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From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 1998 10:03:43 +0000
Subject: Re: Critical Point Drying

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} I have a theory question about Critical Point Drying that has been
} bothering me. I know that the specimen is placed in a "bomb", and then
} transition fluid replaces the dehydrating fluid in the specimen, and the
} temperature is raised to the critical point, which in turn raises the
} critical pressure in the bomb, so that the specimen is in a sense
} immersed in a dense vapor phase devoid of liquid air/interface, and the
} vapor is slowly released until the vessel is at atmospheric pressure.
} But with the drop in pressure, even though it is slow, below the
} critical pressure for that transition fluid, why doesn't this
} precipitate a condensation of the vapor back to a liquid????
}
} Is the temperature slowly increased beyond the critical temperature, to
} correspond to a new critical temp. for the lower pressure?

} For the veterans, I'm sorry to bug them with elementary questions like
} this, but I can't find the answer in any book.
}
} Garry

Yes - the temperature of the whole system is kept sufficiently high so that
as the pressure drops, it doesn't pass through the vapour/liquid transition
again.

Temp | Vapour
|
| ______ {_____________________ {___
| | /Critical Point |
| | / ^
| | / |
| V / |
| | / |
| | / ^
| / |
| / |
| /_____} ______} ___________} ___|
| / Liquid
| /
|____/__________________________________

Pressure

So the system is taken in a loop around the critical point, as
illustrated:) This also highlights a minor problem that you may run into in
some labs - if the ambient lab temperature is too high, the CO2 is always a
vapour, so the bomb may need cooling to start with, just to get liquid CO2.
This caused me some difficulties when installing a system in Jakarta at the
beginning of the year!

Regards,

--
Larry Stoter
17, Rocks Park Road, Uckfield, E. Sussex, TN22 2AT, UK
email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Phone/Fax: +44 (0)1825 767967






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 1998 19:42:10 -0600
Subject: 350 milliseconds & December 97 Archives

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Colleagues...

Happy New Year to All!

The Dec 1997 archives are now on-line at the MSA WWW Site
http://www.msa.microscopy.com.

Since I just finished writing the annual report to MSA Council
on the ListServer operations here are some year-end statistics
for those ListServer Subscribers that might be curious.

The Listserver has received 5403 postings this year
for an average of 14.8 messages/day.

The Email archives on the MSA WWW Site now contain
29.7 Mbytes of text and have been accessed 2126 times.

The Microscopy ListServer has delivered just over
11,000,000 Email messages to 2000+ subscribers in
49 Countries while the MSA WWW Site has had 16,510 HomePage
logins and delivered just over 9,800,000,000 bytes of information
to WebSurfers from 95 different countries.

For you trivia buffs (or those of you that are just bored with
what ever your supposed to be doing) that averages to an Email
message being sent out of the server about every 350 milliseconds
and a WWW byte about every 3 milliseconds during 1997.

Cheers....

Nestor

Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp









From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 1998 09:30:50 -0600
Subject: Cryo-electron Microscopy

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I am interested in hearing from someone who has done cryo-electron
microscopy on hydrated samples using a cold stage. I have never done
this myself, and am unable to find much mention of it in the books, but
was wondering what kinds of skills I would have to develop in order to
do this sort of microscopy.

To all the people who answered my question about CPD, thankyou very
much, it was helpful.

Garry




From: Zhiyu Wang :      wangz-at-pulsar.cs.wku.edu
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 1998 10:14:13 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Critical Point Drying

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Dear Garry and all:

In order to clarify the process conditions of critical point
dryer, thermodynamics analysis should be introduced.
The critical point of substance needs to be descripted by
three properties, e.g. temperature (T), pressure (P) and
specific volume (v). The later is defined as the ratio of
v=V/m, where V is the volume of chamber and m is the
mass of substance in the chamber. It is easy to understand
by common sense that there is no way to achieve the
critical point if the amount of CO2 in the chamber is less
than certain level, as most of us know, say 10% of CO2 in
the chamber.

T-v diagram can be used to show the process of liquid-gas
phase inter-changes as following.



isobar curves
T | / / /
| c.p / / /
| /\ / *A / *B / *C
| /__\/ *a / /
| / \ / *b / gas phase
| /______\/ / *c
| solid /liquid \ /
| phase /__phase___\/
|______/______________________________
v

Case 1: Put above certain amount of CO2 into chamber
and heat it: the T and P increase, finally c.p can be
achieved, the v of gas equals to the v of liquid, no interface
between gas and liquid exists(point c.p).
Case 2: After c.p, the gas is slowly vented, resulting m
decreasing, V (chamber) is constant, thus v=V/m
increases (important point here!).
1. As v increases and T is constant, the system will
shift along with points of A, B and C,and goes
through isobar curves meaning the pressure is
decreasing. It is clear that as v increasing, the
system has no way to back to liquid condition,
instead, it goes into gas condition deeply.
2.As v increases and T decreases slowly(turn off
heater): the system will shift along with the points
of a, b, and c, which are still staying in the gas
phase.
3.In an extremely condition, where the
chamber is cooled very fast, say using ice-CO2 or
LN2 to cool it, the T drops sharply, it is a chance
for the system to back to liquid phase, but it is
not in the normal operation condition.
Conclusions:
1. In the normal operation condition, T does not
drop sharply, the C.P.D has no chance to back to
liquid phase, no matter how fast the gas is releasing.
2. The slowly ventilation of gas is required in order
to prevent the sample from "pop-corn", which will
damage the sample physically.

Hopeful it helps.

******************************************
Zhiyu Wang, senior technician
Electron Microscope Lab
Western Kentucky University(WKU)
Bowling Green KY 42101

Phone: (502)745-5993(office)
email: wangz-at-pulsar.cs.wku.edu
******************************************
Looking for new position
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: momiller-at-ccia.com [SMTP:momiller-at-ccia.com]
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 1998 09:00:49 -0800
Subject: metallography CoPt

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Allen,

Do you have access to a conventional ion mill??? I had a lot of success =
preparing surfaces or EBSD by giving them a low angle ion mill treatment =
for 15-30 minutes. This seemed to knock off any surface oxide that may =
have formed and seemed to remove any small damage layer near the surface =
induced by mechanical polishing. For many materials (metals included), =
I skipped a chemical polish altogether and simply mechanically polished =
with a final step using Syton, followed by the ion milling step.

Hope this helps,

Tom

Thomas C. Isabell, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc.
tci-at-fischione.com
webpage: www.fischione.com

-----Original Message-----

Does anyone have experience with preparation of CoPt(20%Pt) for SEM and =
EBSD.
Brand new material for me and aqua regia so far doesnt seem to be the =
right
approach.Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks
Allen Miller

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%=
%%%
%%%%%%%%%
Patty Miller
Stained Panes
momiller-at-ccia.com






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 1998 16:36:16 -0400
Subject: RE: Info on Cryo-EM

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There is a book entitled 'Low Temperature Methods in Biological Electron
Microscopy", written by A. W. Robards and U. B. Sleytr that might be of
some interest to you. This was published in 1985 by Elsevier as Vol. 10
(ISBN 0-444-80684-9 pbk & ISBN 0-444-80685-7 hbk) in the series 'Practical
Methods in Electron Microscopy' that is edited by Dr. Audrey M. Glauert.

The two most recent volumes in this series: No. 15, Vacuum Methods in
Electron Microscopy, and No. 16, X-ray Microanalysis for Biologists, have
been published by Portland Press (sales-at-portlandpress.co.uk) and are
marketed in the USA by Ashgate Publishing (info-at-ashgate.com).

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Jette Wendt-Larsen :      wendt-larsen-at-dou.dk
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 1998 23:17:51 +0100 (MET)
Subject: FM - tubulin staining

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Hello everyone
First of all - HAPPY NEW YEAR!
I am planning to stain the tubulin part the cytoskeleton in live
protozoa.
Microinjection with labled tubulin is not possible - the cells are rather
delicate. Any suggestions of fluorochromes and technioques are welcome.

Best regards Jette


















From: Eric or Pat Metzler :      spruance-at-infinet.com
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 1998 20:30:59 -0500
Subject: Assistent company in Germany

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I have some cover slides made by a company named ASSISTENT. According to
the box, the company is(was) located in Germany. The cover slides are very
small (5 mm to 8 mm diameter) and are ideal for one of my uses. I'd like to
locate this company, a replacement, or anyone else making such a product.
Can you please help me?

Reply directly to me if you do not want to reply to everyone.
spruance-at-infinet.com

Many thanks.

Eric Metzler





From: adavis-at-netpci.com
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 1998 12:55:02 +1000
Subject: Dehydration query responses DIGEST

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Thank you to the many people who responded with helpful suggestions about
dehydration. The basis for my query is isolation: it is hard to get
anything shipped here. We are at the western edge of the Pacific Ocean (in
fact, our West Coast overlooks the Philippine Sea. The humid tropical
climate is an added factor.

The following suggestions were received:

W. Muss suggested Acetonitrile:
96% EtOH=1:1 to 3 x 15-20 minutes pure Acetonitrile; the medium is
100% miscible with water as well with resins, like EPON or its
substitute epoxy resins. I use the Acetonitrile schedule (from EtOH 100%
to AN 3x 10 min) in routine diagnostic tissue specimen processing to
EPON/Epoxy resin embedding since now 12 years without problems.

A. Greene suggested Everclear:
When having difficulties obtaining Absolute ETOH, I
have found that "Everclear" (from a liquor store) usually works. It is
only 95% but then again, as soon as you open a bottle of absolute, it
ceases to be absolute, due to its hygroscopic nature.

H. Ortega: isopropanol

R. Olley suggested also Isopropanol (Propan-2-ol), and disapproved acetone:
Isopropanol (or Propan-2-ol, as we are told to call it these days) in many
ways behaves similarly to ethanol. It is somewhat more viscous and less
volatile, but not overwhelmingly so. Moreover, it is miscible with water
and should be usable for dehydrating in stages of increasing alcohol
concentration.

Acteone is somewhat fiercer, might go for lipids, and when it evaporates
tends to chill the specimen and pull condensation out of the air.

M. Peterson suggests acetone:
I use acetone to dehydrate samples which are to be embedded in Spurr's, or
Epon-Araldite. I still take care to use dry acetone, although
Epon-Araldite reportedly tolerates some water. This has worked
successfully for plant tissues, for years. I've seen Spurr's become very
brittle, possibly as the result of incomplete dehydration.

