sites. Thanks for the help,

Hasso Weiland

Alcoa Technical Center
Alcoa Center, PA 15068





From: Glamp, Jane :      glamp-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 97 10:29:00 PST
Subject: Ultra Microtoming Classes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Everyone,
I am interested in attending an ultra microtoming class and I need
information about a date, place and cost of an upcomming class if there is
one. I work in the materials area, not biological.
Thank you very much in advance,
Jane Glamp
glamp-at-ppg.com





From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 12:20:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: How to flatten o-rings

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Our larger o-rings usually come packaged with each o-ring having
two or more overlapped turns. One of these o-rings must be inserted in a
groove on the bottom of a plate in the scope, and I have not found a way
to unfold the o-ring into a circle which will lay flat. I have put a book
on it overnight and put it around a beaker slightly larger than the ID, but
neither of those is satisfactory. I don't want to deform the o-ring, so I
haven't been too rough with it. I am trying the beaker again, this time
filled with hot water. (If the cold caused the o-ring on Challanger to
harden, maybe the hot water will soften one.) Other than using so much
grease that it holds the o-ring in place--obviously not good practise--I
haven't found a way to keep the deformed o-ring in place. Has anyone out
there solved this problem? TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: howard-at-cshl.org (Tamara Howard)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 12:43:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM:Answers to agar-stain question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Several people have asked me to post the replies I've received to my recent
call for help...how to stain agar for acrylic resin embedding? I'm not
going to post the complete replies - just a summary (lazy today).
SO:
*Fast green when the tissue is in 100% EtOH. Add a few ul of a 7% fast
green solution to the vial with the samples. Doesn't work well
with acetone.
*Alizarin red for acetone dehydrations.
*A light coat of india ink on the outsides of the agar blocks.
*Dilute eosin (nobody ever says how dilute!). Acidified eosin. 1% Eosin B.
*Alcian Blue.
*2% Safranin O in the 100% EtOH step.
*Mix some Dextran Blue in the agar.

There were also suggestions to fix with osmium or picric acid...both will
color the material. Won't work for my samples, but...something to keep in
mind.

Thanks to everyone who responded - I'm going to give the fast green a whirl
today, since I have some on hand.

If anyone wants more info, I have the original messages and can hook you up
with the people who sent them.

Tamara
CSHL






From: Glamp, Jane :      glamp-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 97 12:47:00 PST
Subject: FW: Ultra Microtoming Classes

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Hi Everyone,
I am interested in attending an ultra microtoming class and I need
information about a date, place and cost of an upcomming class if there is
one. I work in the materials area, not biological.
Thank you very much in advance,
Jane Glamp
glamp-at-ppg.com






-----------------------------------






From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 14:00:04 EST
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Paula!

You've probably heard from every vendor and his or her dog by now, and we
also sell a variety of SEM specimen storage boxes, but, in my opinion, the
*best* storage method is a good desiccator cabinet with shelving having
holes to accomodate the specific specimen mounts you are using. At least
two of the EM supply companies sell such systems, Energy Beam Sciences being
one of them. My second choice, for standard "pin-type" specimen mounts,
would be this lovely wooden mount storage box, made in the U.K., and sold by
at least the same two vendors.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: klivi-at-jhu.edu (Kenneth JT Livi)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 14:38:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: DP oils

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Dear all,

I have heard that organic diffusion pump oils could ignite under certain
conditions. Can anyone confirm this or has anyone heard of such an event
happening?

Ciao for now,
Ken

Kenneth JT Livi
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
34th and Charles Streets
The Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland 21218

klivi-at-jhu.edu (e-mail)






From: robert_alain-at-iaf.UQUEBEC.CA (robert alain)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 97 15:30:19 EST
Subject: Re: direct count of viral particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Debbie,

I count regurlarly virus particles with latex beads. You can use latex beads at
a size between 90-140 nm at a concentration of about 10^8 beads/mL. You can find
this beads with a known concentration at Marivac ltd, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
(tl.902-429-0209).
My protocol consist to mix 100 uL of viral suspension with 100 uL of latex beads
in a 240 uL "Beckman Airfuge" tube. Place a grid in the bottom of tube.
Centrifugate at 20 psi (about 120 000g) during 5 min. Take the grid, dry it and
stain with phosphotungstic acid (PTA 3%, pH 6).
I count on 2 differents grids at least 200 virus or beads in different areas.

Viral particle concentration (part/mL)= virus count / latex beads count X latex
bead conc. X 1/dilution of test article

You can find my Airfuge technique in:

Alain R. and al., J.Vir.Methods, 16 (1987): 209-216

I don't have experience with nebulizer but I think it's a good conpromise.

Don't hesitate to write me if you want more details.

Robert Alain
Microscopie Electronique
Institut Armand-Frappier
Laval, Quebec

Robert_alain-at-iaf.uquebec.ca


Hi,
I need to count virus particles/ml of several viral suspensions with the
viruses ranging in size from 20nm - 100nm. I need something quick and
easy to give me a rough idea of the numbers. I've found some general
information using polystyrene latex particles to do this, but I'd like to get a
detailed protocol if anyone has one.
1. Do I need to get different sized latex particles for each virus size?
The smallest latex I've found so far is 85nm.
2. Does anyone have a source for the latex? The companies I've called
use them for mag. calibration and couldn't tell me how many particles/ml
they contained.
3. Can I spray my sample on my grid with a nebulizer or should I drop it
on? If I can spray it on, will I alter my count because of the extra water
and PTA I'll be using?

Thanks for your help.
Debbie Cassout
TVMDL
e-mail : dcassout-at-tamu.edu
fax: (409) 862-7047





From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 20:45:01 +0000
Subject: Re: Charge Contrast Microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Can somebody please explain what Charge Contrast Microscopy is? I found
} this technique mentioned in a paper related to the analysis of ceramics,
} using a FEG-SEM. I was not successful in finding a description of this
} technique in my standard textbooks on microscopy or any of the
} microscopy related web-sites. Thanks for the help,
}
} Hasso Weiland
}
} Alcoa Technical Center
} Alcoa Center, PA 15068

Not a term I have come across. My first thought was EBIC - electron beam
induced current - one step on from specimen current imaging, but both of
these only apply to conductors or semiconductors.

As the specimen is an insulator, I guess the term is being used
synonymously with voltage contrast. Again, mainly used for semiconductors
but has been applied to ceramics. Non-conducting, or poorly conducting
specimens charge if not coated. If everything is balanced out correctly,
you can achieve a steady state where the charge input to the specimen
equals the charge leakage to ground. Sometimes a very thin carbon coat, as
used for EDX, is applied to help establish steady state conditions. In some
specimens this is useful and contrast in images relates via the level of
charge in different parts of the specimen to, among other things, local
conductivity. Not very quantitative but quite sensitive. Check Goldstein et
al (1992), Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, 2nd
Edition, Plenum Press, pp 557-562.

Regards,

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
United Kingdom
---------------------------------------------------------------






From: Ricky L Vaughn :      RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 16:22:49 -0600
Subject: This is great! Ask and you shall recieve.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This is great! Ask and you shall recieve.
In regards to George Braybrooks and Scott Whittaker's comments this makes two strikes against Lexmark. I didn't
mention in my original message regarding lazer printers that we had tried several years ago using Lazer Master's
card to double a HP4's resolution, but it took 50% of the RAM upon loading and was finicky with some hardware.
Those of you that mentioned other cards: how are they for RAM usage and cost. Not to put down SEM but they
seem to get by with non-photo printing easier than us with TEMs. An SEM print off our HP4 looks much better than
the TEM?




From: Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) :      ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 97 17:51:29 EST
Subject: Short courses and meeting listings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've taken on the responsibility of assembling separate short course
and future meeting listings for the revamped journal of MSA, MAS and
MSC: "Microscopy and Microanalysis," which will go to over 5,000 scientists.

If you have, or know of anyone who has, information concerning future
short courses and/or topical meetings of interest to microscopists
internationally, please send e-mail directly to me (not the listserver).

We will publish in date order short paragraphs giving Date and Title
of the short course or meeting; Location; Name, phone, mail and e-mail ad-
dresses of a contact person(s); and a short (50 word) description of the event.

The Jan/Feb issue is at press. The Mar/Apr issue closes this Friday,
24 January. If you wish to be listed in this issue e-mail (ascii format)
me *TODAY* and I'll try my best to fit your contribution in.

Send me a e-mail for closing dates for the balance of the issues for 1997.

Ron Anderson
ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com




From: Kim A. Brackett :      strangedoc-at-fuse.net
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 18:25:46 -0500
Subject: Asbestos counting methods

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----------
} From: Jacky Larnould {larnould-at-mnet.fr}
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Asbestos counting
} Date: Tuesday, January 21, 1997 1:35 PM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi everybody,
} And specially people working on asbestos.
} I would like to know which method is used in the other countries (USA UK
} Canada Germany....) to determine the concentration
} of asbestos in atmosphere.
}
} Jacky Larnould
} tel 33 (0)4 67 72 28 26
} fax 33 (0)4 67 79 54 90
} email larnould-at-mnet.fr
}
The following meyhods are currently in use for measuring airborne asbestos
concentrations.
1. Phase contrast microscopy (PCM): U.S. and Britain for most occupational
exposures
2. SEM: Germany, all exposure measurements
3. TEM: U.S. testing for airborne concentrations after asbestos removal
operations in schools, for certain occupational studies and some public
buildings.

PCM really gives total airborne fiber concentration because asbestos cannot
be differentiated from any other fiber of similar size.
SEM methods rely on EDS for identification but cannot differentiate
asbestos from other mineral fibers with the same chemical composition but
different crystalline structure.
TEM uses both EDS and SAED and is the only method currently acceptable in
law courts in the U.S.

The individual protocols for each are too involved to post on this server.
If you are interested, contact me by email strangedoc-at-fuse.net and I'll try
and help you further.
K. A. Brackett, Ph.D.





From: Maoxu Qian :      mxq-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 17:27:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Summary of zip disk problem

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----- Begin Included Message -----

From Microscopy-request-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com Tue Jan 21 18:45:42 1997
Mime-Version: 1.0

I received a lot of replying for my post on problem in zip disk. Many
people said they have simlar problem. Finaly, I got my data recovered by
Norton utility. It took very long time waiting the Norton to recognize
the zip drive (it was keeping spin and click for 10+ minuts) and after
recovering the files, the zip drive was completely damaged - any good-new
disk will bdcame bad after insert to the drive. I called iomega then and
got a return number to repair the drive.
I'd like thank all of you who responded my question.

****************************
* Maoxu Qian, Ph.D. *
* Dept of MSE, box 352120 *
* University of Washington *
* mxq-at-u.washington.edu *
* (206)543-1514(phone) *
* (206)543-3100(fax) *
****************************






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 21:15:40 -0500
Subject: Re: plasma cleaning and EDX windows

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Hi, Nestor. Your ideas on plasma cleaning for specimens and stages are most
} welcome -- good for you! The next question is .... can the cleaning be done
} in an EM without damaging an EDX window (a thin one)?
--------- stuff cut out ----------
} Cheers,
} Brian
} ==============

Brian etal....

I guess I'm not sure what you want to really do here. Do you want
to just clean the EDS window, or if I'm guessing correctly the interior of the
column? If it's the column then this is a good concept! Obviously
once you clean the stage the next area to consider is the immediate
surroundings which are also sources of contamination. Assuming
of course your not in the situation where the vacuum system itself
is poor and overwhelming the whole process aka vintage 70's microscopes.
On the other hand, if we are talking about only cleaning EDS windows
I would not recommend this be done with plasmas as the cleaning time will
be far too long.
Assuming we are talking about cleaning a column, then my comments below
apply.

Basically, what you have to remember is that the plasma is acting like a
catalyst
for a localized (surface) chemical reaction. The energy of the plasma is
breaking weak bonds
of the hydrocarbon compounds on the surface which then make the species
somewhat volatile so that they can further react with the gas in the plasma.
The subsequent action of the gas is to provide an additional chemical process
which is converting the compound into a gaseous phase which can be easily
removed
by the mild vacuum conditions. For example here are some reactions
which could be used if we were dealing only with pure carbon...

C + 2H2 -} CH4 ; C + CO2 -} 2CO; C + O2 -} 2CO .....

Lots of other possibilities exist depending on the materials and "gas".
If the EDS window compound is a strongly linked polymer then you will need a
high energy plasma to disassociate the OH bonds to make an appropriate reaction
proceed. This will occur only if you are running plasma's on the order of
50eV,
or with very chemically reactive gas compounds (i.e. something more than just
Ar, O2 ....). In this regime you can easily "etch" polymers and thus also
a hydrocarbon
based EDS window. If on the other hand you run with only very low energy
plasmas ( { 10 eV) this should not be a problem. I would recommend you test
the EDS window material first, as in most materials, some compounds are
more resistant than others. If you can't do it locally just send some to me
and I'll try it here for you in some of my gobs of spare time! ;-)
My best guess is that there will be a readily set of conditions which will not
cause problems for most hydrocarbon based thin-window detectors, however
I have yet to test any here at ANL. The other obvious advantage is that
the plasma is nearly a RT process. I've measured temperature
rises in a thermocoupled TEM stage of ~ 5 degrees C under cleaning
conditions, which is less than one gets using a 150W flood lamp!

If you decide to try this yourself, then I would recommend that you use a 2
step
process first pure Ar then O2. The Ar disassociates the most volatile
compounds first
which then get swept away pretty quickly. The O2 finishes the job on the
stuff that is more strongly bound. The presence of O-rings in the column will
not be a problem, since the sealing surfaces are protected from the
plasma. As an
example consider the o-rings on specimen stages which survive multiple
treatments in a stand alone table top system without problems.

Hope that this answers your question.

Nestor

BTW, to keep everything on the up and up, I will remind you all that the
use of reactive gas plasma for cleaning the interior of an
electron-optical column
( SEM, TEM, AEM...) is covered by an patent owned by ANL, who is my
employer.








From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 21:47:05 -0800
Subject: Re: Charge Contrast Microscopy?

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Dear Hasso,
I have never heard that term, but last year I was looking at sintered
mixtures of SiC and Al2O3. The SiC was dark, because it is conductive and
the Al2O3 was white, as it was charging. This only worked if the mixture was
more than about 20% SiC, otherwise the Al2O3 charged so much it disrupted
the picture. In order to try to keep the charging down I tried doing very
short gold-palladium sputter coats of 20 seconds or less, but even 10
seconds of coating completely obscured this contrast. The technique would
only work with a well-dispersed mixture of conductive and non-conductive
material. The proportion is easily determined by area percent image analysis.
You wrote:
} Can somebody please explain what Charge Contrast Microscopy is? I found
} this technique mentioned in a paper related to the analysis of ceramics,
} using a FEG-SEM. I was not successful in finding a description of this
} technique in my standard textbooks on microscopy or any of the
} microscopy related web-sites. Thanks for the help,
}
} Hasso Weiland
}
} Alcoa Technical Center
} Alcoa Center, PA 15068

Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 1997 21:47:07 -0800
Subject: Re: How to flatten o-rings

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Dear Bill,
When our EM sevice engineer wants to "plump up" an o-ring that has been in
service for a long time, he puts it into an oven at 50 degrees C for an
hour. This seem to relax them and plump them back to round. Perhaps if you
put them in an oven with a weight on them for a while, then keep a weight on
them as you cool them down, this would flatten them enough.
You wrote:
} Our larger o-rings usually come packaged with each o-ring having
} two or more overlapped turns. One of these o-rings must be inserted in a
} groove on the bottom of a plate in the scope, and I have not found a way
} to unfold the o-ring into a circle which will lay flat. I have put a book
} on it overnight and put it around a beaker slightly larger than the ID, but
} neither of those is satisfactory. I don't want to deform the o-ring, so I
} haven't been too rough with it. I am trying the beaker again, this time
} filled with hot water. (If the cold caused the o-ring on Challanger to
} harden, maybe the hot water will soften one.) Other than using so much
} grease that it holds the o-ring in place--obviously not good practise--I
} haven't found a way to keep the deformed o-ring in place. Has anyone out
} there solved this problem? TIA.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Matthew A. Stough :      stoughma-at-ornl.gov
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 02:25:35 -0400
Subject: ALCHEMI and ceramics

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Hi all,

I'm doing an ALCHEMI (Atom Location by Channelling
Enhanced MIcroscopy) study on a dopant in cubic
zirconia. The literary references I've found to date
mostly deal with intermetallics where atoms A and B
(and impurity atom X) *can* lie on either the alpha
or beta site of a structure (e.g., L1o superstructure).

My problem:
I'd like to find a reference or two on an ALCHEMI
study of an ionic material where atoms A and B
can *not* reside on either of the sites (meaning,
for example, that Zr would not be found on the O
sites and vice versa). The mathematical treatments
in the above references allow for this to occur
and often times rely on an iterative convergence
to the site occupancies of the X atom.

If you are aware of specific ALCHEMI studies on
ionic (and perhaps covalent) materials, I'd appreciate
the reference.

Thanks!
Matt Stough
stoughma-at-ornl.gov






From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 08:40:27 +0000
Subject: Re: How to flatten o-rings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Our larger o-rings usually come packaged with each o-ring having
} two or more overlapped turns. One of these o-rings must be inserted in a
} groove on the bottom of a plate in the scope, and I have not found a way
} to unfold the o-ring into a circle which will lay flat. I have put a book
} on it overnight and put it around a beaker slightly larger than the ID, but
} neither of those is satisfactory. I don't want to deform the o-ring, so I
} haven't been too rough with it. I am trying the beaker again, this time
} filled with hot water. (If the cold caused the o-ring on Challanger to
} harden, maybe the hot water will soften one.) Other than using so much
} grease that it holds the o-ring in place--obviously not good practise--I
} haven't found a way to keep the deformed o-ring in place. Has anyone out
} there solved this problem? TIA.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol

Bill,

Not a problem I've faced, but how about putting it around the beaker, as
you've been doing and then putting it in the deep freeze over night. When
it comes out nice and hard, you'll probably have a minute or so to get it
into place and the bottom plate located, wait a few minutes for it to
soften and then tighten the bolts. Worth a try? ... :)

Regards,
Larry Stoter






From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 10:49:30 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: How to flatten o-rings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To Mary, Bill and others interested

I can confirm that heat for restoring o-rings does work in many
instances. For many years I have successfully used hot water to
do this rather than an oven.

Regards

Robin Cross
EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa



Robin H Cross
Director : EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
eurc-at-giraffe.ru.ac.za - tel: +27 461 318168 - fax: +27 461 24377




From: Joergen Bilde-Soerensen 5802 :      j.bilde-at-Risoe.DK
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 13:57:10 +0100
Subject: Re: ALCHEMI and ceramics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Matthew Stough wrote:
} I'd like to find a reference or two on an ALCHEMI
} study of an ionic material where atoms A and B
} can *not* reside on either of the sites (meaning,
} for example, that Zr would not be found on the O
} sites and vice versa).
} ....
} If you are aware of specific ALCHEMI studies on
} ionic (and perhaps covalent) materials, I'd appreciate
} the reference.

Dear Matthew,
Much of the early work on ALCHEMI by Spence and Taftoe was done on
ionic materials, e.g. with spinel structure. You will find several
references in

J.C.H. Spence & J. Taftoe, Journal of Microscopy, vol. 130, pt. 2, May
1983, p. 147 - 154.

The papers by Rossouw et al. on axial channeling ALCHEMI
are also concerned with ionic materials of spinel and perovskite
structures:

C.J. Rossouw, P.S. Turner & T.J. White, Philos. Mag. B vol. 57, 1988,
p. 209 - 225.

C.J. Rossouw, P.S. Turner, T.J. White & A.J. O'Connor, Philos. Mag. Letters 60,
1989, p. 225 - 232.

Personally, I have had good experience with the axial channeling
method.

Best wishes,
Jorgen.


-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
J. B. Bilde-Soerensen
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 46 77 58 02 (direct)
phone: +45 46 77 46 77 (switchboard)
fax: +45 46 35 11 73
website: http://www.risoe.dk




From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 08:32:53 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM sample storage

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} I guess that low humidity and constant temperature are the important
} factors. I've thought (comments please) that it might be worth
} replacing the air with an inert gas as well.
}
} Geoff Avern

Now that I've got email working again, I'll stick in my $0.02 worth.
I agree with Geoff (and several others): humidty is very important.
However, I'd rate protection against mechanical shock 2nd, then
temperature, etc. Make sure the stubs are firmly mounted, sticky tape is
only for temporary storage or for when you can be assured that specimens
won't be moved. I've used specimens that I've shipped in a VW bug across
country and ones shipped from Antarctica, and sticky tape would *not* have
done the job. Stubs firmly mounted in commercial or specially made stub
holders do OK. Also, make sure the specimens are firmly mounted on the
stub--it can take only a small jar to knock specimens off the stub or
de-orient them. Given the rough handling of specimens by many people,
long-distance shipping isn't needed to lose samples, just a trip across the
lab or campus.
For medium to long term storage, vacuum (10-3) or *dry, oil-free*
inert gas (N2 or Ar) is good; for archival storage, I'd exchange the air
with N2 or Ar and then pump down. O2 can be a long term problem, but I
wonder more about the general crud in the lab air.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 23 Jan 1997 10:01:09 EST
Subject: Sample Storage

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To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


If you have a bulk N2 system as we do, gas boiled off the liquid
is super clean. We're plumbed up to it for air tables, sample
blow off, and we bleed it slowly into those big plastic boxes
with the foam door seals, bolted to the wall. This is convenient,
ultra-dry, and close enough to vibration free. We just use any
sample box designed for 1/8" stud sample mounts.

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: Eric Johnston :      ericdj-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 11:28:11 -0500
Subject: Deblurring/deconvolution

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Message-ID: {01BC0920.84D227E0-at-OAKMONT.SEAS.UPENN.EDU}

Hi

I was following the a discussion in the Confocal archives around 3/95 =
regarding deconvolution of images. It was said at one point that to =
accurately deconvolve an image, the complete system must be known. =
Given a simple transmitted light microscope system, ie objective, =
coverslip, etc, does anyone know what exactly must be "known", how one =
goes about getting that information, and is there software that can take =
that information to deblur or deconvolve an image? Also, can it be done =
to a digitized image?

Thanks

Eric




From: thughan-at-gatan.com (Tim Hughan)
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 07:48:25 -0800
Subject: Re: Short courses and meeting listings

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Gatan offers the following short courses at $750 each.
Tim Hughan
Gatan, Inc.



Gatan's 1997 Schools for
Electron Microscopy:

Digital Microscopy
April 7-10, 1997

EELS Imaging & Analysis
April 15-18, 1997

Specimen Preparation
April 28-30, 1997


Digital Microscopy

This course introduces TEM, STEM, and SEM users to the capabilities of
Digital Microscopy. On-line digital imaging facilitates the immediate
viewing of samples and has made quantitative acquisition and analysis of
electron micrographs and diffraction patterns possible. The course will
explore the parameters necessary to optimize TEM, STEM, and SEM image
acquisition, processing, and analysis for biological and physical sciences
applications.

EELS Imaging & Analysis

The purpose of this school is to inform potential Gatan PEELS and Imaging
Filter (GIF) users of the capabilities of parallel-detection electron
energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered imaging, and to give
current users the necessary theoretical background and hands-on training to
get the most out of their PEELS or GIF systems.


TEM Specimen Preparation

This extensive, practical course has been designed to teach materials
scientists the art and science of TEM specimen preparation. The course will
concentrate on the various ion-milling techniques now available and will
show how excellent TEM specimens can be produced from almost any
material encountered. Special attention will be given to preparation of
cross- sections through surfaces and interfaces. The materials used
in the laboratory sessions will include semiconductors, metals, ceramics,
and their combinations.






From: WAYNE KING :      WAYNE.KING-at-quickmail.llnl.gov
Date: 23 Jan 1997 08:54:43 -0800
Subject: please add a link

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From: AMCGroup2-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 11:58:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy Classes

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April 20-25, 1998
7th Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science Conference
Irsee Germany
Contact: W. E. King, L-356, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94551
E-mail: weking-at-llnl.gov

Please visit the Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials
Science Conference website at

http://multiscale.llnl.gov/femms98

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id NAA23371; Wed, 22 Jan 1997 13:07:35 -0800
Message-ID: {32E68199.46B4-at-llnl.gov}

on Wed, 22 Jan 97 18:29:00 Jane Glamp wrote:

} Hi Everyone,
} I am interested in attending an ultra microtoming class and I need
} information about a date, place and cost of an upcoming class if } there =
is
one. I work in the materials area, not biological.
} Thank you very much in advance,
} Jane Glamp
} glamp-at-ppg.com

} Jane,

AMC Group has offered intensive hands-on workshops on Materials
Ultramicrotomy, at basic and advanced levels, twice a year, on a regular
basis since 1993. The schedule of the workshops for 1997 is:

Basic Materials Ultramicrotomy May 19-21, =9197 and Nov. 17-19, =91=
97
(Phoenix, AZ)
Advanced Materials Ultramicrotomy May 22-23, =9197 and Nov. 20-21 (Pho=
enix,
AZ)

To receive detailed information about these workshops, please send me yo=
ur
complete mailing address. Thank you.

Rene E. Nicholas
Marketing Director
AMC Group
(602) 949-4203
Fax (602) 473-9421
**************

AMC Group offers hands-on workshops on TEM Wedge-polishing, FIB-TEM
Cross-sectioning, and Materials Ultramicrotomy on a regular basis. =20




From: Gregory.Argentieri-at-sandoz.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 11:40:31 -0500
Subject: Collecting Nasal Tissue from Monkeys

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Dear Colleagues:

Is anyone willing to share their experience in collecting nasal tissue
from cynomolgus monkeys?

Perfusion techniques are not an option.

Exact sites of collection are not known to date. I assume we will be
collecting from proximal and distal turbinates, and possibly septum.

I Would be interested in any references to methods of collection,
fixation. Also would be interested in nasal comparative anatomy of the
Rat vs. Monkey.

Gregory Argentieri
Novartis
201-503-8617
fax 201-503-6339
Gregory.Argentieri-at-sandoz.com
Greg2NJ-at-AOL.com






From: Susan Carbyn :      CarbynS-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 13:50:00 -0500
Subject: HMDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I was wondering if anyone has tried air-drying plant samples using
Hexamethyldisilazane? If so, how successful was it? Our critical point
drier is out of commission and I am searching for alternative methods to
CPD. If anyone has any other comments or suggestions for drying plant
material, I would greatly appreciate it.

Susan Carbyn
Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Station
Kentville, Nova Scotia B4N 3R2
Canada

Phone: (902) 679-5566
Fax: (902) 679-2311

E-mail: carbyns-at-em.agr.ca




From: richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Lander)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 08:28:11 +1200
Subject: EM Cooling systems

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Message on behalf of Allan Mitchell;

Many thanks to all those who replied to my recent questions about closed
circuit cooling systems for electron microscopes. It has been interesting
following the subject as, I believe, something so fundamentally simple
shouldnt be as complicated as it would seem.
I think part of the problem is many people seem to be using locally
available products with tradenames that are unheard of elsewhere. It would
seem that many of these products are either anti-corrosion or
anti-microorganism but often not both.
I believe the supplier of the electron microscope should be able to supply
the name of a product that is globally available at a reasonable price, or
at least supply the name of a product in your area.
The additive we were recommended with our last microscope purchase is
available to us (from Germany) at a considerable cost. In addition, the
supplier of the product recommends regular replacement of the water in the
systems, a job I certainly dont want to do.

My questions, just for interest really, to those with closed circuit
cooling systems on their microscopes.
- What is the name of the anti-corrosion agent you use?
- What ratio do you use it at?
- How do you replenish it and how often?

- What is the name of the anti-microorganism agent you use?
- What ratio do you use it at?
- How do you replenish it and how often?

- What is the name of the manufacturer of these products?


TIA,

Allan Mitchell.

Please send responses to allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz


Richard Lander, NZCS
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
c/- Pathology Department
Otago Medical School
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand.
Tel. National 03 479 7301 Fax. National 03 479 7254

"Southernmost EM Unit in the World!"






From: richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Lander)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 09:00:04 +1200
Subject: TEM-Platelet peroxidase

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Message on behalf of Zyg Poczwa, Scientific Officer in diagnostic EM;

I am requesting help with trying to diagnose a bone marrow biopsy which
shows tumor infiltration.
The pathologists query whether or not it is megakaryoblastic and
consequently would like Platelet Peroxidase (PPO) performed on it.
Unfortunately, the only material I have is a Formalin fixed, Paraffin
embedded bone marrow specimen.

Has anyone had any experience with doing platelet peroxidase on paraffin
embedded tissue?

TIA

Zyg Poczwa.


Richard Lander, NZCS
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
c/- Pathology Department
Otago Medical School
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand.
Tel. National 03 479 7301 Fax. National 03 479 7254

"Southernmost EM Unit in the World!"






From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 15:51:25 -0500
Subject: Re: HMDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We generally get very poor results with plant tissue using HMDS
} } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } }

}
} I was wondering if anyone has tried air-drying plant samples using
} Hexamethyldisilazane? If so, how successful was it? Our critical point
} drier is out of commission and I am searching for alternative methods to
} CPD. If anyone has any other comments or suggestions for drying plant
} material, I would greatly appreciate it.
}
} Susan Carbyn
} Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Station
} Kentville, Nova Scotia B4N 3R2
} Canada
}
} Phone: (902) 679-5566
} Fax: (902) 679-2311
}
} E-mail: carbyns-at-em.agr.ca
}
}
*******************************************************
G.W. Erdos, Ph.D. Phone: 352-392-1295
Scientific Director,
ICBR Electron Microscopy Core Lab
218 Carr Hall Fax: 352-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
Home of the #1 Gators
*****
"Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased"
Daniel 12:4





From: Ya Chen :      ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 15:07:29 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM of collagen matrix

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} Does anyone have any experience with SEM of reconstituted rat tail
collagen

} matrix? The collagen is laid down onto glass coverslips and then
cells are

} plated on top of the matrix. I am interested in the collagen more
than the

} cells, but can't get any definition of fibers. In some areas there is
some

} definition, but the majority of the surface seems compacted with
little or

} no definition. I have tried a variety of preparation conditions
including

} different fixatives as well as cpd vs. freon for drying. The latter
seemed

} to produce the best results, but there is still little definition of
the

} matrix.

} I have sputtered for different times, but I still seem to have a
problem of

} charging that eventually burns the sample no matter what kV I use.
Does

} this

} sound like a preparation problem, an imaging problem, or both? Any
help

} would be greatly appreciated.

} Thanks.

} Bill Swaim


Bill,

I have studied the conformation of fibronectin fibrils, which were
formed either from fibroblast culture or in cell-free system, using a
field emission SEM.


To succeed for high-resolution SEM, you need to preserve structures
well in all specimen preparation steps and to reduce beam damage in the
FESEM at high magnification. I use cryo techniques: fast-freezing,
freeze-drying, cryo-transfer, cryo-coating, and cryo-SEM to achieve the
goal.


The images obtained reveal the surface features of fibronectin fibrils
and fibronectin molecule at a few nm resolution.


If you have any further questions or want to look at your samples,
please feel free to contact me.


Here is a reference list:


Chen, Y., Centonze, V.E., Verkhovsky, A. & Borisy, G.G. (1995) Imaging
of cytoskeletal elements by low temperature high resolution scanning
electron microscopy. {italic} J.Microsc. {/italic} {bold} 179(1) {/bold} ,
67-76.


Chen, Y., Brummel, S. & Peters, D.M.P. (1996) High resolution
cryo-scanning electron microscopy in studying of macromolecular
structures and assembly of fibronectin fibrils.
{italic} Mol.Biol.Cell {/italic} 7(supplement),412a


Chen, Y., Brummel, S. & Peters, D.M.P. (1996) The structure and
assembly of fibronectin fibrils studied by high resolution cryo-SEM.
{italic} Scanning {/italic} {bold} 18(3) {/bold} , 200-201.


Chen, Y. & Peters, D.M.P. (1997) High resolution cryo-scanning
electron microscopy (cryo HRSEM) study of the macromolecular structure
of fibronectin fibrils. {italic} Scanning {/italic} , (In Press)


Peters, D.M.P., Chen, Y., Zardi, L. & Brummel, S. (1997) Conformation
of fibronectin fibrils varies: discrete globular domains of type III
repeats detected. {italic} J.Cell Biol. {/italic} (submitted)



Hope this answers your questions.


Regards,



Ya Chen











Ya Chen


*** My email address has been changed to: ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
***

==========================================================================

Cryo/SEM Coordinator

Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR)-- III M M
RRRRRR

an NIH Biomedical Research Resource I M M M M R
R

University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI I M M M
RRRRRR

1675 Observatory Drive #159 I M M R R

Madison, WI 53706, USA I M M R
R

TEL : 608-263-8481 I M M R
R

FAX : 608-265-4076 III M M R
R

Email:ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu

==========================================================================

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From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-bgsm.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 18:15:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM-Platelet peroxidase

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We have not been successful in recovering peroxidase activity in parafin
embedded tissue. The platelet peroxidase (as apposed to that in
neutrophils) is very sensitive. Prolonged fixation will also remove
activity. We have been successful at diagnosing M7 (megakaryoblastic
leukemia) in peripheral blood using a combination of specific
platelet peroxidase staining (using Breton-Gorius's published method)
and immunostaining for GPIIb/IIIa (alphaIIb beta3 integrin). This is
relatively easy to do and only requires that the peripheral blood have
significant numbers of blasts.

Sorry I could not give a more positive answer, but with platelet
peroxidase I think you will not be successful with anything other than
very fresh tissue.

Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-bgsm.edu *
**************************************************************

On Fri, 24 Jan 1997, Richard Lander wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Message on behalf of Zyg Poczwa, Scientific Officer in diagnostic EM;
}
} I am requesting help with trying to diagnose a bone marrow biopsy which
} shows tumor infiltration.
} The pathologists query whether or not it is megakaryoblastic and
} consequently would like Platelet Peroxidase (PPO) performed on it.
} Unfortunately, the only material I have is a Formalin fixed, Paraffin
} embedded bone marrow specimen.
}
} Has anyone had any experience with doing platelet peroxidase on paraffin
} embedded tissue?
}
} TIA
}
} Zyg Poczwa.
}
}
} Richard Lander, NZCS
} South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
} c/- Pathology Department
} Otago Medical School
} P.O. Box 913
} Dunedin
} New Zealand.
} Tel. National 03 479 7301 Fax. National 03 479 7254
}
} "Southernmost EM Unit in the World!"
}
}
}




From: Eric Steel :      eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 19:19:14 -0500
Subject: Re: Asbestos counting methods

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} K. A. Brackett, Ph.D. wrote:
}
} "PCM really gives total airborne fiber concentration because asbestos cannot
} be differentiated from any other fiber of similar size.
} SEM methods rely on EDS for identification but cannot differentiate
} asbestos from other mineral fibers with the same chemical composition but
} different crystalline structure.
} TEM uses both EDS and SAED and is the only method currently acceptable in
} law courts in the U.S."
}

The difference between the techniques is related to resolution and
visibility in addition to the identification mentioned above. There are
three common commercial types of asbestos: chrysotile, crocidolite, and
Amosite. Single crystal chrysotile asbestos fibers (fibrils) are typically
about 40nm wide, crocidolite asbestos has a larger width distribution but
fibrils are commonly seen down to about 10-20 nm in width. Single crystals
of Amosite are typically thicker than the other two commercial abestos types
and may be a few tenths of a micrometer. (note: In all cases length is
somewhat independent of the width, so that one can easily have very
long-thin fibers.)

Chrysotile and crocidolite, therefore, can have a significant portion of the
fibers below the resolution of the phase contrast light microscope (PCM).
When analyzed directly on filters, the visibility (not resolution) of these
thin fibers using a thermionic gun SEM is also very limited and not reliable
for analysis. TEM can easily see/analyze the thinnest asbestos fibers. For
Amosite, due to its thicker nature, the resolution/visibility case is more
ambiguous and may be sufficient, especially in the SEM case.

Thus, PCM not only counts fibers indiscriminately (adding nonasbestos
fibers), it also misses fibers indiscriminately (missing thin asbestos and
other fibers).
Thermionic gun SEMs have biases that are similar but not quite as severe as
the PCM.

The reliability/use of the PCM/SEM/TEM also depends on its application.
Asbestos occurs naturally in veins or mats of billions of bundled fibers.
Since size fractionation of aerosol particles is a well known phenomenon,
the sizes, especially the width, of the asbestos fibers/bundles in an
aerosol will vary with location and the processes to which the asbestos has
been exposed. Thus different locations/samples will have different size
distributions. And different techniques (PCM/SEM/TEM) may get useful or
totally useless results depending on the fiber sizes and types and the
history of that particular aerosol.

To make the choice of method problem more complex yet ... only occupational
(asbestos textile plants and the like) air samples analyzed by PCM have been
correlated with health effect.