D. Feely suggested the use of molecular sieve with with absolute EtOH to
keep it dry:
To insure that you use absolute ETOH for the final step, keep your 100%
in a jar with dry "molecular seive" and use only what you need. MAke
sure the bottle is tightly stoppered and let it sit for a few days to be
sure it is dry and to let the small particals settle out.

M. Kroez says that acetone works ok for delicate tissues.
Propylene-glycol is suggested as the final step.:
for dehydration we use either a graded series of ethanol OR acetone.
This works very well, even on delicate tissues like e.g. bone marrow.
You can also use propylene-glycol as the last step of dehydration,
after absolute ethanol or acetone.

P. Oshel recommends care in selecting the appropriate dehydrating agent
for the medium:
Acetone can be an excellent dehydrating agent. *But*, which is superior,
acetone or EtOH, depends on the embedding medium and your specimen. If
you're embedding in paraffin, use EtOH, as that's better for
transferring to xylene/Histoclear etc., if in resin, some resins do
better with acetone, some with EtOH, some don't care.

Your specimens may care a great deal. I've used EtOH for the specimens
you mention with great success.


Thanks to everyone who kindly responded. I think I am encouraged enough to
try acetone for exploratory work, and in a pinch (embedding in Paraffin),
though I will try to stay with Absolute EtOH for the critical specimens. On
these islands, essentially field conditions prevail, and anything I might
try will involve making do. This is the spirit in which I had made my
query.

(I will take up one kind person's remarkably generous offer to send a bit of
Absolute EtOH).

Happy 1998.

Alan Davis

--
"Our loyalties are to the species and the Alan E. Davis
planet. We speak for Earth. Our adavis-at-netpci.com
obligation to survive is owed not just to Marianas High School
ourselves but also to that Cosmos, ancient AAA196, Box 10001
and vast, from which we spring." Saipan, MP 96950
Northern Mariana Islands
---Carl Sagan GMT+10




From: Al Bingham :      semopt-at-istar.ca
Date: Sat, 03 Jan 1998 15:19:07 -0400
Subject: Oxoid

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There is a Unit on our street with the sign "Oxoid" which we always
wondered what they did. I took the liberty to ask the employees if
they are still in business and could they help you.
Their address is
Oxoid Inc.
217 Colonnade Road
Nepean, Ontario K2E 7K3
Telephone 613 226-1318 or Fax 613-226-3728
or E-mail: Gnyman-at-oxoid.ca
A good and prosperous New Year to you all
Al Bingham
Semoptics Ltd
Nepean, Ont




From: jkdye-at-ucdavis.edu (J. K. Dye)
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 16:10:03 -0700
Subject: RE: Info on Cryo-EM

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Garry, There is a relatively recent book specifically on microscopy of
frozen-hydrated specimens, entitled "Low-Temperature Microscopy and
Analysis", by Patrick Echlin, 1992, Plenum Press, New York. It gives a
good introduction to the subject. Other than that, my experience was that
I had to be very fast on my feet with the one or two samples that could be
done in one day, and the long waiting periods while the system pumped down
(or not) to ultrahigh vacuum. Good luck with your study.

Janet.






From: Keith Moulding :      mcmouldk-at-uxmail.ust.hk
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 1998 11:52:40 +0800
Subject: TEM Jewel tips

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Greetings,

Does anybody know where I can buy the jewel bearing used in TEM sample rods?
I want to make a special sample rod and just require the jewel for the rod.

Many thanks,

Keith.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr. K. Moulding.

Materials Characterisation and Preparation Facility
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon,
Hong Kong.

FAX: (852) 2358 2451
TEL: (852) 2358 8724
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 10:34:15 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: re: Tem jewels

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Hi Keith,

If you are after the synthetic sapphire balls used, for example,
in JEOL side entry holders we get ours (2mm dia) from:
Dejay Distribution Ltd,
9, The Business Centre,
Molly Millars Lane,
Wokingham,
Berkshire RG11 2GS.
UK.

However, I am sure that you could find a local supplier for these.

We also use other diameter balls from the same supplier in our
specimen holder designs.

Ron
==========================================================================
=
Mr. Ron Doole e-mail ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
Department of Materials, phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
University of Oxford, fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
Parks Road.
Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
==========================================================================
==





From: chris gilpin :      cgilpin-at-fs1.sem.man.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 13:51:19 BST
Subject: Re: TEM Jewel tips

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}
} Greetings,
}
} Does anybody know where I can buy the jewel bearing used in TEM sample rods?
} I want to make a special sample rod and just require the jewel for the rod.
}
} Many thanks,
}
} Keith.
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There is a company in Manchester UK which manufactures the jewel end
bearings. They can aslo make Philips type jewels which are not
spherical like the JEOL type. Contact me if you want to know more.


Chris


Chris Gilpin
Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Unit
G452 Stopford Building
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PT
phone +44 161 275 5170
fax +44 161 275 5171
http://www.biomed.man.ac.uk/biology/emunit/emhome.html




From: L.D.Marks :      ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 07:56:21 -0600 (CST )
Subject: InSb [001] orientation

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I have an InSb [001] sample, and need to know precisely
which direction is (100) and which is (010). Does anyone
know how to determine this, perhaps using CBED?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208-3108
tel: (847) 491-3996
fax: (847) 491-7820
email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: philippe.buffat-at-epfl.ch ( =?iso-8859-1?Q?Philippe=2DAndr=E9?= Buffat)
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 19:52:44 +0100
Subject: Re: Negative Scanners

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Leah L. Dobbs of Intel asked the following:

} Does anyone have experience using the Polaroid Sprint Scan 45 for TEM
} negatives? I would appreciate any opinions on this scanner.

About the question of special glass to avoid Newton rings,

We have simply removed the glass on the support for the negatives on our
Agfa Duoscan. Our workshop has designed a metal plate drilled with
rectangular apertures and frames with the same opening to clamp the
negative inbetween. The size of the aperture is large enough to hide only
3mm all around the edge of the negative. We used an aluminum alloy and
treated to get it black (to avoid spurious reflections. We do not observe
any bending and the negative flatness is sufficient even for 3 1/4" x 4"
TEM negatives. Of course don't longer have to worry about fingerprints on
the glass window. More, we mount 4 negatives at a time, exactely parralel
to each others, it saves prescan time. We are very pleased by this system.

If it helps=8A

Best regards and Happy New Year

Philippe Buffat

__________________________________________________________________
Philippe Buffat
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Centre Interdepartemental de Microscopie Electronique
Address: EPFL-CIME, Batiment MX-C, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Phone: +41(21)693 29 83 Fax: +41(21)693 44 01 (Central European Time)
E-mail: philippe.buffat-at-epfl.ch, WWW URL http://cimewww.epfl.ch/
______________________________ Eudora F2.1 ___________________________






From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 98 16:51:00 PST
Subject: Job Position: PPG Inc. ,Surface Scientist/Analyst

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PPG Industries, Inc. Glass Technology Center has a job opening for a Surface

Scientist/Analyst.

PPG Glass Technology Center is located 10 miles north of Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania. The Surface Analysis Laboratory at this site provides surface

chemical and microanalysis to all four divisions of PPG: Glass, Fiberglass,
Chemicals, and Coatings and Resins. Currently two major instruments (VG
ESCALAB MkII and VG SIMSLAB) operate in five modes for surface analysis:
XPS, AES, SNMS, SIMS and FAB-SIMS.

Education: Advanced degree (or equivalent in experience) in chemistry or
other related physical science.

Job Requirements: Minimum 3 years of industrial experience collecting and
interpreting surface analysis data, preferably XPS and/or SIMS. Data and
interpretation of data to be presented in written reports. Good written and

verbal communication skills are a must. Job requires ability to handle
multiple tasks simultaneously. Demonstrated practical problem-solving
ability is essential.

Detailed information about PPG Industries, Inc. may be found on our Web page

at: http://www.ppg.com.

Send resume (no email, please) and salary requirements to:

Glass Technology Center
PPG Industries, Inc.
Box 11472
Pittsburgh, PA 15238




From: Keith Moulding
Date: Monday, January 05, 1998 11:52AM
Subject: TEM Jewel tips

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We had a machinist at Univ. Florida (Go Gators!) that used to make them from
glass (or quartz?). He would take a rod, heat it, and pull to get a thin
strand. After breaking the strand, he applied heat and the strand would
ball up at the end. When he got the size he wanted, he stopped. The little
tail would go into the hole in the end of the specimen rod.

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."

----------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Greetings,

Does anybody know where I can buy the jewel bearing used in TEM sample rods?
I want to make a special sample rod and just require the jewel for the rod.

Many thanks,

Keith.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr. K. Moulding.

Materials Characterisation and Preparation Facility
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon,
Hong Kong.

FAX: (852) 2358 2451
TEL: (852) 2358 8724
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~






From: KINNEAR-at-oxford.usa.com (KINNEAR Glenn)
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 17:31:01 -0600
Subject: Cryo SEM

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Gary, We have product literature applications notes and a video tape which
we can make available to you. Please come back with your mailing address so
I can send them off to you. Also there will be a cryo SEM hands on workshop
and seminar at Scanning this year. Scanning will be in Baltimore May 9th
through 12th. The cryo workshop will be held on Saturday the 9th. Our Cryo
product manager will be at the seminar and people involved will have acess
to equipment at the USDA in Beltsville Maryland. There will be a limited
number of people for the hands on portion (probably around 6 to 8) so if
you're interested please get back to us soon.

Feel free to call or me at 978-456-9736. Best regards, Glenn Kinnear






From: MicroToday :      MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 18:36:26 EST
Subject: ICT Company

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Group,
A friend of mine, not on this listserver, would like to contact a company in
Germany(?) named ICT. Apparently they are involved in designing, etc.
electron optics.
Any help, direct to me, would be much appreciated.
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today




From: Hartmut S. Leipner :      leipner-at-physik.uni-halle.de
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 09:05:05 +0100
Subject: RE: InSb [001] orientation

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Crystallographically, [100] and [010] directions are equivalent. You may =
arbitrarily choose the coordinate s

} -----Original Message-----
} From: L.D.Marks [mailto:ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 05, 1998 2:56 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: InSb [001] orientation
} =20
} =20
} =
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of =
America=20
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to =
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} =
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} =20
} I have an InSb [001] sample, and need to know precisely
} which direction is (100) and which is (010). Does anyone
} know how to determine this, perhaps using CBED?
} =20
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Laurence Marks
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Northwestern University
} Evanston, IL 60208-3108
} tel: (847) 491-3996
} fax: (847) 491-7820
} email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
} http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}




From: Hartmut S. Leipner :      leipner-at-physik.uni-halle.de
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 09:11:04 +0100
Subject: RE: InSb [001] orientation

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Crystallographically, [100] and [010] directions are equivalent. You may =
arbitrarily choose an appropriate coordinate system to name one =
direction [100] and the other [010], etc.

Hartmut



Dr. Hartmut S. Leipner
Fachbereich Physik
Friedemann-Bach-Platz 6
Martin-Luther-Universitaet
D-06108 Halle
Germany

Tel. +49-345-55 25 453
Fax +49-345-55 27 563
Web http://www.physik.uni-halle.de/Fachgruppen/Kristall/index.html



} -----Original Message-----
} From: L.D.Marks [mailto:ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 05, 1998 2:56 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: InSb [001] orientation
} =20
} =20
} =
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of =
America=20
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to =
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} =
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} =20
} I have an InSb [001] sample, and need to know precisely
} which direction is (100) and which is (010). Does anyone
} know how to determine this, perhaps using CBED?
} =20
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Laurence Marks
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Northwestern University
} Evanston, IL 60208-3108
} tel: (847) 491-3996
} fax: (847) 491-7820
} email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
} http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}




From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 10:29:02 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Cryo-electron Microscopy

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Dear Garry: A Happy New Year from a dedicated cryo-microscopist to one
who intends entering the field. I have been doing cryo-SEM and
cryo-x-ray microanalysis for about 25 years. It is a lot of fun. You
might care to dip into my book "Low Temperature Microscopy and
Analysis"Plenum Press 1992 which will give you some idea of what it is
all about.

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences
University of Cambridge UK

On Fri, 2 Jan 1998, Garry Burgess wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am interested in hearing from someone who has done cryo-electron
} microscopy on hydrated samples using a cold stage. I have never done
} this myself, and am unable to find much mention of it in the books, but
} was wondering what kinds of skills I would have to develop in order to
} do this sort of microscopy.
}
} To all the people who answered my question about CPD, thankyou very
} much, it was helpful.
}
} Garry
}





From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 11:25:28 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: JEOL SEM/STEM frame grabbers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello All,
I am interested in getting digital images from my rather aged JEOL
120CX TEM/STEM. JEOL advertise a system to do this, which they call SemAfore.
I would be very interested in the opinions of users of this system - and
those of people who decided to do it some other way, particularly in regard to
cost and ease of installation and use. I'll summarise the replies to the list
and anyone else who is interested.

Many thanks in advance,

Richard Beanland,
GMMT Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ
UK
e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com





From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 12:07:04 +0000
Subject: RSI-Safety & Microscopes - summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This message is being posted to the:
1. Microscopy
2. Histonet
3. Safety and
4. Sorehand Listservers.
It contains two sections. The first is essentially a workstation assessment form for microscope users, the
second is an earlier list of instructions
for using microscopes safely. These items are based on selections from the many replies to my initial
query. Thanks to all those who replied on the
Listservers listed above. If you think there is a mistake/problem, please let me know!!

I am also attaching the two sections as Microsoft Word 6 files.

Best wishes for 1998

Keith Ryan
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
_____________________________________________



Workstation assessment for
Safe Use of Microscopes

Introduction. Looking through a microscope for extended periods is not what we were designed for. It
requires holding our bodies in an unnaturally
rigid position. It is important to adopt a correct, ergonomic working posture. This means fitting the
workstation to the worker, not vice versa. It is
also important to take regular breaks.

Ideally, the microscope should be on a bench which is adjustable for height: first, the seating position is
adjusted (steps 2-8 below) followed by the
bench height and subsequent steps (11-22 below). The following is based on a fixed work bench.

Before entering *No' to the following questions, attempt to rectify the problem.

(the following section is a table in the attached file, it looks much better!)

Yes No
1. Have you been show how to use the microscope, including how to align the optical path to
optimise performance? If no, seek this training
before continuing. Other-wise, poor results and eye strain may ensue.

2. Are you sitting back in the chair, rather than perching on it? If no, sit back into the chair.

3. Is the height of the chair adjusted so that your feet are resting comfortably, flat on the floor? If
no, adjust the chair height
appropriately.

4. Is there an even pressure along the backs of the thighs? If no, check if the seat platform can
be tilted appropriately for comfort. If
not, consider readjusting the height slightly.

5. Does the chair support your back in an upright position? Ideally, it should support to beyond the
level of the shoulder blades. If no, adjust
chair back appropriately.

6. Does the chair back give support in the lumbar region? If no, check the chair's back adjustment
again, possibly adjusting the tilt control.
Or, obtain a separate lumbar cushion.

7. Are you now sitting with your back upright? Ask a colleague to comment. If no, repeat steps 2-6
above.

8. Are the microscope eye-pieces in line with, or extending over, the front edge of the bench? If no,
move the microscope towards you
appropriately (caution - you may need skilled assistance)

9. Is the vertical position of the eye-pieces a little high for comfort, so that your head is upright?
Initially, this will feel unnatural. If
no, raise the microscope vertically to a suitable height at which you are are forced to sit upright. This can
be done with layers of plywood etc. If
you are using the microscope long-term, get the workshop to make a suitable stand.

10. Can you see at all into the eye-pieces of the microscope? If no, raise the chair height
appropriately and obtain a suitable footrest.

11. Are you gazing slightly downwards into the eye-pieces, as opposed to tilting your head and
*looking straight-ahead' into them? If no, you are
not sitting upright enough. The back should be *vertical' and the neck and head upright. Holding the
head tilted for long periods will induce neck and
shoulder-ache. Repeat steps 2-10.

12. Is the leg-well clear of clutter so that your legs and feet are not impeded when sitting at the
bench? If no, clear the clutter.

13. Are your thighs clear of the under-surface of the bench? If no, the bench is unsuitable for
microscopy work. Have it modified or seek
another site for the microscope.

14. When operating the focus and stage controls, are your forearms resting on something, either the
bench or microscope arm rests? If no, obtain
arm rests, perhaps sloping. Holding the arms off the bench for long periods will induce static loading
problems. The most comfortable position for the
hands is as for when shaking hands.

15. Are the eyepieces set correctly for your inter-pupillary distance? If no, set this distance properly -
the oculars should move towards or away
from each other. This reduces eye-strain.

16. Are the eyepieces parfocal?
If no, adjust them individually so that the image is sharp in each. This reduces eye-strain.

17. Before you begin microscope work for the first time, are you free from pre-existing visual
problems? If no, you should see an optician in
case you have astigmatism, fusion insufficiency (poor eye co-ordination) or simple long/short sight.
Microscopy work may make these problems more
obvious.

18. Are your surroundings free from glare and reflections? If no, try to remove light sources
from the visual field by re-positioning the
workstation, removing highly reflective surfaces, using blinds, curtains or other screens.

19. Is the image in microscope free from glare and reflection? If no, adjust the internal lighting so
that there is not an uncomfortably high
level of light or contrast. This may be done by regulating the transformer or by using appropriate filters.

20. Are you satisfied with other environmental factors, such as temperature, humidity, draughts,
ventilation, ambient lighting? If no, try to sort
problems locally yourself or discuss them with line management. Beyond that, see your union safety
representative or local safety advisor. Humidity
(and dry eyes) are aided by watering plants, where appropriate.

21. Are you/will you be taking regular breaks from the microscope, e.g. two or three minutes every
half-hour? If no, this needs urgent
consideration. Discuss it with your manager, union safety representative or local safety advisor.
Computer users are recommended to take five minutes
every hour, microscopy work is probably more physically demanding.

22. When taking a break from the microscope, are/will you be doing stretching exercises? If no, refer
to the article *Applying ergonomics to
improve microscopy work* in Microscopy and Analysis, Issue 36 (July 1993), 15-17 (available from
your local safety advisor). You should do these
exercises to relieve the static loading stress on the body. This applies equally to computer users.



_________________________________________________

Instructions for
Safe Use of Microscopes

Introduction. Looking through a microscope for extended periods is not what we were designed for. It
requires holding our bodies in an unnaturally
rigid position. This can cause cramped muscles and strained tendons and ligaments in the head, neck,
back, shoulders, arms and wrists. Also,
repetitive movements associated with microscope work can cause strain injuries. There are specific
health and safety regulations for computer use.
Yet, you are tied much more to a microscope than to a computer, because of the eye-piece requirements.

Main problem - microscopists know how to align their microscope but few align themselves! Many
users are *slumpers' and need training to avoid
problems later.
_____________________________________________

Main requirements: The bench height is important and ideally it should be adjustable so that eye-piece
height is adjustable - but this is often not
practicable due to cost. What follows will be based on a fixed bench height. Microscopy requires a good
seating position in an adjustable,
ergonomically-designed chair. The back should be high enough to support the shoulder blades and be
adjustable for height and angle, with the most
prominent part being the lumbar support. The seat should be low enough to have the back *perfectly
straight' to see through the oculars. Then move the
chair towards the bench so that the chair fully supports the back - this feels unnatural at first. Most
people have the seat too high, which results
in *hunching'. Sitting for long periods places strain on the lower back.

An alternative chair is the Swedish or Scandinavian chair. First, get the posture right in the chair, then
adjust the table/microscope height until
the oculars meet the eyes.
_____________________________________________

1. Have you been shown how to use the microscope, including the alignment of the optical path so
as to optimise performance?
If not, stop at this point and seek this training.

2. Adjust chair height so that your feet sit comfortably on the floor.
a) get an even pressure along the back of the thighs.
b) it may be advantageous to tilt the seat slightly down at the front (to eliminate *pinch' behind the
knees). Sit in the chair. Do not tuck the feet
underneath the chair or on its base, this tilts the hips away from the backrest. The position of the feet
should be varied from time to time, to
spread the load on the back and leg muscles.
NB - adjust the chair for comfort without regard to the height of the microscope.

Adjust the microscope so that you can see into the oculars without leaning significantly forward.
This requires two adjustments:
a) set the horizontal position of the microscope so that it is close to the front edge of the bench with the
eye-pieces no further away from you than
the front edge of the bench
b) set the vertical position of the microscope so that it is a little high for comfort. This normally means
elevating the microscope on some type of
stand on the bench.

The purpose of this is to force yourself to straighten your back as you draw up to the microscope, so that
your head is in an upright position. Look
down the eyepieces by letting your eyes view at a downward angle. Do not bend your neck so that you
are, in effect, looking *straight ahead* into the
microscope.
Sometimes it is necessary to adjust chair height so that you can just see into the eye-pieces because the
bench has a fixed height. Then, you may need
a footrest.