Again, as Brackett mentioned, the asbestos analysis issue can be very complex.


Eric B. Steel, Leader e-mail: eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Microanalysis Research Group Office: 301-975-3902
N.I.S.T. FAX: 301-216-1134
Bldg. 222/Rm A113
Gaithersburg MD 20899





From: Gregory.Argentieri-at-sandoz.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1997 21:08:51 -0500
Subject: Looking for a new Photographic Enlarger.

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Dear Microscopists.


Currently we are looking to replace our 20+ year old Simmon Omega
Variable Condenser enlarger.

I was wondering what is the latest and greatest in the world of
photographic enlargers for electron microscopy applications.


Gregory Argentieri
Novartis
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
201-5-3-8617
FAX 201-503-6339
Gregory.Argentieri-at-Sandoz.com
Greg2NJ-at-aol.com






From: Timon Fliervoet :      timon.fliervoet-at-uni-bayreuth.de
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 08:44:23 +0100
Subject: Re: ALCHEMI and ceramics

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Matthew Stough wrote:
} I'd like to find a reference or two on an ALCHEMI
} study of an ionic material where atoms A and B
} can *not* reside on either of the sites (meaning,
} for example, that Zr would not be found on the O
} sites and vice versa).
} ....
} If you are aware of specific ALCHEMI studies on
} ionic (and perhaps covalent) materials, I'd appreciate
} the reference.

Dear Matthew,
To add on the reply from Joergen Bilde-Soerensen: There are two nice
references from mineral physics:

Max T. Otten,1989, A practical guide to ALCHEMI, Philips Electron Optics
Bulletin, 126, 21 - 28 (and refs therein)

Alex C. McLaren, 199, Transmission electron microscopy of minerals and
rocks, chapter 7, Cambridge topics in mineral physics and chemistry,
Cambridge University press, Cambridge

Hopes this helps,

Timon


---------------------
Timon Fliervoet
Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth
D-95440, Bayreuth, Deutschland
tel: ++49 921 553745; fax: ++49 921 553769
BGI Homepage: http://www.bgi.uni-bayreuth.de






From: Mikael Jargelius :      mikael-at-ele.kth.se
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 10:13:28 +0100
Subject: Re: Monte Carlo Models

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} Subject: Monte Carlo Models
}
} I've got a set of these models on my FTP site, and everyone is
} welcome to them. I worked with Dave Joy in the mid '80's to
} convert these from Apple basic to IBM Basic. Later I took them
} from CGA to VGA resolution. They're compiled Quick Basic. The
} source code is not included, since I'm concerned about someone
} changing the code and effecting the validity of the results.
}

David Joy's Monte Carlo models are also available, including source code in
Borland Turbo Pascal ver 5, for example at

ftp://freebie.engin.umich.edu/pub/MSA+MAS/MMSLib/Monte/Joy/JoyPC/


Mikael Jargelius
Department of Electronics
KTH
Sweden





From: Dr Eric E. Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 09:55:12 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: EM Cooling systems

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Dear Richard,

Many years ago I tried a variety of anti-corrosion,
anti-bug additives, none of which were really satisfactory.
On my current microscope, a Jeol 2000, I use distilled
water without any additives. The water has not been
changed in ten years, only topped up. In the absence of any
nutrient bug growth is minimal and there have been no
corrosion problems.
Regards,

Eric Lachowski

----------------------
Dr Eric E. Lachowski
University of Aberdeen
Department of Chemistry
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk







From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 08:30:40 +0000
Subject: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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I am curious. After 28 years of changing tungsten filaments out in the
sticks, and with little contact with the alternatives, what do you really
think about LaB6 and FEG sources? This is in case we are successful in
getting funding again!

Is FEG reliable or do you still get problems these days - I know in its early
days there were some scare stories but how about now?

Any off-line/on-line comments would be appreciated.

Keith Ryan

Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk

PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: Yves Maniette :      yves-at-giga.sct.ub.es
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 13:46:10 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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On Fri, 24 Jan 1997, Keith Ryan wrote:

} I am curious. After 28 years of changing tungsten filaments out in the
} sticks, and with little contact with the alternatives, what do you really
} think about LaB6 and FEG sources? This is in case we are successful in
} getting funding again!

LaB6 has the great advantage that is has a life much longer than
tungsten, therefore the money issue is maybe not so critical. Moreover you
would not have to spend so much time in changing cathodes (a LaB6 cathode
here lasts from 6 months to one year, to be compared with the 2 weeks for
a tungsten one, if the microscope is used full time).

Also it must be emphazised that you get more intensity with LaB6, as
well as more coherence of the beam, factors which may be critical for
high resolution works.

The main problem may arise if the microscope is used by numerous users,
when there is always a risk of someone doing something wrong. And it musr
be noted that LaB6 needs "conditioning", meaning that it takes over one
day (better a week-end) to have it ready to operate, if nothing gets
wrong...

Yves MANIETTE
Universitat de Barcelona
Serveis Cientifico Tecnics
Unitat ESCA TEM
Carrer Lluis Sole i Sabaris, 1-3
E-08028 BARCELONA ESPANYA

Tel +34 (9)3 402 16 95
Fax +34 (9)3 402 13 98





From: Scott Whittaker :      sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 07:52:48 -0500
Subject: Re: HMDS

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Hi Susan. I keep an archive of biologic discussions posted to the
microscopy list. There are two discussions which you may be interested in.
Go to the web address listed at the end of this message and click on the
"Tips & Tricks" link. From there go to the SEM section and look for the
HMDS and Peldri links. Both should be informative.
In answer to your question, HMDS might work. We teach an SEM short
course twice a year and we make everyone dry their sample down with both
HMDS and CPD to teach them the process and make them aware that different
procedures can give different results. So far we have found no rhyme or
reason to which plant tissues will work and which won't and we haven't made
an attempt to catalog which do. I can't express an opinion on Peldri
because we do not use it here. Boss man says it is a pain and that has been
good enough for me. Hope this helps.





At 01:50 PM 1/23/97 -0500, you wrote:
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} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {
GO GATORS
Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
Research Assistant Gainesville, FL 32610
University Of Florida ph 352-392-1295
ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
The home of " Tips & Tricks "









From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 15:09:23 +0100
Subject: Re:Monte Carlo

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List of all public domain and commercial Monte Carlo programs are
available at:
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/monte.html

Henrik

--
Henrik Kaker
SEM-EDS Laboratory, Metal Ravne d.o.o., Slovenia
Tel: +386-602-21-131, Fax: +386-602-20-436,
E-mail: Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/index.html
Microscopy Vendors DataBase:
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/vendors.html
http://www.kaker.com/mvd/vendors.html




From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 24 Jan 1997 08:56:37 EST
Subject: Monte Carlo Model Source

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


Difficulties in getting to my models on AOL have prompted me to
move them. You should be able to FTP them from:

http://members.aol.com/dking99/mc

The self un-packing file is; MCVGAPAK.EXE
Short instructions are in: MCVGAPAK.DOC

Again, these are based on Dave Joy's mid 80's Apple Basic model.
Sorry for any inconvenience this has created. Please let me know
how this works, what you think of the code, etc.

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 11:30:47 -0500
Subject: Re: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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Message-Id: {2.2.32.19970124163047.006a3c34-at-po9.mit.edu}
X-Sender: tonygr-at-po9.mit.edu
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Pro Version 2.2 (32)
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Keith Ryan asks about sources for EM's.

It all depends!!!

The only real advantage of a W source is that it is quite inexpensive to
buy. Although changing a W source is relatively quick, I suspect the total
down-time compared with LaB6 is comparable, because it has to be done quite
often. The W source, of course, cannot begin to touch the performance of
the LaB6.

LaB6 and FEG are now mature options. We have 4 LaB6 instruments and 2
FEG's. Premature gun failures are associated only with operator error. (In
fact our FEG SEM is 2 years old and has not yet required a new tip, and the
HB603 has run for 4 years on the same tip). Some people even question the
need to heat LaB6 slowly these days, though we still do it. Our one
remaining W microscope will be retired within the next few weeks, and
replaced with another LaB6.

I hope this gives a sense of our opinions on the subject!

Tony Garratt-Reed.





****************************************************
****************************************************
** **
** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed **
** Room 13-1027 **
** Center for Materials Science and Engineering **
** Massachusetts Institute of Technology **
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue **
** Cambridge, Massachsetts 02139-4307 **
** U. S. A. **
** **
** Phone: 617-253-4622 **
** Fax: 617-258-5286 or 617-258-6478 **
** **
****************************************************
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From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 11:34:42 -0600
Subject: LKB Microtome Repair

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We have a venerable LKB III Ultramicrotome in need of repair. The problem
resides in the external control unit (swapping out another control unit
from another LKB III solves the problem) and has to do with the specimen
arm "quivering" rather than rising and falling in an appropriate manner. We
have replaced vac tubes to no avail and now believe that professional
assistance is warranted. Anyone know of a company or individual who might
be of assistance?
Thanks.

####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4402
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: longlor-at-mail.auburn.edu (Rena Long)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 11:08:34 -0600
Subject: Placement of ad

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--============_-1358014886==_============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Auburn University would like to post the attached ad.



--============_-1358014886==_============
Content-Type: application/mac-binhex40; name="position_announcement"
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="position_announcement"

(This file must be converted with BinHex 4.0)



--============_-1358014886==_============--





From: Ricky L Vaughn :      RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 11:18:30 -0600
Subject: Susan Carbyn

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Susan Carbyn
I did a small comparative study several years ago using HMDS, the now out of production Peldri, and CPD. I used
renal and bronchial tissue with each treatment. The HMDS was as good as CPD for both tissues, but the fine cilia in
the bronchial tissue looked better using the Peldri. I wish they had not taken that off the market. Another
investigator working with whole fish (minnows) couldn't get any other drying procedure to work other than Peldri.
For soft tissues, the HMDS seemed to have a greater chance of shrinkage artifact but this was not consistent. It did
help to increase the number of infiltration steps from ETOH into 100% HMDS. I have heard that you can use Freon
113 as a drying agent but people I have talked to say they were not happy with it's results. Hope some of this
helps instead of making it more confusing

Rick Vaughn
Univ Neb Med Ctr





From: longlor-at-mail.auburn.edu (Rena Long)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 12:56:50 -0600
Subject: Susan Carbyn

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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT


ELECTRON MICROSCOPIST/RESEARCH FELLOW

Auburn University is seeking an electron microscopist who is
experienced in biological electron microscopy and has a working knowledge
of current techniques. A working knowledge of and experience with advanced
light microscopic techniques are desirable. It is also desirable for the
candidate to be able to apply electron microscopy to other fields.

Rank and Salary: Appointment is a non-tenure track research fellow
position. The position is a 2-year appointment, renewable upon
satisfactory performance and available funding. Salary is commensurate
with training and experience.

Qualifications: Ph.D. in the biological sciences with an emphasis
in electron microscopy.

Responsibilities: This position involves both research and teaching.
The appointee is expected to manage and operate an electron microscope
facility that has a Zeiss DSM 940 scanning electron microscope that is
equipped with an X-ray unit, a Zeiss EM-10 transmission electron
microscope, and ancillary equipment
critical point dryer, vacuum evaporator, sputter coater, etc. Assist
faculty, staff and graduate students in sample preparation and operation of
the electron microscopes. Teach and/or assist in teaching courses in
electron microscopy. Collaborate with reseachers and actively participate
in writing research proposals and performing research. Write competitive
research proposals and conduct original research.. Take the lead role in
writing equipment proposals for upgrading the electron microscope facility.
Interact well with users of the electron microscope facility and provide
outreach to members of the community. Establish a working relationship
with and attract funds from industry.

Application: Please send resume and names, addresses and
telephone numbers of three

references to:

Christine W. Curtis, Chair, Search Committee
Office of the Associate Provost and Vice
President for Research
202 Samford Hall
Auburn University, AL 36849-5112
(334) 844-4784 (Phone)
(334) 844-5971 (Fax)
curticw-at-mail.auburn.edu

Review of candidates will begin on February 15, 1997.

Auburn University is an Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity Employer
Minorities and Women are Encouraged
to Apply






From: Robin Griffin :      rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 14:08:29 -0600
Subject: Physical Sciences em job

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Columbian Chemicals Company has an immediate opening in the Physics
Laboratory section of Laboratory Services located in Monroe, Louisiana.
The job responsibilities include materials characterization and research
in carbon black morphology and its interaction in vehicle systems
(mainly elastomers) using scanning electron microscopy and energy
dispersive x-ray analysis (SEM/EDS), scanning tunneling/multi-mode
atomic force microscopy (STM/AFM), transmission electron microscopy
(TEM), light microscopy and image analysis. We are seeking a candidate
with a M.S. or Ph.D. in Carbon Science, Materials Science, Chemistry or
Physics with a thorough background in one or several of the above
microscopy techniques. Interested candidates should contact or send
their resume to:

Dr. Alex Dmytraczenko
Director, Laboratory Services
Columbian Chemicals Company
P.O. Box 96, Hwy 139
South Carbon Road
Swartz, LA 71281
(318)329-8021

Columbian Chemicals Company is a subsidiary of Phelps Dodge Corporation
and is the second leading produce of carbon blacks in the world with
plants in North America, Europe, and Asia. Any interested candidates
should be aware that Laboratory Services may be relocating to Marietta,
Georgia in the near future.




From: Katherine.S.Connolly-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Katherine S. Connolly)
Date: 24 Jan 97 15:28:38 EST
Subject: W,LaB6 and FEG

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I have no idea how many hours are in the two weeks of W filament life but I
suspect if it's life is that short you do not have a column vacumn that is
low/high? enough for LaB6 or FEG source.
Kate Connolly




From: lizard-at-okway.okstate.edu (Ginger Baker)
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 14:42:39 -0800
Subject: Apparent dehydration/fixation problem?

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Mime-Version: 1.0

To all:

A fellow researcher has been experiencing possible
fixation/dehydration problems using wheat root tissue.

The method being used for our wheat roots is: fix in 2%
paraformaldhyde plus 0.8% glutaraldehyde in 0.01 M Na-phosphate
buffer overnight, followed by 3 changes of buffer, then 1% osmium
for 1 hr, then 3 changes in water, then dehydrated (hold in 70% ETOH
overnight), eventually embedding in LR White.

Main problems are:

1. Inconsistent infiltration of tissue

2. Very often get considerable shrinkage and distortion of the
cortical tissue

Thank you for any suggestions,

Ginger Baker

Electron Microscopy Lab Manager
Department of Anatomy, Pathology, and Pharmacology
250 Veterinary Medicine
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, OK 74078
(405) 744-6765
FAX: (405) 744-5275
EMail: lizard-at-okway.okstate.edu




From: Steven W. Miller :      73150.2217-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 16:27:47 -0500
Subject: Ultramicrotomy of Materials Course

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Ultramicrotomy in Materials Science

For 4 years RMC and the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ have sponsored a
workshop that has received excellent reviews from the participants, several
of whom had attended other similar courses.

The course is typically held in October each year, the dates for this year
will be set in February. We will post a second announcement at the time
the course dates are set.

This course focuses on actual transfer of skills, not just knowledge. The
instructors from each discipline of metals, polymers, thin films and
biologicals all work with each student to truly understand the demands of
their samples. Knowledge of glass knife making, diamond knife selection and
care, types of resins, sectioning variables how to attack special problems
are all part of the course.

For a complete prospectus please contact me at RMC, 4400 S. Santa Rita,
Tucson, AZ 85714, phone 520-889-7900, fax 520-741-2200, email
RMCBTLI-at-AOL.com

Steve Miller
Director of Sales, North America
Ultramicrotomy Division




From: Jacky Larnould :      larnould-at-mnet.fr
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 22:33:32 +0100
Subject: Re: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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At 08:30 24/01/1997 +0000, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
than 4 years with restriction due to a very good vacuum and the necessity
to bake the gun once or two time a year.
FEG Sem are now used by all people working in electron microscopy with no
major problem, the resolution is very good even for low voltage,
current is enough to do EDS (not WDS for now or in special condition with
sealed counters...) and maintenance rather cheap (just consider the price
of filament boxes during 4 of 5 years)
FEG Tem are not very common for now because of cost but in term of
analytical the machines are fantastic.
Hope That helps.

==========================================================
Jacky Larnould
tel 33 (0)4 67 72 28 26
fax 33 (0)4 67 79 54 90
email larnould-at-mnet.fr





From: HARDY, JOHN :      jhardy-at-smtplink.coh.org
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 97 14:36:18 pst
Subject: cryo-ultramicrotome manufacturers?

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Greetings from soggy California: I would like to know who is still
making cryo-ultramicrotomes. With all the mega-mergers these past few
years, I've lost track of all the "older" companies except for
Reichert-now Leica. Are they still out there under different names?
Thanks for your time.

John Hardy
E.M. Facility
City of Hope Med. Cntr.
Duarte, CA
(818) 301-8265
jhardy-at-smptlink.coh.org




From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 16:59:57 -0600
Subject: Re: Apparent dehydration/fixation problem?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In message {2E943120.1991-at-okway.okstate.edu} Ginger Baker writes:
} To all:
}
} A fellow researcher has been experiencing possible
} fixation/dehydration problems using wheat root tissue.
}
} The method being used for our wheat roots is: fix in 2%
} paraformaldhyde plus 0.8% glutaraldehyde in 0.01 M Na-phosphate
} buffer overnight, followed by 3 changes of buffer, then 1% osmium
} for 1 hr, then 3 changes in water, then dehydrated (hold in 70% ETOH
} overnight), eventually embedding in LR White.
}
} Main problems are:
}
} 1. Inconsistent infiltration of tissue
}
} 2. Very often get considerable shrinkage and distortion of the
} cortical tissue
}
} Thank you for any suggestions,
}
} Ginger Baker
}
} Electron Microscopy Lab Manager, Department of Anatomy, Pathology, and
} Pharmacology, 250 Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater,
} OK 74078, (405) 744-6765, FAX: (405) 744-5275
} EMail: lizard-at-okway.okstate.edu

Ginger,

I'd suggest boosting the glutaraldehyde concentration up to 2-2.5% for better
fixation, and increasing the buffer concentratin to 0.1M. Your present buffer of
0.01M is quite low and you don't have much buffering capacity for roots of any
appreciable mass. Also, extending dehydration and infiltration times may help.
These may help eliminate the shrinkage and poor infiltration.

Under seperate cover, I'll send you technical tips on LR White proceedures that
I've gleaned from this forum over the last few years (anybody else want them,
please reply privately to my e-mail address).

Good luck!




Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu

"When the mode of the music changes, the walls of the city will shake." - PLATO
"There's a whole lotta shakin' goin' on!" - CHUCK BERRY





From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 15:57:22 -0800
Subject: Re: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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At 08:30 AM 1/24/97 +0000, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
The only thing I don't see having been mentioned here is your
application. If you typically use 10 to 30kV, then there might not be any
advantage of FEG over LaB6 unless you can afford the extra expense and want
the ease of use. However, at voltages below 5kV you'll notice markedly
improved brightness and improved resolution of the FEG over LaB6, and LaB6
over W.

And of course, by extra expense, we mean it isn't that expensive to add
an ion pump to the gun region for LaB6, but for FEG you really ought to
consider a different instrument.

cheers, shAf

{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} cogito, ergo ZOooOM {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - University of Oregon Electron Probe Facility
mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu -or- mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/




From: Cihangir Akyol :      cakyol-at-cisco.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 17:02:29 -0800
Subject: Wang Biomedical

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Has anyone heard of "Wang Biomedical" microscopes ?
Apparently thay are made in Holland. I am trying
to find out about their reliability and quality.

Please send your responses directly to "cakyol-at-cisco.com"
since I am not sure whether my membership request to this e-mail
alias has been successfull or not.

thanx




From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 10:17:31 +0100
Subject: Re:Wang Biomedical

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In my Microscopy Vendors Database is all information about Wang
Biomedical (postal address, phone, fax, e-mail and www address):
http://www.kaker.com/mvd/vendors.html

Henrik

--
Henrik Kaker
SEM-EDS Laboratory, Metal Ravne d.o.o., Slovenia,
Tel: +386 602 21 131 Fax: +386 602 20 436
mailto:Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/index.html
Microscopy Vendors Database:
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/vendors.html
http://www.kaker.com/mvd/vendors.html




From: rw9-at-psu.edu (Rosemary A. Walsh)
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 15:50:36 GMT
Subject: Re: LKB Microtome Repair

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At 11:34 AM 1/24/97 -0600, John J. Bozzola wrote:
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John,
We have three vintage LKB's (II and III)
and would appreciate any info you obtain regarding
service/repair.
Rosemary Walsh






From: rw9-at-psu.edu (Rosemary A. Walsh)
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 15:56:45 GMT
Subject: Re: Apparent dehydration/fixation problem?

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At 2:42 PM 1/24/97 -0800, Ginger Baker wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Ginger,
You might trying leaving the samples under
vacuum overnight during the primary fixation
and then prolonging the infiltration steps. It depends
on the specimen but you also might take the
dehydration past 70% to 85% or further.

Rosemary






From: rw9-at-psu.edu (Rosemary A. Walsh)
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 15:59:40 GMT
Subject: Re: Apparent dehydration/fixation problem?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Gib,
Would you post your technical tips on LR White
mentioned in your response to Ginger Baker on
the listserver or copy them to me? TIA
Rosemary






From: Gregory.Argentieri-at-sandoz.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: 1/24/97 7:56 PM
Subject: Re: Re[2]: Looking for a new Photographic Enlarger.

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In response to all who are selling the idea of total digital
photography. We are aware of digital technology, we have it, we use
it, we love it. Heck if you have the cash digital image technology
comes quite close to that of film. However, I still want to offer
traditional darkroom capabilities as well, hence the request for a
decent enlarger.

I am in agreement with the logic regarding the move from conventional
darkroom to a totally digital lab. Going digital not only saves time
in darkroom processing is more flexible, and also has environmental
impact as well.

Currently our lab is 80% digital having digital capture from SEM,
Image analysis, and partially from TEM. Currently we have two
Kodak/Codonic 1600 series Dye sublimation printers. We also have
decent CCD
cameras, even use a Kodak DCS420 digital 35mm camera for other
applications. Routinely we use digital images for publications, etc.

No doubt about it, digital photography has a strong future in electron
microscopy and image analysis. However, I still believe there are
occasions
where traditional photography is the best alternative, especially since we
have thousands of negatives in archives that on occasion need quality
prints for our customers requesting that service.

Whatever the reason I believe we still have a need for darkroom enlargers
for several more years.

For those who are fully digital, quite possibly you might be interested in
donating your darkroom enlarger:-).

Greg
______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


I would ask why you still need darkroom PRINT capability.
With a good CCD with macro lens, you should be able to enlarge
any area that you could using a photographic enlarger.
However, I do not speak from direct experience, as I've never
worked in a lab without a darkroom. However, I'm making a strong
push to eliminate photopaper processing at my present place of
employment. The basic point to be made is that a good dye
sublimation printer can faithfully reproduce any captured image
with proper grayscale rendition just as well as a photographic reproduction.
Two years ago, however, I could not make the same claim.
Thus, I would not recommed spending the $5-10K necessary to purchase
a good new enlarger. Rather, invest the money in a high end CCD camera,
such as the Kodak MegaPlus, and a decent dye-sublimation printer.






From: JAkyol-at-Pacbell.net
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 13:08:02 -0800
Subject: microscope advice for a newbie

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Has anyone heard of "Wang Biomedical" microscopes
in Holland ?

I am trying to find out about their reliability, quality
etc.

I am buying my first scope and any advice anyone offers will be
much appreciated.

I tried to subscribe to the listserver but have not got
a confirmation, therefore I'm not sure if I am included
in the e-mail alias, so I would appreciate it if responses could be
e-mailed to me: jakyol-at-pacbell.net

Thanks




From: jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye)
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 13:54:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: LR White Tips.

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Gib, I would also be interested in receiving a copy of your accumulated
LRWhite tips. Thanks in advance, Janet.

Janet K. Dye
Ph. D. Graduate Student, Soils
Land, Air, and Water Resources
University of California
Davis, California USA
(916) 752-0199
(916) 668-4217
jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu






From: Cihangir Akyol :      cakyol-at-cisco.com
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 15:53:25 -0800
Subject: test, please ignore

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test please ignore




From: Cihangir Akyol :      cakyol-at-cisco.com
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 21:51:41 -0800
Subject: test

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test




From: Matthew A. Stough :      stoughma-at-ornl.gov
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 08:32:44 -0400
Subject: Thanks (ALCHEMI)

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My appreciation is extended to all
who offered assistance regarding my
ALCHEMI question...thanks!

Matthew A. Stough
stoughma-at-ornl.gov






From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 10:10:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: marine bacteria

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Hi!

I am going to start looking at marine bacteria grown on plates and was
wondering if someone had a good protocol for the fixation process. I will
be doing SEM so I need to get rid of the salts and maintain cell
integrity. I have used 2.5% glut in artificial sea water to fix but even
with DH20 washes, I still get a lot of salt on the specimen and the
specimen seems to be covered with a "slime" like coating. Is there a way
to prevent this? I want to look at the alignment of the bacteria. Thanks
for any help.



Peace through Christ,

Phil Rutledge, Director e-mail: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Center for Microscopy voice: (410) 455-3582
UMBC Dept. of Biology fax: (410) 455-3875
Catonsville, MD 21228
/////
/ /
/ /
/////// ///////
/ /
/////// ///////
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/////





From: fams-at-holonet.net
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 10:11:13 +0400
Subject: SCANNING 97 Announcement and Short Courses

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From: Bob_Citron-at-cc.chiron.com (Bob Citron)
Date: 1/24/97 8:30 AM
Subject: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

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Keith;

I do not have experience with FEG (which I would love to have), but with
LaB6, I believe that you can count on the following advantages, in order of
importance:

1) Less "downtime" - much cleaner emission source. This also equates to
less $$ in the long run, if you consider what your time is worth.
2) Higher EDS count rates. This means you can run at lower kV's and still
get reasonable statistics and good analyses; almost a requirement for
charge sensitive samples.
3) Higher brightness; again, you can run at lower kV's and get better S/N
in your image.

BTW, depending upon your microscope, the cost of LaB6 is rather minimal -
about $600. Might be worth the investment. I use one LaB6 source at a
time, and use tungsten as my "backup". Works pretty well.

************************************
Bob Citron
Chiron Vision
555 W. Arrow Hwy
Claremont, CA 91711
USA
Email: Bob_Citron-at-cc.chiron.com
*************************************

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


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I am curious. After 28 years of changing tungsten filaments out in the
sticks, and with little contact with the alternatives, what do you really
think about LaB6 and FEG sources? This is in case we are successful in
getting funding again!

Is FEG reliable or do you still get problems these days - I know in its early
days there were some scare stories but how about now?

Any off-line/on-line comments would be appreciated.

Keith Ryan

Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk

PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 09:42:30 -0800
Subject: lists and attachments

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Message-Id: {3.0.32.19970127094222.00711b48-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu}
X-Sender: mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Pro Version 3.0 (32)

At 10:11 AM 1/28/97 +0400, fams-at-holonet.net wrote:
}
You actually write nothing, but attach 3 documents (30kb) ... I really do
wish people wouldn't send attachments to any list. Please understand that
we have to download them whether we want them or not, and if we choose to
delete the e-mail (for whatever reason) we ^also^ have to find and delete
the attachments. For me, this happens to be easy ... I know where
attachments are saved ... but this is not generally true of everyone on a
list.

Let me suggest you make the list aware of such announcements, and if
anyone responds then you can send them the info ... or (better still) you
could make us all aware that these announcements are available at a website
...

sorry to gripe, shAf
} Attachment Converted:
"D:\W95Apps\internet\pceudora\darkwing\attach\scanning 97"
} Attachment Converted: "D:\W95Apps\internet\pceudora\darkwing\attach\short
courses =7F"
} Attachment Converted: "D:\W95Apps\internet\pceudora\darkwing\attach\call
for papers=7F"

{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} cogito, ergo ZOooOM {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - University of Oregon Electron Probe Facility
mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu -or- mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/




From: Susan Carbyn :      CarbynS-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 12:08:46 -0500
Subject: Squeaky shaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have a penetron swirling shaker and over the weekend, something
happened to it. The O-ring inside snapped, and this morning I got it
temporarily replaced. Now, when I turn it on, it squeaks real loud!
Apparently, it was making this noise over the weekend before it snapped.
Does anyone have this type of shaker or have any ideas of how I could
quieten this down? Perhaps there is something wrong with it! It is not
that old, but I believe that the warranty has run out. I need to use it now
but am afraid that I may be doing more damage by letting it run.

Any help or suggestions are welcome!
Thanks,
Susan

P.S. I want to thank everyone who replied to my HMDS question. I find
this news group to be incredibly helpful! Thanks again.


Susan Carbyn
Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Station
Kentville, Nova Scotia B4N 1J5
CANADA

Phone: (902) 679-5566
Fax: (902) 679-2311

E-mail: carbyns-at-em.agr.ca




From: lkerr-at-mbl.edu (Louis Kerr)
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 13:59:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: marine bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 10:10 AM 1/27/97, rutledge phil wrote:
} I am going to start looking at marine bacteria grown on plates and was
} wondering if someone had a good protocol for the fixation process. I will
} be doing SEM so I need to get rid of the salts and maintain cell
} integrity. I have used 2.5% glut in artificial sea water to fix but even
} with DH20 washes, I still get a lot of salt on the specimen and the
} specimen seems to be covered with a "slime" like coating. Is there a way
} to prevent this? I want to look at the alignment of the bacteria. Thanks
} for any help.

Phil,

We routinely use 2% glut in 0.1-0.2 M sodium cacodylate. With three
washes, post-fix in OsO4, three washes, dehydration in ethanol, and CPD we
usually don't have a problem with salt precipitation. The slime could be a
mucous coat from the bacteria, therefore might need a prefixation
treatment. If your preparation includes the plate media then that could
be the problem.

A couple of references:

Watson, LP, AE McKee, and BR Merrell. 1980. Preparation of Microbiological
Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy. Scanning Electron Microscopy.
II: 45-56.

Krueger, DM, RG Gustafson, CM Cavanaugh. 1996. Vertical Transmission of
Chemoautotrophic Symbionts in the Bivalve Solemya velum (Bivalvia:
Protobranchia). Biological Bulletin. 190: 195-202.

Hope that helps,
Louie Kerr

Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu






From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 14:48:49 -0500
Subject: used equipment web site?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,
Awhile back someone posted a message about a web site that listed used EM
equipment. Does anyone still have the address?
TIA
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
**************************************






From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 12:37:14 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: marine bacteria

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We have looked at settlement of marine bacteria (and whatever else) on
glass plates, and I use my usual marine invertebrate fix:

4% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M cacodylate with 0.35M sucrose
(2.5% glut will probably do)

Wash with 0.1M cacodylate with 0.44M sucrose

Postfix with 1% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate (sucrose optional)

Dehydrate with 30% - 100% EtOH as usual, then CPD.

Haven't had trouble with salt sticking around.
Slime may or may not be removed - in many cases we WANTED to see the
slime (but Murphy's law dictates that it will disappear if that's what we
wanted to see). De-sliming seems to take place with thorough dehydration
with EtOH (?).

Try to minimize the amount of culture medium that gets fixed onto the
bacteria! That may be the culprit.

And remember to wear your lucky red shoes.

Tina

On Mon, 27 Jan 1997, rutledge phil wrote:

} Hi!
}
} I am going to start looking at marine bacteria grown on plates and was
} wondering if someone had a good protocol for the fixation process. I will
} be doing SEM so I need to get rid of the salts and maintain cell
} integrity. I have used 2.5% glut in artificial sea water to fix but even
} with DH20 washes, I still get a lot of salt on the specimen and the
} specimen seems to be covered with a "slime" like coating. Is there a way
} to prevent this? I want to look at the alignment of the bacteria. Thanks
} for any help.


http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangelo
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 18:14:06 -0600
Subject: Re: marine bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Hi!
}
} I am going to start looking at marine bacteria grown on plates and was
} wondering if someone had a good protocol for the fixation process. I will
} be doing SEM so I need to get rid of the salts and maintain cell
} integrity. I have used 2.5% glut in artificial sea water to fix but even
} with DH20 washes, I still get a lot of salt on the specimen and the
} specimen seems to be covered with a "slime" like coating. Is there a way
} to prevent this? I want to look at the alignment of the bacteria. Thanks
} for any help.

The slime is normal. Crang & Klomparens _Artifacts in Biological
Electron Microscopy_ discusses this, and ways to avoid it.
Avoiding sea salts is different. You might try washing with a
sucrose solution adjusted to the same osmolarity as the sea water you're
using, then washing with DDH2O. If you're not having problems with osmium
precipitation after washing with sea water, you could do extended DDH2O
washes after the OsO4--osmolarity is no problem (or less of one) after the
Os.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Pollock H (pyahmp) :      h.pollock-at-lancaster.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 12:35:00 -0000
Subject: Subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--IMA.Boundary.763893458
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

This was received from a very reliable source and just further supports my
personal policy of never responding to phone surveys.

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com


Please:
Subscribe Microscopy
to:
h.pollock-at-lancaster.ac.uk
format:
Microsoft Word
Thank you.




From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 08:34:15 EST
Subject: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Keith and colleagues,

I am surprised that there have been so many comments from folks about
different electron sources *in general*, without reference to the specific
electron microscope Keith is using. LaB6 requires a better vacuum than
tungsten (10 -6 torr or better) and FE requires a *much* better vacuum.
Keith's EM must have this capability available to it for him to consider
other sources than tungsten. As several folks have pointed out, the benefits
also depend a great deal on the sort of work he is doing. The basic "rules
of thumb" are that LaB6 is potentially 10 times brighter than tungsten, and
that the cost of a source is about US$1.00/hour (these are very broad
generalizations; your own "mileage" may vary...).

I would like to call attention to the fact that there is another option to
be considered, even on an instrument with relatively poor vacuum: the use
of a pointed tungsten filament to increase brightness.

Disclaimer: Energy Beam Sciences manufactures a range of proprietary
pointed tunsgten filament tips for most EMs.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: lab.trop-at-agr.kuleuven.ac.be (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 07:48:16 -0500
Subject: Toluidine Blue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I search a staining method for bacterial in plant tissue

The next article excist but I can not find it.

Toluidine Blue : The staining method of Shoemaker and Riddel applied to
bacterial plant diseases
(FBPP News 1 : 40-41)

Other publications are also good.

Every help is welcome


Johan Guns






From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 10:06:01 EST
Subject: Re: used equipment web site?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

At 02:48 PM 1/27/97 -0500, Beth Richardson wrote:
} Awhile back someone posted a message about a web site that listed used EM
} equipment. Does anyone still have the address?

This information is available at the MicroWorld Resources and News web site,
which is located at the URL:

http://www.mwrn.com

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 10:07:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: used equipment web site?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Beth,

Our Website lists over 80 products and is fully hyperlinked to
manufacturer's e-mail and websites. It is http://www.shore.net/~catalogs

Call if you would like a copy of the current catalog.

Regards,

Elinor Solit
Director of Publications
The Microscope Book

On Mon, 27 Jan 1997, Beth Richardson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi,
} Awhile back someone posted a message about a web site that listed used EM
} equipment. Does anyone still have the address?
} TIA
} Beth
}
} **************************************
} Beth Richardson
} EM Lab Coordinator
} Botany Department
} University of Georgia
} Athens, GA 30602
}
} Phone - (706) 542-1790
} FAX - (706) 542-1805
} Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
} **************************************
}
}





From: Beverly E Maleeff
Date: 28 Jan 97 10:04:43 EDT
Subject: MSA Professional Technical Staff Award

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

MSA Professional Technical Staff Award

The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) and the MSA Technologists' Forum are
the sponsors of the Professional Technical Staff Awards (PTSA) to provide
assistance on a competitive basis to full-time professional staff who submit
papers for presentation at Microscopy and Microanalysis '97. The PTSA
consists of free full registration for the meeting, a copy of the Proceedings
and the Sunday evening social event at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In
addition, MSA will reimburse awardees up to $600.00 for travel, lodging and
other expenses. It is the intent of this award to stimulate attendance for
those who ordinarily might not participate, and to encourage employers to
support their staff in professional activities. Applicants must have been full
paid-up members of MSA for 3 years prior to the time of the meeting. Awards
are based upon the quality of the paper submitted for presentation at the
meeting. Abstracts will be judged by the MSA Technologists' Forum. The
applicant must be the first author of the submitted paper. There will be four
awards, two each in the Biological and Physical sciences. Successful
applicants must present their papers personally at the Meeting in order to
receive the award. Former winners will not be eligible for another award.
Applications shall consist of (1) a photocopy of the completed Abstract and
Data Form, originals of which can be found in the M&M '97 Registration Bulletin
and Call for Papers, to be sent to the Technologists' Forum for judging on or
before March 1, 1997. Judgment will be made and awardees notified to submit an
original Abstract and Data Form by March 15, 1997. Those not receiving awards
will also be notified in time to submit an Abstract and Data Form by March 15,
if desired. (2) A supporting letter from the applicant's employer, manager or
supervisor, attesting to the applicant's status as a full-time, professional
staff member. Send a copy of the completed Abstract and the completed Data
Form (copies only, no originals please), along with the supporting letter from
your employer, manager or supervisor, to arrive by March 1, 1997, to Beverly E.
Maleeff, Chair, MSA Technologists' Forum, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals,
Toxicology-US, Mail Code UE 0462, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA
19406; Phone 610/270-7987; Fax 610/270-7202; E-mail
Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com.