The leg-well should be clear.
Bench thickness should be minimal to give clearance for thighs
- refer to Microscopy and Analysis article.

Obtain forearm-rests so that you do not constantly keep lifting your arms off the bench to adjust
the microscope, these may be best if they
are sloping. Consider getting a permanent support made for the microscope. It won't cost much and will
make an enormous difference to working comfort
and productivity. The most comfortable position for the hands is in the mid-range position (as when
shaking hands).

Practice continuously focusing - essential to minimise eye strain
Proper setting of the inter-pupillary distance and eye-piece parfocality also minimise eye strain.

Take breaks away from the microscope, perhaps ideally every half-hour for a couple of minutes. Get up,
walk around, stretch arms, neck, back and legs.
_____________________________________________


Appendix - selected information from:
Applying ergonomics to improve microscopy work, H. Haines & L. McAtamney, Microscopy and
Analysis, July 1993, pages 15-17.

Visual demands
Eyestrain is due variously to microscope design parameters, length of work period, pre-existing eye
problems and inappropriate lighting conditions.

1. Design of microscopes: beyond the scope of these instructions. See references cited in article.

2. Length of work period: work/rest schedules should be appropriate. It is important to take breaks away
from the microscope to counteract the
build-up of postural and visual fatigue. A well-designed job will incorporate both microscope and non-
microscope tasks. Frequent short breaks are
preferable to occasional long breaks. This enables relief from the static, maintained working posture and
a chance to look around and vary the
accommodation of the eyes. Computer users are recommended to take 5 minutes every hour away from
the computer; it may be preferable to take
half-hourly breaks away from the microscope. Bending and stretching exercises are recommended (see
Microscopy and Analysis article).

3. Pre-existing eye problems: visual strain is pronounced for operators with uncorrected astigmatism and
fusion insufficiency (poor eye
co-ordination). It is important to treat these problems, see an optician.

4. Inappropriate lighting conditions: eye fatigue is minimised in a well-designed visual environment.
Where possible, avoid high light levels and high
contrast in the microscope in comparison to the room surroundings. Minimise glare and reflections in
the work area. Glare can be reduced by removing
light sources from the visual field. This can be done by re-positioning workstations, using blinds or
curtains, removing highly reflective surfaces or
by using shielding screens. The Health & Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 give
further information regarding work with VDU screens.

Environmental factors
Sedentary workers are particularly susceptible to the effects of their work environment. Draughts,
temperature extremes, poor air quality, inadequate
lighting and noise affect comfort and performance. It is important to consider the needs and preferences
of the individual.

Temperature, humidity and air movement: the recommended range is 19-23 *C. Low humidity dries the
eyes and produces discomfort, relative humidity
should be maintained between 40 and 60% (watering plants fulfils this need in offices). Draughts should
be minimised.


END OF MESSAGE

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Keith Ryan B.Sc., Ph.D., C.Biol., M.I.Biol.
Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Citadel Hill,
Plymouth, Devon PL1 2PB, England

Tel: ++44 1752 633294 (international)
01752 633294 (national)
Fax: ++44 1752 633102 (international)
01752 633102 (national)
e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk
PML web site: http://www.npm.ac.uk/pml
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


begin 644 MICRSCO2.DOC



From: LSFY69A-at-PRODIGY.COM (MR KARL H BERGER)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 07:19:22, -0500
Subject: Zeiss Video Interface

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For Sale: Video Interface for EM's 10,109,900,902 . Supports up to 1,
600 pixels.
Asking $ 5k. Call 732-370-8082




From: LSFY69A-at-PRODIGY.COM (MR KARL H BERGER)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 07:24:00, -0500
Subject: Zeiss 109 for sale

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For sale: A good 109, outside of vacuum camera, asking $ 4,000.
Installed in north
east, add $ 1,500.- Call 732-370-8082




From: L.D.Marks :      ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 08:56:44 -0600 (CST )
Subject: InSb [001]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thanks for people who have sent responses -- but to
date no solutions. Let me expand a little with a
diagram to clarify. Looking down [001] the structure
is:


IN SB IN SB --} [110]

Sb In Sb In

IN SB IN SB

|
V
[1,-1,0]

Where, along z or [001] the order is IN, SB, In, Sb
(Note: I may not have picked a proper right-handed set
but this does not matter.)

Indium and Antimony have similar structure factors (seperated
by 2 in the periodic tables) although the Debye Waller factor
for In is about 80% higher than for Sb (Saravana, Mohanlal and
Chandrasekaran, J Phys Chem Solids 52, 7, 879, 1991). The
problem is to align the above with a diffraction pattern.
Almost certainly optical methods will work, but the probability
of correctly aligning this with a diffraction pattern is
small (particularly since we have to do other things to the
sample).


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208-3108
tel: (847) 491-3996
fax: (847) 491-7820
email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: albalak-at-carmel-olefins.co.il (Albalak.J.Ramon)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 13:33:57 +-200
Subject: InSb [001]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Subscribe albalak-at-carmel-olefins.co.il





From: Janine Sherrier :      djs56-at-mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 17:26:42 +0000
Subject: lIGNIN IN PLANT CELL WALLS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Shea,

I came across this reference today in a lit. search. Perhaps it might be
interesting to you. Best wishes, Janine Sherrier

TI- NEW IMMUNOGOLD PROBES FOR STUDYING THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE DIFFERENT
LIGNIN TYPES DURING PLANT-CELL WALL BIOGENESIS
AU- RUEL, K;FAIX, O;JOSELEAU, JP
JN- JOURNAL OF TRACE AND MICROPROBE TECHNIQUES
PY- 1994
VO- 12
NO- 4
PG- 247-265






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 16:13:53 -0400
Subject: RE: Jewel Tips

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A couple of years ago I ran into the problem of finding a 1 mm diameter
ball for use in the tip of a side-entry specimen rod I was designing. I
wasn't able to find a sapphire ball to fill the bill, but did find that a
local company, Industrial Tectonics, Ball Division, 7222 West Huron River
Drive, Dexter, MI 48130, tel: 734-426-4681, makes precision balls of
various sizes out of a range of other wear-resistant materials. In the end
I was able to obtain 1mm tungsten carbide balls that served the purpose
quite well (these are used in ball point pens, and so you might be able to
just dissect a pen). (Incidentally, I did not find their sales people too
helpful in being willing to supply just a few balls, they wanted to sell a
minimum of several hundred dollars worth; therefore, I suggest you try to
get in touch with someone in engineering, who might send you a few as a
scientific sample). I still have a few of these balls left - if you want,
I'll be happy to send you a couple. They also make larger balls out of
similar materials, but not sapphire.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:313-763-4788; Ph:313-764-3321






From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 15:59:39 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Mouse Histology Atlas

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone know of an atlas of mouse histology? With the
ultrastructural work we are doing lately with transgenic
mice, I must admit that I am not always sure that the
interesting structures we see are normal or result from
genetic manipulation. Obviously, we observe control
tissue, but an atlas would be invaluable as a baseline for
comparison.

Thank you in advance,

Doug
----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
Portland, Oregon 97201
DRK-at-shcc.org





From: NANCY SMITH :      nsmith-at-gauss.sci.csuhayward.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 16:08:32 PSD8PDT
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Please subscribe
nsmith-at-csuhayward.edu




From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 21:49:08 -0500
Subject: Location of Allen R. Sampson

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Please forward to me directly the current phone or email address for Alle=
n
R. Sampson. Allen used to service Etec SEMs and other electronics
equipment.

TIA,
Steve Miller
RMC
Tucson, AZ
Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com




From: Dmitry Cherny :      dtcherny-at-mpc186.mpibpc.gwdg.de (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 21:13:46 -0600
Subject: Address of BalTec?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would be very appreciated in case you can provide me the address of the
electron microscopy supplier Bal-Tec AG
With best regards,

Dmitry Cherny

Current address: MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, dept. of Molecular Biology
am Fassberg 11, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany
tel: +49(0) 551 201 1765; fax: +49(0) 551 201 1467
e.mail: dtcherny-at-mpc186.mpibpc.gwdg.de
dtcherny-at-img.ras.ru






From: dpurdy-at-capitalnet.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 1998 21:21:26 -0600
Subject: W.T.B. WILD/LEICA PHOTO AND BINOCULAR TUBES

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have been looking for a used phototube that will fit a Wild M7A or M3Z
stereomicroscope. Any phototubes bearing one of the following Wild/Leica
part numbers will do: #10 446 174, #10 445 924 or #10 445 925. Although I
would prefer a good quality, used Wild/Leica product, I am willing to
consider a Chinese manufactured tube so long as it is compatible with my
Wild/Leica instruments.

I am also in the market for an inclined binocular tube that will fit either
the M7A or M3Z. Again, these can bear any of the following part numbers:
#10 445 619, #10 445 822, #10 429 781 or #10 429 782

Please note, parts that fit the Wild M5A instrument are not interchangable
with the rest of the Wild M series stereomicroscopes.

Dan Purdy
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada






From: Paiboon Nuannin :      pnu-at-geofys.uu.se
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 09:50:32 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: JEOL SEM/STEM frame grabbers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sir


Semafore is less powerful than others. We can do very few
application from this solfware.

Member


On Tue, 6 Jan 1998, Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello All,
} I am interested in getting digital images from my rather aged JEOL
} 120CX TEM/STEM. JEOL advertise a system to do this, which they call SemAfore.
} I would be very interested in the opinions of users of this system - and
} those of people who decided to do it some other way, particularly in regard to
} cost and ease of installation and use. I'll summarise the replies to the list
} and anyone else who is interested.
}
} Many thanks in advance,
}
} Richard Beanland,
} GMMT Caswell,
} Towcester,
} Northants NN12 8EQ
} UK
} e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
}
}





From: rouviere :      jrouviere-at-cea.fr
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 10:08:57 +0000
Subject: Re: InSb[001]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear L.D. Marks,

I am not sure that what I am going to say to you will be adapted to your
situation. If I got it rigth, you want to distinguish the B=[011]
direction from a A=[1-10] direction in a bulk InSb material.

There should be a solution to this problem because some people know how
to prepare controlled vicinal surfaces in one of these two directions.
Myself, I do not know how they do, but once multilayers have been grown
on these vicinal or nominal (001) surfaces we are able to determine
which direction is which by observing {110} cross-sections of the
multilayers by High Resolution Electron Microscopy.
This work has been part of Marion Charleux's PhD work (submitted the
1/4/97 at the Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble France) and has been
submitted to JAP. It has not been accepted for publication yet.

If you are interested by these methods, answer me.


PS What is the difference between Sb and SB in your scheme ?
--
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Jean-Luc ROUVIERE
CEA-GRENOBLE
17 rue des Martyrs
38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 - France
Tel. (33) (0)4 76 88 50 86
Fax. (33) (0)4 76 88 50 97
jrouviere-at-cea.fr
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From: Michel Deschuyteneer :      deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 98 11:04:05 +0100
Subject: EM: Atlas of virus morphology?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings all!

The visual info I am sometimes looking for (good EM pictures of this or that
virus) being scattered among a lot of books I have access to, I was
wondering whether there is/are recent and well illustrated atlas(es) on
virus ultrastructure.
I have Virus Morphology but it seems a bit outdated in light of the recent
advances in the field, particularly with the data obtained with cryo-EM.

Any recommendations?

Thanks a bunch in advance.
Michel

****************************************************
Michel Deschuyteneer, Ph.D. deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Scientist Electron Microscopy Laboratory

SmithKline Beecham Biologicals
Rue de l'Institut, 89 B1330 Rixensart, BELGIUM
Tel: +32-2-656 9290 Fax: +32-2-656 8164
****************************************************
Standard disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this
communication are my own and do not necessarily
reflect those of SmithKline Beecham.
****************************************************





From: Sara Prins :      SPrins-at-csir.co.za
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 14:49:12 +0200
Subject: Co3O4 films for TEM

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On behalf of a colleague (please reply to fkoch-at-csir.co.za)

We are trying to obtain electron transparent ( 120 kV) single crystalline
(or large grain) Co3O4 films to be used as substrates for subsequent
epitaxial growth. Our facilities to thin bulk specimens are limited and we
are forced to used a vacuum evaporation/oxidation route or something
similar like the MoO3 sublimation route. So far we tried growing epitaxial
Co on Ag on mica, a la Grunbaum, and do get single crystals but do
experience other problems. The Co film removal for TEM is not simple and
oxidation, by heating in air, of the crystals results in the formation of a
finely divided oxide which is also not desirable. Any suggestions will be
much appreciated.

Thank you
Dr. Frik Koch
fkoch-at-csir.co.za




From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/6/98 8:50 PM
Subject: Location of Allen R. Sampson

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------ =_0_MIME_Boundary_25532.34b37ae0.mta.mcdermott.com
Content-Type: text/plain; name="Authorized by..."; charset=us-ascii
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="Authorized by..."

Message authorized by:
: Steven_W_Miller-at-compuserve.com_at_internet at X400post

------ =_0_MIME_Boundary_25532.34b37ae0.mta.mcdermott.com

FWIW:
Don't have the address handy, but have "seen" him on the microscopy
newsgroup not too long ago.....

Woody White, McDermott Technology

http://www.mtiresearch.com
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722


______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


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Please forward to me directly the current phone or email address for Allen
R. Sampson. Allen used to service Etec SEMs and other electronics
equipment.

TIA,
Steve Miller
RMC
Tucson, AZ
Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com

------ =_0_MIME_Boundary_25532.34b37ae0.mta.mcdermott.com--




From: Heinz Fehrenbach :      hefeh-at-Rcs1.urz.tu-dresden.de
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 14:02:42 +0100
Subject: Re: Mouse Histology Atlas

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by rks3 with SMTP (PP); Wed, 7 Jan 1998 14:02:47 +0100
Received: from rcs1.urz.tu-dresden.de by rmail with SMTP (PP);
Wed, 7 Jan 1998 14:00:23 +0100
Received: from [141.30.35.16] by rcs1.urz.tu-dresden.de (8.6.12/SDL-5.8)
with SMTP id OAA27901; Wed, 7 Jan 1998 14:02:42 +0100

Dear Dough,

there is an excellent atlas about mouse development (mostly histology, some
scanning EM, few transmission EM):

Matthew H. Kaufman "The atlas of mouse development", Academic Press, London/
San Diego (1st edition in 1992, revised ed. in 1995).

Best wishes

Heinz

***********************************************************************
Dr. Heinz Fehrenbach
Institute of Pathology
University Clinics "Carl Gustav Carus"
Technical University of Dresden

Fetscherstr. 74 Phone: ++49-351-458-5277
D-01307 Dresden Fax: ++49-351-458-4328
Germany e-mail: hefeh-at-rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de
***********************************************************************






From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 15:26:57 +-100
Subject: AW: "Assistent" company in Germany /MSA: Search for Adresses, LM: Sectioning: cover

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SALZBURG, Austria, 7th of Jan, 1998, local time: 3.20 p.m.

First of all: Happy, HEALTHY, SUCCESSFUL NEW YEAR to YOU and YOURS!

Secondly: have seen your posting and Query:
if the request hasn't been answered in the meanwhile, here you go:

- The Company "ASSISTENT" doesn't exist: it is a "Brand".
- The fabricating company is:=20
Karl HECHT GesmbH & CoKG
Stettener Strasse 22-24
D-97 647 SONDHEIM/Rhoen

phone: ++0049++ 9779-808
fax: ++0049++9779 - 1388, or - 1868
e-mail: hecht-at-swin.baynet.de

for a contact outside USA,
if you can't get what you want from:


CAROLINA BIOLOGICAL
2700, York Road
BURLINGTON, NC 27 215-3398 USA

(only) FaxNo (available): USA: (919) -584-33-99

Hope this helps,
Best regards and a nice day

Dr. Wolfgang MUSS
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")


----------
Von: Eric or Pat Metzler[SMTP:spruance-at-infinet.com]
Gesendet: Samstag, 03. J=E4nner 1998 02:30
An: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: Q: "Assistent" company in Germany /MSA: Search for Adresses, =
LM: Sectioning:cover glass

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

I have some cover slides made by a company named ASSISTENT. According =
to
the box, the company is (was) located in Germany. The cover slides are =
very
small (5 mm to 8 mm diameter) and are ideal for one of my uses. I'd =
like to
locate this company, a replacement, or anyone else making such a =
product.
Can you please help me?

Reply directly to me if you do not want to reply to everyone.
spruance-at-infinet.com

Many thanks.

Eric Metzler







From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 10:54:12 -0500
Subject: RE: Rod Tip Balls

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Small Parts Inc.
13980 N.W. 58th Court
P.O. BOX 4650
Miami Lakes, FL 33014-0650

PH: 800-220-4242
FAX: 800-423-9009
Email: smlparts-at-smallparts.com
WEB: www.smallparts.com

They have small balls made of Aluminum Oxide, Synthetic Ruby and
Synthetic Sapphire (as well SS, Brass, Tungsten Carbide, Plastics,
Teflon, etc.,, etc.). Qunatities of (1) on up in sizes: of 1/64",
1/32", 1/16", 3/32", 1/8" [1/4", 1/2" in AlO], sphericity of
0.000025" on Synthetics and 0.00001" on ALO. At ~$4.00 each for the
jewels and $3.00 for most of the ALO's (in single quantities).

Small Parts has changed policy and there no longer is a min order $.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"WE ARE MICROSOFT.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE.
YOU WILL BE ASSIMILATED."




From: m-moody-at-nwu.edu (Maya Moody)
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 10:10:06 -0600
Subject: Re: Location of Allen R. Sampson

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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You should be able to reach Al at,

Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

email ars-at-mcs.net

ph# 708-513-7093

fax 708-513-7092

http://www.mcs.net/~ars/home.html

Maya Moody
Cell Imaging Facility
Cell and Molecular Biology
Northwestern University Medical School
Ward-7-143
303 E. Chicago Ave.
Chicago, IL 60611
T: 312-503-4445
F: 312-503-7912
E: m-moody-at-nwu.edu


} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Please forward to me directly the current phone or email address for Allen
} } R. Sampson. Allen used to service Etec SEMs and other electronics
} } equipment.
} }
} } TIA,
} } Steve Miller
} } RMC
} } Tucson, AZ
} } Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com
} }
} }
}





From: ROBERT WILLIS :      WILLIS.ROBERT-at-EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 15:03:18 -0600
Subject: request for FE-SEM image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fellow Microscopists:

I must justify the need for FE-SEM or TEM capabilities to a customer
wanting to characterize particles smaller than 0.1 microns. (We
presently have a conventional SEM). I would like to include a
photomicrograph or two in my report of ultrafine particles imaged by
FE-SEM demonstrating the resolution capabilities of FE-SEM. If you are
willing to share one of your images, please correspond to the email
address below (not to the Listserver please!). A TIFF file accompanied
by a brief description would be great. Thank you very much.

Bob Willis
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc
e-mail:willis.robert-at-epamail.epa.gov






From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 13:17:45 -0800
Subject: Re: mouse atlas

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy New Year, Doug -
My brother-in-law was looking over my shoulder this morning when
your request for a mouse histiolgy atlas arrived. He teaches histology &
has done a bit of rodent research & he suggests a book from the 60s on
mouse embryology by Roberts Rugh. Happy hunting...

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.MSA.microscopy.com/ProjectMICRO/Books.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/






From: tgeer-at-mbl.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 16:34:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LM, SEM maintaining specific locations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings this is my first post to this list,
I am looking for coverslips or slides that will enable me to record the
exact location of an object (calcite crystal) when viewed with a light
microscope. I then would like to image the same crystal with an SEM, to
view the morphology of the crystal. I have heard of slides or coverslips
with grids that are labeled for just this purpose. I have not been able to
find slides or coverslips for sale in any catalogs or on the web. I have
also searched the archives with no luck. Perhaps someone has had similar
experiences or knows just just what I am looking for. If so please let me
know.
TIA
thom

________________________________________________________________________
Thomas Geer
Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, MA 02543
Tel:508-289-7629
fax:508-540-6902
E-mail:tgeer-at-mbl.edu
web http://www.mbl.edu/oldenbourg






From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 20:10:21 -0800
Subject: Re: JEOL SEM/STEM frame grabbers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Richard,
I don't believe the JEOL SemAfore system will digitize a TEM image, I think
it is just for SEMs. Any time you want to digitize a TEM image, which is a
real image as opposed to a raster, you must use some sort of camera. It is
the interfacing of the camera to the TEM that is the expensive part, and the
camera, if you want better than video resolution, which is quite poor. The
STEM can go in just like an SEM. The output of the camera can, perhaps, go
into the SemAfore, or any other system, such as Quartz PCI. I think the
expert on putting cameras on TEMs is Jim Mancusso, of AMT. The phone number
is +1 508 774 5550. (USA)

You wrote:
} Hello All,
} I am interested in getting digital images from my rather aged JEOL
} 120CX TEM/STEM. JEOL advertise a system to do this, which they call
SemAfore.
} I would be very interested in the opinions of users of this system - and
} those of people who decided to do it some other way, particularly in regard to
} cost and ease of installation and use. I'll summarise the replies to the list
} and anyone else who is interested.
}
} Many thanks in advance,
}
} Richard Beanland,
} GMMT Caswell,
} Towcester,
} Northants NN12 8EQ
} UK
} e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca





From: Goodwin, Brad :      goodwib-at-wdni.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 1998 16:19:00 -0800
Subject: Mouse Histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Concerning a book by Rugh Roberts, a search using the internet turned =
up
this book.