From: Ya Chen :      ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 12:17:18 -0600
Subject: Re: W, LaB6 and FEG sources

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {v03007801af13e78936ec-at-[144.92.238.41]}
In-Reply-To: {2ECCE520.-at-cc.chiron.com}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

} Subject: W, LaB6 and FEG sources
} Author: Keith Ryan {KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK} at SMTP
} Date: 1/24/97 8:30 AM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Keith,

After working with a good FEG, you will really like it. The FEG tip of our
Hitachi S-900 in Madison was almost 10 years old. It was very stable, you
can easily obtain a resolution test image at magnification of 350kx-400kx.
That means that you have no down time for filament change, high brightness,
high resolution. The key factor for FEG is a GOOD vacuum. We flash the tip
every 2-3 days, that saves the life of FEG a lot. It was just replaced
last week due to the extraction voltage went up.

Best regards,

Ya Chen


Ya Chen

=========================================================================
\ / Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR)--
\ / __ an NIH Biomedical Research Resource TEL : 608-263-8481
\/ / / University of Wisconsin-Madison FAX : 608-265-4076
/ / / 1675 Observatory Drive #159 Email1:ychen14-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
/ /__/_ Madison, WI 53706 Email2:chen-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
=========================================================================
IMR WWW Home Page: http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr.html






From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 28 Jan 1997 10:46:50 -0800
Subject: Writable CDs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I have about $2300 to buy a writable CD system for a high end Mac =
computer. Does anyone have any experience with any of these systems for =
things like reliability, longevity, etc. We deal with lots and lots of =
images and the Jazz and Zip drives get too expensive for the students =
when storing many images.
Thanks
Judy M

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207

Phone: 209/474-5284
FAX: 209/474-5600
e-mail: murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
program web page: http://www.sjdccd.cc.ca.us/ElectMicro/sjdc.html





From: John J. Lemasters :      lemaster-at-med.unc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 13:52:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Carolina Workshop on: LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-------------------------------------------------------------------
COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT

Carolina Workshop on: LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
June 1-6, 1997
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Instructors: John J. Lemasters
Edward D. Salmon
Brian Herman
-------------------------------------------------------------------
LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES is an introduction
to applications of light microscopy. Students will have
opportunities for extensive hands-on experience with
state-of-the-art equipment for optical imaging, digital imaging
processing, fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy guided
by experienced academic and commercial staff. The course is
divided into three major sections with lectures and laboratory
exercises on: 1) geometric and wave optics of image formation,
microscope alignment, phase contrast and reflection interference
contrast microscopy; 2) video imaging, including contrast
enhancement by analog and digital image processing, fluorescence
microscopy, image detectors, fluorescent probes, ion imaging,
and green fluorescent protein; and 3) laser scanning confocal
microscopy emphasizing live cell imaging and 3-dimensional image
reconstruction. Students are encouraged to bring their own
specimens for analysis.

The workshop on LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
will cover basic concepts of light microscopy and introduce
several advanced techniques relevant to modern cell and molecular
biology. A commercial staff representing leading microscopic
manufacturers will make available for student use the latest and
most advanced instrumentation for light microscopy, image
detection and computerized image analysis. Tuition is $950.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
APPLICATION FORM
Carolina Workshop on LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES


Position:

Address:



Telephone:

Fax:


Please return this form along with a brief letter describing your
research interests and a curriculum vitae. Applicants
should contact the program as soon as possible. Full
consideration will be given to applications received by
April 18, 1997.

Send application to:
Dr. Wayne Litaker, Director of Workshops
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Program in Molecular Biology &
Biotechnology
CB# 7100, 442 Taylor Hall
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7100
Tel: (919) 966-1730
Fax: (919) 966-6821
e-mail: litaker-at-unc.med.edu
-------------------------------------------------------------------
About Carolina Workshops:
CAROLINA WORKSHOPS are intensive hands-on laboratory
courses designed to teach cutting edge methods in molecular
biology and biotechnology. Several courses on different topics in
molecular biology and biotechnology are offered each year by the
Program in Molecular Biology & Biotechnology at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Most participants in the Carolina
Workshops already hold M.D. or Ph.D. degrees or are advanced
pre-doctoral students. The courses are designed for novice
students as well as for individuals with prior experience. All
students benefit from in-depth interaction with instructors.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
About the Instructors:
John J. Lemasters, M.D., Ph.D. (Course Director): Dr. Lemasters
is Professor and Director of Confocal Imaging in the Department
of Cell Biology & Anatomy. Dr. Lemasters' research interests
center on toxic and hypoxic injury, liver preservation for
transplantation and mitochondrial calcium homeostasis, using
confocal microscopy to monitor ions, membrane potentials, cell
volumes, oxygen radicals and other parameters in single living
cells.

Brian Herman, Ph.D: Dr. Herman is Professor and Co-Director of
the Digitized Video Microscopy Facility in the Department of
Cell Biology & Anatomy. Dr. Herman's research addresses the role
of calcium, tumor suppressor genes, and anti-apoptotic proteins
on regulation of cell growth and cell death using techniques of
digital ion imaging, resonance energy transfer, confocal
microscopy and fluorescence life time imaging.

Edward (Ted) D. Salmon, Ph.D: Dr. Salmon is a Professor in the
Department of Biology whose interests are cell biology, cell
motility, microtubules and mechanisms of mitosis and cell
division. Dr. Salmon's research applies high resolution video
and digital imaging microscopy towards understanding the
molecular mechanisms governing the assembly of spindle
microtubules and the segregation of chromosomes during mitosis.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Carolina Workshop on: LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
June 1-6, 1997
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Instructors: John J. Lemasters
Edward D. Salmon
Brian Herman
-------------------------------------------------------------------
{End of Announcement}




From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 13:50:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: marine bacteria, round2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yesterday I posted a message about the fixation of marine bacteria. I
guess I should have added that the bacteria is being grown on agar in 9cm
petri dishes. What I want to look at is the association of the bacteria
to each other without disturbing the colony. There seems to be a
particular orientation and I want to observe this by SEM without taking
the bacteria off of the medium. Any suggestion? I appreciate all of the
help so far, many thanks.


Peace through Christ,

Phil Rutledge, Director e-mail: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Center for Microscopy voice: (410) 455-3582
UMBC Dept. of Biology fax: (410) 455-3875
Catonsville, MD 21228
/////
/ /
/ /
/////// ///////
/ /
/////// ///////
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/ /
/////





From: Robert Schmitz, Biology :      rschmitz-at-macsrv1.uwsp.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 97 12:46:01 +0600
Subject: Re: mucus removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Date: Fri, 10 Jan 1997 08:26:57 -0700
} To: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
} From: george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca (George Braybrook)
} Subject: mucus removal
} Cc: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

I know this is old mail but can you explain why EDTA should not be used to=
=20
decalcify specimens with bone?

Bob Schmitz

}

rschmitz-at-uwspmail.uwsp.edu
or
rschmitz-at-macsrv1.uwsp.edu=20
(note its macsrv"one" not "el")
Robert (Bob) J. Schmitz
Department of Biology,=20
University of Wisc. Stevens Point.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin 54481
ph 715-346-2420




From: Heuer Jim P. :      HeuerJ-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 97 11:48:00 PST
Subject: CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Judy -

We have a Pinnacle Micro RCD 5040. Works great. Cost was around 1k from
MacWarehouse (800-255-6227). There is a later model, I think. All the
best.

Jim Heuer
General Electric Co.
(510) 862-4501
heuerj-at-vncpo1.ne.ge.com




From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 16:58:12 -0600
Subject: Re: marine bacteria, round2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Yesterday I posted a message about the fixation of marine bacteria. I
} guess I should have added that the bacteria is being grown on agar in 9cm
} petri dishes. What I want to look at is the association of the bacteria
} to each other without disturbing the colony. There seems to be a
} particular orientation and I want to observe this by SEM without taking
} the bacteria off of the medium.

You should be able to process them _in situ_ by puddling the
solutions on the colonies, exchanging them by careful pipetting. After
drying, dissect away sample areas and thin the underlaying agar. Leaving
the contents of the dishes intact in the dishes during processing should
reduce or eliminate distortion/curling during drying. This assumes drying
from HMDS. For CPD, dissect under 100% EtOH.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 1997 17:01:19 -0600
Subject: Re: Writable CDs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} I have about $2300 to buy a writable CD system for a high end Mac
} computer. Does anyone have any experience with any of these systems for
} things like reliability, longevity, etc. We deal with lots and lots of
} images and the Jazz and Zip drives get too expensive for the students when
} storing many images.
} Thanks
} Judy M

Judy,
This may be a case where you want to wait a year. The DVD discs are
starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: adam vivian-smith :      Adam.Vivian-Smith-at-adl.hort.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 11:14:53 +1030
Subject: Re: DVD's and writeable CD's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} } I have about $2300 to buy a writable CD system for a high end Mac
} } computer. Does anyone have any experience with any of these systems for
} } things like reliability, longevity, etc.

{SNIP}
} Judy,
} This may be a case where you want to wait a year. The DVD discs are
} starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
} year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
} incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.
} Phil

Can you please explain what DVD media is please......are they comparable to
mini-discs?


Thanks, Adam.
''~``
( o o )
_____________________.oooO--(_)--Oooo._______________________________________
Adam Vivian-Smith
PhD Student
CSIRO/ University of Adelaide Voice: +61 08 8303 8627
Division of Horticulture Fax : +61 08 8303 8601
Urrbrae, Adelaide Email: Adam.Vivian-Smith-at-adl.hort.csiro.au
S.A., 5064
AUSTRALIA
.oooO
( ) Oooo.
________________________\ (____( )_________________________________________
\_) ) /
(_/





From: CUONG-HUY LE :      n1275232-at-sparrow.qut.edu.au
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 11:43:47 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Could you remove my name from the list .
My email address is n1275232-at-Sparow.qut.edu.au

Thanks.































































































From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 97 21:00:11 -0500
Subject: "Penetron" (tm) Swirling Shaker question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Susan Carbyn wrote:
==================================
We have a penetron swirling shaker and over the weekend, something happened
to it. The O-ring inside snapped, and this morning I got it temporarily
replaced. Now, when I turn it on, it squeaks real loud! Apparently, it was
making this noise over the weekend before it snapped. Does anyone have this
type of shaker or have any ideas of how I could quieten this down? Perhaps
there is something wrong with it! It is not that old, but I believe that
the warranty has run out. I need to use it now but am afraid that I may be
doing more damage by letting it run.
=================================================
SPI Supplies has been selling this product for roughly fifteen years and
this is the first time I have heard of this (actually any) problem with it.
Also, it is hard to diagnose just what the problem is without seeing the
unit. However since this is perhaps about the most expensive shaker of this
type money can buy, it would certainly be worth fixing. Let us know if you
would like us to take a look at it. Unless the unit has been dropped, I am
sure it would be more than worth repairing.

Chuck

======================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
=====================================================




From: Gary Dietrich Chinga :      garyc-at-stud.ntnu.no
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 12:53:18 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: DVD's and writeable CD's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Can you please explain what DVD media is please......are they comparable
} to mini-discs?


DVD : Digital Video Disc?? They can store as much as 4-20 GB.

Gary...






From: Gary Dietrich Chinga :      garyc-at-stud.ntnu.no
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 12:49:48 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Writable CDs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} We deal with lots and lots of
} } images and the Jazz and Zip drives get too expensive for the students
when
} } storing many images.

We had the same problem with students and buy a Sony CD-R (2X). The CDs
does not cost so much (About $10). The price of the CD-R was $1000 for
about 1 year ago.



Gary...



On Tue, 28 Jan 1997, Philip Oshel wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} } I have about $2300 to buy a writable CD system for a high end Mac
} } computer. Does anyone have any experience with any of these systems for
} } things like reliability, longevity, etc. We deal with lots and lots of
} } images and the Jazz and Zip drives get too expensive for the students when
} } storing many images.
} } Thanks
} } Judy M
}
} Judy,
} This may be a case where you want to wait a year. The DVD discs are
} starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
} year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
} incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.
} Phil
}
} &&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
} Philip Oshel
} Station A
} PO Box 5037
} Champaign, IL 61825-5037
} (217)244-3145 days
} (217)355-3145 evenings
} oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
} *** looking for a job again ******************
}
}

}
}





From: akracher-at-iastate.edu (Alfred Kracher)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 08:58:24 -0600
Subject: Writable CDs

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To: george.braybrook-at-ualberta.ca
Cc: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com

Phil, regarding your statement...

} This [i.e., buying a writable CD drive] may be a case where you want to
} wait a year. The DVD discs are
} starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
} year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
} incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.

...but will the drives be able to *write* (not just read) the current CD
standard? If you want to distribute info widely (rather than just
archiving), which Judy apparently wants to do, you don't want to do it on
DVD until most people have access to drives that can read them.

Alfred






From: kna101-at-utdallas.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 09:02:44 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: mucus removal

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On Tue, 28 Jan 1997, Robert Schmitz, Biology wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} } EDTA fell out of favour as a decalcifier some time ago.
}
} I know this is old mail but can you explain why EDTA should not be used to
} decalcify specimens with bone?
}
} Bob Schmitz
}
I'd like to konw the answer to this too, as we use EDTA to decalcify bone
of the otic capsule routinely in inner ear histology. However, we are
usually not interested in the bone itself, but the tissues it encapsulates.

Karen Pawlowski
Inner Ear Histology
UT Dallas/UT Southwestern Med. Ctr.




From: Edward Hurlbut :      hurlbut-at-mesa7.mesa.colorado.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 08:04:27 -0700 (MST)
Subject: subscription to listserver

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This is to confirm that I received your initial message and want to
subscribe to Listserver. Thanks!

Ed




From: Dave Howell :      Dave_Howell-at-ccm.ch.intel.com
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 97 07:00:00 PST
Subject: TEM Tech Position at Intel

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Analytical Lab Tech
FAB 12 Yield Dept. Materials Lab
Intel Corporation

Responsibilities:

The successful candidate will be a analytical lab tech in the FAB-12
Materials Lab. Responsibilities will include supporting materials
characterization for tool quals, process quals, process
troubleshooting, reliability and manufacturing yield improvement.
Primary responsibility will be hands-on support for TEM and SEM
characterization requirements.

Skills:

Excellent communication/interpersonal skills required. The successful
candidate should be able to prioritize multiple tasks to effectively
meet customer needs in a changing environment. Candidate should have
hands on experience with TEM sample preparation equipment used in
dimpling/ion-milling or wedge polishing techniques. Experience with
SEM and FIB are also highly desired. Minimum AA/AS degree or
equivalent with 3-5 years work experience in materials analysis
related to the semiconductor industry.

Intel is an equal opportunity employer. Resumes accepted by fax,
email, or snail mail. Interested candidates should contact:

David Howell
FAB 12 TEM Engineer
Intel Corporation
M/S OC2-218
4500 S. Dobson Rd
Chandler, AZ 85248-4906
dave_howell-at-ccm.ch.intel.com
Fax (602)715-8363





From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 10:43:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: O-rings

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Dear All,
Thanx for all the input. Here is a summary of that input, info
from Parker and my own observations.

The most often-mentioned method to flatten o-rings was boiling.
This method worked very well with viton. The advantages of boiling are
that the method is easy to do reproducibly, and "It also drives out a lot of
'glup,' to use the technical term. (J. Pawley)". The disadvantage is that
the water must then be removed. For viton, this is pretty easy, since that
elastomer can be baked out at ~200 C.
Another popular method was heating to 50 C in an oven. This was
not quite high enough for viton, which did not lay flat after an overnight
heating at that temp. I'm sure that heating at a somewhat higher temp
would do it, however. The advantages of the oven method are that one need
not remove water, and it is the best-controlled method for those elasto-
mers, such as buna-N and fluorocarbons, which cannot be heated above 70 C.
Following the heating process, one can cool the o-ring either slowly
or rapidly. Slow cooling works for me, but there may be situations where
shock cooling would be advantageous. In particular, to shape an o-ring to
a particular non-flat or non-round configuration, it might be good to heat,
shape, then shock-cool.
The opposite suggestion--to put the o-ring around a beaker and
freeze it in the round state--would not be applicable for my purpose.
The reassembly of the column takes so long that the o-ring would thaw and
fall out; furthermore, there would be condensation. I can imagine situa-
tions where it could be useful to shape an o-ring, freeze it, and install.
Spring clips were also suggested for holding the o-ring in place.
This also would not be suitable for my situation, but might be useful to
consider.
A caution about silicone o-rings was that they are very permeable
to He. As a result, leak-checking can give false positives for several
days.
Both viton and silicone o-rings can be baked out at ~200 C, and
that may be a good idea for a standard practise, since it will drive off
volatiles in the o-rings. Buna N and fluorocarbon cannot be heated above
70 C, and that for only a few hours. Buna N just melts, but fluorocarbon
decomposes. Ethylene-propylene is the most radiation-resistant of the
common elastomers. We use it for seals which are close to the beam, and
it remains relatively flexible under circumstances where either viton or
neoprene harden. The Parker O-Ring Handbook is a useful source of info
about many properties and applications of various available elastomers.
Since elastomers are treated by crosslinking and with additives,
and are, no doubt, optimized for particular applications, the appropriate
temps and times for particular treatments should be determined experimen-
tally, rather than relying on info from books. Some info--such as decom-
position temps--can be obtained reliably from books and used to set upper
limits for trial runs, but even in this case, it is probably better to
talk to the manufacturer before approaching these limits, since the treat-
ments may significantly change them.

As usual, the list was a great source of info. Thanx, Nestor,
for establishing and maintaining it.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: akracher-at-iastate.edu (Alfred Kracher) at -SMTPLink
Date: 1/29/97 8:58 AM
Subject: Writable CDs

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_______________________________________________________________________________

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Phil, regarding your statement...

} This [i.e., buying a writable CD drive] may be a case where you want to
} wait a year. The DVD discs are
} starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
} year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
} incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.

} } ...but will the drives be able to *write* (not just read) the current CD
} } standard? If you want to distribute info widely (rather than just
} } archiving), which Judy apparently wants to do, you don't want to do it on
} } DVD until most people have access to drives that can read them.

} } Alfred


The issue of access to read the disks is why we decided to use CD-R's instead of
Zip drives or other storage media. Nearly everyone has a CD player for
retrieving data and the one recorder (Optima 650) can be moved around for
recording. We are fairly happy with this recorder but it seems to me that I get
more recording errors than I would like (2 or 3 image files per 50 need to be
individually recorded or otherwise manipulated, but these are mostly Photoshop
files and these problems may be confined to that type). Not having wider
experience with CD-R's I don't know if it is more or less than typical.

Good Luck,

John Vetrano
js_vetrano-at-pnl.gov





From: Linda Fox :      lfox1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 10:30:28 -0600
Subject: Alizarin Red

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Message-Id: {s2ef26b2.033-at-wpo.it.luc.edu}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

Can anyone help locate a proceedure for staining a whole chick embryo
with Alizarin Red? We did find something for sectioned material
(Dahl's Method for Calcium) but wonder if there is a specific
protocol for whole tissues, perhaps with a tissue clearing step.
Thanks, Linda Fox
lfox1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Loyola University Medical Center
Maywood Illinois




From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 14:51:18 -0400
Subject: RE:Ignition of DP Oils

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Concerning the question about ignition of organic diffusion pump oils:

Most organic compounds will ignite if heated to a sufficiently high
temperature, and there are specific tests designed to characterize this
property. It has been more than 50 years since I worked on such matters,
but as I recall the most common test involves heating the fluid in an open
dish over a bunsen burner, in a well-specified configuration, and noting
the temp at which it catches fire. Most manufacturers provide flash point
data in the literature for their DP oils. Here are values I found in my
files for a few common DP oils:
Convoil-10 190 C; Convoil-20 217 C; Octoil-S, 209 C; DC-704, 221 C;
DC-705, 243 C; Alcatel 22, 280 C; Santovac-5, 288 C; Neovac SY, 230 C;
the perfluorinated Krytox and Fomblin fluids, completely non flammable.
Interestingly, these values are comparable to the boiling temperatures
for these fluids at a pressure of about 100 Pa, where most DPs operate (see
Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy, p. 181); however, I have never heard
of the oil in a DP igniting under ordinary (and even some rather
extraordinary) conditions of use and misuse. Even if it did, the fire
would be relatively well confined and could be easily extinguished by
placing something over the throat of the pump to exclude air.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 15:27:39 -0400
Subject: RE:Corrosion & Cooling Sys

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I have not been aware that corrosion (i.e. the dissolving away of
metal in an aqueous medium) was much of a problem in the cooling systems of
most electron mocroscopes and related instruments. It was my impression
that such suystems are usually constructed of metals such as stainless
steel and copper, which are quite resistant to corrosion under ordinary
operating conditions. This has certainly appeared to be the case for the
dozen or so instruments I have dealt with over the last several decades.
That is, all we have done is to use ordinary distilled water (which we
usually bought from a local drug store or grocery store, where it is
stocked for people to use in steam irons) in our recirculating cooling
systems, and we did this mainly to reduce the formation of mineral
deposits, such as might result from the use of ordinary tap water.
If you are experiencing evidence of corrosion, such as having the
water become 'rusty', I would recommend that you check to see if someone
has installed an ordinary steel coupling or other fixture somewhere in the
system where it is in contact with one of the more inactive metals such as
Cu or StSteel. In that case such metal-to-metal contact would form a
galvanic cell that would lead to fairly rapid corrosion of the ordinary
steel part. All you should need to do is to replace this steel part with a
comparable part made of the metal with which it is in contact. This would
eliminate the galvanic cell and the corrosion.

Control of the growth of algae is discussed in some detail in 'Vacuum
Methods in Electron Microscopy' (p. 216). As noted there, we have had good
success using the compound Chloramine-T (the sodium salt of
N-chloro-p-toluenesulphonamide) at the level of about 0.25 gram per liter.
This compound is not exceedingly expensive and is commonly available from
specialty chemical companies such as Polysciences, Aldrich and Sigma.
Excluding light from all parts of the circulating system also helps
supress algal growth (i.e. don't use transparent plastic tubing). We have
only changed the water when it looked dirty or happened to develop
noticable amounts of algal growth.
Others have recommended controlling algal growth by: adding enough
sodium borate to raise the pH to a value of 9 (making the water alkaline in
this way would also supress corroison of iron parts); the use of
Dichlorophene (2-2-methylenebis-P-parachlorophenol); and the use of a
compound called 'Aqua Treat', available from Aqua Labs (508-388-3989). I
have had no direct experience with these latter three methods.
Good luck,

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Lesley Suzanne Bechtold :      lsb-at-aretha.jax.org
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 17:01:37 -0500
Subject: decalcify vs. non-decalcify

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I seem to remember that in December there was a group of replies to someone
who asked if it was possible to prepare bone for TEM without decalcifying
it. As luck would have it, I now have a P.I. asking about that very subject.
From what I remember, my impression was that it was possible to prepare bone
samples without any special procedures being needed. Did I remember correctly?

Thanks in advance.

Lesley Bechtold





From: Cheryl Cheney :      hr-at-micrion.com
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 16:51:18 -0500
Subject: Advertisement for Applications Engineers

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--------------30DD1E181387
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Please post the following attachment.

Thank You.

Cheryl Cheney
Human Resources Manager

--------------30DD1E181387
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--------------30DD1E181387--





From: jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 14:09:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: re: Alizarin Red.

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I am also interested in staining for calcium. My subject is Douglas Fir
ectomycorrhizal with a basidiomycete fungus, Rhizopogon vinicolor. I am
trying to localize calcium in the fungal tissue and in the interface area
between the plant and the fungal cells. Tracers for calcium have proven
difficult, i.e. flourescent probes for calcium do not cross fungal
membranes and are probably too large to pass through cell walls as calcium
does. I am interested in references on Alizarin red, or "Dahl's method for
Calcium", whether these are applicable to botanical specimens, and what
about fixing the calcium in place so that it is not displaced by
sectioning, etc., prior to staining? Thanks in advance for any advice.


Janet K. Dye
Ph. D. Graduate Student, Soils
Land, Air, and Water Resources
University of California
Davis, California USA
(916) 752-0199
(916) 668-4217
jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu






From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 09:28:01 +1000
Subject: Re: Writable CDs

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Judy,

I'd recommend going with a CD-writer too, for the following reasons;

1) Your clients (students, faculty members, etc) are MUCH more likely to have
immediate access to a CD reader than a DVD.

2) CD standard won't dissappear in a hurry because the whole music industry is
locked in on it. It's probable that DVD's will read 'old' CD's too.

3) Assuming a micrograph is around 1MB in size, a CD will hold approx. 600
micrographs - more than enough already. Why would a student, working on your
average sized project, want a DVD that holds 4,000-20,000 micrographs? Of
course it's a different matter for archiving within the EM lab.

4) I don't know the cost of a DVD witer, but I bet it's a LOT more than a CD
writer. You've got the money for a CD writer now. Why wait til you can afford
a DVD?

Geoff Avern
Microscopy Labs
Australian Museum
Sydney, Australia

Philips CDD 522 - we're very happy with it. (Usual disclaimer)




From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 17:09:35 -0600
Subject: Re: DVD's and writeable CD's

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} Can you please explain what DVD media is please......are they comparable to
} mini-discs?
}
}
} Thanks, Adam.

DVD is the new standard for multigiga byte storage. CD-ROMs with
multiple layers of data. The 1st generation is about 4GB, the 2nd about
9GB. I believe they'll be about the same diameter as CDs. Not comparable to
mini-discs.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 17:18:54 -0600
Subject: Re: Writable CDs

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At 08:58 29/01/1997, Alfred Kracher wrote:
} Phil, regarding your statement...
}
} } This [i.e., buying a writable CD drive] may be a case where you want to
} } wait a year. The DVD discs are
} } starting to come out now, with the 2nd generation late this year or next
} } year. Don't get 1st generation--the standards for F2 is already known and
} } incompatible with F1. DVD will likely replace CD-ROMs in a few years.
}
} ...but will the drives be able to *write* (not just read) the current CD
} standard? If you want to distribute info widely (rather than just
} archiving), which Judy apparently wants to do, you don't want to do it on
} DVD until most people have access to drives that can read them.
}
} Alfred

True. As far as I know, the 1st generation of DVDs will be
read-only or if writable, then only to 1st gen DVD. 2nd gen DVD will read &
write only 2nd gen DVD. Current CD-ROM will only read & write to current
CD-ROM. Except probably not to all current CD-ROM; as they go to 12X (maybe
even 8X) they're changing what they hold constant: the angular velocity or
the data density. Currently CD-ROMs change speed as they read from
inside=} out. The "faster" ones hold the rotation speed constant, as I
recall. Anyway there is/will be compatibility problems between {6-8X
CD-ROMs & (8?) 12X and higher ones.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 17:24:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Alizarin Red

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} Can anyone help locate a proceedure for staining a whole chick embryo
} with Alizarin Red? We did find something for sectioned material
} (Dahl's Method for Calcium) but wonder if there is a specific
} protocol for whole tissues, perhaps with a tissue clearing step.
} Thanks, Linda Fox

Linda,
_Staining Procedures_, 3rd ed. Pg.137ff. Biological Stain
Commission, Williams &Wilkins Co. Baltimore. 4th ed. has it also, but don't
know the page. This work is likely on a higher edition by now. Email me if
you need the detailed recipe. Hi to John!
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 16:54:37 GMT+1200
Subject: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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This is possibly a very dumb question, but anyway:-

If the carbon coating on a sample is imperfect, or if the
earthing from said coating is imperfect, so that the sample charges,
is the resulting charge positive or negative?
My initial assumption was that is would be -ve (buildup of all
those bombarding electrons with nowhere to go), but then surely one
15kV electron produces more than one secondary, doesn't it?
I've recently had an incident whereby I got EPMA analytical
totals which were a bit high (101 to 103), and this went away when I
was more liberal with the conductive paint.
Could this be because the sample was charging +ve, thus
increasing the effective accelerating voltage?

cheers

Ritchie

Ritchie Sims phone: 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology fax: 64 9 3737435
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand




From: awilson-at-sghms.ac.uk (Amanda Wilson)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 97 09:58:59 GMT
Subject: Re: Alizarin Red

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4$tfdGT$D۷_~ {&6fWvvFV4Lm/ȉ鹊XD

Especially to Janet Dye and Linda fox

The Alizarin technique for calcium is called "Dawsons" and is quite old. We
don't have the original reference, but for bone the proceedure is: fix in
10% NFS, wash then transfer to 0.5% aq KOH to which enough alizarin red S
has been added to turn solution to deep purple, leave for 24 hours or till
bones are distinctly red, transfer thro KOH-glycerine series,3:1, 1:1, 1:3,
to pure glycerine. Store in pure glycerine plus few crystals of thymol.
Refs for meth blue plus alizarin red staining of bone may help: Bechtol
1948 Stain Technol 23, p3-9; Burdi and Flecker 1968 Stain Technol 43,
p47-48; Lundvall 1927 Anat Anz 62, p353-373. If you still require more
info, contact me via e-mail and we will try to help.

Miss A.J.Wilson
Electron Microscope Unit
St George's Hospital Medical School
Cranmer Terrace
Tooting London SW17 ORE
Tel: 0181 725 5220






From: awilson-at-sghms.ac.uk (Amanda Wilson)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 97 10:06:50 GMT
Subject: Re: Alizarin red(part 2)

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We found Dawson's original technique for alizarin preparations:

1. Fix in 95% ALC for 48-72Hrs. Prolonged fix in alcohol renders tissue
less liable to maceration.

2. Remove fats in acetone for 2-4 days then return specimens to alcohol for
12-24 hrs.

3. Place in 1% KOH until bones or digits appear thro' muscle
Transfer to 0.1% Alizarin Red S in 1% KOH. (Other stains eg alcian blue, or
victoria blue can be used to counter-stain cartilage or bone at this
stage.)

4. Leave till stained or desired bone colour, change to fresh stain if
necessary.

5. CLEARING
Place in solution of 1g KOH, 20mls glycerine, 79mls dist water, leave till
sample clears.

6. When clear, pass thro' increasing conc of glycerine, 50, 70, 90, 100%

Miss A.J.Wilson
Electron Microscope Unit
St George's Hospital Medical School
Cranmer Terrace
Tooting London SW17 ORE
Tel: 0181 725 5220






From: jeharper-at-amoco.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 97 07:58:51 -0600
Subject: Re: Advertisement for Applications Engineers

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The "Advertisement For Applications Engineers" has an unreadable
attachment. It appears to be a Wordpro document which I cannot
handle. Please repost the message without using attached files.





From: Scott D. Walck WL/MLBT :      walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 97 08:57:12 -0500
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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} This is possibly a very dumb question, but anyway:-
If you don't know the answer and you want to know it, then no question is
dumb.


} My initial assumption was that is would be -ve (buildup of all
} those bombarding electrons with nowhere to go), but then surely one
} 15kV electron produces more than one secondary, doesn't it?
} I've recently had an incident whereby I got EPMA analytical
} totals which were a bit high (101 to 103), and this went away when I
} was more liberal with the conductive paint.
} Could this be because the sample was charging +ve, thus
} increasing the effective accelerating voltage?

The only way the sample can charge up is if the BSE and SE current is more
than the incident current. It is my understanding that for flat
non-conducting samples that this situation occurs around 1kV, slightly less
than the charge balancing condition for LVSEM. At higher voltages, the sum of
the backscatter coefficient and secondary electron coefficients will be
significantly less than one. If the sample is tilted to high angles (e.g., 70
deg), then the charge balance condition can be extended to about 3keV. But
you wouldn't be tilting your sample to such high angles for analysis.

I think the answer to your increased signal may lie in the cross section for
core ionization with overvoltage. If your sample charges negatively, then the
overvoltage will decrease. The cross section for ionization increases as the
overvoltage decreases. (It has a maximum at about 2.5-3.) Test this. When you
have a good sample that is behaving properly, reduce the beam voltage a little
and keep the probe current constant and see if the counts go up.
- -Scott Walck




From: Cheryl Cheney :      hr-at-micrion.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 09:19:46 -0500
Subject: Applications Engineer

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Micrion---Moving Beyond Expectations
Put your talent to the test and job Micrion in the design, development,
and manufacture of focused ion beam technology for semiconductor and
disk drive industries. Micrion is recognized as a global leader in
focused ion beam wafer modification and mask repair technology. As our
business scope broadens to include magnetic head micromachining, we seek
candidates who have an interest in leading edge technology and enjoy
direct customer relations.

Applications Engineers

To provide technical marketing assistance on design and integration of
customer applications relating to Focused Ion Beam systems, perform
product demonstrations and technical presentations, research and develop
customer applications and represent company at trade shows. BS
technical degree, 2 years' related experience. Hands-on experience
operating SEM, FIB, or process/analytical equipment desired. Strong
communication skills, customer relations and a willingness to travel a
must.

Micrion offers a competitive salary and benefits package, including but
not limited to medical, dental, life insurance, tuition assistance, ESPP
and 401K matching plan.

Reply to: Ms. Cheryl Cheney, Human Resources Manager

Mail: Micrion Corporation, 1 Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960-7990
Email: hr-at-micrion.com
Web Site: www.micrion.com
AA/EOE M/F/D/V




From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 97 16:15 MET
Subject: Writable CDs

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} } ...but will the drives be able to *write* (not just read) the current CD
} } standard? If you want to distribute info widely (rather than just
} } archiving), which Judy apparently wants to do, you don't want to do it on
} } DVD until most people have access to drives that can read them.
} }
} } Alfred

I read an recent article about the development and marketing of DVD disks and
drives. The introduction of writeable DVD drives is planned only for next year
and of course it will take some time until they become affordable.

Petra
--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu or 100112.2335-at-compuserve.com





From: pat hales :      hales-at-medcor.mcgill.ca
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 10:21:35 -0800
Subject: Bone Decalcification

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I, too, would be very interested in any first hand information or references
available regarding the decalcification of bone - EDTA, ascorbic acid, or other.

Pat Hales
Dept. of Anatomy & Cell Biology
McGill University
E-Mail: hales-at-hippo.medcor.mcgill.ca





From: weixin xu :      wshu-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 10:59:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Writable CDs

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Hi, there:
One of my friends is going to buy a DVD writer. Does anybody know how
much it costs and where to get information?
Thanks in advance for your help.
------Weixin Xu------





From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-bgsm.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 12:15:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Attachments

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A word to the wise. If you want people on a list to read your messages-
don't send them as attachments- at least unless they are simple ASCII
text files (but even that does not work for everyone). Attachments, often
being specific to software, must be translated to be readable [this I
know is a simplification]. Most of us won't take the time (or won't have
the correct software) to accomplish the translation.

Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-bgsm.edu *
**************************************************************





From: jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu (James Pawley)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 12:35:33 -0500
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


It is a bit more complex than you think. Apart from the "overall"
situation the impinging electrons have momentum. they know electronsout of
the surface layer, creating a positive volume and are deposited farther in.
Truely immense field are thus created if the resistivity is high enough.
Eventually breakdown occurs and the electrons trapped inside can actually
blast out through the surface into the vacuum (ballistic electrons).

It is a can of worms and makes one realize that EPMA on insulators is an
approximate activity at best. There was work on this in terms of looking
at frozen biological specimens (ice being an insulator). If memory serves,
the fellow involved was Ricke, in Germany about 20 years ago and he found
that the electrons didn't penetrate anywhere near as far as they were
supposed to because the internal field slowed them down. Note, this was on
coated specimens!! They also didn't make as many x-rays as they should
becuse much of their initial kinetic energy was still stored in the field
of the "virtual capacitor" near the surface.

Jim Pawley

****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 1235, Engineering Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI, 53706
JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU






From: Sarath Menon :      skmenon-at-nps.navy.mil
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 12:58:12 -0800
Subject: TEM-EELS

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I am looking for electron energy loss spectra (both oxygen and metal) from
pure oxides such as Cr2O3, Cu2O and CuO. Can someone provide references?



Sarath K Menon
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Naval Postgraduate School
Monterey, CA 93943

Ph. No. (408)-656-2551
FAX No. (408)-656-2238
E-mail : skmenon-at-nps.navy.mil




From: paulc-at-gps.caltech.edu (Paul K. Carpenter)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 14:03:44 -0800
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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Ritchie Sims asked,

} } I've recently had an incident whereby I got EPMA analytical
} } totals which were a bit high (101 to 103), and this went away when I
} } was more liberal with the conductive paint.

Scott Walck added,

} I think the answer to your increased signal may lie in the cross section for
} core ionization with overvoltage. If your sample charges negatively, then the
} overvoltage will decrease. The cross section for ionization increases as the
} overvoltage decreases. (It has a maximum at about 2.5-3.) Test this. When you
} have a good sample that is behaving properly, reduce the beam voltage a little
} and keep the probe current constant and see if the counts go up.

My own working definition for charging is that there is an avalanche of
secondary electrons emitted from the sample. The practical effects of
charging are that the electrons are slowed down going into the sample,
because the negative local charge at the sample surface produces a force
against the electrons arriving from the gun. The electrons may also be
deflected away from the nominal beam spot. In terms of what you think you
are analyzing, the beam may be on an adjacent grain, or on a grain
boundary, etc. The beam could easily be deflected out of the lateral depth
of field for the WDS spectrometers (several tens to hundreds of microns),
the result being a lower x-ray intensity and therefore a low analytical
total due to spectrometer defocusing.

Three ways to check for sample charging. First, the high energy cutoff of
the EDS spectrum (Duane-Hunt limit) should ramp right up to the
accelerating voltage. If it is routinely below that acc voltage, the
sample is charging, and if it is above the acc voltage, you are seeing some
pulse pileup -- that is ok. Secondly, if you are in imaging mode and you
switch from very low mag right up to high mag, you may see a fairly rapid
shift of the image due to beam deflection. Thirdly, you may see the
absorbed current value jump around. Finally, for really bad charging, you
see the streaking of the secondary electron image due to the SE avalanche.
Of these it is my experience that the Duane-Hunt limit is most sensitive,
and shows charging when none of these other features are observed. For
this reason, you should acquire an EDS spectrum with each analysis to
monitor the cutoff, as well as to check for missed elements.

The effect of electron retardation is to lower the overvoltage. This will
reduce the generated x-ray intensity in the sample relative to the standard
(assuming that the standard is fully conductive). If you are operating at
an accelerating voltage that is 1.5 times the excitation energy of your
most energetic line, then the ionization cross section is pretty linear in
that range, and a small decrease in overvoltage should not really affect
the cross section. Thus, a decrease in overvoltage (and intensity) will
give you a low total, not a high one. If you are operating at a voltage
that is right down on the excitation energy, then you are in the strongly
curved portion of the cross section curve, and you might see an increase in
intensity. But you should not be operating in this voltage regime to begin
with, because we do not know the exact nature of the ionization cross
section function. The same comment applies to a situation where, for
example, the instrument is operating at 15KV but, due to charging, the
sample is seeing an accelerating voltage more like 7 KV, i.e. really bad
charging. This is what you would be talking about to really screw up a
silicate analysis where Fe is your highest energy line.

Anyway, I don't really see why you should be getting high totals. You may
wish to look beyond the topic of charging, like spectrometer alignment and
reproducibility, standards, etc.

Paul


+----------------------------------------------------+
| Paul K. Carpenter paulc-at-gps.caltech.edu |
| Division Analytical Facility |
| Geological and Planetary Sciences MC 100-23 |
| California Institute of Technology |
| Pasadena, CA 91125 |
| 818-395-6126 (X-ray Lab) 818-568-0935 (Dept. FAX) |
+----------------------------------------------------+






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 14:39:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: A tisket, a tasket, I need a gasket

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hey Kids!


I have a Polaron E5400 Sputter Coaterthat needs new gaskets. The gaskets I
need go around the top and bottom of the glass sleeve(?). The thing that
goes around the specimens and the sputtering thing sits on. Whatever... My
old gaskets are getting cracked and that's probably causing it to take
longer to pump down.

Does anyone out there know of a vendor on the West coast of the USA where I
could buy my gaskets from?

Not only that, but what type of gasket do I need? Cuna? Viton? Neoprene?
All I know is that it's black, rubber looking and kinda L shaped.


Thanks ahead of time for all the information.


Paula = )
The gasketless wonder.
Electron Microscope Lab
UC Berkeley






From: jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 15:00:30 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Localizing Ca in Botanicals.

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Thanks to Amanda Wilson, Bruce Wagner, and David Brauer for recommendations
and comments.
Bruce has recommended (pyro?) antimonate to precipitate Ca in place,
localizing it, and I assume followed by TEM and electron probe to confirm
the presence of Ca. I have heard of this technique, especially as applied
to plants which employ sequestering of excess Ca as oxalate crystals in
specialized cells called idioblasts. But I have also heard that your
specimen must have very high levels of Ca present in some form, such as Ca
crystals, in order for this method to work. So I also would assume that
this method won't work for Ca which is held on the ion exchange groups of
the cell wall, or as non-crystalline co-ions in the vacuole?
Anyway, I will read up on the pyroantimonate method and see if it will
track Ca even when it isn't a precipitate. Also will look at Alizarin red
and try to translate to botanicals.
Thanks, Janet.

Janet K. Dye
Ph. D. Graduate Student, Soils
Land, Air, and Water Resources
University of California
Davis, California USA
(916) 752-0199
(916) 668-4217
jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu






From: Paul Webster :      paul.webster-at-Yale.edu
Date: 30 Jan 1997 17:58:09 -0500
Subject: resin polymerization

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I wonder if anyone can help with this one?

I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has stimulated
it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the cell. His
eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to see its
intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the cell, with
inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he processes and embeds
it - including resin polymerization.

This is the question:

Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
heating?

Could the regular Spuur or Epon mixes be modified by adding more DMP-30, or
would that make the blocks too brittle to section?

The resins that polymerize under UV illumination would not work because we have
no way of excluding oxygen from the resin surface.

If there is no good answer to this I suppose the next question should be: "what
happens to an expensive light microscope after heating to 60#161#C for 8hr?"

Thanks in advance.

Paul Webster
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale School of Medicine
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg





From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 17:30:13 -0600
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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Message-Id: {v02120d02af16df4b30c4-at-[130.126.26.21]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


} It is a can of worms and makes one realize that EPMA on insulators is an
} approximate activity at best. There was work on this in terms of looking
} at frozen biological specimens (ice being an insulator). If memory serves,
} the fellow involved was Ricke, in Germany about 20 years ago and he found
} that the electrons didn't penetrate anywhere near as far as they were
} supposed to because the internal field slowed them down. Note, this was on
} coated specimens!! They also didn't make as many x-rays as they should
} becuse much of their initial kinetic energy was still stored in the field
} of the "virtual capacitor" near the surface.
}
} Jim Pawley

Do you have the reference for this? Or someone? Thanks!
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Carl Henderson :      chender-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 20:38:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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: Ritchie Sims asked,
:
: } } I've recently had an incident whereby I got EPMA analytical
: } } totals which were a bit high (101 to 103), and this went away when I
: } } was more liberal with the conductive paint.

and Paul K. Carpenter responded,
:
: The electrons may also be
: deflected away from the nominal beam spot. In terms of what you think you
: are analyzing, the beam may be on an adjacent grain, or on a grain
: boundary, etc. The beam could easily be deflected out of the lateral depth
: of field for the WDS spectrometers (several tens to hundreds of microns),
: the result being a lower x-ray intensity and therefore a low analytical
: total due to spectrometer defocusing.
:
: Anyway, I don't really see why you should be getting high totals. You may
: wish to look beyond the topic of charging, like spectrometer alignment and
: reproducibility, standards, etc.
:

Beam deflection because of charging might even give high totals. I have
seen beam line scans across a homogeneous sample have a maxima away from
the zero deflection point. This occurred even when the spectrometer was
"peaked" at the zero deflection point. Presumably this indicates some
kind of spectrometer misalignment, but it could give high analytical
totals.

Carl

Carl Henderson
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2005 C.C. Little Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA
--------------------------------
(313) 936-1550 (voice)
(313) 763-4690 (FAX)
chender-at-umich.edu (e-mail)
--------------------------------






From: Leonard Radzilowski :      radzil-at-elt.mit.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 21:23:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: resin polymerization

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On 30 Jan 1997, Paul Webster wrote:
}
} I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has stimulated
} it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the cell. His
} eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to see its
} intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the cell, with
} inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he processes and embeds
} it - including resin polymerization.
}
} This is the question:
}
} Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
} heating?
}

Paul:

I have had reasonable success with a resin called Epo-Fix, sold by
Electron Microscopy Sciences.

Len Radzilowski






From: Takanori Maeda :      maeda-at-crdl.pioneer.co.jp
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 97 11:57:40 JST
Subject: Re:Writable CDs

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Hellow folks.

Weixin wrote;
}
} Hi, there:
} One of my friends is going to buy a DVD writer. Does anybody know how
} much it costs and where to get information?
} Thanks in advance for your help.

We, Pioneer has demonstrated a prototype DVD-R at Japan Electronics Show
last October. You can get some information from following WWWs. (Some of
them are in Japanese with some pictures. Try your exploration!)

http://www.pioneer.co.jp/dvd/index.html
http://www.panasonic.co.jp/dvd/
http://eiplaza.toshiba.co.jp/dvd/j/news/index.html

Thanks in advance.

_____________________________________________________________
Takanori Maeda e-mail: maeda-at-crdl.pioneer.co.jp
Corporate R&D Lab. voice: +81-492-87-3900
PIONEER ELECTRONIC CORP. fax: +81-492-79-1512
http://www.pioneer.co.jp/crdl/crdl/
6-1-1 Fujimi Tsurugashima Saitama 350-02 JAPAN
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^




From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 21:25:57 -0800
Subject: Re: resin polymerization

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Dear Paul,
There are several embedding resins that can be polymerized without heating,
but I don't know about their sectioning capabitities. I use them to embed
and polish bulk samples for SEM. They are Epokwik from Buehler, a two part
epoxy that hardens in 0.5 hour and a cheaper alternative, called Jet-Set,
that is made in Burnaby, B.C. These do heat themselves up a bit as they
harden, but if you keep the volume low it shouldn't be too bad.

You wrote:
} Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
} heating?
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 08:14:16 GMT+0200
Subject: A tisket, a tasket, I need a gasket

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At last a technical question that doesn't sound like an extract
from the parts list or instruction manual - how refreshing!

I can't help, though, unless you would like to come out here
where I have a spare gasket and know somewhere to find more of
these.

Date sent: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 14:39:26 -0800 (PST)
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com

Hey Kids!


I have a Polaron E5400 Sputter Coaterthat needs new gaskets. The gaskets I
need go around the top and bottom of the glass sleeve(?). The thing that
goes around the specimens and the sputtering thing sits on. Whatever... My
old gaskets are getting cracked and that's probably causing it to take
longer to pump down.

Does anyone out there know of a vendor on the West coast of the USA where I
could buy my gaskets from?

Not only that, but what type of gasket do I need? Cuna? Viton? Neoprene?
All I know is that it's black, rubber looking and kinda L shaped.


Thanks ahead of time for all the information.


Paula = )
The gasketless wonder.
Electron Microscope Lab
UC Berkeley



Robin H Cross
Director : EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
eurc-at-giraffe.ru.ac.za - tel: +27 461 318168 - fax: +27 461 24377




From: Gordon Watt :      gwatt-at-brookes.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 09:51:36 -0800
Subject: Job Opportunity

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OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY

Geology & Cartography Division - PDRA post

A Postdoctoral Research Assistant is required to provide analytical
support for Geology Research using the SEM-EDX system. There may also be
the opportunity to contribute to the undergraduate teaching programme if
appropriate. The post will be tenable for a period of 13 months from 1st
April 1997 to 30th April 1998. The post will commence on a salary of
=A315,516 (point 3 on Researcher 'B' Scale). Application forms may be
obtained from, and should be returned to, the Personnel Department,
Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford, OX3
0BP. The closing date for applications is 18th February 1997. Further
details can be obtained from Dr R A Strachan (01865-483609 or e-mail
rastrachan-at-brookes.ac.uk).




From: Paul Sayers :      ug3010-at-sees.bangor.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 10:52:06 GMT
Subject: Unsubscribe

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he Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Could you remove my name from the list .
My email address is ug3010-at-seecs.bangor.ac.uk

Thanks.







From: Jim Darley :      p&s-at-ultra.net.au
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 21:12:10 +1100
Subject: Re: resin polymerisation

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----------
} From: Paul Webster {paul.webster-at-Yale.edu}
}
} I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has
stimulated
} it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the cell.
His
} eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to see its
} intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the cell,
with
} inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he processes and
embeds
} it - including resin polymerization.
}
} This is the question:
}
} Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
} heating?
}
} Could the regular Spuur or Epon mixes be modified by adding more DMP-30,
or
} would that make the blocks too brittle to section?
}
} The resins that polymerize under UV illumination would not work because
we have
} no way of excluding oxygen from the resin surface.
}
} If there is no good answer to this I suppose the next question should be:
"what
} happens to an expensive light microscope after heating to 60#161#C for
8hr?"
**************************************
LR White with accelerator added cures at room temperature and below. LR
Gold would cure at nasty minus temperatures. White intense light will do
the curing. It's easy to keep out oxygen.
Just set up a nitrogen cylinder with a two stage regulator and a tube
outlet. Insert into the tube a pasteur pipette. Adjust the flow to give
about a bubble a second with the pipette held in water. A cylinder at that
flow rate will last many weeks. Use a retort clamp to fix the pipette
within a few mm of the resin on the microscope slide. I expect that the
light from the microscope itself - especially with a blue filter in place
would cure the resin. With luck the nitrogen flow would also help to keep
the specimen cool.
I delightful experimental set-up to play with!
I must mention that P&S sells LR White. I hope that this posting is of
some help and I do not expect to sell a 44 gallon drum of the stuff to Paul
Webster or anybody who is embedding single cells on slides.
Cheers
Jim Darley

Probing & Structure (Microscopy Supplies & Accessories)
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia

Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
A great microscopy site: http://www.ultra.net.au/~pns/




From: Woody.N.White%650 :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 8:05:00 -0500
Subject: Re: A tisket, a tasket, I need a gasket

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Although when you see the price, you may feel the gaskets are made
from gold rather than rubber, many Polaron parts are available from
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc., Agawam MA. The last # I have is (800)
992-9037.

Good Luk! Woody

My other address...
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722




From: Woody.N.White%650 :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/30/97 8:56 AM
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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With a lower incident beam potential, the analysis volume (scatter) is
smaller/more shallow. As the center analysis volume moves toward the
material surface, resultant x-ray adsorption decreases. For the same
energy input to the specimen, this can change not only countrates, but
the overall shape of the acquired spectrum. This degree of effect is
also a function of (at least) both the sample composition (softer
x-rays are affected more than those of higher energy) and the
beginning incident beam potential.

Woody

The other addresses...
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722




{snip}
core ionization with overvoltage. If your sample charges negatively, then
the
overvoltage will decrease. The cross section for ionization increases as
the
overvoltage decreases. (It has a maximum at about 2.5-3.) Test this. When
you
have a good sample that is behaving properly, reduce the beam voltage a
little
and keep the probe current constant and see if the counts go up.
- -Scott Walck




From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 09:11:49 -0500
Subject: Re: resin polymerization

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Message-Id: {1.5.4.32.19970131141149.0069d310-at-biotech.ufl.edu}
X-Sender: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Light Version 1.5.4 (32)
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I believe that Unicryl (Biocryl) resin can be polymerized with UV in the
presence of oxygen. It is sold by SPI.
} } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } }
At 05:58 PM 1/30/97 -0500, you wrote:
-----------------------------------------.
}
}
} I wonder if anyone can help with this one?
}
} I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has
stimulated
} it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the cell. His
} eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to see its
} intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the cell, with
} inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he processes and embeds
} it - including resin polymerization.
}
} This is the question:
}
} Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
} heating?
}
} Could the regular Spuur or Epon mixes be modified by adding more DMP-30, or
} would that make the blocks too brittle to section?
}
} The resins that polymerize under UV illumination would not work because we have
} no way of excluding oxygen from the resin surface.
}
} If there is no good answer to this I suppose the next question should be: "what
} happens to an expensive light microscope after heating to 60#161#C for 8hr?"
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Paul Webster
} Center for Cell Imaging
} Yale School of Medicine
} http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg
}
}
}
*******************************************************
G.W. Erdos, Ph.D. Phone: 352-392-1295
Scientific Director,
ICBR Electron Microscopy Core Lab
218 Carr Hall Fax: 352-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
Home of the #1 Gators
*****
"Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased"
Daniel 12:4





From: H. ADAMS :      hadams-at-nmsu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 08:49:05 -0700 (MST)
Subject: polymerization at room temp

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In answer to Paul Webster's question about polymerization in situ on a
microscope stage. We routinely polymerize LR Gold with a halogen headlamp
on a ringstand. the lamp is connected to a 12 volt battery charger and
works well. If you used this in conjunction with Jim Darley's advise on
excluding oxygen, you should/may not to much of a problem. We surround the sample as much as
possible with aluminum foil to concentrate the light from the lamp on the
specimen.
Hank Adams
EML
New Mexico State University




From: Giles John E Jr :      giles_john_e_jr-at-space.honeywell.com
Date: 31 Jan 1997 11:17:42 -0500
Subject: Quantitative EDS vs. WDS

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Hello All,

I am trying to get some opinions/data in regards to the relative accuracy of
quantitative EDS vs. WDS. The specific case is the analysis of nickel in gold
plating cross sections. The plating contains approximately 2.5% nickel (to
improve mechanical properties), with no other elements present. The samples are
polished mounts. The plating is over 4 microns thick, with a nickel underplate
of 3 microns.

We stay away from the underplate region and with this thickness, I don't think
there should be any interaction volume size problems.

We are using quantitative EDS with standards. The standards are plating
coupons that have been analyzed by AA to have approximately 2.2 and 2.5%
nickel. The beam current, mags, spot size etc are kept the same for each
sample and analyze both standards before and after the sample. On the sample,
we analyze 3 separate areas (500 sec acquires) and average the results.

Our results seem to be very good for this technique. On the standards, we are
always within 0 to 0.2 percent of the standard (ie: 2.22% standard is between
2.1 to 2.3 %). On the samples, if we get a reading which is more than 0.2%
different than the group, we will throw that data point out and acquire another
for the average. If the post analysis standards do not get within the 0.2%
tolerance, we will throw out all three data points and re-run the entire test.

For this particular application, will WDS provide better results, and if so,
how much better? Also, why would it be better in this case where there is no
deconvolution necessary.

With pure element standards, the results were not as good. It seems intuitive
that this would be true, is there any reason why pure standards would give
better results when you have standards that bracket the composition?

Thanks for any advice or data,

John Giles
Senior Materials Engineer
Honeywell Space Systems




From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 11:12:54 EST
Subject: gaskets for Polaron coaters

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Dear Paula & fellow microscopists,

I know it's hard to keep up with all of the mergers, new company names and
so on in this field. The former Polaron (later, BioRad) range of specimen
preparation equipment is now manufactured by VG Microtech, in England, again
under the "Polaron" trade name.

For those of you in the United States, Energy Beam Sciences has been
appointed the exclusive agent for VG Microtech, and we provide spare parts
(like gaskets) and consumables (like targets), along with bench service, for
this equipment, even obsolete models. For those of you in Canada, the same
service is provided by Soquelec.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: tom moninger :      moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 10:28:03 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Symposium

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International Symposium on Geology and the Environment
Istanbul, Turkey September 1 to 5, 1997

There will be a session on "Materials and Biomedical Applications of Laser
Scanning and Tandem Scanning Reflected Light Confocal Microscopy" as part
of the above mentioned symposium. The confocal session is scheduled for
Thursday, September 4. The symposiom has been organized in celebration of
the 50th anniversary of the Geological Congress of Turkey.

The confocal session is being organized by Kenneth C. Moore of the
University of Iowa. For additional information on this session he
can be contacted at kenneth-moore-at-uiowa.edu. General information on the
symposium can be found at

http://www.info-mine.com/events/access/970901geo.html

Tom

Thomas Moninger (moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu)
Central Microscopy Research Facility http://www.uiowa.edu/~cemrf
85 EMRB University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA 52242 319-335-8142 FAX 319-335-8049





From: akracher-at-iastate.edu (Alfred Kracher)
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 10:39:55 -0600
Subject: Microphilosophy

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This may sound really bizarre to some of, but...

Is anyone in this group familiar with the philosophical debates about
whether the things one sees in a microscope should be regarded as "real"
(realism) or simply "useful" (instrumentalism)? Prominent philosophers of
science interested in this are Ian Hacking, Bas van Fraassen, etc.

I would like to hear from anyone who has any interest in this area, whether
they have heard of the debate before or not. It may some day play a role in
teaching.

Alfred

-----------------------------------------
Alfred Kracher
Geological Sciences
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3212
akracher-at-iastate.edu
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~akracher
vox:515 294 5439 fax:515 294 6049
-----------------------------------------






From: T. Page Owen Jr :      tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 12:15:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: resin polymerization

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Paul--

I've been able to embed isolated cells in LR White between glass slides
then polymerize with UV. I keep the slides together using those black
spring clamps. To keep the cells from getting squashed I usually
Super-glue some coverslips on the ends of one of the slides. The slides
need to be treated with a mold-parting compound first so you can get them
apart later. The LRW polymerizes well except for the outer edges.

I can provide more details if needed.

--Page Owen
Connecticut College
Dept. of Botany
New London, CT

tpowe-at-conncoll.edu








From: pat hales :      hales-at-medcor.mcgill.ca
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 12:28:42 -0800
Subject: resin polymerization

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Dear Paul,
Another choice for an embedding resin might be "Unicryl" - made by British
BioCell (no - I have absolutely no connection). Although I haven't yet had
experience with it I have heard good reports about it with regard to tissue
morphology and antigenicity at the EM level. According to the booklet of
information about it, it will polymerize anywhere between -50C and 60C -
either by heat or UV. They maintain that at lower temperature (4C to -20C)
evaporation is minimal and the blocks may not need to be covered. One of my
colleagues reports that at -10C the blocks polymerized under UV while still
exposed to the air (no cover at all).

Pat Hales
Dept. of Anatomy & Cell Biology
McGill University





From: hans.dijkstra-at-edax.nl
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 97 15:39:25 GMT
Subject: Re: Sample charging in EPMA & EM

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} I've recently had an incident whereby I got EPMA analytical
} totals which were a bit high (101 to 103), and this went away when I
} was more liberal with the conductive paint.

A possible cause may be the reduced absorption of X-rays in your sample.

The negative charging inside your sample will reduce the penetration depth of
the electrons, thus increasing the amount and the energy of SE and BSE
electrons, and thus reducing the amount of electron-energy available for X-ray
production. So in combination with the lower effective penetration voltage
percentages of less than 100 are usually expected.

But if your sample contains elements that emit X-rays that are heavily absorbed
in the compound (esp. ultra-light elements) then the reduction of the amount of
X-rays generated could be more than compensated by the fact that those X-ray
that are still produced get to the surface much more easily, increasing the
emitted X-ray intensity.

For further reading: Please see the article from Bastin and Heijligers in
"Electron Probe Quantitation" (Ed. Heinrich & Newbury, Plenum 1991, pages
163-175), in which the EPMA of non-conductive specimens is discussed.

Hans Dijkstra

EDAX International
European support office
Tilburg, the Netherlands
hans.dijkstra-at-edax.nl





From: jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu (James Pawley)
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 14:42:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Sample Charging in EM & EPMA

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} } It is a can of worms and makes one realize that EPMA on insulators is an
} } approximate activity at best. There was work on this in terms of looking
} } at frozen biological specimens (ice being an insulator). If memory serves,
} } the fellow involved was Ricke, in Germany about 20 years ago and he found
} } that the electrons didn't penetrate anywhere near as far as they were
} } supposed to because the internal field slowed them down. Note, this was on
} } coated specimens!! They also didn't make as many x-rays as they should
} } becuse much of their initial kinetic energy was still stored in the field
} } of the "virtual capacitor" near the surface.
} }
} } Jim Pawley
}
} Do you have the reference for this? Or someone? Thanks!
} Phil

Here you go Phil and others.

Nothing on the Gernam group but the name Dorge comes to mind. Otherwise it is:

Pawley, J.B. (1972) Charging artifacts in the scanning electron
microscope. Scanning Electron Microsc. 1972 (I), 153-160

Shaffner, T.H., Hearle, J.W.S. (1976) Recent advances in
understanding specimen charging. Scanning Electron Microsc. 1976
(I), 61-70

****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 1235, Engineering Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI, 53706
JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 15:40:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Localizing Ca in Botanicals.

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Dear Janet,

} Bruce has recommended (pyro?) antimonate to precipitate Ca in place,

Yes, pyroantimonate. This can, however, wreck havoc with the
ultrastructure; try it and see.

} localizing it, and I assume followed by TEM and electron probe to confirm
} the presence of Ca.

You can also locate the antimony by EDS.

} I have heard of this technique, especially as applied
} to plants which employ sequestering of excess Ca as oxalate crystals in
} specialized cells called idioblasts.

If you have ~ micron-sized CaC2O4 xtals, you can use EDS directly
without using pyroantimonate--there is plenty of Ca in them.

} But I have also heard that your
} specimen must have very high levels of Ca present in some form, such as Ca
} crystals, in order for this method to work. So I also would assume that
} this method won't work for Ca which is held on the ion exchange groups of
} the cell wall, or as non-crystalline co-ions in the vacuole?

EDS needs a large fraction of a %, or ~mM concentrations (wet) to
detect and quantitate an element. It is irrelevant what the chemical form
of the element is. These amounts must only be present in the analysed
volume; the overall amount can be very much less as long as it is present
in small, concentrated regions.

} Anyway, I will read up on the pyroantimonate method and see if it will
} track Ca even when it isn't a precipitate.

Any Ca++, and other Ca which has a greater affinity for pyroan-
timonate than for its ligands will be precipitated. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Jeff Fortner :      jeff_fortner-at-qmgate.anl.gov
Date: 31 Jan 1997 15:46:42 -0600
Subject: Re: Microphilosophy

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"microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Co" {microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
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From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 13:52:30 -0700
Subject: Resin polymerization

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RE} Microphilosophy 1/31/97


------------------------------------------------------------------------



oThe displacement of the idea that facts and evidence matter by the idea
that everything boils down to subjective interests and perspectives is
-- second only to American political campaigns -- the most prominent and
pernicious manifestation of anti-intellectualism in our time.

-- Larry Laudan, Science and Relativism(1990), Quoted by Alan Sokal in article
2, below.

I refer those considering this question seriously to read the articles:
1. "Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of
Quantum Gravity "
by Alan D. Sokal (published in Social Text)46/47, pp. 217-252 (spring/summer
1996).

-and the follow-up article:

2. "A Physicist Experiments With Cultural Studies"

also by
Alan D. Sokal
published in Lingua Franca, May/June 1996, pp. 62-64.

--------------------------------------

This may sound really bizarre to some of, but...

Is anyone in this group familiar with the philosophical debates about
whether the things one sees in a microscope should be regarded as "real"
(realism) or simply "useful" (instrumentalism)? Prominent philosophers
of
science interested in this are Ian Hacking, Bas van Fraassen, etc.

I would like to hear from anyone who has any interest in this area,
whether
they have heard of the debate before or not. It may some day play a role
in
teaching.

Alfred

-----------------------------------------
Alfred Kracher
Geological Sciences
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3212
akracher-at-iastate.edu
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~akracher
vox:515 294 5439 fax:515 294 6049
-----------------------------------------



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At 05:58 PM 1/30/97 -0500, you wrote:
-----------------------------------------.
} I wonder if anyone can help with this one?
}
} I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has
} stimulated
} it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the cell. His
} eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to see its
} intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the cell, with
} inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he processes and
} embeds
} it - including resin polymerization.
}
} This is the question:
}
} Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
} heating?

Paul - You don't say what resolution your friend requires. Would it be
possible to do this on the stage of a confocal scope, thus eliminating
embedding & sectioning? As a group, the UV-polymerizing resins have
miserable cutting characteristics, and I presume that the electrode is a
lot harder than the cell. Sectioning this prep will not be easy.

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117
Caspar, CA 95420

Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
schooley-at-mcn.org
http://www.MSA.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/Books.html






From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Sat, 01 Feb 1997 22:56:55 -0600 (cst)
Subject: fixation, embedding and microtomy of bone

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On Sat, 1 Feb 1997 22:50:32 -0600 (cst) Doug Keene
{DRK-at-shcc.org} wrote:

}
} Responding to a query of a few days ago, we routinely cut
} bone and growth plate in this facility. Our processing
} routine includes fixation in 1.5% glut / 1.5%
} paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate pH 7.4 containing
} 6,000 ppm ruthenium hexamine trichloride (fix for 60
} minutes) followed by o.1m cacodylate with 6,000ppm RHT for
} 15 minutes, followed by 1% OsO4 in the same buffer with
} RHT. The buffer rinse after OsO4 should be 0.1M cacodylate
} with no RHT. This is a somewhat modified
} procedure of Hunziker et al., J Ultrastruct Res 8:1, 1984.
} Dehydrate in 30, 50, 70, 90, 95 % EtOH, Propylene oxide,
} infiltrate in Spurrs and polymerize at 70 C for 16 hours.
} We face the block and section for LM using a glass knife,
} then use a somewhat damaged area of our diamond for
} ultrathin sections. We always have two diamond knives
} open in the lab, one which is slowly getting trashed
} cutting relatively soft tissue and one which is no longer
} optimal and is now used to cut calcified samples. The
} lifetime of the knives is usually about 7 to 8 months
} before resharpening. Our blocks are often larger than 0.5
} x 1 mm.
}
} Hope this helps,
}
} Doug Keene
} Shriners Hospital for Children
} Portland (always raining) Oregon
} ----------------------
} Doug Keene
} DRK-at-shcc.org
}

----------------------
Doug Keene
DRK-at-shcc.org






From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 1997 10:34:32 -0800
Subject: Re: Quantitative EDS vs. WDS

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At 11:17 AM 1/31/97 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} For this particular application, will WDS provide better results, and if so,
} how much better? Also, why would it be better in this case where there is no
} deconvolution necessary.

John ...

It bothers me sometimes when EDX is compared with WDX, the accuracy for
EDX is evaluated relative to having measured a known ... and claiming the
result is "good", "excellent", or for that matter "close enuf" ...

My definitition of "quantitative analysis" also includes quantifying the
error associated with the analysis. WDX makes this easy ... pure counting
stats with regard to the integral and that associated with subtracting the
background. It is the statistical evaluation of the background subtraction
(let alone the error probagated by de-convoluting) which make evaluation of
the counting error almost impossible with EDX.

It is true, that with today's computing power, the analyst wouldn't have
to wait very long for an error associated with "modelling" the EDX
continuum, but I don't see any EDX vendors delivering this error analysis.
It is also true, the error associated with de-convolution, as common as it
is needed, is also just as important. I'd certainly be interested in
reading others' opinion on applying error analysis to the continuum, and
subsequent determination of EDX sensitivities and detection limits.

So, my answer to your question, is there is no comparison ... if you want
quantitation with accurate error analysis ... EDX is ^not^ your tool.
However, I'm not saying it is inappropriate for Ni in Au at those
compositions ... you don't appear to be near any detection limits. But, I
would be careful with reporting your accuracies ...

cheers, shAf

{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} cogito, ergo ZOooOM {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - University of Oregon Electron Probe Facility
mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu -or- mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/




From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Sat, 01 Feb 1997 22:50:32 -0600 (cst)
Subject: fixation, embedding and microtomy of bone

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Responding to a query of a few days ago, we routinely cut
bone and growth plate in this facility. Our processing
routine includes fixation in 1.5% glut / 1.5%
paraformaldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate pH 7.4 containing
6,000 ppm ruthenium hexamine trichloride (fix for 60
minutes) followed by o.1m cacodylate with 6,000ppm RHT for
15 minutes, followed by 1% OsO4 in the same buffer with
RHT. The buffer rinse after OsO4 should be 0.1M cacodylate
with no RHT. This is a somewhat modified
procedure of Hunziker et al., J Ultrastruct Res 8:1, 1984.
Dehydrate in 30, 50, 70, 90, 95 % EtOH, Propylene oxide,
infiltrate in Spurrs and polymerize at 70 C for 16 hours.
We face the block and section for LM using a glass knife,
then use a somewhat damaged area of our diamond for
ultrathin sections. We always have two diamond knives
open in the lab, one which is slowly getting trashed
cutting relatively soft tissue and one which is no longer
optimal and is now used to cut calcified samples. The
lifetime of the knives is usually about 7 to 8 months
before resharpening. Our blocks are often larger than 0.5
x 1 mm.

Hope this helps,

Doug Keene
Shriners Hospital for Children
Portland (always raining) Oregon
----------------------
Doug Keene
DRK-at-shcc.org






From: Dr. Andrew P. Somlyo :      aps2n-at-elvis.med.virginia.edu
Date: Sat, 1 Feb 1997 12:06:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Localizing Ca in Botanicals.

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The detection limit of averaged (or, when feasible, high dose) Ca
measurements with EPMA (=EDS) is about 0.3 mmole/kg dry wt.

On Fri, 31 Jan 1997, William Tivol wrote:

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}
} Dear Janet,
}
} } Bruce has recommended (pyro?) antimonate to precipitate Ca in place,
}
} Yes, pyroantimonate. This can, however, wreck havoc with the
} ultrastructure; try it and see.
}
} } localizing it, and I assume followed by TEM and electron probe to confirm
} } the presence of Ca.
}
} You can also locate the antimony by EDS.
}
} } I have heard of this technique, especially as applied
} } to plants which employ sequestering of excess Ca as oxalate crystals in
} } specialized cells called idioblasts.
}
} If you have ~ micron-sized CaC2O4 xtals, you can use EDS directly
} without using pyroantimonate--there is plenty of Ca in them.
}
} } But I have also heard that your
} } specimen must have very high levels of Ca present in some form, such as Ca
} } crystals, in order for this method to work. So I also would assume that
} } this method won't work for Ca which is held on the ion exchange groups of
} } the cell wall, or as non-crystalline co-ions in the vacuole?
}
} EDS needs a large fraction of a %, or ~mM concentrations (wet) to
} detect and quantitate an element. It is irrelevant what the chemical form
} of the element is. These amounts must only be present in the analysed
} volume; the overall amount can be very much less as long as it is present
} in small, concentrated regions.
}
} } Anyway, I will read up on the pyroantimonate method and see if it will
} } track Ca even when it isn't a precipitate.
}
} Any Ca++, and other Ca which has a greater affinity for pyroan-
} timonate than for its ligands will be precipitated. Good luck.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol
}




From: Paul Webster :      paul.webster-at-Yale.edu
Date: 1 Feb 1997 14:05:55 -0500
Subject: Course

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For anyone who is interested, there will be an EMBO Practical Course in Prague,
Czech Republic this summer.

The course will focus on the application of immunocytochemical and stereological
methods in biomedical research.


Prague 23 June - 2 July 1997

Electron Microscopy and Stereology in Molecular Cell Biology


Details can be found at the following URL:

http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg/EMBO.html

Or from:

Paul Webster
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale School of Medicine
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg
Paul.Webster-at-Yale.edu
Tel 203 785 3219
Fax 203 785 7226

Best regrds,

Paul Webster.





From: Vaitilingon Devarajen :      dvaitili-at-ulb.ac.be
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 12:55:03 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Resin Polymerization

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For resin polymerization without heating, try LRGold resin. This resin
polymerises with UV and at -10deg celsius. Be careful, as the distance
between the UV light and your resin is very important for good
polymerization. If you are interested, i will give you more information
later.

Dev. Vaitilingon
Free University of Brussels
Marine Biology Lab.
{dvaitili-at-ulb.ac.be}





From: m.munro :      ab157-at-ab.sac.ac.uk
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 15:58:49 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: UV polymerisation problem

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Can anyone help with a Unicryl problem?
I am using unicryl to fix root pieces for semi-thin sectioning.
I am uv polymerising at -20, but the process is taking over 1wk
no matter how close the Uv bulbs are to the beam capsules. I am
using 6W Sylvania bulbs in an aluminium-foil lined box.
The end result is often disappointing also with some samples
requiring oven polymerisation to finish them off.

Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

Mark Munro
The Soil biology unit
SAC
E-Mail m.munro-at-ab.sac.ac.uk




From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 17:03:36 +0000
Subject: Re: Quantitative EDS vs. WDS

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} Hello All,
}
} I am trying to get some opinions/data in regards to the relative accuracy of
} quantitative EDS vs. WDS. The specific case is the analysis of nickel in gold
} plating cross sections. The plating contains approximately 2.5% nickel (to
} improve mechanical properties), with no other elements present. The samples are
} polished mounts. The plating is over 4 microns thick, with a nickel underplate
} of 3 microns.

snips

} For this particular application, will WDS provide better results, and if so,
} how much better? Also, why would it be better in this case where there is no
} deconvolution necessary.
}
} With pure element standards, the results were not as good. It seems intuitive
} that this would be true, is there any reason why pure standards would give
} better results when you have standards that bracket the composition?
}
} Thanks for any advice or data,
}
} John Giles
} Senior Materials Engineer
} Honeywell Space Systems

As has been mentioned, proper statistical analysis of the errors in EDX
spectra (and WDX spectra, for that matter) is not undertaken in any
commercial software packages, as far as I'm aware. However, the mechanisms
of WDX mean that the user can themselves process the data more easily for
proper error analysis.