Book Details for ISBN no. 0198542771

Mouse, The: Its Reproduction and Development by Rugh,
Roberts, Price: =A367.95
Hardback, 434 pages, Publisher: Oxf. University
Press, Date Published: Apr 1990





From: Bart Cannon :      cannonmp-at-accessone.com
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 1998 18:03:58 -0800
Subject: LM/SEM grain marking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Etched grid coverslips or slides are not an option if both LM and SEM
are to be used.

One must mark the sample directly. Inked circle markers are available
from Jaynes-Elkro of Columbus, Ohio. Phone 614 276 6196 (in 1992).

OR.. I supply the Microscope Marker / Drill which mounts in place of an
objective lens in a light microscope and turns the function of the
microscope racking system into a little drill press. 60 um holes can be
drilled or 500 to 1500 um circles can be scribed.

Bart Cannon
Cannon Microprobe
1041 NE 100th St.
Seattle, WA 98125
206 522 9233
cannonmp-at-accessone.com




From: Keith Moulding :      mcmouldk-at-uxmail.ust.hk
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 10:55:48 +0800
Subject: TEM Jewel Tips - Thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Many thanks to all who replied. Many useful sources have been found for the
jewels.

Regards,

Keith.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr. K. Moulding.

Materials Characterisation and Preparation Facility
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,
Clear Water Bay,
Kowloon,
Hong Kong.

FAX: (852) 2358 2451
TEL: (852) 2358 8724
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





From: steyaert-at-nlr.nl
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 98 10:08:23 +0100
Subject: ESEM applications for material-science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello to all this is my first post to this list,

I am interested in ESEM applications for material-science (both metallic and
plastic-materials).

Thank you for your reaction.

Jean-Paul.

J-P Steyaert
National Aerospace Laboratory
The Netherlands
E-Mail Steyaert-at-nlr.nl







From: Jacques Weterings :      jaw-at-eo.ie.philips.nl
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 09:37:17 GMT+0100
Subject: Software jobopportunities for FEI Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear readers,

I like to announce that FEI Company's software development group for
Electron Microscopes in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, has several
jobopportunities.
Please look at our Website http://www.peo.philips.com/jobmain.htm for
more details.

Thank you very much for your attention!


Jacques Weterings
Personnel manager




From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 11:12:03 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: RE: InSb [001]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Lawrence,
the previous replies you had were right, if your InSb has the usual
sphalerite (zinc blende) cubic structure (and if it doesn't - wow!).
The symmetry of the crystal is Fbar43m; although there is no four fold axis,
there is a bar4 axis (4 fold plus inversion). So [100] is equivalent to
[010]. Any textbook on crystallography will show this - my favourite is
'Crystallography and Crystal Defects', by Kelly and Groves.


Regards,

Richard Beanland
GMMT Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ
UK
e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com

} Thanks for people who have sent responses -- but to
} date no solutions. Let me expand a little with a
} diagram to clarify. Looking down [001] the structure
} is:
}
}
} IN SB IN SB --} [110]
}
} Sb In Sb In
}
} IN SB IN SB
}
} |
} V
} [1,-1,0]
}
} Where, along z or [001] the order is IN, SB, In, Sb
} (Note: I may not have picked a proper right-handed set
} but this does not matter.)
}
} Indium and Antimony have similar structure factors (seperated
} by 2 in the periodic tables) although the Debye Waller factor
} for In is about 80% higher than for Sb (Saravana, Mohanlal and
} Chandrasekaran, J Phys Chem Solids 52, 7, 879, 1991). The
} problem is to align the above with a diffraction pattern.
} Almost certainly optical methods will work, but the probability
} of correctly aligning this with a diffraction pattern is
} small (particularly since we have to do other things to the
} sample).
}
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Laurence Marks
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Northwestern University
} Evanston, IL 60208-3108
} tel: (847) 491-3996
} fax: (847) 491-7820
} email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
} http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 10:22:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Mouse Histology Atlas

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have the following atlas, although I do no know whether it still is in
print:

William D. Gude, Gerald E. Cosgrove, Gerald P. Hirsch. 1982.
Histological Atlas of the Laboratory Mouse. Plenum Press, New York.

ISBN 0-306-40686-1

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718







From: Bennett, Cynthia, HDG / FHF :      bennett-at-MSMHDG.Hoechst.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 16:53:00 +0100
Subject: EM and conductive silver paint?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello there microscopy world!

I hope all you "listees" have had happy holidays...

Now to my question:

We've been using fast drying conductive silver paint to contact the
top of metallized plastic film samples to the stub for imaging with our
SEM (W filament). Usually this works all right, but recently we've been
having problems.

The conductivity is fine at first, but after a while (about a day or so)
it
degrades and we get charging. We know its not the sample or the
metallized coating that's degrading or aging because when we put
a fresh dab of paint on, things are OK again. This aging seems to
take place both in the vacuum chamber and outside.

Is this normal? Is there some paint out there that doesn't age? Or
are there better ways of contacting upper conductive layer on our
samples to the stub?

TIA!

Cindy Bennett

************************************************************************
******
Dr. Cynthia Bennett
Hoechst Diafoil GmbH
Wiesbaden, Germany
e-Mail: bennett-at-msmhdg.hoechst.com

************************************************************************
******




From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 12:36:07 -0600
Subject: Re: InSb [001]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I think the answer is that you are both correct. It doesn't matter if I call
my surface normal [001] or [100] as the two are equivalent. But once I choose
to call my surface [001], it DOES matter which direction I call [100] and
[010]. This is because I want (001) + (010) + (100) = (111)A (i.e. a group
III terminated (111) plane or a group V plane if you defined your basis the
other way). The point is is that you need to keep track of the [110] and
[1-10] directions on a III-V(001) cut wafer (or the [011] and [01-1] on a
(100) wafer ...) as the two direction are not equivalent.

I hope this helps,
--
Ray D. Twesten Center For Microanalysis of Materials
(217) 244-6177 University of Illinois
(217) 244-2278 (fax) 104 S. Goodwin Ave.
(217) 359-4035 (home) Urbana, IL 61801
http://www.mrl.uiuc.edu/~cmm/index.html




From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 09:30:33 -1000 (HST)
Subject: LM and NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hau'oli Makahiki Hou (Happy New Year)!

I would like to 'talk' to anyone who has experience with using NIH Image
to quantify the amount of antibody staining in LM sections (by optical
densitometry). I am particularly interested in methods of calibration. I
have a number of constraints, so I think this will be a tough one.

Please e-mail me at tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu

Thanks!
Tina
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: hoopea01-at-mchip00.med.nyu.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 15:20:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Digest?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am new to this list and need to know if this list can be sent out as a
"digest"?

Andrea

On Thu, 08 Jan 1998 10:55:48 +0800 mcmouldk-at-uxmail.ust.hk (Keith Moulding)
wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 12:19:17 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Mouse Histology books

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Many thanks to those who responded to my query about=20
Histology books relating to the mouse. For those also=20
interested, here are all three suggested references:

Matthew H. Kaufman "The atlas of mouse development",=20
Academic Press, London/ San Diego (1st edition in 1992,=20
revised ed. in 1995).

Robert Rugh "The Mouse: Its Reproduction and Development"=20
Oxford University Press, Date Published: Apr 1990. =20
Hardback, 434 pages, =A367.95 ISBN no. 0198542771

William D. Gude, Gerald E. Cosgrove, Gerald P. Hirsch. =20
1982. "Histological Atlas of the Laboratory Mouse." Plenum=20
Press, New York. ISBN 0-306-40686-1
----------------------=20
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
Portland, Oregon 97201
DRK-at-shcc.org





From: Robin E Neft :      rneft-at-itri-1.lrri.org
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 14:06:52 MDT
Subject: IHC

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Does anyone out there have a protocol for IHC on frozen rat brain
sections ? We're planning on looking at cytokine expression.
Robin E. Neft, Ph.D.
Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute
P.O. Box 5890
Albuquerque, NM 87185
RNEFT-at-lrri.org
FAX: 505-845-1198
505-845-1142




From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/8/98 10:18 AM
Subject: EM and conductive silver paint?

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Since silver oxide is sufficiently conductive,
oxidation should not be the problem. Micro-cracking
of the adhesive or debonding of the interface would
cause such a problem. Not knowing materials, can't
be much direct help. I am using carbon paint rather
than silver. The conductive particles are MUCH smaller,
and carbon does a good grounding job for EM. Also, it
is usually cheaper.


Woody White McDermott Technology, Inc.
______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


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Hello there microscopy world!

I hope all you "listees" have had happy holidays...

Now to my question:

We've been using fast drying conductive silver paint to contact the
top of metallized plastic film samples to the stub for imaging with our
SEM (W filament). Usually this works all right, but recently we've been
having problems.

The conductivity is fine at first, but after a while (about a day or so)
it
degrades and we get charging. We know its not the sample or the
metallized coating that's degrading or aging because when we put
a fresh dab of paint on, things are OK again. This aging seems to
take place both in the vacuum chamber and outside.

Is this normal? Is there some paint out there that doesn't age? Or
are there better ways of contacting upper conductive layer on our
samples to the stub?

TIA!

Cindy Bennett

************************************************************************
******
Dr. Cynthia Bennett
Hoechst Diafoil GmbH
Wiesbaden, Germany
e-Mail: bennett-at-msmhdg.hoechst.com

************************************************************************
******




From: Phishgr8 :      Phishgr8-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 18:36:05 EST
Subject: EM Servers

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Reply to: RE} } how to tell orientations in InSb [001]

Well, It seems that everyboday is correct here. (001) III-V materials usually
have a cutoff angle several degrees toward one of the {110 } directions. There
is a differece between two crystalllogrrphically equivalent planes (110) and
(1 -1 0) because one plane is parallel to the wafer normal but the other one
is several degree off the wafer normal. (Important!! wafer normal is several
degree off the (001) plane)

If you have a whole wafer, the major flat should parallel to the (110) planes
but the minor flat will be several degree off the crystallography (1-10)
plane.