WDX principally offers lower detection limits, by about an order of
magnitude, and better energy resolution, which will improve your results if
you are anlysing peaks which overlap in EDX.

I don't think either of these issues is relevant to your particular specimen.

You might find 'Quantitative electron-probe microanalysis' by Scott, Love
and Reed, pub Ellis Horwood 1995, ISBN 0-13-104050-2 a useful reference.

Regards,

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
United Kingdom
---------------------------------------------------------------






From: Amy A. Linder :      alinder-at-univ.dbq.edu
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 13:27:34 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Help!

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I am a college senior who needs help finding resources on microscopy
topics. I am doing a research paper on the applications of geology to the
transmission/scanning electron microscope. I am particularly interested
in soil analysis, fossils, or glacial geology. As of yet, I have had no
luck in finding any sort of available resources. I need not only find
resources, but narrow my topic. Could you recommend something or at
least direct me to research done in this field? Thank you for your help
and time.

Sincerely,
Amy Linder at the University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 14:01:49 -0500
Subject: Geology Papers

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Amy

You should check the proceedings of the Annual Meetings
of both the Microbeam Analysis Society and the Microscopy
Society of America. I recall sessions on geological application
over the last few years. It will not be alot but it will be
a start...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

------cut----------
} in soil analysis, fossils, or glacial geology. As of yet, I have had no
} luck in finding any sort of available resources. I need not only find
} resources, but narrow my topic. Could you recommend something or at
} least direct me to research done in this field?

} Amy Linder at the University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA







From: Paul Webster :      paul.webster-at-Yale.edu
Date: 2 Feb 1997 19:22:15 -0500
Subject: Re: UV polymerisation proble

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Mark Munro writes:
"Can anyone help with a Unicryl problem?
I am using unicryl to fix root pieces for semi-thin sectioning.
I am uv polymerising at -20, but the process is taking over 1wk
no matter how close the Uv bulbs are to the beam capsules. I am
using 6W Sylvania bulbs in an aluminium-foil lined box.
The end result is often disappointing also with some samples
requiring oven polymerisation to finish them off."

Often, poor results with UV polymerization can be traced back to the age of the
illumination being used. If the bulbs are old, try the polymerization process
with new bulbs.

Paul Webster
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale School of Medicine
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg





From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 1997 18:39:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Help!

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} I am a college senior who needs help finding resources on microscopy
} topics. I am doing a research paper on the applications of geology to the
} transmission/scanning electron microscope. I am particularly interested
} in soil analysis, fossils, or glacial geology. As of yet, I have had no
} luck in finding any sort of available resources. I need not only find
} resources, but narrow my topic. Could you recommend something or at
} least direct me to research done in this field? Thank you for your help
} and time.
}
} Sincerely,
} Amy Linder at the University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA

I haven't any sources to hand, but the U. library should have the
books/journals necessary by interlibrary loan at least. Iowa State will
have the relevant materials if you're up for the 3 hour drive. Maybe U of
Iowa.
I'd limit your topic, depending on your interest, to either
micropaleontology or mineralogy. Scanning EM has been used extensively in
studying microfossils--foramenifera, conodonts, nannoliths (nannoplankton,
a calcareous algae) and so on. If I remember right, there is a journal
called "Micropaleontology", there definitely are books by that title (try
subject and title searchs in BIP).
Mineralogy uses both SEM and transmission EM. SEM is particularly
useful because of EDX--energy dispersive x-ray analysis--that allows
identification and rough quantitation of elements in a rock. This allows
mineral identification; or helps, anyway. It should be discussed in a text
on mineralogy. SEM & TEM are used to examine mineral structure as well.
This topic should also be easily available in journals--find one recent ref
and go nuts with its bibliography.
Also try looking in Current Contents: find a likely-looking article
or three from the title, and chase from there.
Sorry I don't have more specific info., but someone else will.
Also, this is enough to get you started--it's how I usually start my
literature chases.
Philip Oshel
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu






From: Jitu Shah :      JSS-at-siva.bris.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 05:19:36 -0600
Subject: JSM 35 Lens

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I am in need of acquiring the conical part of the final lens of a JSM
35(version C) scanning electron microscope. The cone in question is the part of
the lens that hangs down in the chamber. We intend to develop a modification.
Please email me with the information so that further negotiations can be carried
out. I should welcome also any information on the composition (and commercial
specification) of the metal from which the cone is made of. Of course, info on
where this metal can be obtained will be invaluable.


Thank you in anticipation of your cooperation and help.


Yours sincerely,


Jitu Shah

Dr. J. S. Shah
H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol
Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1Tl.
UK.
email: jss-at-siva.bristol.ac.uk
Tel: 44 117 9288719
Fax: 44 117 9255624







From: es0mhs-at-environment.sunderland.ac.uk (HASWELL Malcolm)
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 12:46:23 GMT
Subject: Software for detecting movement

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I have been asked by a colleague about freeware/shareware which may be used
to track the movements of particles or bodies, captured from the light
microscope, and viewed on a PC . What he wants is something that can detect
direction, distance of travel and/or speed. I think the idea is that he
already has the captured images but needs to measure the motion of one or
two particles in each of a lot of images.

Apparently there was a piece of software, written for the BBC computer ( a
pre IBM PC invention in the UK) which could do this sort of thing for star
pictures many years ago.

Has anyone got any ideas?

thanks

Malcolm Haswell
University of Sunderland
UK





From: Paul Webster
Date: 31 January 1997 10:50
Subject: resin polymerization

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Have you considered encapsulating the specimen in warmed agar (I don't know
what the lowest temperature agars are), acrylamide gel or something similar
and then embedding the whole block normally afterwards.
I could have misunderstood but I am assuming that once the sample is
immobilized and fixed temperature may not be so critical.

Malcolm Haswell
University of Sunderland
UK


----------

I wonder if anyone can help with this one?

I have a colleague who would like to embed a single cell after he has
stimulated. it with a fine carbon electrode which has been inserted into the
cell. His eventual aim is to cut a section through the carbon electrode to
see its intracellular orientation. However, to do this, he must keep the
cell, with inserted electrode, in place on the microscope stage as he
processes and embeds it - including resin polymerization.

This is the question:

Is there an EM embedding resin available that can be polylmerized without
heating?

Could the regular Spuur or Epon mixes be modified by adding more DMP-30, or
would that make the blocks too brittle to section?

The resins that polymerize under UV illumination would not work because we
have no way of excluding oxygen from the resin surface.

If there is no good answer to this I suppose the next question should be:
"what happens to an expensive light microscope after heating to 60#161#C for
8hr?"

Thanks in advance.

Paul Webster
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale School of Medicine
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg





From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 08:09:11 -0500
Subject: Re: resin polymerization

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Message-Id: {1.5.4.32.19970203130911.00677b38-at-pop.fast.net}
X-Sender: goldmrkr-at-pop.fast.net (Unverified)
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Light Version 1.5.4 (32)
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

At 09:11 AM 1/31/97 -0500, you wrote:
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Paul/Greg

Received comments from John Chandler, British BioCell Int Ltd in Cardiff for
whom we distribute, regarding UNICRYL, which they manufacture. He says:

Of course you could use UNICRYL at 4C with UV, but all acrylic resins are
softer than epoxy resins (the latter have aromatic cross-linking
structures). It would be quite difficult to cut carbon inside the cell in a
relatively soft resin. The whole thing looks impossible anyway to try and
polymerize on the microscope stage with heat. If UV light could be passed
down the microscope at the right wavelength then polymerization could take
place that way, and a cover slip may be used to prevent evaporation from an
open tray or to exclude oxygen, if necessary.

CONCLUSIONS
1. UNICRYL can polymerize under UV in the presence of oxygen.
2. Evaporation is minimal at low temperatures if the specimen can be kept
cold on the microscope stage.
3. UNICRYL may or may not be hard enough to allow sectioning with carbon in
the cells, depending on the size of the carbon wire.