If you only have a small piece of a wafer and it is cleaved, you can still
tell. Becasue III-V material usually have (110) type cleavage planes, the
cleavage plane should follow the crystallography. Therefore, one of the
cleavage plane will be perpendicular to the wafer normal and the other one
will not. This can be check under SEM or may be a high mag optical
microscope.

Tan-Chen Lee
Motorola, Inc.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
I think the answer is that you are both correct. It doesn't matter if I call
my surface normal [001] or [100] as the two are equivalent. But once I choose
to call my surface [001], it DOES matter which direction I call [100] and
[010]. This is because I want (001) + (010) + (100) = (111)A (i.e. a group
III terminated (111) plane or a group V plane if you defined your basis the
other way). The point is is that you need to keep track of the [110] and
[1-10] directions on a III-V(001) cut wafer (or the [011] and [01-1] on a
(100) wafer ...) as the two direction are not equivalent.

I hope this helps,
--
Ray D. Twesten Center For Microanalysis of Materials
(217) 244-6177 University of Illinois
(217) 244-2278 (fax) 104 S. Goodwin Ave.
(217) 359-4035 (home) Urbana, IL 61801
http://www.mrl.uiuc.edu/~cmm/index.html


------------------ RFC822 Header Follows ------------------
Received: by mesaqm.sps.mot.com with ADMIN;8 Jan 1998 12:05:05 U

I am an undergraduate student doing bacteriophage research. I was wondering
if anyone knew of a good, inexpensive EM server in the Philadelphia area, or
of any servers where I could send my sample to be done. If one comes to mind,
please let me know.
Thank you,
Emily





From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 16:23:42 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Confocal: Zeiss or Leica? (fwd)

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I am forwarding the following query for a colleague. Please reply to her
at mcfallng-at-hawaii.edu

Mahalo!
Tina
****************************************************************************

Dear Microscopists-

In purchasing a confocal microscope, we'd like to get some input from
current users of Zeiss and Leica confocal scopes to get an idea of
user satisfaction.

Many thanks for any and all help in making our selection.

Margaret McFall-Ngai
Pacific Biomedical Research Center
University of Hawaii





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 20:17:40 -0800
Subject: Re: EM and conductive silver paint?

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Dear Cindy,
I have the same problem sometimes with the carbon dag I use. I believe it is
a small
crack appearing in the paint, too small to see, as the paint becomes brittle
upon
further drying. Using copper tape (in most EM catalogues) may solve this,
or, as
you say, another small dab of paint.
You wrote:
} Hello there microscopy world!
}
} I hope all you "listees" have had happy holidays...
}
} Now to my question:
}
} We've been using fast drying conductive silver paint to contact the
} top of metallized plastic film samples to the stub for imaging with our
} SEM (W filament). Usually this works all right, but recently we've been
} having problems.
}
} The conductivity is fine at first, but after a while (about a day or so)
} it
} degrades and we get charging. We know its not the sample or the
} metallized coating that's degrading or aging because when we put
} a fresh dab of paint on, things are OK again. This aging seems to
} take place both in the vacuum chamber and outside.
}
} Is this normal? Is there some paint out there that doesn't age? Or
} are there better ways of contacting upper conductive layer on our
} samples to the stub?
}
} TIA!
}
} Cindy Bennett
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca





From: Yves Maniette :      yves-at-giga.sct.ub.es
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 22:58:52 -0600
Subject: help needed: vacuum on CM30

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For users of Philips CM microscopes.

We have got a recurrent problem in the vacuum system of our CM30. When P1
(pirani head, reading pressure in the vacuum buffer) reaches 38, the P3
(penning gauge, reading pressure in the lower chamber) pressure increases
and the vacuum system goes into "startup" status until the pump empty
again the buffer down to 30. Then the P3 pressure goes back to reasonable
values, about 55. Actually it goes back to normal values already while
pumping when P1 reads 37. On the other hand, while in the past the P3
could get down to 34 (or even "0", as no reading is available below "34"),
it does not any more. We have changed the oil of the ODP and noticed some
improvements, but the problem is not completely fixed.

Any hint is welcome. I suspect problems with the reading of P1, giving a
pressure lower than the real one, which might prevent the OPD from working
in suitable conditions. However, I have no experience in that matter.

thanks

Yves MANIETTE
Universitat de Barcelona
Serveis Cientifico Tecnics
Unitat ESCA TEM
Carrer Lluis Sole i Sabaris, 1-3
E-08028 BARCELONA ESPANYA

Tel +34 3 402 16 95
Fax +34 3 402 13 98






From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 1998 08:44:40 +0000
Subject: EM and conductive silver paint? -Reply

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Dear Cindy

If the paint is really fast drying, maybe it is too thin (i.e. too 'watery' or
'runny')?

The only time I have had this type of charding problem (over too many
years to mention), it has been because of movement of the specimen by
accidentally touching it or by hitting it on the side/roof of the airlock going
in or out of the microscope. Is it that your specimens might be heating a
little and that expansion is breaking the conductive path? I can't believe
that silver itself can actually 'age' to give the efect you describe! Unless it
is very thinly applied and can oxideise.

I would suggest a slightly 'thicker' solution of paint, or try two or three
applications in sequence. That is, one coat, dried followed by a second
and maybe a third after the second is dry? I am curious.

Finally, if you have any old silver, or gold, or diamonds, that have aged
and are no longer any good, you can send them to my address at ...... !

Best wishes - Keith Ryan
Plymouth Marine Lab., UK




From: mcalabrese-at-rsc.rockwell.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 17:32:39 -0800
Subject: Silver paint

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Cynthia- We have switched from silver paint to collodial graphite paint for
making contact to SEM stubs. It works well and is much easier to apply.
Mike
mcalabr-at-rsc.rockwell.com






From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 1998 09:08:23 -0800
Subject: test , ignore

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test message to check subscription
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
***************************************************************




From: Brandon j Hernandez :      brandon-at-gotnet.net
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 08:22:29 -0600
Subject: EM Work Experience?

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Hello to all!!!
I'm in my last year of the electron microscopy program at S.J. Delta
College.
I would like some information or ideas on who to contact for summer
internships that deal with electron microscopy (FIB,SEM,TEM,OLM, etc......)
as well as any sample prep. work primarily in the Materials field
(Semiconductors).
Thank You.

Brandon Hernandez






From: samuelsson.sj-at-pg.com
Date: 1/8/98 3:07 PM
Subject: IHC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Robert,

This is a common protocol to be found in IHC texts and materials and methods
sections of numerous papers. An easy start would be the protocols offered in
the rear of the Immunochemicals section of your Sigma catalog.


Steve Samuelsson
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Does anyone out there have a protocol for IHC on frozen rat brain
sections ? We're planning on looking at cytokine expression.
Robin E. Neft, Ph.D.
Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute
P.O. Box 5890
Albuquerque, NM 87185
RNEFT-at-lrri.org
FAX: 505-845-1198
505-845-1142




From: Malcolm Thomas :      mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 10:18:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM "squeeze" grid

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for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Fri, 9 Jan 1998 10:18:21 -0500 (EST)
(8.8.7/Cornell-MSC-IDA-client for msc.cornell.edu); Fri, 9 Jan 1998 15:18:19 GMT
Message-Id: {199801091518.PAA41648-at-hannah.msc.cornell.edu}
X-Originated-From: hannah.msc.cornell.edu
X-MSC-Version: IDA Client - AIX

Fellow microscopists,

I am aware of a 3mm titanium grid for TEM specimens which allows you to put
a specimen in a little slot inside it, and then to put a little screw-
driver in a parallel slot on either side of the specimen and twist a little
to hold the specimen in place, but I am having difficulty locating a
manufacturer. Any help finding a supplier would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks very much for your time and help.

Sincerely,

Mick Thomas
Cornell Materials Science Center
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-255-0650
mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu




From: Energy Beam Sciences, Inc. :      ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 13:13:16 -0500
Subject: microprobe standards

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Dear fellow microscopists,

At 11:15 AM 1/9/98 -0400, David Wark wrote:
} I'm planning to purchase a one-inch mount containing a variety of metals -
} the more the merrier. I'd be interested in learning the names of vendors
} supplying such mounts...

We (Energy Beam Sciences) have, for many years, sold microprobe standards
made by Micro Analysis Consultants in the U.K. The list of available
standards can be accessed from our web site (http://www.ebsciences.com).
Multi-element standards can be mounted in 25mm or 32mm brass blocks.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap
Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: Delilah Wood :      wood-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 1998 11:03:44 -0800
Subject: Kevex 7000 donation

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We have a Kevex 7000 EDS system (purchased in 1978) which we'd like to
donate to a school. As far as I know, it still works (no guarantees). We
had it connected to an Hitachi S-530 scanning electron microscope so it
would fit a similar instrument. Please contact me by email or phone if
you're interested. The system is located in Albany, CA (Berkeley) so we'd
prefer someone who can just come and pick up the system.

Thank you.




*****************************************

Delilah F. Wood
United States Department of Agriculture
Western Regional Research Center
800 Buchanan Street
Albany, CA 94710

Tel: 510.559.5653
Fax: 510.559.5777
Email: wood-at-pw.usda.gov




From: hadams-at-NMSU.Edu ()
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 12:14:49 +0000
Subject: TEM: slotted grids

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Does anyone have any suggestions for mounting ultrathin sections on
to carbon-coated, formar slotted grids?
TIA

Hank Adams
EML
New Mexico State University




From: Sally Shrom :      sally-at-retina.anatomy.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 15:04:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: slotted grids

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Hello Hank,
I routinely use formvar coated slot grids(1mm/2mm oval slot) for mounting
ultra thin sections. I do not use carbon coating, however. I hold the grid
with forceps, immerse the grid in the water in the diamond boat, approach
the section at a 45 degree angle. Allow the edge of the section to adhere
to the formvar, then gently withdraw the grid from the water at a 45
degree angle. That should do it. I set the grids on a copper plate with
3mm holes . The grids perch on top of the holes till they are dry.

Good luck.