Good Luck -

Don Cox

********************************************************
Donald P. Cox, Ph.D., M.B.A.
GOLDMARK BIOLOGICALS/D.P. COX ASSOCIATES
437 Lock Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865-2764
(908) 859-2631 - - (908) 859-2875-FAX
E-Mail: goldmrkr-at-fast.net/goldmarker-at-aol.com
Web Page: http://members.aol.com/goldmarker

~~~"Goldmarking is everlasting probing!"~~~
********************************************************






From: Woody.N.White%650 :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 8:05:00 -0500
Subject: Re[2]: Quantitative EDS vs. WDS

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Re: Pure element standards vs. "near match" standards. The correction
coefficients are typically larger when using pure element standards
compared to standards nearly matching the unknown. Larger corrections
can result in larger errors. The degree of this effect will vary,
depending on the elements involved.

Woody

http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722/




From: HASWELL Malcolm
Date: 31 January 1997 16:55
Subject: Software for detecting movement

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I apologise if this message arrives at the list twice but the first one
seems t have gone to the wrong address.

Malcolm Haswell
----------

I have been asked by a colleague about freeware/shareware which may be used
to track the movements of particles or bodies, captured from the light
microscope, and viewed on a PC . What he wants is something that can detect
direction, distance of travel and/or speed. I think the idea is that he
already has the captured images but needs to measure the motion of one or
two particles in each of a lot of images.

Apparently there was a piece of software, written for the BBC computer ( a
pre IBM PC invention in the UK) which could do this sort of thing for star
pictures many years ago.

Has anyone got any ideas?

thanks

Malcolm Haswell
University of Sunderland
UK





From: Richard E. Edelmann :      edelmare-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 09:01:28 -500
Subject: Looking for reference

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I have a copy of a preprint for an article by H. Hoch which was
published in Staining Technology but I do not have the full
reference information (i.e. no title, no pages, no volume number).
The paper deals with staining ultrathin sections of fungi with
barium permanganate.

Can anyone help me out so that I can give correct credit where
credit is due?

Thanks



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712 Fax: 513-529-4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: gradice-at-richmond.edu (Gary Radice)
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 09:46:03 -0500
Subject: re: are microscope images real

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I'm not familiar with the philosophical debate, but for what it is worth, I
always teach my microanatomy students that they never see an actual object
in the real world OR in the microscope. What they see is the light
reflected, transmitted through, diffracted, refracted, or emitted from an
object. The IMAGES on their retinas are "real" because the light exists,
but the images are only an approximation of the object, not the object
itself.

Gary Radice, Associate Professor gradice-at-richmond.edu
Department of Biology 804-289-8107 (voice)
University of Richmond VA 23173 804-289-8233 (FAX)






From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 09:03:33 -0600
Subject: microphilosphy

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Greetings,
I agree that attacts on the rationalist stance of science are
growing in frequency are important to rebut. My view of the error that the
social constructionists make comes down to this. Consider the color red.
When you look at a red object your brain "contructs" a color for that
object. There can never be a way to know that the color that your brain
paints that object in your mind is the very same color that my brain picks.
Color in that sense is a "construct" of the mind. BUT, we can agree that
the object in question is the SAME color, and agree that it corresponds to
some reference color, obtained for example with a monochrometer. The
constructionists argue because there are constucts in the mind that
EVERYTHING in the mind is a construct. This can be easily disproved by the
fact that we all agree about what color stop signs are.

Our agreement about the color of stop signs means that we can make
another object, color it like a stop sign, and every one will agree about
that one too. This sounds trivial, but it is at the core of our assurance
about the reality of science.

Many people who doubt the reality of objects down the scope have
never looked through a microscope. Perhaps the best thing we can do for
such sceptics is to invite them into our labs and show then a rotifer,
ascorbate crystals in polarized light, or a fly in SEM?

Just my virtual two cents.

Tobias Baskin

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Robert Mixon :      mixonr-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 08:36:46 -0800
Subject: RE: Microphilosophy

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The geological journals are full of studies applying SEM/TEM/EPMA, among
other microscopic techniques, to geologic problems. Look up the journals
"American Mineralogist", "Journal of Sedimentary Petrology", and any
journal on Paleontology/Micropaleontology (I don't know their titles).
Also two general references that should point you in the direction are:
"Electron Microscopy in Mineralogy" , Springer-Verlag, 1976, H.-R. Wenk,
ed.
And
"Transmission electron microscopy of minerals and rocks", by Alex C.
McLaren, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991.

*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*
James J. McGee (jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Dept. of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina (803) 777-6300 (Office)
Columbia, SC 29208 (803) 777-6610 (Fax)


----------

My bias is that reality exists if only by my own definition (the conclusions one
jumps to may be only your own) however it is clear to me that by almost all
rigorous recent (after 1940 or so) philosophic or "scientific" (misused here for
emphasis) definitons, reality is unobservable. The most obvious example is the
heisenberg uncertainty principle which states that one cannot observe both
position and velocity of any moviing particle. Certainly looking to the night
sky for stars is looking at ancient history. So to is looking at light images
thru a microscope "ancient history" albeit on a smaller time scale.
Point Number two: (are you counting??) My colleagues consider when asked that
everything one observes thru a microscope to be "artifact"...but by golly I like
my particular reliable artifact (some color stain, phase contrast,SEM,TEM etc).
This is an important point when the uninitiated ask you if what they are seeing
is "artifact".

Thanks,
really
bob




From: Dennis Goode :      goode-at-zool.umd.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 12:02:27 +0500EST
Subject: Re: Localizing Ca in Botanicals.

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jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye) wrote on the subject: Localizing Ca in Botanicals.

} Bruce Wagner has recommended (pyro?) antimonate to precipitate Ca in place,
} localizing it, and I assume followed by TEM and electron probe to confirm
} the presence of Ca. I have heard of this technique, especially as applied
} specialized cells called idioblasts. But I have also heard that your
} specimen must have very high levels of Ca present in some form, such as Ca
} this method won't work for Ca which is held on the ion exchange groups of
} Anyway, I will read up on the pyroantimonate method and see if it will
} track Ca even when it isn't a precipitate. Also will look at Alizarin red
} and try to translate to botanicals.
} Thanks, Janet.

} Janet K. Dye
Ph. D. Graduate Student, Soils
Land, Air, and Water Resources
University of California
Davis, California USA
(916) 752-0199
(916) 668-4217
jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu

Janet,

Charley Smalls and I used the pyroantinomate method years ago to localize Ca2+
in developing muscle at sites where Ca2+ is not normally crystaline. However,
it also precipitates Mg2+ if I recall, so you have to do some special
controls. The refs are in our paper:
Smalls, C.M. & Goode,D. (1977) Ca+2 - accumulating components in
developing skeletal muscle. J. Morphol.151: 213-238.

-Dennis

Dr. M. Dennis Goode Phone (301) 405-6917
Department of Zoology Fax (301) 314-9358
University of Maryland e-mail goode-at-zool.umd.edu
College Park MD 20742
*************************************************************
"If the Lord Almighty had consulted me before embarking upon the
creation, I should have recommended something simpler."
-Alphonso X of Castile, 15th Century




From: WAYNE KING :      WAYNE.KING-at-quickmail.llnl.gov
Date: 3 Feb 1997 09:24:09 -0800
Subject: Frontiers of Electron Micro

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Reply to: Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science...

April 20-25, 1998
7th Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Materials Science Conference
Irsee Germany
Contact: W. E. King, L-356, LLNL, Livermore, CA 94551
E-mail: weking-at-llnl.gov


http://multiscale.llnl.gov/femms98





From: Jitu Shah :      JSS-at-siva.bris.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 12:17:19 -0600
Subject: JSM 35 Lens

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I am in need of acquiring the conical part of the final lens of a JSM
35(version C) scanning electron microscope. The cone in question is the part of
the lens that hangs down in the chamber. We intend to develop a modification.
Please email me with the information so that further negotiations can be carried
out. I should welcome also any information on the composition (and commercial
specification) of the metal from which the cone is made of. Of course, info on
where this metal can be obtained will be invaluable.


Thank you in anticipation of your cooperation and help.


Yours sincerely,


Jitu Shah

Dr. J. S. Shah
H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol
Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1Tl.
UK.
email: jss-at-siva.bristol.ac.uk
Tel: 44 117 9288719
Fax: 44 117 9255624


Dr.Jitu Shah
H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory,
University of Bristol,
Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue,
Bristol BS8 1TL. UK
email: jss-at-siva.bristol.ac.uk
Tel: 44 117 9288719
Fax: 44 117 9255624





From: Fermin, Cesar :      fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.Edu
Date: 3 Feb 1997 13:30:52 -0500
Subject: Confocal

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I would appreciate the summary of confocal discussion that was posted sometime
ago. I am interested on the properties of stand alone instruments since I
already know and have the hardware to add digital confocal.
1) Basic stand alone price?
2) Options price
3) Gripes about instrument users have.
4) What made you decide on the instrument you have?
5) Realistic user/project ratio based on present utilization?
6) Does it take a full time percent effort to run the instrument? Thanks.
________ ___________
/ ______/ / _________/ Cesar Danilo Fermin, Ph.D.
/ / / / Professor of Pathology & Otolaryngology
/ / / /_____
/ \______ / ______/ Fax 504 587-7389 & Voice 584-2521
/________/ / / Internet: fermin-at-tmc.tulane.edu
/_______ \/_/
| | | | http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/ferminlab
| | | |
| |______/ |
|________ / Disclaimer: Whatever... is not Tulane's opinion!




From: Beverly Phipps-Todd (Beverly Phipps-Todd) :      PHIPPTOD-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 15:22:45 -0500
Subject: TEM-Immunolabelling using sodium borohydride

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Message-Id: {s2f602d7.040-at-EM.AGR.CA}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

I was wondering if anyone has tried using sodium borohydride (0.5 - 1.0 mg
/ ml ddH2O) on sections as a way to unmask antigens for immunolabelling.
I have read that it is a good idea so I ordered some and discovered that
sodium borohydride may not be a very safe chemical to have around.

Bev. Phipps Todd

PhippTod-at-em.agr.ca




From: m.munro :      ab157-at-ab.sac.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 21:07:01 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: SEM of Zoospores

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Does anyone know of a technique either based on resin fixation
or on a cryostage that can be used to image Phytophthora zoospores
whilst keeping them intact?

Thanks

mark munro
Soil Biology unit
SAC Aberdeen

e-mail m.munro-at-ab.sac.ac.uk




From: Peter Smith :      PS-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 15:04:56 EST-10ESUT
Subject: Wanted: a SiLi detector

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Hello, Microscopists.

Does anyone have available (especially in Australasia) a SiLi
detector, complete with pre-amp and cryostat, and with reasonable
resolution (~150eV)? If so, please let me know (incl. price) as we
need to put one on our JEOL 35CF SEM (it can be suited to any
SEM - we'll make our own vacuum interface).

Thanks,

Peter Smith,
Dept. of App. Physics,
RMIT,
124 LaTrobe St.,
Melbourne,
Victoria, 3000,
AUSTRALIA

Ph: +61 3 9660 2205
Fax: +61 3 9660 3837
e-mail: ps-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au




From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 14:33:44 +1100
Subject: Probing & Structure is now ProSciTech

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Dear Microscopists -

After 17 years we have changed our business name from Probing & Structure
to ProSciTech (caps are optional) and we have acquired a domain address for
email and our
on-line catalogue.

Nothing else has changed: management, ownership and or our commitment
remain the same.
The old internet addresses will continue to function, but please change
your records and bookmarks to ProSciTech.

Regards
Jim Darley

jim-at-proscitech.com.au

ProSciTech Microscopy Supplies & Accessories
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia

Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
A great microscopy site: http://www.proscitech.com.au





From: jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye)
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 1997 13:25:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Localizing Ca in Botanicals

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Bill Tivol, Dr. Somlyo, and Dennis Goode, Thank you for the advice. The
detection limit for Ca by EPMA=EDS, or electron probe, is suprisingly high.
My results with the fungus I work with would indicate a 100 x higher level
of Ca held in exchangeable form on the cell walls, after exposure to
realistic soil solution levels of Ca. And the literature on the host
plant, Douglas Fir, would indicate Ca levels 25-30 x higher than the fungus
(making some assumptions there). So, apparently, electron probe will do
this, although I understand that asking a yes/no tracer question is a lot
easier than asking how much Ca (and how exact?). Ca oxalate crystals have
been observed to form in the walls and possibly in the vacuoles/vesicles of
the structure I work with, so confirming that is not very interesting.
What is interesting is where did the Ca come from is such quantities and
where does it go, if anywhere. (The normal habitat for this symbiosis is
an acidic, leached, relatively low Ca soil.) Maybe using Sr (stable) as a
short term tracer for Ca is more useful. Still reading up and thinking,
Janet.


Janet K. Dye
Ph. D. Graduate Student, Soils
Land, Air, and Water Resources
University of California
Davis, California USA
(916) 752-0199
(916) 668-4217
jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu






From: iva-at-leon.estnet.ee (I.V.A. Leon Ltd.)
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 10:28:00 EET-2
Subject: unsubscribe

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From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 11:22:35 +0100
Subject: Re: Microphilosophy

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Robert Mixon wrote:

} My bias is that reality exists if only by my own definition (the conclusions one
} jumps to may be only your own) however it is clear to me that by almost all
} rigorous recent (after 1940 or so) philosophic or "scientific" (misused here for
} emphasis) definitons, reality is unobservable. The most obvious example is the
} heisenberg uncertainty principle which states that one cannot observe both
} position and velocity of any moviing particle.

I wouldn't paint such a black picture of quantum mechanics. QM is a theory of
OBSERVABLES which means it ONLY makes statements about things that CAN be observed.
The uncertainty principle states that e.g. location and momentum cannot be measured
(or imposed on a particle) simultaneously with better than a certain precision.
As I see it this has nothing to do with how well we can observe reality but is a
property of reality itself. If You trap a particle in a potential (e.g. a quantum
well) it will always have a certain kinetic energy (which is related to a momentum).
If You make the potential well narrower the energy and momentum will increase.
This is a direct consequence of the uncertainty principle and really the way a
particle behaves. It is not a weakness of our observing powers.

Unfortunately QM is being misused a lot by people who want to prove that
'nothing is real' but it never said anything of the sort, just as Relativity
never said that 'everthing is relative' and Goedel never said that 'every theory
is either contradictory or incomplete'.

--
Philip Koeck
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience
Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
Tel.: +46-8-608 91 93
Fax.: +46-8-608 92 90
Email: Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se
http://www_scem.csb.ki.se/pages/philip.html




From: Richard E. Edelmann :      edelmare-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 08:26:33 -500
Subject: ? Specific imaging card Vendors

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I have been asked if there are any vendors of frame capture cards
with some specific requirements - and I have come up blank and was
hoping someone else be able to point us in the right direction.

RGB Input
frame averaging

---} } and plugs into a PCMCIA laptop port. { {----

Or at least the ability to be utilized in a Laptop system.

Thanks.

Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712 Fax: 513-529-4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 08:37:03 -0500
Subject: drive belt for Anglia Scientific microtome

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Dear All,

Can anyone help a colleague of mine locate a toothed drive belt for the
following microtome? Particulars follow.

} Belt is needed for a SURGIPATH (now SHANDON) instrument model/type0300
originally manufactured by Anglia Scientific circa early 80's.

}
} Measurements of the "toothed belt" are:
} Outside circumference: 705mm/27.75inches
} Tooth center-to-center pitch: 2.03mm/0.080inch
} Belt width: 6.35mm/0.250 inch

Please respond to me directly. TIA.

Owen
Owen P. Mills
Michigan Technological University
Metallurgical & Materials Engineering
Rm 512 MME Building
Houghton, MI 49931
906-487-2002
906-487-2934 FAX
opmills-at-mtu.edu




From: Norman Elliott :      nee-at-lanl.gov
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 09:13:40 -0700
Subject: sputter coaters

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Dear list,
We are about to replace a 20 year old Technics Hummer VI sputter coater.
Does anyone have opinions, strong or otherwise, as to who makes a descent
one for ~$5000 or less (we don't need a Cr coater.) All individual
responses will be kept as confidential as all the other government secrets.



Norman Elliott | Los Alamos National Laboratory
MST-7 | PO Box 1663
MS E549 | Los Alamos, NM 87545

Phone 505-667-1587
Fax 505-665-2104
e-mail nee-at-lanl.gov





From: Robert Mixon :      mixonr-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 09:23:18 -0800
Subject: RE:Microphilosophy

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Philip Koeck wrote:
{I wouldn't paint such a black picture of quantum mechanics. QM is a theory of
OBSERVABLES which means it ONLY makes statements about things tha CAN be
observed. The uncertainty principle states that e.g. location and momentum
cannot be measured (or imposed on a particle) simultaneously with better than a
certain precision.}
Reply: Actually I wish to paint a full spectrum picture (color plus waves above
and beyond "color") of quantum mechanics and indeed the changing face of the
philosophy of science. To quote Shakespeare you have been "hoisted by your own
pitard" (literally blown-up by your own bomb). It is not particularly useful in
my opinion to invite philisophical discourse (especially in the future from
students) and then totally limit their view of science and reality (or is that
realities). You are quite correct in your view of science and reality from a
16th century point of view...indeed meterologists still talk about 20 yr
"CYCLES" as if phenomena occured in round circles. "Science" changed forever
about 1968 or so when it was realized that chaos theory indeed provides better
models to explain natural phenomena than the 16th century "scientism" (which by
the way correlates closely with strict religious philosophy of this era). For
references I would strongly recommend author Ralph Abrahms esp titles about
"Gaia, chaos, and eros"(not exact title). Biologists have been the last group
to embrace this "new" (actually very old) way of looking at the universe..indeed
they still misuse the phrases "good science" and "bad science" when sometimes
all they are noting is the wild joyful ride of variation in all its "colors".
PS In my informal poll of 10 oregonians all 10 thought reality(ies) "exist" but
that they are not "observable" [substitute observable for measureable in the
sentence you quote above] as we strictly understand. I suppose this could be
attributed to the fact that it rains here a lot and soaks our brains.

bob




From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 19:43:15 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: re: are microscope images real

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Gary:

This whole debate, which is more semantic than sensible, can be summed
up in the painting of an apple by the surrealist Belgium painter
Magritte which has a caption "ce ne pas une pomme"

Patrick Echlin
Cambridge On Mon, 3 Feb 1997, Gary
Radice wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm not familiar with the philosophical debate, but for what it is worth, I
} always teach my microanatomy students that they never see an actual object
} in the real world OR in the microscope. What they see is the light
} reflected, transmitted through, diffracted, refracted, or emitted from an
} object. The IMAGES on their retinas are "real" because the light exists,
} but the images are only an approximation of the object, not the object
} itself.
}
} Gary Radice, Associate Professor gradice-at-richmond.edu
} Department of Biology 804-289-8107 (voice)
} University of Richmond VA 23173 804-289-8233 (FAX)
}
}
}





From: Ultratecex-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 16:01:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Help! -- Applications of Geology to Microscopy

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Dear Amy,

There's a very good book on sample preparation which may set your mind
buzzing as to geology applications...

Section "Preparation of Rock, Mineral, Ceramic and Glassy Materials" from
"Procedures in Electron Microscopy" Section 13.3 Ed,. AW Robards and AJ
Wilson Publ. 1994

Good Luck

Tim Hazeldine
ULTRA TEC MFG., INC.
_________________________________________________________
*Manufacturing, Sales & Service
1025 E.Chestnut Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92701-6491, USA
Tel. 714 542 0608 Fax. 714 542 0627 Email. info-at-ultratecusa.com

*International Sales
PO Box 312, Lincoln LN5 9XW, UK
Tel./Fax. +44(0)1522 722833 Email. Ultratecex-at-aol.com
__________________________________________________________

Precision Systems for Cutting, Lapping and
polishing..........................
___________________________________________________________









From: Michael P. Goheen :      mgoheen-at-indyvax.iupui.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 16:38:37 -0500
Subject: RALPH Knife maker

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Greetings,

Some folks on our campus have need of a Ralph Knife maker and have had no
success in finding one new or used. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Mike Goheen
Dept. of Pathology
Indiana University School of Medicine
mgoheen-at-indyvax.iupui.edu
(317) 274-7604





From: johnf-at-geology.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 97 16:02:51 CST
Subject: looking for a new CCL....

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We have folks here who want to upgrade to a dependable cold cathode luminoscope
(currently we have an unreliable hybrid setup)

Anyone out there know who makes the following cold cathode luminoscope:
Citl CCL 8200 Mk3A (who is Citl?) (we've heard good things about it)

Similarly, we'd be interested in hearing about experiences with any
recently purchased CCL systems.
. Thanks.

John


John Fournelle
Electron Microprobe Lab Internet:johnf-at-geology.wisc.edu
Dept of Geology & Geophysics Office: (608) 262-7964
University of Wisconsin Lab: (608) 265-4798
1215 West Dayton Street Fax: (608) 262-0693
Madison, WI 53706 Amateur radio: WA3BTA/9
http://geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/sx51.html

"The first rule of all intelligent tinkering is to save every cog and wheel."
Aldo Leopold







From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 17:18:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM-Immunolabelling using sodium borohydride

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Beverly,

Sodium borohydride is indeed difficult to work with. A solution needs to
be prepared fresh for each use, but if the container is left open the
borohydride takes up moisture rapidly and will cake (no longer powder).
When I used it years ago, I made up multiple 10 mg aliquots in capped
microtubes, and stored them in a plastic container of silica gel dessicant
in a -20 degree C freezer. When I needed a borohydride solution, I added
a ml of ddH2O or buffer to an aliquot, and vortexed briefly (open the cap
very quickly after vortexing, or the hydrogen gas evolving from the
borohydride will pop it open, possibly causing a spill). Those aliquots
have satisfied my needs since then.

A. Kent Christensen
University of Michigan
{akc-at-umich.edu}

--------------------------------------

On Mon, 3 Feb 1997, Beverly Phipps-Todd wrote:

} I was wondering if anyone has tried using sodium borohydride (0.5 - 1.0 mg
} / ml ddH2O) on sections as a way to unmask antigens for immunolabelling.
} I have read that it is a good idea so I ordered some and discovered that
} sodium borohydride may not be a very safe chemical to have around.
}
} Bev. Phipps Todd
} PhippTod-at-em.agr.ca
}






From: Paul Webster :      paul.webster-at-Yale.edu
Date: 4 Feb 1997 22:18:13 -0500
Subject: Re: Microphilosophy

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Taking care not to be "hoisted by my own petard", I should like to carefully add
a few comments on this subject.

Indeed Magritte did paint "Ceci n'est pas une pomme", which is what came to mind
when I read the first message of the series.

Indeed what we look at are not cells but 2-dimensional representations of highly
modified things that once were cells. (We have no doubt, I hope, that these
cells are as round as the world).

However, the highly technical work which examined fully hydrated thin
cryosection sections through vitrified biological tissues (eg McDowall et al
1983, J. Microsc. 131:1-9; 1984 J. Mol. Biol. 178:105-111; plus other work from
the groups of Dubochet and Muller) do show that our pictures of chemically
modified cells may well be on the way to being a representation of "the real
thing" as they appear in 2-dimensions.

Our critical self doubt and constant search for new ways of imaging these
structures may one day give us the ultimate - to image living processes inside
living cells (in fact, this is possible for some intracellular processes).

Until then, we will have to make do with the brief moments in time captured in
our 2-dimensional representations. For comfort we can hold onto the idea that
collected facts predict unseen events? If we are able to examine our samples
with a randomness that will give us a true representation of the whole
population then we are lucky.

With this in mind, we now have to take care that we never "sell" the idea that
cells consist of clearly defined organelles surrounded by white space all
enclosed by two black lines. Not an easy task when the benchmark images are of
highly extracted, high contrast images.

Keep Magritte in mind when presenting the micrographs:

"This is not a cell".

The implied message of course is:

"This is a picture of a cell"

Perhaps these comments are worthy only of smoking in Magritte's pipe ("Ceci
n'est pas une pipe") but it will not stop my enjoyment of the discussion as it
continues.

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale School of Medicine
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg





From: Roberto Cossio :      cossio-at-dsmp.unito.it
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 10:33:26 -0800
Subject: subscribe

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From: maryanne-at-pxx.one.com.au-at-one.com.au
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 19:32:10 +1000
Subject: subscribe

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I was wondering if anyone could help me,

I have been trying to find some literature on the scanning electron microscopy
of sugar cane stalk with particular reference to wax morphology. If anyone has
encountered such literature or has personal experience I would appreciate some
details.
I am not a subscriber so will require a personal response.
With thanks maryanne-at-one.com.au





From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 07:43:58 EST
Subject: Ralph Knife maker

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Dear fellow microscopists,

Michael Goheen wrote:
} Some folks on our campus have need of a Ralph Knife maker and have had no
} success in finding one new or used. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Energy Beam Sciences manufactures a Ralph Knife maker. We bought the rights
to this product as part of the light microscopy specimen preparation product
line formerly manufactured by BioRad in the U.K. Details are available
on-line at our web site (http://www.ebsciences.com).

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 08:52:20 -0600
Subject: Humor: If Poe had a PC, 8-)

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Here is something irresistable for all you Poe fans out there.


Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Once upon a midnight dreary, fingers cramped and vision bleary,
System manuals piled high and wasted paper on the floor,
Longing for the warmth of bed sheets, still I sat there doing spreadsheets.
Having reached the bottom line I took a floppy from the drawer,
I then invoked the SAVE command and waited for the disk to store,
Only this and nothing more.

Deep into the monitor peering, long I sat there wond'ring, fearing,
Doubting, while the disk kept churning, turning yet to churn some more.
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token.
"Save!" I said, "You cursed mother! Save my data from before!"
One thing did the phosphors answer, only this and nothing more,
Just, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

Was this some occult illusion, some maniacal intrusion?
These were choices undesired, ones I'd never faced before.
Carefully I weighed the choices as the disk made impish noises.
The cursor flashed, insistent, waiting, baiting me to type some more.
Clearly I must press a key, choosing one and nothing more,
From "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

With fingers pale and trembling, slowly toward the keyboard bending,
Longing for a happy ending, hoping all would be restored,
Praying for some guarantee, timidly, I pressed a key.
But on the screen there still persisted words appearing as before.
Ghastly grim they blinked and taunted, haunted, as my patience wore,
Saying "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

I tried to catch the chips off guard, and pressed again, but twice as hard.
I pleaded with the cursed machine: I begged and cried and then I swore.
Now in mighty desperation, trying random combinations,
Still there came the incantation, just as senseless as before.
Cursor blinking, angrily winking, blinking nonsense as before.
Reading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

There I sat, distraught, exhausted, by my own machine accosted.
Getting up I turned away and paced across the office floor.
And then I saw a dreadful sight: a lightning bolt cut through the night.
A gasp of horror overtook me, shook me to my very core.
The lightning zapped my previous data, lost and gone forevermore.
Not even, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

To this day I do not know the place to which lost data go.
What demonic nether world us wrought where lost data will be stored,
Beyond the reach of mortal souls, beyond the ether, into black holes?
But sure as there's C, Pascal, Lotus, Ashton-Tate and more,
You will be one day be left to wander, lost on some Plutonian shore,
Pleading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Phil Fraundorf :      philf-at-NEWTON.UMSL.EDU
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 09:17:14 -0600
Subject: Re: Microphilosophy

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My intention has been to ignore this thread entirely, but alas
the enthusiasm of some responses has managed to reach out from
the rows of words on my computer screen and cause my fingers
to key this paragraph and the one below.

Life involves both replicable codes and excitations. Only the
former can we put to paper or micrograph. However, the latter
we can interact with. In the TEM, for example, we respond with
hand on console to photons generated by electrons scattered by
very tiny dynamical (albeit seldom living) objects in the path
of the microscope's beam. Some signs of this interaction find
their way to paper or disk, but never all of it since replicable
codes (like pictures or spectra or words) hitch rides on only a
miniscule subset of the dynamical excitations (ranging up in size
from elementary particles through atoms to us) that we find in
the world around. Hence the micrographs (and these words) are
mere representations. They may or may not be of help. The
interactions, however, are as real as are we.

Cheers. /philf :)


\\/
(-at- -at-)
//\/\/\/\--o0O-(_)-Ooo--}
//P.Fraundorf Phys&Astr/CME 3145165044 philf-at-newton.umsl.edu
\\U.Missouri-St.Louis MO 63121 http://www.umsl.edu/~fraundor
\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/----------------}




From: evansnd-at-ornl.gov (Neal D. Evans)
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 10:57:12 -0500
Subject: ORNL - SHaRE Faculty Fellowship Program 1997

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SHaRE Faculty Fellowship Program 1997

Purpose and Program Description

These fellowships are intended to provide outstanding university faculty
access to the SHaRE User Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This
user facility is equipped with state-of-the-art electron microscopes, atom
probe field ion microscopes, and mechanical properties microprobes for
materials science microanalysis. These appointments are intended to assist
faculty by enhancing their materials science research through extended
access to SHaRE's state-of-the-art microanalytical facilities, and through
collaborations with appropriate researchers at ORNL. It is anticipated that
one junior and one senior university faculty will be appointed as fellows.

The duration of each fellowship is expected to be between six and twelve
weeks. It is anticipated that fellowships will be taken during the
participant's summer semester or quarter terms.

Eligibility
Applicants must be full-time permanent faculty members at accredited U.S.
colleges or universities.

Stipends and Allowances
Stipends paid to participants are based on, but may not exceed, their
regular college/university salary. The cost of travel for one round-trip
between the academic institution and ORNL will be reimbursed if the distance
is greater than 50 miles. Reimbursement is made according to the standard
travel policy of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Applications
Application for fellowships may be made by submitting a written proposal, no
more than four pages in length, to the below address. The proposal should:

=95Set forth the scientific or technological significance of the proposed
research.
=95State the relevance of research to the U.S. Department of Energy, and=
ORNL.
=95Include a statement of work which describes the major research tasks to=
be
performed, specifies needed research instrumentation, and indicates any
anticipated specimen preparation at ORNL.
=95Summarize the applicant's previous work in the field of the proposed
research, including relevant expertise on the research equipment being
proposed for use in this research.
=95Identify a researcher at ORNL who agrees to collaborate in the research.
SHaRE can assist faculty personnel in identifying appropriate ORNL
collaborators.
=95State the intended start date and duration of the appointment.
=95Include a one-page professional resume.

Five copies of the proposal should be submitted to:
SHaRE Faculty Fellowship Program
Education and Training Division
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education
P.O. Box 117
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117

or a single copy submitted electronically to Ms. Renetta Godfrey
(godfreyrd-at-ornl.gov). Supported file formats are ascii, and Word 6.0, and
WordPerfect 7.0 (or earlier versions).

Review Process and Deadline
=95Appointments are based on competitive evaluation of the applicants'
qualifications, proposed plan of research, and relevance to ORNL/DOE
research programs and activities
=95Appointments are made by recommendation of the SHaRE Executive Committee
=95Proposals for FY 1997 fellowships should be received by March 3, 1997

Additional Information
For additional information regarding either SHaRE or these fellowships
=95http://www.ms.ornl.gov/share/intro.htm
=95contact Neal Evans evansnd-at-ornl.gov 423-576-4427

SHaRE Faculty Fellowships are contingent upon the availability of funds,
collaborating personnel, and research facilities.


The Shared Research Equipment User Facility and Program are supported by the
Division of Materials Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract
DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., and through
contract DE-AC05-76OR00033 with Oak Ridge Associated Universities.





From: Linda L. Kirstein :      104365.3522-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: February 19, 1997
Subject: NESM February Meeting Announced

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The New England Society for Microscopy announces first meeting of 1997

PROGRAM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1997

5 pm-----Registration and Tours of Philips Electroscan

6 pm-----Buffet Dinner

7:15 pm-----"Development of Recombinant Oral Vaccine Against Helicobacter
pylori" to be presented by Thomas Ermak from OraVax, Inc.

8:00 pm-----"High Temperature Applications in Environmental SEM" to be
presented by Thomas A. Hardt, Applications Development Manager at Philips
Electroscan.


NEW MEMBERS WELCOME! Regular membership dues are $15 per calendar year.
Registration for this meeting is $5.

To register, contact L. Kirstein at tel: 508-473-9673 or E-mail:
104365.3522-at-compuserve.com.
(Mark message: NESM February Meeting Registration)

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: February 12, 1997.




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 12:02:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: microphilosphy

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} I agree that attacts on the rationalist stance of science are
} growing in frequency are important to rebut.

Not only that, but there is a long tradition of anti-intellectualism
in America which must be counteracted. Otherwise, more rational people will
see their economies expand while ours goes down the tubes.

} My view of the error that the
} social constructionists make comes down to this. Consider the color red.
} When you look at a red object your brain "contructs" a color for that
} object. There can never be a way to know that the color that your brain
} paints that object in your mind is the very same color that my brain picks.

If, as I think, a brain '"constructs" a color' by modifying synapses
etc. which results in a particular neural firing pattern being associated
with everything the brain's owner sees of that color, then everyone's brain
constructs a different color, since the connectivity of neurons is almost
certainly different for each individual brain. That said, however, there
are likely to be similarities in the neural firing patterns which are con-
structed, since each arises from signals from cones in the retina, which
have features common to all individuals.

} Color in that sense is a "construct" of the mind. BUT, we can agree that
} the object in question is the SAME color, and agree that it corresponds to
} some reference color, obtained for example with a monochrometer. The
} constructionists argue because there are constucts in the mind that
} EVERYTHING in the mind is a construct. This can be easily disproved by the
} fact that we all agree about what color stop signs are.
}
Not quite. The social constructionists would argue that your mind
only constructs the agreement; i.e., I think that you and I agree about the
color of stop signs, but you may think that we are agreeing about an entirely
different construct.

} Our agreement about the color of stop signs means that we can make
} another object, color it like a stop sign, and every one will agree about
} that one too. This sounds trivial, but it is at the core of our assurance
} about the reality of science.
}
That depends. You are only talking about people with normal color
vision--an unstated assumption. You can easily make a second object which
appears red, but whose spectrum of reflected or emitted light is quite dif-
ferent from that of a stop sign. In any event, one can, however, specify
a set of algorithms for the construction of an object and the measurement
of some of its properties, and, if any number of other independent persons
follow the same algorithms, they will all make the same observations. By
this I mean that the observations will agree within some limits--it is very
unlikely that any two measurements will yield *exactly* the same results.
This whole subject gets quite complicated when all the details are consi-
dered.
My belief is that there is an actual reality which underlies each
of our perceptions. No one's perceptions correspond exactly to that real-
ity, nor even encompass more than an infinitessimal part of reality. By
probing reality through making observations, recording our perceptions,
correllating those perceptions which agree with those of others (including
the magnitude and nature of expected disagreements), and rationalizing away
those perceptions which do not agree, we can each and collectively set
limits within which actual reality probably lies.
I can assure any social constructionists that, if they perceive a
boulder falling down a cliff heading directly toward them, they should act
as though that boulder were actually real. Reality can always make an im-
pact on any one of us whether or not we believe in it.

} Many people who doubt the reality of objects down the scope have
} never looked through a microscope. Perhaps the best thing we can do for
} such sceptics is to invite them into our labs and show then a rotifer,
} ascorbate crystals in polarized light, or a fly in SEM?
}
These are, indeed, pretty constructs. What we can show sceptics
are images of a rotifer (perhaps one which has been modified extensively),
etc. What we see--and what they will see--are signals which have been
manipulated so as to produce representations from which we can better
understand the objects from which these representations arose. My lab
does TEM of biological materials, and we rarely look at the biological
material itself; we almost invariably look at the results of electrons
scattered from a heavy metal stain. Fortunately, there are stains whose
properties are well correllated to those of the biological specimen, so
we can infer properties of the specimen from observations of the stain.
I have no doubt that the biological specimen is real--as are the heavy
metal atoms of the stain. I also have no doubt that what I see is only
an approximation of some of the true properties of the system in which I
am interested.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: AMRAYINC-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 12:17:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: WWW Site Announcement

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AMRAY, Inc., a manufacturer of Scanning Electron Microscopes, invites you
to browse our newly constructed WEB site. We can be found at www.amray.com.
The WEB site includes information about AMRAY's 3000 series of scanning
electron microscopes, our customer service organization, our customer
training schools, and other imporatant information about AMRAY.

AMRAY, Inc.




From: Diana_Papoulias-at-nbs.gov (Diana Papoulias)
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 13:53:41 -0700
Subject: picric acid substitute?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would like to use a staining procedure (Masson's trichrome) that
calls for picric acid for nuclear differentiation after staining with
hematoxylin. Our safety officer would prefer it if I could avoid
using picric acid. Is there a substitute? Is this step necessary?

TIA,

Diana_Papoulias-at-nbs.gov





From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 14:41:03 -0500
Subject: picric acid substitute?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I would like to use a staining procedure (Masson's trichrome) that
calls for picric acid for nuclear differentiation after staining with
hematoxylin. Our safety officer would prefer it if I could avoid
using picric acid. Is there a substitute? Is this step necessary?

TIA,

Diana_Papoulias-at-nbs.gov





From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 15:56:16 -0500
Subject: RE: picric acid substitute?

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Diana,

My lab doesn't do any biological staining, but we do use picric acid
solutions for metallographic etching. For years we went round and round
with our safety people. They claimed it was not safe IF it was combined
with SUFFICIENT amounts of certain metals (notably Pb) AND the
subsequent picrate was subjected to a LARGE IMPACT, OR if the solution
dried to below approximately 15% water AND the container was subjected
to a LARGE SHOCK. Under the RIGHT circumstances it can be dangerous.
So can a bottle of root beer.

The iron and steel industry has been using picric acid etchants for half
century.

My personal opinion is that small (gram) quantities of wet picric acid,
handled, stored, and disposed of properly by qualified personnel would
not pose an extraordinary risk sufficient to prohibit its use.

Harry Crossman




From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 15:22:46 -0500
Subject: Re: picric acid substitute?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Diana,

My lab doesn't do any biological staining, but we do use picric acid
solutions for metallographic etching. For years we went round and round
with our safety people. They claimed it was not safe IF it was combined
with SUFFICIENT amounts of certain metals (notably Pb) AND the
subsequent picrate was subjected to a LARGE IMPACT, OR if the solution
dried to below approximately 15% water AND the container was subjected
to a LARGE SHOCK. Under the RIGHT circumstances it can be dangerous.
So can a bottle of root beer.

The iron and steel industry has been using picric acid etchants for half
century.

My personal opinion is that small (gram) quantities of wet picric acid,
handled, stored, and disposed of properly by qualified personnel would
not pose an extraordinary risk sufficient to prohibit its use.

Harry Crossman





From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 16:00:36 -0600
Subject: Re: Humor: If Poe had a PC, 8-)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings,
Many people seem to have liked the poem I sent round; but alas many
have suggested that I wrote it. I have to make clear that I just forwarded
it. I wish I had the time and skill to have written it. Sorry that wasn't
clear in the first post.

Tobias

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Philomena Kaan :      PKaan-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 14:50:14 +0800 PST
Subject: unsubcribe

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Please unsubscribe.




From: Tseng Ming Chou :      tchou-at-menger.eecs.stevens-tech.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 1997 18:41:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

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i LIKE TO KNOW THE INFORMATION OF VENDORS PROVIDE THE LAMBS OF OLYMPUS
BH SERIES OPTICAL MICROSCOPY.

BEST REGARDS,

Tseng-Ming Chou (Alex)
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030
e-mail: tchou-at-attila.stevens-tech.edu
tchou-at-menger.eecs.stevens-tech.edu
The Microstructure Group of Stevens





From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 18:18:47 -0500
Subject: unsubcribe

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Please unsubscribe.





From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 20:12:38 -0500
Subject: Humor: If Poe had a PC, 8-)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Here is something irresistable for all you Poe fans out there.


Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Once upon a midnight dreary, fingers cramped and vision bleary,
System manuals piled high and wasted paper on the floor,
Longing for the warmth of bed sheets, still I sat there doing spreadsheets.
Having reached the bottom line I took a floppy from the drawer,
I then invoked the SAVE command and waited for the disk to store,
Only this and nothing more.

Deep into the monitor peering, long I sat there wond'ring, fearing,
Doubting, while the disk kept churning, turning yet to churn some more.
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token.
"Save!" I said, "You cursed mother! Save my data from before!"
One thing did the phosphors answer, only this and nothing more,
Just, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

Was this some occult illusion, some maniacal intrusion?
These were choices undesired, ones I'd never faced before.
Carefully I weighed the choices as the disk made impish noises.
The cursor flashed, insistent, waiting, baiting me to type some more.
Clearly I must press a key, choosing one and nothing more,
From "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

With fingers pale and trembling, slowly toward the keyboard bending,
Longing for a happy ending, hoping all would be restored,
Praying for some guarantee, timidly, I pressed a key.
But on the screen there still persisted words appearing as before.
Ghastly grim they blinked and taunted, haunted, as my patience wore,
Saying "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

I tried to catch the chips off guard, and pressed again, but twice as hard.
I pleaded with the cursed machine: I begged and cried and then I swore.
Now in mighty desperation, trying random combinations,
Still there came the incantation, just as senseless as before.
Cursor blinking, angrily winking, blinking nonsense as before.
Reading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

There I sat, distraught, exhausted, by my own machine accosted.
Getting up I turned away and paced across the office floor.
And then I saw a dreadful sight: a lightning bolt cut through the night.
A gasp of horror overtook me, shook me to my very core.
The lightning zapped my previous data, lost and gone forevermore.
Not even, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

To this day I do not know the place to which lost data go.
What demonic nether world us wrought where lost data will be stored,
Beyond the reach of mortal souls, beyond the ether, into black holes?
But sure as there's C, Pascal, Lotus, Ashton-Tate and more,
You will be one day be left to wander, lost on some Plutonian shore,
Pleading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 1997 16:20:37 -0500
Subject: Re: Humor: If Poe had a PC, 8-)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Greetings,
Many people seem to have liked the poem I sent round; but alas many
have suggested that I wrote it. I have to make clear that I just forwarded
it. I wish I had the time and skill to have written it. Sorry that wasn't
clear in the first post.

Tobias

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: 02/06/1997 (Thursday)
Subject: Utermohl chamber?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Item Type: Note

Dear List

I have had a request regarding suppliers of Utermohl-type
sedimentation chambersfor standard quantitative
hydrobiological analyses. My ignorance in this area is quite
undiminished! All help gratefully received.

Best wishes

Keith Ryan

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

Tel: ++44 1752 633294 (international)
01752 633294 (national)
Fax: ++44 1752 633102 (international)
01752 633102 (national)
e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk
PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: Stankovic-at-fns.uniba.sk () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 07:59:00 -0500
Subject: price of scannig coil

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X-Sender: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Message-Id: {v03007803af1f859e079f-at-[206.69.208.21]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Colleages

Can anyone of our subscribers reply to this person?
Send the message direct to him as he is not on the
Listserver.

Nestor

------------------


Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by
(Stankovic-at-fns.uniba.sk) on Thursday, February 6, 1997 at 05:40:07
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Stankovic-at-fns.uniba.sk
Name: Joze Stankovic

State: Slovak Republic

Question: I am interesting about costprice of scannig coil
for EM JEOL 840
Than you for ansver
yuors sincerely
Jozef Stankovic

---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 14:25:58 +0000
Subject: Utermohl #2 & inverted microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All

I forgot to mention in the message about Utermohl dishes that they are
required for use in water analyses using inverted light microscopy.

Regards - Keith Ryan





From: David Susnitzky at RNBCCM25
Date: 2/5/97 3:45PM
Subject: Summer internship announcement

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---------------------------- Forwarded with Changes ---------------------------



The TEM group at Intel Corp. in Santa Clara, CA announces a summer
internship available for a graduate-level student in the area of
focussed ion beam (FIB) milling. FIB milling is used in the
semiconductor industry for specific-site thin sectioning of single-bit
device failures for TEM analysis. The Ga+ ion beam typically used
during FIB milling is known to amorphize the milled surfaces. The
amorphous surface layers on the TEM section limit the scope, quality
and utility of the TEM analysis.
The goals of this internship are: 1.) to quantify the depth of
amorphization imparted during FIB milling as a function of milling
parameters (voltage, milling angle, etc.), 2.) to determine a
low-damage milling condition and 3.) to develop a method to eliminate
residual amorphization damage which remains after FIB milling.
Prior experience with preparing and handling TEM samples is highly
desirable.
This position is for U.S. citizens or permanent residents, 3.0 gpa
or higher, enrolled fulltime in school and able to work full time
during the internship. Intel Corp. is an equal opportunity employer.

Please forward inquiries and resumes to:

David W. Susnitzky
Intel Corporation
3065 Bowers Avenue, M.S. SC2-24
Santa Clara, CA 95052-8119

Phone: (408)-765-2026
FAX: (408)-765-2393
E-mail: David_Susnitzky-at-ccm.sc.intel.com




From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 11:10:27 -0800
Subject: Re:Picric acid destaining

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Message-Id: {32FA2CA3.648-at-umdnj.edu}

Diana:

Destaining can be accomplished with 2% aqueous iron alum (ferric ammonium
sulfate) instead of picric acid. Picric acid is said to give better
definition of nuclei, though. I do not consider picric acid to be
dangerous if stored "wet" (10% water) which is the way we get it from
Fisher or whomever.
Perhaps your Safety Officer could store the bottle for you and you could
keep a saturated aqueous solution in the lab for use as needed.

Geoff
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (908)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-.umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: kna101-at-utdallas.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 10:06:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: picric acid substitute?

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On Wed, 5 Feb 1997, O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(a)Spar wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Diana,
}
} My lab doesn't do any biological staining, but we do use picric acid
} solutions for metallographic etching. For years we went round and round
} with our safety people. They claimed it was not safe IF it was combined
} with SUFFICIENT amounts of certain metals (notably Pb) AND the
} subsequent picrate was subjected to a LARGE IMPACT, OR if the solution
} dried to below approximately 15% water AND the container was subjected
} to a LARGE SHOCK. Under the RIGHT circumstances it can be dangerous.
} So can a bottle of root beer.
}
} The iron and steel industry has been using picric acid etchants for half
} century.
}
} My personal opinion is that small (gram) quantities of wet picric acid,
} handled, stored, and disposed of properly by qualified personnel would
} not pose an extraordinary risk sufficient to prohibit its use.
}
} Harry Crossman
}
}
Harry:

I thought I should reply after reading your message.
About 15 years ago, I was working as an EM tech when a message came to
the lab from the hazarads manager about a small vial of picric acid which
had blown up in one of the labs on campus. It was a very old vial and
appearantly had been forgotten. Noone was hurt, but I haven't forgotten
the insident, and I make sure any excess picric acid is disoped of after
the project requiring it is finished.

Karen Pawlowski




From: johnf-at-geology.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 97 10:13:07 CST
Subject: Pencil forensics

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Any leads on how one might verify if two documents were written with the same
pencil? Actually, the question is if something written in, say, 1948 can be
distinguished from something written 10-20 years later (did the formulas
for
the pencil 'lead' change?). Perhaps pull off some lead particles with
scotch tape and then examine with EDS/WDS? Any one know anything, or where
to look?

Thanks.


John Fournelle
Electron Microprobe Lab Internet:johnf-at-geology.wisc.edu
Dept of Geology & Geophysics Office: (608) 262-7964
University of Wisconsin Lab: (608) 265-4798
1215 West Dayton Street Fax: (608) 262-0693
Madison, WI 53706 Amateur radio: WA3BTA/9
http://geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/sx51.html

"The first rule of all intelligent tinkering is to save every cog and wheel."
Aldo Leopold







From: O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=kna101(a)utdallas.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 10:08:52 -0500
Subject: Re: picric acid substitute?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Wed, 5 Feb 1997, O=PRDSMTP; DDA.TYPE=RFC-822; DDA.VALUE=Microscopy-request(
a)Spar wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Diana,
}
} My lab doesn't do any biological staining, but we do use picric acid
} solutions for metallographic etching. For years we went round and round
} with our safety people. They claimed it was not safe IF it was combined
} with SUFFICIENT amounts of certain metals (notably Pb) AND the
} subsequent picrate was subjected to a LARGE IMPACT, OR if the solution
} dried to below approximately 15% water AND the container was subjected
} to a LARGE SHOCK. Under the RIGHT circumstances it can be dangerous.
} So can a bottle of root beer.
}
} The iron and steel industry has been using picric acid etchants for half
} century.
}
} My personal opinion is that small (gram) quantities of wet picric acid,
} handled, stored, and disposed of properly by qualified personnel would
} not pose an extraordinary risk sufficient to prohibit its use.
}
} Harry Crossman
}
}
Harry:

I thought I should reply after reading your message.
About 15 years ago, I was working as an EM tech when a message came to
the lab from the hazarads manager about a small vial of picric acid which
had blown up in one of the labs on campus. It was a very old vial and
appearantly had been forgotten. Noone was hurt, but I haven't forgotten
the insident, and I make sure any excess picric acid is disoped of after
the project requiring it is finished.

Karen Pawlowski





From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 12:51:22 -0400
Subject: RE:Philosophy

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--wik9YOjyGayp5g4cbdcV4H15ELUCTlPu
Content-type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"



--wik9YOjyGayp5g4cbdcV4H15ELUCTlPu
Content-type: message/rfc822


The various comments that have appeared on the listserver concerning
reality, philosophy, and science remind me of a story my high school
teacher told to help distinguish the meaning of the words 'illusion',
'delusion', and 'hallucination'. It goes as follows:

Imagine a young person, who is somewhat superstitous and a bit afraid of
the dark, walking alone along a deserted back road on a dark night. While
passing an old abandoned house this person thinks he sees, out of the
corner of his eye, a ghost in front of the house. Mustering all his
courage, however, he stops to check the matter out. If on further
investigation,
1. he finds nothing there, he suffered an illusion
2. he finds the remnants of a white sheet hanging from a clothsline, he
had a delusion
3. he finds a ghost, he is having an hallucination

While this doesn't have anything to do directly with the questions at hand,
I thought you might find it amusing

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 13:34:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Perhaps someone can explain what I saw earlier today while examining a
piece of archeological glass by SEM. When examining the sample at 10, 5
and 3 kV, I saw a distorted reflection of the secondary electron detector
at the surface of the sample. The sample was attached to an aluminum stub
using double-sided adhesive tape, and was not coated. The SEM is a
Cambridge stereoscan 100. I did not observe any reflected image at higher
kV.

Any thoughts?

James Martin
Williamstown Art Conservation Center







From: Weiland, Hasso :      Hasso.Weiland-at-alcoa.com
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 14:13:06 -0500
Subject: Post-doc position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Alcoa Technical Center in Pittsburgh, PA announces a post-doc
position for an electron microscopist.

The assignment is to characterize several aluminum alloy systems with
regard to
a) the nucleation mechanisms for recrystallization and the interaction
of the growing grains with the microstructure, as well as
b) the deformed structure (cell sizes, cell misorientation).

The following equipment is available: Philips 420 with TV camera, JEOL
840 with OIM attachment, FEG-SEMs at near-by universities, XRD, image
processors. Besides an excellent background in the operation of TEMs and
SEMs, a successful candidate should be familiar with
EDS, foil thickness determination, analysis of Kikuchi patterns and
quantitative stereology.

This position is limited to a period of two years. Alcoa is an equal
opportunity employer.

Please forward inquiries and resumes to:

Hasso Weiland
Alcoa Technical Center
Alcoa Center, PA 15069

Phone: (412) 337-3133
FAX: (412) 337-2044
E-mail: hasso.weiland-at-alcoa.com







From: Raymond F Egerton :      egerton-at-phys.ualberta.ca
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 14:28:43 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 1997 MSC Meeting

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Final details of the 1997 Meeting of the Microscopical Society of Canada
(Edmonton, 4 - 7 June) are now available. Lecture symposia and confirmed
speakers include:

SCANNING-PROBE MICROSCOPY: Don Eigler, Paul Hansma, Richard Colton,
Cynthia Goh, Darka Migus, Peter Grutter.

DYNAMICAL AND CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY: John White, Fred Fay, Lans Taylor,
Winfried Denk.

ENERGY-FILTERED TEM: Peter Crozier, Richard Leapman, George Harauz, David
Bazett-Jones.

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY: David Joy, Arun Kumar, Arvid Lacis.

+ WORKSHOPS on Fundamentals of AFM, FEGSEM, EPMA and Confocal Microscopy.

2-page abstracts of contributed talks or posters are due 15 March.
A registration package is being mailed to all MSC members;
copies can also be obtained from:

Ray Egerton, Physics Dept, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2J1
Phone: 403-492-5095, FAX: 403-492-0714, e-mail: egerton-at-phys.ualberta.ca

Further details of the meeting are available from the MSC Web Page:
http://www.ualberta.ca/~mmid/msc
------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 14:29:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: LKB Knifemaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All!


I have an LKB 2178 Kinfemaker II that is having a problem. One of the
C2 adjustment things no longer holds its' position. This results in the
thing changing how it makes knives every single time you use it. I think
that the C2 plastic parts are stretched out. It seems like it gets better
if I take the top C2 apart and let it sit in the corner (by itself) for a
day or two and then put it back together.

Has anyone else had this problem? Does anybody know where I can get
the C2 plastic pieces so I can replace the worn out items?

One of my students tweaked all of the knobs one day and the knifemaker
hasn't been the same since. Ah, the joys of a teaching lab!

Any suggestions are gratefully appreciated.


Desperately trying to make knives in Berkeley,

Paula = )

Paula Ssicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu






From: weiliang EARTH.WGONG.PLANET. gong :      wgong-at-UNM.EDU
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 16:12:03 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Forwarded mail....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This message is in MIME format. The first part should be readable text,
while the remaining parts are likely unreadable without MIME-aware tools.
Send mail to mime-at-docserver.cac.washington.edu for more info.

---2129131504-1309753195-855270723=:83294
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=us-ascii
Content-ID: {Pine.A32.3.91.970206160701.83294D-at-pegasus.unm.edu}


This is a forwarded message requested by Profs. Rodney C. Ewing and Lumin
Wang at University of New Mexcio.


VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY --
LABORATORY MANAGER/RESEARCH SCIENTIST


Applications are invited for the position of laboratory manager/research
scientist (Research Scientist III) supporting the transmission electron
microscopy facilities in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences,
University of New Mexico. The laboratory includes a JEOL 2010 high
resolution TEM and JEOL 2000FX analytical STEM. Both instruments are
equipped with EDS capabilities. More information on the lab may be
obtained at HTTP//TEM.UNM.EDU.

We hope to fill this position by 1 May, 1997. The position is full time
initially for 15 months and may be continued on a permanent basis. Duties
will include supervision of all aspects of the electron microscopy
laboratory, maintenance of the instruments, assistance to students,
faculty, and research scientists at UNM, and outside users, and instruction
of a graduate course in principles of electron-microscopy and use of the
instruments. Time will be available for independent or collaborative
research involving the use of the microscopes and other analytical
facilities in the Department.

Candidates must hold a Ph.D. degree in earth science, materials science or
a related field, and have a demonstrated research background in these
disciplines, extensive skills in the operation and maintenance of
transmission electron microscopes, and a record of published research
activity. In addition, the candidate should have strong communication
skills and an ability to work with and/or instruct individuals with broad
research interests and backgrounds.

JOB TITLE: RESEARCH SCIENTIST III
DEPARTMENT: EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES
REQUISITION NUMBER: 970231*A
CLOSING DATE: 5:00 P.M. ON 3/21/97
GRADE 13

Based on Full-Time Salary: $2,858.42 to $3,801.42 mo.
Full-time term fifteen month position with possibility of regular
status.

IN ORDER TO BE QUALIFIED YOU MUST HAVE:

Ph.D. Degree in Technical, Scientific, or Engineering. Three (3) years
experience directly related to the duties and responsibilities specified.

TO APPLY

Applications must be received by the Human Resources Office at 1717 Roma
NE, or Health Sciences Ctr., Med Bldg. 2, Rm. 101, North Campus,
Albuquerque, NM 87131 no later than 5:00 p.m. on the closing date, February
21, 1997. Resumes must list employment dates by month/year and must be
accompanied by a cover letter. Functional resumes will not be accepted.
Indicate the requisition number 970231*A and job title Research Scientist
III on the application/cover letter. Application forms may be obtained by
calling 505-277-6422.



---2129131504-1309753195-855270723=:83294
Content-Type: APPLICATION/MAC-BINHEX40; NAME=TEM_ad_2-4-97
Content-ID: {Pine.A32.3.91.970206160701.83294E-at-pegasus.unm.edu}

(This file must be converted with BinHex 4.0)



---2129131504-1309753195-855270723=:83294
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=us-ascii
Content-ID: {Pine.A32.3.91.970206160701.83294F-at-pegasus.unm.edu}

Rodney C. Ewing
Regents' Professor
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 USA

phone: (505) 277 4163
fax: (505) 277 0090



---2129131504-1309753195-855270723=:83294--




From: Jim McGee :      mcgee-at-epoch.geol.sc.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 18:09:35 -0500
Subject: EPMA of tree

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I usually don't pay much attention to the numerous sample preparation
discussions for biologic materials (I mostly deal with inorganics), so
pardon me if this has been previously discussed.

I have been asked about the possibility of measuring elements in tree core
using the electron probe. How best to prepare the wood for 10 - 20 kV, 20
nA , 30 sec. beam exposure? My only experience with wood usually involves
an axe and a fireplace. Thanks in advance.

*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*
James J. McGee (jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Dept. of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina (803) 777-6300 (Office)
Columbia, SC 29208 (803) 777-6610 (Fax)







From: F. H. Schamber :      fhscham-at-sgi.net
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 22:13:38 -0500
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}



James Martin wrote:
}
} Perhaps someone can explain what I saw earlier today while examining a
} piece of archeological glass by SEM. When examining the sample at 10, 5
} and 3 kV, I saw a distorted reflection of the secondary electron detector
} at the surface of the sample. The sample was attached to an aluminum stub
} using double-sided adhesive tape, and was not coated. The SEM is a
} Cambridge stereoscan 100. I did not observe any reflected image at higher
} kV.
}
} Any thoughts?
}
} James Martin
} Williamstown Art Conservation Center
.................................................
James,
You have encountered one of the neater artifacts you can accomplish
with a SEM. What happened was that while imaging at 10 keV you
established a fairly uniform charge on the surface of the glass. Then
when you dropped down in energy, the incident electrons were elastically
reflected by this uniform charge field and bounced backwards without
ever hitting the specimen. In other words, the uniform charge field
created a very nice "mirror" which reflected the electron beam towards
your secondary detector so that's what you got an image of. It is also
very typical to get a nice image of your final lens pole piece. The
field created by this type of charging tends to be hemispherical in
shape, so you get a kind of "fisheye" lens effect which at low mag
allows you to get a "panoramic" image of the inside of your specimen
chamber.

It is very easy to duplicate this phenomenon. I have found that a piece
of smooth polysterene works quite nicely (I used a divider from a
plastic parts bin). Simply charge the surface by scanning at low mag
for a while at a high voltage and fairly high spot size and then switch
to a lower keV and you will see the mirroring effect. A saphire bead
also works very well. The better the insulator, the longer the effect
lasts. You can actually get very nice images of the inards of your SEM.
Take a few pictures and see if your microscopist friends can figure out
how you did this!

This is really quite a fascinating effect which can really "blow your
mind" if you stumble across it accidentally without knowing that such a
thing is possible. This is such a neat effect that it just seems that
there SHOULD be some good use for it -- Alas -- I don't know of any,
other than to amuse yourself and your friends.

Fred Schamber




From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 18:18:31 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Thu, 6 Feb 1997, James Martin wrote:

} Perhaps someone can explain what I saw earlier today while examining a
} piece of archeological glass by SEM. When examining the sample at 10, 5
} and 3 kV, I saw a distorted reflection of the secondary electron detector
} at the surface of the sample. The sample was attached to an aluminum stub
} using double-sided adhesive tape, and was not coated. The SEM is a
} Cambridge stereoscan 100. I did not observe any reflected image at higher
} kV.
}
Some of the jolly service guys from Philips have performed a similar trick
with uncoated styrofoam without knowing why it worked. They first
bombarded the foam at 25 kV, then turned the acc. voltage down to
3kV or so. Here's my interpretation:

The glass, or styrofoam or whatever, charges up with electrons due to lack
of grounding. As more primary electron bombard the sample they begin to
be repelled by the like charge that has built up within the sample.
When you use low kV the primary electrons are not able to penetrate
the cloud of electrons around your sample, and are repelled by it. These
electrons begin to hit the detector (what you saw), the final
lens (what I saw with the styrofoam), or whatever else in the chamber,
eliciting secondary electrons, and forming an image. What you see
probably depends on the geometry of the chamber. We were able to look
right up the final lens and see the aperture. At higher kVs you
don't see the effect. Kinda cool, huh? Take a picture. Enjoy. Coat the
sample and remove the coating after viewing.

I thunk this up myself - does this sound right?

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: geoffa-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (GeoffA)
Date: 2/6/97 1:34 PM
Subject: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've seen the same when trying to image a minute marine snail that was
poorly adfixed to the stub. I presumed that it was charging SO MUCH
that the Primary Electrons were being completely repelled from the
specimen back to the roof of the chamber. It looked great - a normal
background with a shell-shaped "mirror" showing the ceiling of the
chamber!

Geoff Avern
Microscopy Labs
Australian Museum
Sydney, Australia


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Perhaps someone can explain what I saw earlier today while examining a
piece of archeological glass by SEM. When examining the sample at 10, 5
and 3 kV, I saw a distorted reflection of the secondary electron detector
at the surface of the sample. The sample was attached to an aluminum stub
using double-sided adhesive tape, and was not coated. The SEM is a
Cambridge stereoscan 100. I did not observe any reflected image at higher
kV.

Any thoughts?

James Martin
Williamstown Art Conservation Center







From: Peiyi WANG :      pw2-at-soton.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 12:14:34 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Digital camera--help need

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Message-Id: {199702071214.MAA17496-at-willow.sucs.soton.ac.uk}

Hi, there,

As you may know that the digital technology has came to join us in
anywhere. It is no doubt about that the digital photography has a strong
future in electron microscopy and image analysis. So I am going to
purchase a digital camera and high quality laser print as well for our
image analysis system. It may need to associate with among TEM, SEM and optical
microscopy. Our TEM here is JEOL2000FX and SEM are JEOL 6400 and T300.
But the trouble is that we only have got a limit budget which could be
less than 10,000 pounds.

I am wondering if any body could give me more suggestion and information
for them. Your advice would be very appreciation.

Thanks lot on advance.

Peiyi Wang
Department of Engineering Materials
University of Southampton
Southampton SO17 1BJ
UK
Tel: 00441703 595101;
Fax: 00441703 593016;
E-mail: pw2-at-soton.ac.uk




From: Ronald Cohn (415) 8556059 :      RONALD.COHN-at-roche.com (by way of
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 07:43:59 -0500
Subject: TEM : electron dense tracers for vascular leakage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everyone,

I'm looking for information regarding the availability of
colloidal carbon for use as an electron dense tracer in a
vascular leakage model. I have found numerous references to
Pelikan Ink, in particular Pelikan "Fount" Black India Ink No.
78. Pelikan still makes a No. 78 black ink, but it is not called
Black India Ink. Does anyone know: 1) are these equivalent
products, 2) are there other sources of colloidal carbon
available for our studies, 3) has anyone tried using colloidal
gold for these types of studies and would be willing to share
their experience?

With regard to my third question, we are considering using BSA
conjugated to 20 nm gold particles. At this point however,
perfusion times, dilutions, etc. would all have to be empirically
derived. I would greatly appreciate any insights from list
members that might save us a lot of time and effort. Thanks in
advance.

Ron Cohn
ronald.cohn-at-roche.com






From: ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 08:59:39 EST
Subject: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello, fellow microscopists!

Fred Schamber and Tina Carvalho described a little gizmo which we sell.
It's a lucite sphere mounted on carbon which will produce a reflected image.
We call it a "Lumisphere".

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: lkerr-at-mbl.edu (Louis Kerr)
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 09:07:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Need diamond scriber recommndations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Becky,

I have been using a couple of diamond scribes sold by:
Wale Apparatus Co, Inc.
400 Front Street
Hellertown, PA 18055
phone 610-838-7047
FAX 610-838-7440

This is a glassworking and laboratory products company and their scribes
work really well and come in several different flavors. They all have a
pencil type handle and most have the diamond tip mounted on a
0.028"diameter metal shank. They are also reasonably priced.

I'm just a happy customer.

Hope this helps,
Louie Kerr

} Subj: Need diamond scriber recommndations
}
} Can anybody recommend a good hand-held diamond scriber?
}
} I need something pretty robust but with small tip radius. I used to use a
} scriber made by Fisher Scientific, but they stopped selling them. I mainly
} scribe silicon wafers with varying amounts of metal and oxide layers.
}
} Becky Holdford
} Texas Instruments / DMD Failure Analysis Lab
} r-holdford-at-ti.com

Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 9:19:48 -0600 (CST)
Subject: rock salt question

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From: Terry.R.McCue%650 :      Terry.R.McCue-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 11:31:00 -0500
Subject: EPMA Chromium & Carbon

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Fellow Microprobers

I have two separate issues I'd like some input on. I'm somewhat
constrained by how much info. I can provide so here's the bare bones.

1. I have a sample composed primarily of Fe and Cr. I'm
characterizing the compositional Cr gradient as a function of location
on the sample cross-section by EPMA. " Polished surface". My results
for Cr concentration are nearly 20% lower than is expected based on
analyses done in other labs by other techniques of which I have little
or no knowledge of how it was done. I have reports that make
compositional claims but give little or no methodology.

I'm using a 304 SS standard "nominal 18% Cr" for standardization. On
my sample at a specific location where it is expected to measure 40
wt % Chromium, I'm getting in the range 30 to 35 Wt % Chromium.

As I said above this is the bare bones of the circumstance. Any input
regarding Cr/Fe EPMA analysis will be appreciated.

ON ANOTHER FRONT

2. I'm toying with carbon analysis by EPMA. I've got a set of 6 carbon
standards that with the exception of carbon concentration, are
basically 52100 material. Their carbon ranges from 0.018 to 0.610 and
they are very homogeneous. I'm using them to generate a curve from
which I can use to pick off x-ray on peak count levels that relate to
count rates from an unknown. I'm having trouble reconciling count
differences between my curve generating standards and those of a
SRM1225 which contains 0.275 carbon. All the standards have been
verified by Spectrographic analysis. I've run as high as 300 points
on the 1225 material and it consistently gives me lower average counts
than would be expected based on the carbon curve.

Again any thoughts or suggestions will be appreciated " Thanks "

Terry R. McCue
Babcock & Wilcox Research
Metallurgical Analysis Section
1562 Beeson St.
Alliance, Oh 44601
Phone: 330-829-7427
Internet: terry.r.mccue-at-mcdermott.com
Fax: 330-829-7831




From: Jeff Fortner :      jeff_fortner-at-qmgate.anl.gov
Date: 7 Feb 1997 10:40:54 -0600
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SE

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From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 12:06:40 -0600
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

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RE} detector reflected in SEM micrograph 2/7/97

I've seen a couple of responses attributing this effect to reflected
electrons. Although I've never observed these "reflection" images (we
religiously coat our glass samples, although I understand why one may not want
to coat an art relic), I think I have a better explanation. The surface of the
non-conducting sample is acting as part of a capacitor... the other part being
the inside of the chamber. What you are imaging is a surface charge set up by
this capacitance, and not reflected electrons. Electrons deflected completely
away from the sample are unlikely to image much of anything (try running the
EDS simultaneously with this effect...if the electrons are reflected there
should be a huge bremstraalung peak, and nothing else.


--------------------------------------

Perhaps someone can explain what I saw earlier today while examining a
piece of archeological glass by SEM. When examining the sample at 10, 5
and 3 kV, I saw a distorted reflection of the secondary electron
detector
at the surface of the sample. The sample was attached to an aluminum
stub
using double-sided adhesive tape, and was not coated. The SEM is a
Cambridge stereoscan 100. I did not observe any reflected image at
higher
kV.

Any thoughts?

James Martin
Williamstown Art Conservation Center




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} Some of the jolly service guys from Philips have performed a similar trick
} with uncoated styrofoam without knowing why it worked. They first
} bombarded the foam at 25 kV, then turned the acc. voltage down to
} 3kV or so. Here's my interpretation:
}
} The glass, or styrofoam or whatever, charges up with electrons due to lack
} of grounding. As more primary electron bombard the sample they begin to
} be repelled by the like charge that has built up within the sample.
} When you use low kV the primary electrons are not able to penetrate
} the cloud of electrons around your sample, and are repelled by it. These
} electrons begin to hit the detector (what you saw), the final
} lens (what I saw with the styrofoam), or whatever else in the chamber,
} eliciting secondary electrons, and forming an image. What you see
} probably depends on the geometry of the chamber. We were able to look
} right up the final lens and see the aperture. At higher kVs you
} don't see the effect. Kinda cool, huh? Take a picture. Enjoy. Coat the
} sample and remove the coating after viewing.
}
} I thunk this up myself - does this sound right?
}
} Aloha,
} Tina

Tina,
Got it in one. Somebody (SPI? EDS?) used to sell a "specimen
chamber inspection" stub that was basically half a marble that did this.
Charged some outrageous price for it.
Phil

P.S. I hope my "not the obvious" was taken as it was meant.

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Fred Pearson :      eoptics-at-mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 14:06:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re:Pencil forensics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John:

On the web there is a page listing "The Pencil Pages"
All you ever wanted to know about pencils, materials and related items.

It is maintained by Doug Martin, email: dmartin-at-bgnet.bgsu.edu

_________________________________________

Fred Pearson
McMaster University

email: eoptics-at-mcmaster.ca




From: csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 16:11:53 -2359
Subject: Need of an o-ring for our SEM

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Hi dear friends,

we need to replace an o-ring in our SEM to solve vacuum
problems. If we order it, we'd have to buy the whole set of o-rings.
According to our budget assigned for this year, this is not possible for us.

Our SEM is an old JEOL 35C. The o-ring we need is the one located at the
bottom of the anode chamber. It's in viton and described by JEOL as G120, the
dimensions are:
internal diameter: 119,4 +- 0,4 mm
thickness or width: 3,1 +- 0,1 mm

If anyone has extra ones and is willing to offer one to us, we would be happy
to arrange something to get it (buying it, exchanging it for other part...)

We appreciate very much your attention. Thanks,


Silvia Montoro
Centro Regional de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Santa Fe
Santa Fe - Argentina
csedax-at-arcride.edu.ar






From: csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 16:11:53 -2359
Subject: Need of an o-ring for our SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi dear friends,

we need to replace an o-ring in our SEM to solve vacuum
problems. If we order it, we'd have to buy the whole set of o-rings.
According to our budget assigned for this year, this is not possible for us.

Our SEM is an old JEOL 35C. The o-ring we need is the one located at the
bottom of the anode chamber. It's in viton and described by JEOL as G120, the
dimensions are:
internal diameter: 119,4 +- 0,4 mm
thickness or width: 3,1 +- 0,1 mm

If anyone has extra ones and is willing to offer one to us, we would be happy
to arrange something to get it (buying it, exchanging it for other part...)

We appreciate very much your attention. Thanks,


Silvia Montoro
Centro Regional de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Santa Fe
Santa Fe - Argentina
csedax-at-arcride.edu.ar






From: Carolyn Emerson :      cemerson-at-morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 16:01:22 -0330 (NST)
Subject: Static and Ni grids

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A colleague has had difficulty handling Ni grids because of the
high degree of static electricity -- one of the side effects of
the dry laboratory air during Feb. in the Great White North.
He has shunned his woolen sweaters, has been using appropriate
tweezers and when staining has beenn wetting the forceps to
reduce the problem. The critical step is of course when inserting
the grids into the holder for viewing in the TEM. Short of
purchasing an anti-static device, are there any ingenious tips
to overcome the case of the leaping grids? Thanks.

Carolyn J. Emerson
email: cemerson-at-plato.ucs.mun.ca

Biology Department
Memorial University
St. John's, NF A1B 3X9
Tel: (709) 737-7515
Fax: (709) 737-3018





From: dperetti-at-cmefcm.uncor.edu (Diego Peretti)
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 97 16:16:42 EST
Subject: Suscribe Microscopy

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--IMA.Boundary.883533558
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Fred et al. Actually, this effect does have one
useful application: if you suspect something wrong
inside the chamber, such as a loose wire, or a cold
stage tubing gone amuck, you can check it out this
way without having to open up the chamber to atmos.
That's the only use I've found; any others?

Damian Neuberger
Baxter International
neuberd-at-baxter.com

James,
You have encountered one of the neater artifacts you can accomplish
with a SEM. ..... This is such a neat effect that it just seems that
there SHOULD be some good use for it -- Alas -- I don't know of any,
other than to amuse yourself and your friends.

Fred Schamber
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Please Suscribme


E mail:dperetti-at-cmefcm.uncor.edu





From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 15:30:00 -0800
Subject: pencil forensics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John:

The authentication of documents is a big deal for the legal profession so try
contacting your local/state bar association or look in classified ads in
their newsletter/journal. There are companies that specialize in this sort of
thing.

Geoff
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (908)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-.umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: Scott D. Walck WL/MLBT :      walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 97 15:44:49 -0500
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Are you sure it is static and not magnetic tweezers? Try non-magnetic ones.
- -Scott


- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

A colleague has had difficulty handling Ni grids because of the
high degree of static electricity -- one of the side effects of
the dry laboratory air during Feb. in the Great White North.
He has shunned his woolen sweaters, has been using appropriate
tweezers and when staining has beenn wetting the forceps to
reduce the problem. The critical step is of course when inserting
the grids into the holder for viewing in the TEM. Short of
purchasing an anti-static device, are there any ingenious tips
to overcome the case of the leaping grids? Thanks.

Carolyn J. Emerson
email: cemerson-at-plato.ucs.mun.ca

Biology Department
Memorial University
St. John's, NF A1B 3X9
Tel: (709) 737-7515
Fax: (709) 737-3018





From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 15:51:27 -0800
Subject: pencil forensics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John:

The authentication of documents is a very big deal in the legal
profession and there are companies that specialize in this work.
Try your local/state bar association or their journal/newsletter.

Geoff
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (908)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-.umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: Dennis Kunkel :      kunkel-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 12:59:52 -1000 (HST)
Subject: re: Confocal

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Hello fellow microscopists,
Could anyone provide us with information on upgrading a Zeiss
Axiovert 10 inverted fluorescence microscope with confocal capabilities?
Are there relatively inexpensive kits available in setting up confocal or
do you have to go the route of a manufacture's design?
In addition are there any good software programs available for 3-D
reconstruction of confocal Z series, etc.?

Thanks in advance. Dennis Kunkel

***********************************************
* Dennis Kunkel Ph.D. *
* Pacific Biomedical Research Center *
* University of Hawaii *
* *
* email - kunkel-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* www - http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/~kunkel/ *
***********************************************





From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 16:27:05 -0800
Subject: EDS on a shoestring?

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Over the past few years I have been collecting the components of an EDS
system for our TEM. I think I have all the parts, and now hope to put them
together in the most efficient and cost effective manner (I also want it to
work!).

Here is what I have:

Kevex detector to fit our microscope.

Kevex 7000 chassis with 4505P pulse processor, bias power supply is
somewhere inside, no Kevex software, dead disk drive and rest of system
appears to be dead too.

NIM bin with another 4505P and PGT bias power supply modules.

Link model 1134 bias power supply and PP, newer would like to use this if
possible.

Dapple X-Mate MCA and acquisition controller.

A Link detector that does not fit our microscope.


Questions:

If I can figure out the plugs and sockets, could I use the Link PP and bias
on the Kevex detector? I would like to do this because the Link box is
newer and a better shape than the Kevex 4505P either in a NIM bin or in the
old Kevex 7000 chassis.

What is the chance of finding out the pin outs and adjustments needed to
mate the weird combination of plugs and pins I will end up with in a hybrid
system?

How nuts do you think I am for to try to piece together a system this way
as opposed to just getting all the components from a single source?

We are kind of Mac oriented in the lab, so I was thinking of a Mac MCA
(maybe 4pi) board to collect and work over spectra once I get some of the
detector/bias/PP part worked out.

What are some of the other pitfalls I should watch out for in putting
something like this together? We might have as much as $10K to devote to
this project, that would have to go for the new 4pi or other board and the
modifications to the components.

Any ideas for a better plan? Anybody want the leftovers if it works?

Thanks for your patience.



Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(408) 459-2477
FAX (408) 429-0146
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu






From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: 07 Feb 97 19:28:07 EST
Subject: Tripod Polisher (R) Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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REDUCED FEE REGISTRATION DEADLINE April 30, 1997
Workshop on Tripod Polishing

Workshop Objective
This course will cover all aspects of pre-thinning and focus on final thinning
for TEM via Tripod Polishing. Due to the limited class size and the extensive
hands-on opportuinities, this course is well suited to novices as well as
advanced Tripodders. Attendees will also learn the latest techniques available
in ion milling and in plasma cleaning for TEM samples. The course will include
sections on:

How to do it and why should I?
What's really going on and what am I really seeing?
How to prepare small, specific area cross-sections.
The problem of wildly differing materials (eg tungsten).
Rapid preparation of TEM cross-sections.
Preparation of a wide range of materials: semiconductors, ceramics, metals,...

Hands-on Opportunity
This course will be unique in that it will provide a hands-on opportunity for
every class participant. Tripod Polishers, Polishing Wheels, and pre-thinning
equipment will be made available to all participants and actual samples will be
prepared - by the students - as part of the course. This is a great opportunity
to get your hands dirty and actually learn by doing. The instructors will walk
you through each step of the process and then let you loose on the equipment.
This course is designed to teach the Tripod Polishing technique. Silicon
samples will be provided to the students and used as the basis for the course
teaching.

Workshop Location and Dates
South Bay Technology - San Clemente, CA
Dates: Friday & Saturday - June 6 & 7, 1997

Previous Participants (partial list)
INTEL, AMD, Motorola, LSI Logic, Conner Peripherals, Univ of Maryland, Univ of
New Mexico, UNAM (Mexico), LG Electronics (Korea), Battelle, MEMC, MVA Inc.,
Univ of Michigan, U.S. Bureau of Mines, IBM, Naval Research Lab, Purdue Univ,
Univ of Alabama, Univ of Arizona, Univ of Colorado, Univ of Wisconsin.

Class Size
Due to the intensive hands-on aspects of this course, class size will be
strictly limited to 10 participants.

Registration Fee: $795 (includes lunches and Friday night Dinner)
$695 if registration fee paid by April 15, 1997

Registration Deadline: 30 days prior to workshop

For additional Information: Diane Macdonald
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673
TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499
e-mail: sbt-at-southbaytech.com

ON-LINE Registration available at: http://www.southbaytech.com

Registration Form

To register for the workshop, please fill out this form and send it, with
registration fee to:

South Bay Technology, Inc.
Workshop on Tripod Polishing
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

Payment must be made in the form of a check, money order, Visa or MasterCard.
Checks must be drawn on a U.S. Bank and made payable to South Bay Technology,
Inc. Credit card orders by FAX may be sent to South Bay Technology at
714-492-1499. Please do not send credit card information via e-mail.



Affiliation:


Address:




City: State:
Zip: Country:_________
Telephone: FAX:

e-mail:________________________

Primary sample type:




VISA MasterCard Card #_________________________________

Expiration Date________ Signature of Cardholder_________________________

Cardholder name (Please print):________________________________________





From: Michael OKeefe :      Michael_OKeefe-at-macmail.lbl.gov
Date: 7 Feb 1997 17:03:29 -0700
Subject: Job Opportunity at NCEM

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Subject: Time:4:58 PM
OFFICE MEMO Job Opportunity at NCEM Date:2/7/97

Staff Scientist Opening

The Materials Sciences Division of the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory has an immediate opening for a full time Staff Scientist to
work in the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM).

NCEM is a national user facility with several state of the art electron
microscopes and advanced image analysis and specimen preparation
facilities. We are currently looking for an enthusiastic materials
scientist to develop the In Situ Microscopy program at NCEM. The
successful candidate will conduct original research in materials science
utilizing advanced techniques of electron microscopy with a focus on
mechanisms and dynamics of transformations and reactions at internal
interfaces. The candidate will lead the development and operation of the
In Situ facility which includes a 1.5MeV High Voltage Microscope, a
200keV In Situ microscope, and the facility's specimen preparation
laboratory. The position offers a chance to explore a broad range of
research opportunities by initiating collaborative projects with other
internal and external investigators, conceiving novel experiments,
developing new microscopy techniques, sample configurations or
instrumentation. The candidate will contribute significantly to the
future development of the facility.

The position requires a strong background in transmission electron
microscopy and current practical experience in dynamic experimentation,
specimen preparation and advanced microscopy techniques such as high
resolution imaging, high voltage microscopy, convergent beam diffraction,
microanalytical techniques, or computer image analysis/interpretation.
An essential requirement is the ability to initiate collaborations and to
carry out high quality research using the unique facilities of the NCEM.
A Ph.D. in the physical sciences is highly desirable.

Please send resume and cover letter to Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory, Staffing Office, Job #MSD/4891, One Cyclotron Road,
MS938A, Berkeley, California 94720.

For more information, see Current Job Offers at ---
http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/CJOs
The job description is at --
http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/CJOs/sci4891msd.html






From: oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu (Philip Oshel)
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 20:51:35 -0600
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

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Message-Id: {v02120d03af219979b00d-at-[130.126.26.127]}
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} A colleague has had difficulty handling Ni grids because of the
} high degree of static electricity -- one of the side effects of
} the dry laboratory air during Feb. in the Great White North.
} He has shunned his woolen sweaters, has been using appropriate
} tweezers and when staining has beenn wetting the forceps to
} reduce the problem. The critical step is of course when inserting
} the grids into the holder for viewing in the TEM. Short of
} purchasing an anti-static device, are there any ingenious tips
} to overcome the case of the leaping grids? Thanks.
}
} Carolyn J. Emerson

Dry air in St. John's?! A major climatic shift.
A quick-and-dirty try: wrap a clean wire around the specimen holder
(on the outside-of-the-vacuum side of the o-ring), and run the wire to
anything grounded--a bit of bare metal on the EM's chassis, a water pipe,
whatever's handy where you load the grids into the holder.
Have 2 wires, one grounded with a free end--touch the forceps to
the wire, grab the grid, touch wire to forceps again (being paranoid, like
all good EM people), then load.
Phil

&&& Illigitimi non carborundum &&&&&&&&
Philip Oshel
Station A
PO Box 5037
Champaign, IL 61825-5037
(217)244-3145 days
(217)355-3145 evenings
oshel-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
*** looking for a job again ******************







From: Phil Piccoli :      piccoli-at-glue.umd.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 22:42:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Image Analysis/Theory/Serial Sections

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Hello,

I am in the process of attempting to make serial sections of a
heterogeneous rock, and use algorithms in Mathematica to reconstruct 3-D
structures. My question: Is someone familiar with a paper or book which
can be used to determine the distance necessary between adjacent
serial sections, given the size of structures that I am attempting to
join up between sections, for a given statistical significance?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Phil Piccoli

*****************************************************************************
Phil Piccoli
Assistant Research Scientist
Department of Geology
Univ. of Maryland at College Park
College Park, MD 20742-4211

Phone: (301) 405-6966
FAX: (301) 314-9661
E-mail: piccoli-at-geol.umd.edu
WWW: http://www.geol.umd.edu/
*****************************************************************************





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 20:38:54 -0800
Subject: Re: EPMA Chromium & Carbon

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Tsk, Tsk.

One can also go to any well stocked hardware store and buy a nylon
lock nut, the type that has a hemispherical surface closing off one
side.

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com


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Hello, fellow microscopists!

Fred Schamber and Tina Carvalho described a little gizmo which we sell.
It's a lucite sphere mounted on carbon which will produce a reflected image.
We call it a "Lumisphere".

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************

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Dear Terry,
In reply to your questions about EPMA:
1. How can it be a "standard" if the composition is "nominal". Get a
standard. Use pure element by preference. Also, results from an EPMA will
always differ from a bulk technique because they test very different things.
Assume they are wrong. Test all the elements in the sample at every point,
as there are strong interferences for Cr in Fe.
2. The main problem with carbon analysis in the EPMA is that as you sit on a
location trying to get a carbon reading, the microscope is laying down
carbon, probably in far greater amounts than are in your standards. I doubt
if your detection limit is high enough for the levels you are trying to
test. Light element analysis is very sensitive to the matrix, which you do
not specify.
You wrote:
} 1. I have a sample composed primarily of Fe and Cr. I'm
} characterizing the compositional Cr gradient as a function of location
} on the sample cross-section by EPMA. " Polished surface". My results
} for Cr concentration are nearly 20% lower than is expected based on
} analyses done in other labs by other techniques of which I have little
} or no knowledge of how it was done. I have reports that make
} compositional claims but give little or no methodology.
}
} I'm using a 304 SS standard "nominal 18% Cr" for standardization. On
} my sample at a specific location where it is expected to measure 40
} wt % Chromium, I'm getting in the range 30 to 35 Wt % Chromium.
}
} As I said above this is the bare bones of the circumstance. Any input
} regarding Cr/Fe EPMA analysis will be appreciated.
}
} ON ANOTHER FRONT
}
} 2. I'm toying with carbon analysis by EPMA. I've got a set of 6 carbon
} standards that with the exception of carbon concentration, are
} basically 52100 material. Their carbon ranges from 0.018 to 0.610 and
} they are very homogeneous. I'm using them to generate a curve from
} which I can use to pick off x-ray on peak count levels that relate to
} count rates from an unknown. I'm having trouble reconciling count
} differences between my curve generating standards and those of a
} SRM1225 which contains 0.275 carbon. All the standards have been
} verified by Spectrographic analysis. I've run as high as 300 points
} on the 1225 material and it consistently gives me lower average counts
} than would be expected based on the carbon curve.
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 20:38:52 -0800
Subject: Re: EPMA of tree

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Dear James,
Wood preparation for the SEM is usually by slicing with a razor blade. Make
a fairly small block (less than 6 mm. on a face), since all wood outgasses.
The face you want to look at should be done last, with a new blade. Some
woods are best cut dry, others after soaking or even boiling to soften. My
experience is to cut softwoods dry and hardwoods wet. Carbon coat as usual
and analyse as usual in the EPMA. The wood is quite beam stable. I have had
good luck tracing brominated glues and wood preservatives diffusing into wood.
You wrote:
} I have been asked about the possibility of measuring elements in tree core
} using the electron probe. How best to prepare the wood for 10 - 20 kV, 20
} nA , 30 sec. beam exposure? My only experience with wood usually involves
} an axe and a fireplace. Thanks in advance.
}
} *.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*
} James J. McGee (jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
} Dept. of Geological Sciences
} University of South Carolina (803) 777-6300 (Office)
} Columbia, SC 29208 (803) 777-6610 (Fax)
Good luck,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 07 Feb 1997 20:38:56 -0800
Subject: Re: EDS on a shoestring?

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Dear Jon,
I thought only Canadians would be that hard up! The main problem is that the
Kevex pre-amp puts out a very different signal than the Link PP is built to
receive. Also, different detectors require different bias voltages, so you
have to be sure to supply the right one. You can probably come from the
Kevex PP out to the Dapple. Do you have the computer and Dapple software?
The other solution is IXRF, who are supplying computer systems for working
Kevex detectors.
You really need a EDX tech type.
You wrote:
} Over the past few years I have been collecting the components of an EDS
} system for our TEM. I think I have all the parts, and now hope to put them
} together in the most efficient and cost effective manner (I also want it to
} work!).
}
} Here is what I have:
}
} Kevex detector to fit our microscope.
}
} Kevex 7000 chassis with 4505P pulse processor, bias power supply is
} somewhere inside, no Kevex software, dead disk drive and rest of system
} appears to be dead too.
}
} NIM bin with another 4505P and PGT bias power supply modules.
}
} Link model 1134 bias power supply and PP, newer would like to use this if
} possible.
}
} Dapple X-Mate MCA and acquisition controller.
}
} A Link detector that does not fit our microscope.
}
}
} Questions:
}
} If I can figure out the plugs and sockets, could I use the Link PP and bias
} on the Kevex detector? I would like to do this because the Link box is
} newer and a better shape than the Kevex 4505P either in a NIM bin or in the
} old Kevex 7000 chassis.
}
} What is the chance of finding out the pin outs and adjustments needed to
} mate the weird combination of plugs and pins I will end up with in a hybrid
} system?
}
} How nuts do you think I am for to try to piece together a system this way
} as opposed to just getting all the components from a single source?
}
} We are kind of Mac oriented in the lab, so I was thinking of a Mac MCA
} (maybe 4pi) board to collect and work over spectra once I get some of the
} detector/bias/PP part worked out.
}
} What are some of the other pitfalls I should watch out for in putting
} something like this together? We might have as much as $10K to devote to
} this project, that would have to go for the new 4pi or other board and the
} modifications to the components.
}
} Any ideas for a better plan? Anybody want the leftovers if it works?
Good luck, you'll need it.
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng., UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel:604-822-5648, fax:604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 1997 19:28:08 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

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On Fri, 7 Feb 1997, Carolyn Emerson wrote:

} A colleague has had difficulty handling Ni grids because of the
} high degree of static electricity -- one of the side effects of
} the dry laboratory air during Feb. in the Great White North.
} He has shunned his woolen sweaters, has been using appropriate
} tweezers and when staining has beenn wetting the forceps to
} reduce the problem. The critical step is of course when inserting
} the grids into the holder for viewing in the TEM. Short of
} purchasing an anti-static device, are there any ingenious tips
} to overcome the case of the leaping grids? Thanks.
}
Static? What's that? I've read about it, but we rarely experience it
here. HOWEVER, we do frequently have the problem of Ni grids sticking to
and otherwise acting funny around forceps. It's magnetism. In fact, I
have to run my grids through a demagnetizer before putting them in the TEM
or I get horrible astigmatism. Give it a try!

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 97 16:01:40 -0500
Subject: Source for Diamond Scribe

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Becky Holdford wrote:
===================================
Can anybody recommend a good hand-held diamond scriber?

I need something pretty robust but with small tip radius. I used to use a
scriber made by Fisher Scientific, but they stopped selling them. I mainly
scribe silicon wafers with varying amounts of metal and oxide layers.
===================================
A nice hand held diamond scribe can be found on our website, given below.
It is retractable, "refills" are available, and is inexpensive and in wide
use in EM labs.

Disclosure: We believe this is a pretty good choice but then again we are
selling them.

Chuck

=====================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
=====================================================






From: weiliang EARTH.WGONG.PLANET. gong :      wgong-at-UNM.EDU
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 1997 14:21:28 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Position open now!

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This is a forwarded message requested by Profs. Rodney C. Ewing and Lumin
Wang at University of New Mexcio.


VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY --
LABORATORY MANAGER/RESEARCH SCIENTIST


Applications are invited for the position of laboratory manager/research
scientist (Research Scientist III) supporting the transmission electron
microscopy facilities in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences,
University of New Mexico. The laboratory includes a JEOL 2010 high
resolution TEM and JEOL 2000FX analytical STEM. Both instruments are
equipped with EDS capabilities. More information on the lab may be
obtained at HTTP//TEM.UNM.EDU.

We hope to fill this position by 1 May, 1997. The position is full time
initially for 15 months and may be continued on a permanent basis. Duties
will include supervision of all aspects of the electron microscopy
laboratory, maintenance of the instruments, assistance to students,
faculty, and research scientists at UNM, and outside users, and instruction
of a graduate course in principles of electron-microscopy and use of the
instruments. Time will be available for independent or collaborative
research involving the use of the microscopes and other analytical
facilities in the Department.

Candidates must hold a Ph.D. degree in earth science, materials science or
a related field, and have a demonstrated research background in these
disciplines, extensive skills in the operation and maintenance of
transmission electron microscopes, and a record of published research
activity. In addition, the candidate should have strong communication
skills and an ability to work with and/or instruct individuals with broad
research interests and backgrounds.

JOB TITLE: RESEARCH SCIENTIST III
DEPARTMENT: EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES
REQUISITION NUMBER: 970231*A
CLOSING DATE: 5:00 P.M. ON 3/21/97
GRADE 13

Based on Full-Time Salary: $2,858.42 to $3,801.42 mo.
Full-time term fifteen month position with possibility of regular
status.

IN ORDER TO BE QUALIFIED YOU MUST HAVE:

Ph.D. Degree in Technical, Scientific, or Engineering. Three (3) years
experience directly related to the duties and responsibilities specified.

TO APPLY

Applications must be received by the Human Resources Office at 1717 Roma
NE, or Health Sciences Ctr., Med Bldg. 2, Rm. 101, North Campus,
Albuquerque, NM 87131 no later than 5:00 p.m. on the closing date, February
21, 1997. Resumes must list employment dates by month/year and must be
accompanied by a cover letter. Functional resumes will not be accepted.
Indicate the requisition number 970231*A and job title Research Scientist
III on the application/cover letter. Application forms may be obtained by
calling 505-277-6422.







From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 97 17:00:14 -0500
Subject: Grids sticking to tweezers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Carolyn J. Emerson wrote:
==========================================
A colleague has had difficulty handling Ni grids because of the high degree
of static electricity -- one of the side effects of the dry laboratory air
during Feb. in the Great White North. He has shunned his woolen sweaters,
has been using appropriate tweezers and when staining has beenn wetting the
forceps to reduce the problem. The critical step is of course when
inserting the grids into the holder for viewing in the TEM. Short of
purchasing an anti-static device, are there any ingenious tips to overcome
the case of the leaping grids?
==========================================
I would like to clarify some misunderstandings about tweezers and their
"nonmagnetic" nature. First, the so-called "nonmagnetic" or "anti-magnetic"
stainless steel tweezers are not 100% anti-magnetic. It is my understanding
that the very best antimagnetic stainless steel (the kind that is used for
Dumont, SPI and other major manufacturer's of Swiss tweezers) is 92-95%
antimagnetic maximum. And that alone is enough residual magnetism to cause
nickel grids to stick to the so-called nonmagnetic tweezer tips. While
antistatic devices may or may not reduce the effect, the point is most of
the problem is caused by residual magnetism in the tweezer tips.

The SPI "Miracle Tip" and "Gold Plated Miracle" tip tweezers are made of a
super allow (it is not stainless steel at all) that really is 100%
antimagnetic. Nickel grids will not stick to the tips of these tweezers.
The gold plated version of the product keeps the low pH of the typical
reaction from reacting with the metal (e.g. electrochemistry), thereby
stunting the strength of the reaction. Additional information about these
tweezers can be found in the SPI On-Line catalog given below.

Disclosure: SPI has offered for some years tweezers with tips that are 100%
antimagnetic and are ideal for working with nickel grids, especially for
immunogold work.

Chuck
======================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
=====================================================




From: F. H. Schamber :      fhscham-at-sgi.net
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 1997 11:49:46 -0500
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SE (longish reply to Jeff Fortner)

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Jeff Fortner wrote:
}
} I've seen a couple of responses attributing this effect to reflected
} electrons. Although I've never observed these "reflection" images (we
} religiously coat our glass samples, although I understand why one may not want
} to coat an art relic), I think I have a better explanation. The surface of the
} non-conducting sample is acting as part of a capacitor... the other part being
} the inside of the chamber. What you are imaging is a surface charge set up by
} this capacitance, and not reflected electrons. Electrons deflected completely
} away from the sample are unlikely to image much of anything (try running the
} EDS simultaneously with this effect...if the electrons are reflected there
} should be a huge bremstraalung peak, and nothing else.
}
...........................
Gotta disagree with you on this one Jeff,

The idea of a surface image charge is interesting, but doesn't
correspond to the characteristics of the phenomenon. Let me state
several distinctive characteristics:

1. You can focus these images just like an ordinary specimen image.
2. The topography of the reflecting "mirror" specimen disappears.
3. One can image and differentiate objects which are at a uniform
ground potential.
4. One can image objects which are quite some distance away.
5. The effect requires one to first "charge up" the surface at a higher
beam voltage.

Let me illustrate by my first encounter with this effect. I was imaging
on a swatch of nylon fabric at 1 keV when a local thunderstorm knocked
the power out. When power came back on, the SEM came back online at 30
keV and after tuning up my filament settings, I attempted to return to
imaging my nylon material at 1 keV (not very bright in retrospect, but
hey, it was 3 a.m. and I wasn't too coherent). Instead of seeing the
fibrous structures I had seen earlier (at the same relatively low mag) I
was seeing unexpected unfocused contours -- some rounded, some linear --
vaguely familiar, but I couldn't put my finger on it. Fiddling with the
controls, I noticed that by focusing to longer working distances, the
shapes became sharper -- but still in no way recognizable as the
material under the beam (I had meanwhile peeked through the glass
viewport and verified that the nylon sample really WAS what was under
the beam). As the image came into sharper focus, I suddenly realized
that what I was seeing was a "fisheye" image of the entire inside of the
SEM chamber -- polepiece, detectors, stage, and other internal
mechanisms. For a moment I felt like I had entered some sort of
"Twilight Zone"!

After I figured out what was going on I became enamored with the effect
for a time and perfected my technique -- graduating to a saphire bead
with which I could make truly detailed and relatively distortion-free
images of the chamber interior. I could easily zoom in on and image
parts of the chamber which were 12-15 inches from the specimen (this was
a very large chamber).

The point is that although the nylon material had an obviously irregular
topography, it produced a quite uniform "mirroring" field. This is not
surprising, since the electric potential of an insulator charged up by
30 keV electrons will deflect a 1 keV electron at some distance from the
surface. At this distance the contributions from the various surface
charge sites integrate into a quite uniform equipotential surface which
acts as a nice smooth mirror for the incident electrons. The incident
electrons "bounce" off the equipotential surface according to the normal
laws of optical reflection and the electron trajectories behave exactly
as if one introduced a mirror in the path such that the scanning beam
now scans the objects visible in the mirror -- the interior of the
specimen chamber. It takes only a very weak field to attract the
produced secondaries to the detector so a usable image is produced
(though typically weaker, given the longer collection distances.)

If a capacitive "image charge" were responsible, one would need to have
a very regular capacitor surface to retain an intelligible image --
clearly not the case with the nylon swatch. Secondly, creation of such
an imaging charge would require that the features being imaged would
need to be producing strong variations of local field at the capacitor
surface -- not the case when I could image features of the chamber which
were all at ground potential and at considerable distance. Finally, an
image charge would not lend itself to focusing.

I can see the merits of your hypothesis, especially when the original
question involved seeing the secondary detector (which is at an elevated
potential) on a glass surface (presumably smooth). I can imagine a weak
image charge being produced on the glass via the proximity of the SED
field. But this would be evidenced by a rather subtle and smooth
modulation of the normal image contrast (remember that the SED
collection field at the specimen is necessarily weak and uniform, else
the incident beam would also be badly deflected). In the case of the
effect I have been talking about, the topography of the specimen is
REPLACED with a highly detailed reflected image -- exactly as if a
mirror were inserted above the specimen.

I don't recall ever attempting to look at the x-ray spectrum produced.
I wouldn't expect to see anything much since the electrons are striking
objects which are out of the line of sight of the EDS detector. A pure
brehmstrahlung spectrum should be produced, as you suggest, and this is
an interesting idea.

A final note -- in my earlier posting I commented that I knew of no good
use for this effect. In fact, I did once use it to locate a breakdown
across an interior insulator. It is also a good way of noting which
interior features of the chamber are most strongly producing secondary
electron "background" as would normally occur from electron
backscattering onto the chamber walls. But its best use IMHO is still
its considerable potential for amusement!

Fred Schamber
RJ Lee Instruments Ltd.




From: Bruce Cutler :      BCutler-at-eureka.chem.ukans.edu
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 1997 18:09:57 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Ni grids & magnetism

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Ni grids can be a pain, especially the first time they are used by
those who have only used Cu grids, because they are magnetic.
Furthermore, I have found that many so-called non-magnetic forceps
don't seem to be adequately non-magnetic. In over
10 years experience the ones I recommend are
Dumont INOX, in the common tip type and self-closing - N5. I have no
financial connection to Dumont (I wish I did!).
Bruce Cutler, Microscopy Lab, University of Kansas, Lawrence




From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Sun, 9 Feb 1997 14:40:38 -0600
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

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Greetings,
For a low-tech solution to excess static, we keep a box of
"Bounce free" squares in the lab. These squares are made to put in a load
of clothing in the dryer and prevent wrinkles. The "free" in the name means
that they are free of fragrance. You can put one of these squares on the
surface and work over it (i.e., put a dish on the square). You can wipe off
areas or objects. Keeps the static charges down. I wipe my computer monitor
with one and dust stays away for a long while. We buy these things in our
local supermarket. Obviously, this won't do anything for residual
magnitism. I have no stake in the Bounce company.
Hope this helps,
Tobias

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Laurence Tetley :      gbza40-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 08:57:58 GMT
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

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Carolyn

I wouldn't have thought the Ni grids are being affected by static as much
as magnetic fields due to magnetised forceps tips. To alleviate this try
demagnetising by scrambling the domains in a high field strength such as in
an old mains transformer with a cut out channeled in the metal pole piece.
This works for us and is a cheap solution but I dare say someone will sell
you a "degausser" which will work equally well and might look more
acceptable to the safety officer ! Ask your physics/electronics people for
a supplier.

Regards

Laurence Tetley



At 16:01 07/02/97 -0330, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

email gbza40-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk
tel. 0141 330 4431
fax 0141 307 8016





From: Jitu Shah :      JSS-at-siva.bris.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 04:23:21 -0600
Subject: JSM 35 Lens

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Fellow Microscopists,

A few days ago I put in the following request:I am in need of acquiring the
conical part of the final lens of a JSM
35(version C) scanning electron microscope. The cone in question is the part of
the lens that hangs down in the chamber. We intend to develop a modification.
Please email me with the information so that further negotiations can be carried
out. I should welcome also any information on the composition (and commercial
specification) of the metal from which the cone is made of. Of course, info on
where this metal can be obtained will be invaluable.


Thank you in anticipation of your cooperation and help.

Although I have had two replies, my quest continues. If you have any
suggestions/comments, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Many Thanks.

Jitu Shah


Dr.Jitu Shah
H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory,
University of Bristol,
Royal Fort, Tyndall Avenue,
Bristol BS8 1TL. UK
email: jss-at-siva.bristol.ac.uk
Tel: 44 117 9288719
Fax: 44 117 9255624





From: goldmrkr-at-fast.net :      goldmrkr-at-fast.net
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 08:02:08 -0500
Subject: Staining Tissues with Silicone!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Listserver Colleagues -

Has anyone had experience staining tissues (breast, etc.) for the presence
of silicone gel at either EM or Light levels? As far as I know, the
silicone does not accept stain but thought I would learn if anyone has had
any experience with such specimens.

Regards, Don Cox, Goldmark Biologicals





From: Daryl Davis :      Daryl_Davis_at_ZEUS-at-smtpgate.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 97 08:46:06 CST
Subject: Silicon Wafers

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Could someone give me information concerning where to purchase
inexpensive silicon wafers of any diameter and about 0.5 mm thickness.
Silicon quality is not important. I need these wafers to sandwich
cross-section TEM samples. Thank you in advance.


Megan Daryl Davis






From: Leon A. Metlay :      lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 11:18:13 -0500
Subject: Re: Image Analysis/Theory/Serial Sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Phil Piccoli asked:

} Is someone familiar with a paper or book which
} can be used to determine the distance necessary between adjacent
} serial sections, given the size of structures that I am attempting to
} join up between sections, for a given statistical significance?
}
} Any information would be greatly appreciated.

You might try "Stereological methods" by Ewald R. Weibel, Academic Press,
1980. It is better known to people who do morphometry as "Weibel's Bible".
The first volume is practical stuff with examples (mostly from biologic
science) the second volume is theorectical stuff. Unfortunately, someone
has borrowed my copy so I don't know for sure that what you want is in
there, but that's where I'd start.

Leon


--
Leon A. Metlay, M.D.,Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of Rochester Medical Center Phone: (716) 275-5691
P.O. Box 626 Fax: (716) 273-1027
Rochester, NY 14642 lmetlay-at-acu.pathology.rochester.edu
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/smd/pathres/URPLM.html
"Most ass drivers are evil, most camel drivers are decent, most sailors are
saintly, the best among physicians is going to Gehenna, and the best of
butchers is a partner of Amalek" -R. Judah, in Mish. Kidd. 4:14






From: Dr. Mark W. Lund :      lundm-at-physc2.byu.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 10:39:54 MST/MDT
Subject: RE: Silicon Wafers

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Hi,
I hope someone there can give a hand for education of microcopy to our
young generation.

***********************************************
* Ming H. Chen, PhD *
* Medicine/Dentistry Electron Microscopy Unit *
* University Of Alberta. *
* Edmonton, Alberta, Canada *
* *
* Visit My Page At: *
* http://www.ualberta.ca/~mingchen *
***********************************************




---------- Forwarded message ----------

We have a few thousand scrap 4" test wafers that we sell for
$1 each in quantities of 50 for just this kind of use.

best regards
mark

Mark W. Lund, PhD
Director } } Soft X-ray Web page http://www.moxtek.com { {
MOXTEK, Inc.
452 West 1260 North
Orem UT 84057 801-225-0930 FAX 801-221-1121
lundm-at-xray.byu.edu

"367 billion dollars of coal clearly has 367,000 times the value of
a million dollar view."




From: BobCat54-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 13:48:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Thanks for your help - & - a little help from me

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists:

Some time back I posted a request for help. The response I received was
GREAT!

Now, maybe, I can be of some help to you. I have created a web page with
about 90 (so far) LINKS to companies and other interesting sites. I hope
this will be of value to those who are looking for information.

Please, let me know if I have made any errors or omissions. I will be happy
to make changes or add new sites.

Oh, yes, the MSA gets top billing!

Again, thank you for being there and for all the help and on-going
information.

Best regards,

Bob

E-mail: bobcat54-at-aol.com
Home Page: http://members.aol.com/BobCat54/index.html
Springfield, MA, USA





From: DON_STEELE-at-CCKRDC.CA.ALCAN.CA
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 09:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Imaging: Moire from scanner.

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Morning All.

Some time ago I jumped on the digitised image bandwagon. In cases
where a digital image is not acquired at the start, I scan the
negative using an Agfa Arcus II scanner (recommended by folks on this
listserver).

My problem is that in some instances, I get a pattern on my images,
reminiscent of thickness fringes, which I am interpreting as some sort
of Moire effect. I've purchased a few of these scanners now, for
different areas, and the problem occurs to varying degrees on all of
them. On the unit which is most prone to this, the transparency
module is visibly crooked, which may be the cause. I do get the
problem on the others, though, and the lid appears quite straight on
them.

I've yet to find the appropriate Agfa contact who can help, so if one
is out there, or if any one else can shed some light on this for me,
I'd appreciate it. I don't want to go back to the darkroom!

****************************************
Don Steele Steele-at-KRDC.INT.Alcan.Ca
Alcan International
Kingston Research and Development Centre
(613) 541 - 2145
****************************************







From: Paul Webster :      paul.webster-at-Yale.edu
Date: 10 Feb 1997 17:43:40 -0500
Subject: Re: Image Analysis/Theory/Se

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The best way to estimate section thickness is to look at folds in the section.
Small enough folds should be x2 the section thinckness.

Alternatively, it is possible to re-embed the grids with sections on to obtain
cross sections from which you can directly measure the section thickness. In
this case is it interesting to see how variable the section thicknesses are.

An exotic way to estimate section thickness is to trim the block at a
pre-determined angle and measure the increasing dimensions of the block as the
sections are removed. I lost my high school geometry book so I can't help you
more on this one.

Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Center for Cell Imaging
http://info.med.yale.edu/cellimg





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 20:27:15 -0500
Subject: Re: Request for NIH Image FTP address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {v03007800af257b1ba826-at-[206.69.208.21]}
In-Reply-To: {01BC1740.5381E9E0-at-ts1-30.njcc.com}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"



The anonymous ftp site is:

zippy.nimh.nih.gov


Nestor Zaluzec
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
--------------

} Fellow microscopists,
}
} I am trying to locate a copy of the NIH Image Processing Software. on the
} net. Can some one please forward the respective address.
}
}
} Thank you
} Mitch
} Evex Analytical
}
}
}
}
} Evex is the world's leading independent provider of service and support for
} Evex, Link, Kevex, Noran, P.G.T. and Tracor brand EDS systems and related
} peripherals. Our Service Engineers are "factory trained" and are located
} nationwide.







From: Scott D. Walck WL/MLBT :      walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 97 21:56:44 -0500
Subject: Re:Degausser

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To alleviate this try
} demagnetising by scrambling the domains in a high field strength such as in
} an old mains transformer with a cut out channeled in the metal pole piece.
} This works for us and is a cheap solution but I dare say someone will sell
} you a "degausser" which will work equally well and might look more
} acceptable to the safety officer ! Ask your physics/electronics people for
} a supplier.
}
} Regards
}
} Laurence Tetley
}
A degausser that you can buy and perhaps use for something else is a soldering
gun that has the two leads coming out to form the tip. I think that Sears
sells one like that that has a light on it. Put your tweezers slowly in and
slowly out and it will degauss them.
- -Scott Walck




From: fons-at-etl.go.jp (Paul Fons)
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 1997 22:14:37 -0500
Subject: dislocation contrast question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have a what would appear to be a simple question. In the case of
dislocations in a two beam condition, one gets contrast at dislocations,
and of course the reverse contrast in dark field. I understand the imaging
conditions regarding the strain field and g as to when contrast should
occur. I am curious if there is a simple explanation as to why in the
vicinity of dislocations which are after all spatially localized events in
real space and hence delocalized in Fourier space as to why dislocations
diffract more into the diffraction spot (e.g. why are dislocations bright
in bright field (as compared to the background). Sorry for asking what
must be obvious to all, but I am self taught from TEM textbooks and if
possible would like a simple picture in addition to the math. Is the
answer essentially dynamical in that the dislocation causes scattering off
other band in the dispersion surface than the two beam case, and if so why
then is the two beam dark field bright?


Thanks for an answer to a silly question,
Paul Fons

Dr. Paul Fons
Senior Scientist
Electrotechnical Laboratory
Tsukuba, Japan 305

fax: 81-209-58-5615
tel: 81-298-58-5636

email: fons-at-etl.go.jp
Eudora Enclosures O.K.

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From: fons-at-etl.go.jp (Paul Fons)
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 13:22:20 +0900
Subject: dislocation contrast question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a what would appear to be a simple question. In the case of
dislocations in a two beam condition, one gets contrast at dislocations,
and of course the reverse contrast in dark field. I understand the imaging
conditions regarding the strain field and g as to when contrast should
occur. I am curious if there is a simple explanation as to why in the
vicinity of dislocations which are after all spatially localized events in
real space and hence delocalized in Fourier space as to why dislocations
diffract more into the diffraction spot (e.g. why are dislocations bright
in bright field (as compared to the background). Sorry for asking what
must be obvious to all, but I am self taught from TEM textbooks and if
possible would like a simple picture in addition to the math. Is the
answer essentially dynamical in that the dislocation causes scattering off
other band in the dispersion surface than the two beam case, and if so why
then is the two beam dark field bright?


Thanks for an answer to a silly question,
Paul Fons

Dr. Paul Fons
Senior Scientist
Electrotechnical Laboratory
Tsukuba, Japan 305

fax: 81-209-58-5615
tel: 81-298-58-5636

email: fons-at-etl.go.jp
Eudora Enclosures O.K.

PGP Public Key
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From: fons-at-etl.go.jp (Paul Fons)
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 13:27:46 +0900
Subject: Dislocation contrast question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a what would appear to be a simple question. In the case of
dislocations in a two beam condition, one gets contrast at dislocations,
and of course the reverse contrast in dark field. I understand the imaging
conditions regarding the strain field and g as to when contrast should
occur. I am curious if there is a simple explanation as to why in the
vicinity of dislocations which are after all spatially localized events in
real space and hence delocalized in Fourier space as to why dislocations
diffract more into the diffraction spot (e.g. why are dislocations bright
in bright field (as compared to the background). Sorry for asking what
must be obvious to all, but I am self taught from TEM textbooks and if
possible would like a simple picture in addition to the math. Is the
answer essentially dynamical in that the dislocation causes scattering off
other band in the dispersion surface than the two beam case, and if so why
then is the two beam dark field bright?


Thanks for an answer to a silly question,
Paul Fons

Dr. Paul Fons
Senior Scientist
Electrotechnical Laboratory
Tsukuba, Japan 305

fax: 81-209-58-5615
tel: 81-298-58-5636

email: fons-at-etl.go.jp
Eudora Enclosures O.K.

PGP Public Key
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
Version: 2.6.3i

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From: AMCGroup2-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 00:00:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Advanced Specimen Prep Workshops

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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1997 ADVANCED SPECIMEN PREPARATION WORKSHOPS
(for LM, SEM/TEM, and SPM)

The following 8 independent workshops offer an intensive hands-on training
program for the application of the most advanced specimen preparation
techniques currently available for microscopy of complex material systems.
These workshops are intended for R&D personnel involved in microscopy of
advanced materials and/or related specimen preparation. Enrollment is
limited to 4 students in each workshop and early registration is strongly
recommended to ensure admission.

***Site-specific Cross-sectioning and Microthinning
Precision Cleaving (May 6 or Nov. 4 in Santa Clara, CA)
FIB-milling for SEM Cross-sectioning (May 7 or Nov.5 in Sunnyvale, CA)
FIB-milling for TEM Cross-sectioning (May 7-9 or Nov.5-7 in Sunnycale, CA)
Precision Lapping for SEM Cross-sectioning (May 14 or Nov. 12 in Phoenix, AZ)
TEM Wedge-polishing (May 14-16 or Nov. 12-14 in Phoenix, AZ)

***Materials Ultramicrotomy
General Surface Preparation for LM, SEM, or AFM (May 19-20 or Nov. 17-18 in
Phoenix, AZ)
Thin Section Preparation for TEM (May 19-21 or Nov. 17-19 in Phoenix, AZ)
Advanced Ultramicrotomy (May 22-23 or Nov 20-21 in Phoenix, AZ)

A partial list of the past participants in these workshops include:
IBM, Motorola, SEMATECH, Texas Instruments, Medtronic, Hewlett-Packard,
Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Oak Ridge National Lab, National Renewable Energy Lab,
Bell Northern Research (Canada), Honeywell, Martin Marietta, B.F. Goodrich,
3M, MIT Lincoln Lab, United Technologies, Hydro Quebec (Canada), Cabot,
Lawrence Livermore National Lab, US Army Research Lab, Kimberly Clark, etc.

For further information and on-line registration, please see our home page
hosted on Microscopy Online at
http://www.microscopy-online.com/Vendors/AMCGroup/. You may also request a
copy of the workshops brochure by providing us with your complete mailing
address.

Rene E. Nicholas
AMC Group
(a Division of Promotech Associates, Inc.)
amcgroup2-at-aol.com




From: Bo Johansen :      boj-at-bot.ku.dk
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 08:59:04 (=UT+1)
Subject: Re: Image Analysis/Theory/Serial Sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Phil,

} Is someone familiar with a paper or book which
} can be used to determine the distance necessary between adjacent
} serial sections, given the size of structures that I am attempting to
} join up between sections, for a given statistical significance?
}
} Any information would be greatly appreciated.

You may try
Aherne, W.A. & Dunnill, M.S., 1982. Morphometry, Edward Arnold, London.

A number of papers on "stereology" have been published by Gundersen,
H.J.G. and co-workers. Take a look in Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Immun.
Scand. (APMIS) vol 96.

Bo

_____________________________________________________________________
Bo Johansen E-Mail: BoJ-at-bot.ku.dk
Botanical Institute Vioce: +45 3532 2157
Gothersgade 140 FAX: +45 3313 9104
DK-1123 Copenhagen K, Denmark http://www.bot.ku.dk/staff/boj.htm
---------------------------------------------------------------------






From: John Turek :      jjt-at-vet.purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 08:13:50 -0500
Subject: Moire patterns from scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Don:

You are indeed seeing Moire patterns from the scanned images. This is due
to the dot pattern in the image and it is a real problem with glossy images
taken from journals or textbooks. There are several ways around the
problem. One way is to play with the dpi setting of your scanner and find a
resolution that minimizes the pattern. Another is to scan the image in at a
high resolution and do a 1-2 pixel gaussian blur of the image or to adjust
the dpi setting down from a high resolution (600 dpi) to a lower resolution
(100-200 dpi). These latter solutions may be performed in an image
processing program like Photoshop. You can also use fast-fourier transforms
to remove the patterns, but I am not as pleased with the results.

Regards,


John J. Turek, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Dept. of Basic Medical Sciences
Director, Core Laboratory for Image Analysis
and Multidimensional Applications (CRISTAL)
phone: 317-494-5854
fax: 317-494-0781
email: jjt-at-vet.purdue.edu
web: http://vet.purdue.edu/cristal






From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 11 Feb 1997 09:11:29 EST
Subject: NIH Image

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To: Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


I went after NIH Image, and found the 0README.txt claims there is
no DOS version, it's only for Mac. Does anyone know of a DOS
version?

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: Yimei Zhu :      zhu-at-bnl.gov
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 08:12:02 -0500
Subject: PostDoc Opening in Mat. Sci. at BNL

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X-Sender: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
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Postdoctoral Positions in Electron Microscopy
Brookhaven National Laboratory


A postdoctoral opening is available in the Materials Science Division,
Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The
appointment is for one year initially with the possibility of renewal for
longer terms, and involves the use of BNL's new JEOL 300kV FEG transmission
electron microscope in studying high-temperature superconductors, hard
magnets, and other materials of interest. This state-of-the-art instrument
has a point-to-point resolution of 0.16nm, energy resolution of 0.65eV,
equipped with multiscan CCD cameras, a Gatan Imaging Filter, an electron
energy-loss spectrometer, an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer, and a
holography unit. The attached scanning system can provide a {0.2nm probe
with a x-ray chemical-mapping resolution of 1nm, and has an
annular-dark-field detector with Z-contrast imaging capability. Heating
and liquid helium stages will also be available.

The successful candidate will be a recent Ph.D graduate in physics or
materials science with a strong background in structural analysis, as well
as in electron microscopy. Research experience in crystal structure,
structural defects, and interfaces using electron-microscopy imaging,
diffraction, including diffuse scattering, spectroscopy, GIF, holography,
and computer simulation is desired. Qualified candidates should send their
resume and names and addresses of three referees to :

Dr. Yimei Zhu
Building 480, Materials Science Division,
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Upton, Long Island, NY 11973-5000 U.S.A.

phone: (516) 344-3057
fax: (516) 344-4071

BNL is a multipurpose national laboratory managed by Associated University
Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy. BNL is an equal opportunity
employer committed to build and maintaining a diverse work force.

********************************
Dr. Yimei Zhu
Materials Science Division
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Upton, Long Island, NY 11973 USA
Tel. (516)344-3057
Fax. (516)344-4071
********************************






From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 09:55:03 -0500
Subject: RE: NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If the Windows 95 version (not beta) is not out yet, it should be
shortly. It is being developed by Scion Corp. They have more info at
their web site, the address of which I don't have handy right now. The
NIH image www site also has additional info.
------------------------------------------------
Opinions or statements expressed herein, rational or otherwise, do not
necessarily reflect those of my employer.

Harold J. Crossman
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: (508) 750-1717
E-mail: crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com

Our web sites: www.sylvania.com
www.siemens.com
--

"Crossman, Harold" {crossman-at-osi.SYLVANIA.com}




From: Brian Robertson :      bwr-at-unlinfo.unl.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 09:01:15 CST
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SE (longish reply to Jeff Fortner)

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http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

At 11:49 AM 2/8/97 -0500, Fred Schamber wrote:
} I don't recall ever attempting to look at the x-ray spectrum produced.
} I wouldn't expect to see anything much since the electrons are striking
} objects which are out of the line of sight of the EDS detector. A pure
} brehmstrahlung spectrum should be produced, as you suggest, and this is
} an interesting idea.
}
Yes, one would hope and expect to see few x-rays then. However, some are
detected and they are not all bremsstrahlung:

Unless fast electrons reach the atoms in the sample they cannot generate
bremsstrahlung in the sample. The electrons reflected by a strong enough
electrostatic field produced by an electrically isolated, electrically
charged specimen can generate characteristic x-rays as well as
bremsstrahlung from all specimen chamber materials which are visible in the
mirror image of the chamber.

If an abnormal background shape is observed in x-ray spectra recorded in the
"mirror" condition, a significant source is the reflected electrons
themselves -- either entering the x-ray collimator and generating
detectable x-rays there or even penetrating the detector window and
reaching the detector crystal itself (especially if there is a thin window
or if there is no magnetic "electron trap" in the collimator). BTW, this
same effect can be observed clearly in TEM or STEM if the collimator's
internal geometry is bad and the EM is operated with a very low or zero
magnetic lens field at the specimen, as is commonly found in low mag mode.

Best wishes,
Brian





Brian W Robertson Office 402 472 8308
Associate Professor Lab 402 472 8762
Department of Mechanical Engineering and FAX 402 472 1465
Center for Materials Research and Analysis,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
255 Walter Scott Engineering Center
Lincoln NE 68588-0656 USA






From: flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu (Stanley L. Flegler)
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 11:39:51 -0500
Subject: NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is a 32 bit Windows 95 version of NIH Image at
http://rsb.info.nih.gov/nih-image/download.html
The Web page says that it is for Windows NT also, but according to Scion
Corp., the NT version is scheduled for release sometime in the Spring.
Stanley L. Flegler
Center for Electron Optics
Michigan State University
flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu





From: robbw-at-noran.com (Robb Westby)
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 10:52:14 -0600
Subject: Re: Static and Ni grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Good Day,

I have found that when you use a 'Bounce' sheet that is new the screen gets a little 'filmy' so I use the used sheets.

This keeps me happy and it keeps my frugal wife happy that I don't steal the dryer sheets.





From: Carolyn Emerson :      cemerson-at-morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 14:06:12 -0330 (NST)
Subject: Summary Ni grids, magetism, static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Many thanks to all who replied concerning the difficulty in
handling Ni grids. Several folk correctly pointed out that in
addition to difficulties in handling grids in general if there is
static involved (and there is in our lab with the heat cranked up
in winter), Ni grids create an extra problem because of their
ferromagnetic nature and attraction to non-magnetic forceps tips.

Advice ranged from dealing with the possibility of static by
working over an area covered with Bounce Free anti-static laundry
sheets, to making minor modifications of specimen loading ports on
the TEM. Several people commented that even those forceps
described as non-magnetic were not totally so, and could attract Ni
grids. There was advice to dip the tips in glacial acetic acid and
wipe dry, or rinse in ethanol. Others talked of degaussers or
demagnetizing devices available from one's local physics dept or
electronics shop to demagnetise forceps and/or grids. A vendor did
direct us to truly non-magnetic gold-tipped forceps which are
available commercially.

And several microscopists pointed out the additional problem of
astigmatism in the microscope while viewing Ni grids and suggested
we save ourselves all the grief and use gold grids when doing
immuno work.

My colleague is going to purchase some gold grids, we've got a box
of Bounce sheets on the lab bench, and we'll also investigate
demagnetisers and the truly non-magnetic forceps.

Thanks to all who responded on the listserver and privately. 


Carolyn J. Emerson
email: cemerson-at-plato.ucs.mun.ca

Biology Department
Memorial University
St. John's, NF A1B 3X9
Tel: (709) 737-7515
Fax: (709) 737-3018





From: Stewart-Davis, Fred A. :      fstewartdavis-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 13:18:00 PST
Subject: Summary Ni grids, magetism, static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Team Leader
Electron Microscopy

PPG Glass Technology Center located 14 miles Northeast of Pittsburgh has an
immediate opening in its Electron Microscopy Laboratory.

The position interacts with R&D, manufacturing and technical support
personnel in designing analytical approaches and providing meaningful
solutions to projects relating to glass, glass coatings, paints and many
other PPG manufactured or formulated products.

The candidate will be required to operate a JEOL STEM and a Digital scanning
probe microscope, supervise a group of 4-5, and manage this well-equipped
microscopy laboratory.

The position requires an advanced degree in materials science, physics or
chemistry, or the equivalent in relevant experience. The candidate must have
3 or more years of industrial experience. In-depth knowledge of STEM, SEM,
and experience in data/image handling by computers is essential. Experience
in surface analysis, IR spectroscopy and other analytical techniques is
desirable.

The candidate must have technical and organizational skills, must be able to
work independently and must have the interpersonal skills to work
effectively with others. Official authorization to work permanently in the
United States is required.


Please forward resume and salary information to:

PPG Industries
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Att: Supervisor, Personnel

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V




From: Stewart-Davis, Fred A. :      fstewartdavis-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 13:54:00 PST
Subject: Electron Microscopy Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Team Leader
Electron Microscopy

PPG Glass Technology Center located 14 miles Northeast of Pittsburgh has an
immediate opening in its Electron Microscopy Laboratory.

The position interacts with R&D, manufacturing and technical support
personnel in designing analytical approaches and providing meaningful
solutions to projects relating to glass, glass coatings, paints and many
other PPG manufactured or formulated products.

The candidate will be required to operate a JEOL STEM and a Digital scanning
probe microscope, supervise a group of 4-5, and manage this well-equipped
microscopy laboratory.

The position requires an advanced degree in materials science, physics or
chemistry, or the equivalent in relevant experience. The candidate must have
3 or more years of industrial experience. In-depth knowledge of STEM, SEM,
and experience in data/image handling by computers is essential. Experience
in surface analysis, IR spectroscopy and other analytical techniques is
desirable.

The candidate must have technical and organizational skills, must be able to
work independently and must have the interpersonal skills to work
effectively with others. Official authorization to work permanently in the
United States is required.


Please forward resume and salary information to:

PPG Industries
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Att: Supervisor, Personnel

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V




From: Stewart-Davis, Fred A. :      fstewartdavis-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 14:17:00 PST
Subject: EM Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Team Leader
Electron Microscopy

PPG Glass Technology Center located 14 miles Northeast of Pittsburgh has an
immediate opening in its Electron Microscopy Laboratory.

The position interacts with R&D, manufacturing and technical support
personnel in designing analytical approaches and providing meaningful
solutions to projects relating to glass, glass coatings, paints and many
other PPG manufactured or formulated products.

The candidate will be required to operate a JEOL STEM and a Digital scanning
probe microscope, supervise a group of 4-5, and manage this well-equipped
microscopy laboratory.

The position requires an advanced degree in materials science, physics or
chemistry, or the equivalent in relevant experience. The candidate must have
3 or more years of industrial experience. In-depth knowledge of STEM, SEM,
and experience in data/image handling by computers is essential. Experience
in surface analysis, IR spectroscopy and other analytical techniques is
desirable.

The candidate must have technical and organizational skills, must be able to
work independently and must have the interpersonal skills to work
effectively with others. Official authorization to work permanently in the
United States is required.


Please forward resume and salary information to:

PPG Industries
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Att: Supervisor, Personnel

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V




From: Stewart-Davis, Fred A. :      fstewartdavis-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 14:17:00 PST
Subject: EM Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Team Leader
Electron Microscopy

PPG Glass Technology Center located 14 miles Northeast of Pittsburgh has an
immediate opening in its Electron Microscopy Laboratory.

The position interacts with R&D, manufacturing and technical support
personnel in designing analytical approaches and providing meaningful
solutions to projects relating to glass, glass coatings, paints and many
other PPG manufactured or formulated products.

The candidate will be required to operate a JEOL STEM and a Digital scanning
probe microscope, supervise a group of 4-5, and manage this well-equipped
microscopy laboratory.

The position requires an advanced degree in materials science, physics or
chemistry, or the equivalent in relevant experience. The candidate must have
3 or more years of industrial experience. In-depth knowledge of STEM, SEM,
and experience in data/image handling by computers is essential. Experience
in surface analysis, IR spectroscopy and other analytical techniques is
desirable.

The candidate must have technical and organizational skills, must be able to
work independently and must have the interpersonal skills to work
effectively with others. Official authorization to work permanently in the
United States is required.


Please forward resume and salary information to:

PPG Industries
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Att: Supervisor, Personnel

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V




From: Marti, Jordi :      MartiJ-at-MTOMP201.Research.Allied.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 14:48:00 EST
Subject: TEM polymers(Outsourcing)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello !

I was wondering if someone could recommend one or two commercial labs
where we could outsource some of our TEM polymer work. Our samples
would require embedding, cryo or RT sectioning, staining (usually
phosphotungstic acid ) and a few TEM micrographs.

Thanks

Jordi Marti




From: Stewart-Davis, Fred A. :      fstewartdavis-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 97 14:48:00 PST
Subject: EM Posting Address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


EM Posting-PPG
Please forward resume and salary information to:
PPG Industries
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Att: Supervisor, Personnel
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V




From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-OSI.SYLVANIA.com
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 15:28:06 -0500
Subject: Advice on method

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Knowledgeable Microscopists,

Does anyone out there have information that compares/contrasts the
techniques of laser profilometry, contact profilometry, and SEM imaging
over wide areas (i.e. 2x2 mm)? The goal is to see if contact or laser
profilometry (quant. data) can be substituted for SEM imaging (guesswork
and hand-waving) in topographic analysis of layers of 4-10 micrometer
generally spherical particles.

The person wants quick and easy turnaround with as little human
interpretation as possible.

The things we do for money!
------------------------------------------------
Opinions or statements expressed herein, rational or otherwise, do not
necessarily reflect those of my employer.

Harold J. Crossman
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: (508) 750-1717
E-mail: crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com

Our web sites: www.sylvania.com
www.siemens.com
--

"Crossman, Harold" {crossman-at-osi.SYLVANIA.com}




From: XU-at-asuhrm.la.asu.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Feb 1997 17:05:02 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Add me on the ListServer, please.




From: SONEJA A K :      soneja-at-giasbma.vsnl.net.in
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 10:42:40 +0530 (IST)
Subject: enquiry for email addresses of major microscope manufacturers/dealers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would be grateful if the email addresses of major
microscope manufacturers,optics-eyepiece,objective,phase contrast
eqpt,manufacturers dealers could be mailed to me.
Regards,

Soneja A.K.

soneja-at-giasbma.vsnl.net.in






From: Christophe Roos :      roos-at-operoni.helsinki.fi
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 07:47:54 EET DST
Subject: Re: NIH Image -- ImageTool

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} I went after NIH Image, and found the 0README.txt claims there is
} no DOS version, it's only for Mac.

There is an excellent free program for DOS/Win32/Win95 platforms
that stands up very well to NIH Image: ImageTool by Don Wilcox, Brent
Dove, Doss McDavid and David Greer at the University of Texas Health
Science Center in San Antonio:

Find version 1.27 at http://ddsdx.uthscsa.edu/dig/itdesc.html



ChR

_________________________________________________________________________
Christophe Roos Dr.Sc., doc. | Institute of Biotechnology
| & Dept. of Biosciences
Phone: +358 9 7085 9367 | Division of Genetics
Fax: +358 9 7085 9366 | P.O.Box 56, Viksbagen 9
E-mail: Christophe.Roos-at-Helsinki.FI | FIN-00014 Univ. of Helsinki
X-400: /G=Christophe/S=Roos/O=Helsinki/ADMD=fumail/C=Fi Finland
{A HREF="http://www.helsinki.fi/~roos/index.html"} WWW Home Page: Roos {/A}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------




From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 08:48:54 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: TEM polymers(Outsourcing)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Marti Jordi:

I picked up your e-mail message about getting some microscopy done on
polymers.We could do this sort of thing in the multi-Imaging Centre here
in Cambridge UK. We have croy-SEM and ED X-ray microanalysis, Cryo-TEM
and Cryoultramicrotomes. Collectively we have a 120 years of experience.
Our rates are very competative and we can do a fast turn around.

Contact me on e-mail 'Phone +44-1223-333946 or Fax +44-1223-333953.

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre.
University of Cambridge
Cambridge CB2 3EA
United Kingdom

PS Happy Lincoln's Birthday

On Tue,
11
Feb 1997, Marti, Jordi wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello !
}
} I was wondering if someone could recommend one or two commercial labs
} where we could outsource some of our TEM polymer work. Our samples
} would require embedding, cryo or RT sectioning, staining (usually
} phosphotungstic acid ) and a few TEM micrographs.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti
}





From: Kevin Mackenzie :      nhi691-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 09:48:42 +0000 (gmt)
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

HI

To image the inside of my SEM, I first stick a piece of PTFE or a round glass
coverslip onto a stub and then glue a small ball bearing (3mm) onto the centre.
This gives a much better view of the chamber. You can try using larger ball
bearings, also to give a weird effect try sticking two small ball bearings together.

Also try switching on your back scatter detector once you have 'charged' up the
stub, you can visualise the sectors - (if + the sector is white and if - the sector is
black)

Kevin Mackenzie
Tillydrone E.M. Unit
University of Aberdeen
Tillydrone Avenue
Aberdeen
AB9 2NT
SCOTLAND
Tel 01224-272847
Fax 01224-272396

web site: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/~nhi691/





From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 08:56:43 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM polymers(Outsourcing)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Hello !
}
} I was wondering if someone could recommend one or two commercial labs
} where we could outsource some of our TEM polymer work. Our samples
} would require embedding, cryo or RT sectioning, staining (usually
} phosphotungstic acid ) and a few TEM micrographs.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti

If you check out the November issue of MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS, you'll find a
listing of some 40 labs in the US offering various microscopy services. If
you can't find a copy, contact me and I'll e-mail you the list.

Regards,

---------------------------------------------------------------
Dr L. P. Stoter Technical Editor, MICROSCOPY & ANALYSIS
Technesis
17, Rocks Park Road email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Uckfield, E. Sussex Phone: +44 (0)1825 766911
TN22 2AT Fax: +44 (0)1825 766911
United Kingdom
---------------------------------------------------------------






From: Kevin Mackenzie :      nhi691-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 12:18:35 +0000 (gmt)
Subject: Re: detector reflected in SEM micrograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

HI

To image the inside of my SEM, I first stick a piece of PTFE or a round glass
coverslip onto a stub and then glue a small ball bearing (3mm) onto the centre.
This gives a much better view of the chamber. You can try using larger ball
bearings, also to give a weird effect try sticking two small ball bearings
together.

Also try switching on your back scatter detector once you have 'charged' up the
stub, you can visualise the sectors - ( the + sector shows white and the - sector is
black)

Kevin Mackenzie
Tillydrone E.M. Unit
University of Aberdeen
Tillydrone Avenue
Aberdeen
AB9 2NT
SCOTLAND
Tel 01224-272847
Fax 01224-272396

web site: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/~nhi691/









From: hiltrud-at-ruf.uni-freiburg.de (Hiltrud Mueller-Sigmund)
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 13:43:14 +0000
Subject: staining halite

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists,

I wonder if somebody could give me any hints on special embedding and/or
staining methods for halite crystals (sedimented from aerosols). This would
be helpful for a research project which intends to differentiate halite
crystals from other aerosol particles by image analysis.

Thanks in advance
Hiltrud Mueller-Sigmund

Hiltrud Mueller-Sigmund (hiltrud-at-ruf.uni-freiburg.de)
Institut f. Mineralogie, Petrologie und Geochemie
Albertstr. 23b - D 79104 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany)
Tel.: (+49)-761-203-6388 / Fax: (+49)-761-203-6407






From: Glamp, Jane :      glamp-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 97 08:46:00 PST
Subject: Electron Microscopy Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Team Leader
Electron Microscopy

PPG Glass Technology Center located 14 miles northeast of Pittsburgh has an
immediate opening in its Electron Microscopy Laboratory.

The position interacts with R&D, manufacturing and technical support
personnel in designing analytical approaches and providing meaningful
solutions to projects relating to glass, glass coatings, paints and many
other PPG manufactured or formulated products.

The candidate will be required to operate a JEOL STEM and a Digital Scanning

Probe Microscope, supervise a group of 4-5, and manage this well-equipped
microscopy laboratory.

The position requires an advanced degree in materials science, physics or
chemistry, or the equivalent in relevant experience. The candidate must
have
3 or more years of industrial experience. In-depth knowledge of STEM, SEM,
and experience in data/image handling by computers is essential. Experience
in surface analysis, IR spectroscopy and other analytical techniques is
desirable.

The candidate must have technical and organizational skills, must be able to
work independently and must have the interpersonal skills to work
effectively with others. Official authorization to work permanently in the
United States is required.

Please forward resume and salary information to:

PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P.O. Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Attn: Supervisor, Personnel

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/D/V


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------






From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 11:14:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: enquiry for email addresses of major microscope manufacturers/dealers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I hope this information is of some help. It's not a complete list, but the
information I have is as follows. If there is no e-mail address, just
contact the home page. I'm sure all of the manufacturers will have a link
for messages.

Leica: No address just for e-mail, but their home page can be found at the
URL: http://www.leica.com in the USA. Probably have links to other
countries from here.

Zeiss: E-mail to micro-at-zeiss.com Home page is http://www.zeiss.com

Nikon: No e-mail address. Home page is http://www.nikonusa.com If you
contact Nikon USA, you will probably find a link to addresses for other
countries.

Accu-Scope Inc.: http://www.accu-scope.com

Meopta Prerov, a.s.: http://www.vol.cz/MEOPTA/index.html

Olympus: http://www.olympus.plus.at/olympus/

PZO Warszawa: http://www.law.pace.edu/~dwilliam/manufacturers/pzo/pzo/html

Also, please check out the WWW Directory of Microscopy and Microanalysis
Products and Services at: http://www.mwrn.com/product/ You can link
directly to the manufacturers of microscopes, cameras, optical components,
services, accessories, etc. from this page.

Good luck to you!

Bob Chiovetti




From: Dave King (607)757-1248 T37/257-3 Ext deking-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: 12 Feb 1997 10:37:06 EST
Subject: Re: NIH Image -- ImageTool

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

To: roos-at-operoni.helsinki.fi
Microscopy ListSer {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
cc: VANHART --IBMUSM00 Van Hart, D.C.
*** Reply to note of 02/12/97 00:58

I FTP'd these files, and found they need Win95 or WinNT to run.
Win-OS/2 can't do the install. The site was;

ftp://maxrad6.uthscsa.edu

Is there a DOS version somewhere else? Thanks,

. {
} { {
} } ===========} Dave King { { {
} } } ------------------------------------------------------ { { { {




From: Linda Fox :      lfox1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 09:58:05 -0600
Subject: research vs clinical work

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {s3019637.036-at-wpo.it.luc.edu}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

Our lab has an opportunity to pick up some work doing clinical
specimens for $$. Currently we are strictly a research facility, but
in today's world some cash can really go a long way to justify our
existence. Can anyone advise us as to the "Chicago-style pot holes"
that may be looming unforseen on t