Sally Shrom

On Fri, 9 Jan 1998 hadams-at-NMSU.Edu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions for mounting ultrathin sections on
} to carbon-coated, formar slotted grids?
} TIA
}
} Hank Adams
} EML
} New Mexico State University
}





From: SGKCCK :      SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 15:24:34 EST
Subject: MAC Standards

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Dear Sir,
Here at Electron Microscopy Sciences we sell MicroProbe Standards-All types
and varieties.
You may look at our list of standards on our website at emsdiasum.com or in
our catalog.
Please let us know if you have our catalog and if not we would be more then
happy to send you one.
Sincerely,

Stacie Kirsch
EMS
215-646-1566




From: hadams-at-NMSU.Edu ()
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 13:32:47 +0000
Subject: TEM: sections on slotted grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have some suggestions for mounting ultrathins on to
carbon coated, formar covered slotted grids and staining them?
Hank Adams
EML
New Mexico State University




From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 04:33:19 -0600
Subject: TEM: ceramic powders

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I am relaying this message for a student who has a problem with specimen prep.
Please reply to the following address since he is not on this server.
skaza-at-siu.edu
Thanks.



Hi all,

I'm looking at submicron ceramic powders (SiC, Si3N4, TiC etc)
under the TEM. But I cannot get morphological information from the
specimens I've prepared due to particle agglomeration. The specimen
preparation technique I've used is:

Making a suspension of the ceramic powders in Iso-Butanol.
Sonicating them in a water-bath type sonicator for 90 minutes to 3 hrs. And
then dropping the suspension on the grids by means of a pippet. I used
about 3-4 drops each time. But the sonication does not seem to break up the
agglomeration present. I've also tried microprobe sonicator (sonicating for
30 seconds). That doesn't seem to help either.

My questions are:

1) Does sonicating for a longer time in water-bath type sonicator
or a microprobe sonicator help? If so, How long for each?

2) Does milling of the powders in a ball mill type milling
container help? Doesn't this end up breaking the particles along with the
agglomerates?

3) Does the use of a different suspension medium like methanol or
ethanol alleviate the problem, if not solve it?

Any suggestions or references would be appreciated.

Respond to me directly at: skaza-at-siu.edu

Many thanks.







From: cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov (Cynthia J. Zeissler)
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 17:55:38 -0500
Subject: Stahl stage

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We seem to have lost our Stahl motorized stage documentation. Would anyone
be able to share the communication codes with us? (Stahl Model 517 MF X Y
Micro Position Controller).

Thankyou

Cynthia J. Zeissler
Physical Scientist
National Institute of Standards and Technology
cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov
301-975-3910






From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 1998 16:23:16 -0800
Subject: SFMS Monthly Meeting 1/16/98

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Announcing the Monthly Meeting of the
San Francisco Microscopical Society
16 January 1998
Rockridge Branch, Oakland Public Library
7:00 PM

The January meeting of the SFMS is the annual business meeting
where officers will be elected and a revision of the Constitution and
By-Laws will be discussed. After the business meeting will be our
regular technical meeting. The topic this month is the New PARTICLE
ATLAS Electronic Edition. The speaker will be Stephen A. Shaffer.

(Hey! That's me!)

For further particulars, please see the SFMS web page at:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/sfms.htm

Thanks and I hope to see many of you there.
--
**********************************************************
Stephen A. Shaffer sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
MicroDataware http:www.microdataware.com
(Under reconstruction and temporarily out of service)
Personal stuff: steve_shaffer-at-compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/
**********************************************************






From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 98 21:04:17 -0500
Subject: Silver paint Rx

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Dr. Cynthia Bennett wrote:
===============================================
We've been using fast drying conductive silver paint to contact the top of
metallized plastic film samples to the stub for imaging with our SEM (W
filament). Usually this works all right, but recently we've been having
problems.

The conductivity is fine at first, but after a while (about a day or so) it
degrades and we get charging. We know its not the sample or the metallized
coating that's degrading or aging because when we put a fresh dab of paint
on, things are OK again. This aging seems to take place both in the vacuum
chamber and outside.

Is this normal? Is there some paint out there that doesn't age? Or are there
better ways of contacting upper conductive layer on our samples to the stub?
====================================================
In the general case, what you are experiencing is not "normal".

I have personally been involved with the testing and formulation of both
silver and then carbon paints (and pastes) for SEM applications for many
years. And while silver (or carbon) paints might have the "appearance" like
they were all the same, I can state with certainty that they are not all the
same. They differ not only only in terms of the particle size and the
particle degree of dispersion, and the percent of silver (or carbon) solids,
but also in terms of the carrier (check the MSDS sheets) and also the
presence of polymer binders and if they are present, then even down to the
composition of the polymer. Some paints might indeed have no polymer
present.

When there is strange behaviour of the type described, one should keep in
mind that one of the two most important properties or characteristics that a
formulation should possess has to do with the uniformity of the drying of
the suspension, not only into a uniformly thick and homogeneous layer, but
it should dry in a way in which there is a minimum of "skin" effect, that is
, when the paint forms an undesirable "dry" outer layer ("skin") that acts
as a diffusion barrier for the vapor still being evolved from the still
"wet" paint suspension underneath. These are also exactly the conditions
where a "mud cracking" phenomenon can be observed,something occurring in the
skin layer, as it tries to contract over the still "wet" core.

While any paint from any source can be made to not form a skin (and crack)
by diluting it down with (its own) diluent, it also loses its adhesive if
not also its electrical characteristics. And by the same token, evaporate
away quickly enough of the carrier from any of these paint products, you
will eventually cause any product to form a skin if drying proceeds too
quickly and one will eventually end up with a mud-cracking effect (with the
release of vapor into the vacuum of the SEM) if the drying is done quickly
enough (such as premature insertion into a vacuum).

So other than the obvious (try some other brand of paint), try diluting down
your paint and/or switching from the rapidly drying type to the more
conventional drying paint product. See if that does not make your problem
go away.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies formulates and offers for sale silver and carbon
paints, pastes, tapes and sheets, all of which are described on our website
given below.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================






From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 14:15:47 -0500
Subject: TEM "squeeze" grid for Ion Milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Mick:

We have the titanium "grids" you describe. They were actually developed=

by Dr. Arpad Barna at the Research Institute of Technical Physics in
Hungary. These grids are used in conjunction with his TEM sample
preparation methods that he developed for use with the IV3 Ion Mill. We
have these sample holders in the following sizes:

Part# Description
TL-TiS-06 Titanium Sample Holder, 3mm OD, Center Slot 0.6mm=
x
1.8mm
TL-TiS-08 Titanium Sample Holder, 3mm OD, Center Slot 0.8mm=
x
1.8mm
TL-TiS-10 Titanium Sample Holder, 3mm OD, Center Slot 1.0mm=
x
1.8mm

Keep in mind that these are not "grids" as such, but rather a 0.3mm thick=

"clamp" for holdng together cross section samples without using epoxy. F=
or
additional information on the titanium sample holders or the IV3 Ion
Milling System, please feel free to contact me.

I hope this helps!

Best regards-

David =

Writing at 9:52:07 AM on 1/9/98
=

*************************************************************************=
**
************************

David Henriks TEL: =

800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-714-492-1499=

San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com=


*************************************************************************=
**
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by Malcolm Thomas
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =


Fellow microscopists,

I am aware of a 3mm titanium grid for TEM specimens which allows you to p=
ut

a specimen in a little slot inside it, and then to put a little screw-
driver in a parallel slot on either side of the specimen and twist a litt=
le

to hold the specimen in place, but I am having difficulty locating a =

manufacturer. Any help finding a supplier would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks very much for your time and help.

Sincerely,

Mick Thomas
Cornell Materials Science Center
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
607-255-0650
mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu
{





From: Sarka Lhotak :      lhotaks-at-fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 1998 18:51:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: immuno of cell cultures+HistoNet

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers,
I would like to ask two questions:

1. I have done a lot of immunolabelling of TISSUE sections both for EM and
light microscopy. However, now in my new job I am faced with a problem of
doing immunohistochemistry on cell cultures. Could somebody suggest a good
book on cell preparation; such as fixation, suitable substrates for growing
cells that allow subsequent immunowork, treatment of slides for cytospins
etc? Frankly, I dislike the look of trypsinized and cytospinned cells with
very little identifiable morphology and the fact that there is no inherent
control in a homogeneous cell population as in tissue sections, where some
types of cells are expected to label while others are not.

2. Could somebody give me directions how to subscribe to HistoNet or any
other histochemical or immunohistochemical list?

Thank you for your answers,

Sarka Lhotak
Hamilton Cancer Center
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
lhotaks-at-mcmaster.ca





From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 01:40:55 -0500
Subject: LM, SEM maintaining specific locations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Thomas:

While this isn't a very cost effective solution for you in this case, it
may be interesting to know that RJ Lee Instruments makes an SEM that has =
a
facility to view the sample under an optical microscope and then transfer=

the sample to their SEM while imaging the same location. I don't know mu=
ch
about the details, but it may be interesting to talk to them if this is a=

situation you encounter on a regular basis. You can contact them directl=
y
at:

R.J. Lee Instruments
515 Pleasant Valley Road
Trafford, PA 15085
=

TEL: 412-744-0100
FAX: 412-744-0506
www.rjleeinst.com
=

I have no financial interest in RJ Lee Instruments - just thought the
system sounded like a good solution.

I hope this helps!

Best regards-

David =

Writing at 9:24:41 AM on 1/10/98
=

*************************************************************************=
**
************************

David Henriks TEL: =

800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-714-492-1499=

San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com=


*************************************************************************=
**
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.
Message text written by INTERNET:tgeer-at-mbl.edu
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =


Greetings this is my first post to this list,
I am looking for coverslips or slides that will enable me to record the
exact location of an object (calcite crystal) when viewed with a light
microscope. I then would like to image the same crystal with an SEM, to
view the morphology of the crystal. I have heard of slides or coverslips
with grids that are labeled for just this purpose. I have not been able t=
o
find slides or coverslips for sale in any catalogs or on the web. I have
also searched the archives with no luck. Perhaps someone has had similar
experiences or knows just just what I am looking for. If so please let me=

know.
TIA
thom

________________________________________________________________________
Thomas Geer
Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, MA 02543
Tel:508-289-7629
fax:508-540-6902
E-mail:tgeer-at-mbl.edu
web http://www.mbl.edu/oldenbourg
{




From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 17:20:29 +1100
Subject: Metal standards for EDS/WDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear David:
Most suppliers (us too!) carry those standards. Look up their catalogues,
its so easy with these now on the internet.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au




From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 17:14:05 +1100
Subject: Re: immuno of cell cultures+HistoNet

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sarka:
Go on our site and find the "Links". User the browsers Control F function
and search for histonet. Most microscopy pertinent listservers are listed
with instructions on how to subscribe.
Regards
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au

----------
} From: Sarka Lhotak {lhotaks-at-fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: immuno of cell cultures+HistoNet
} Date: Sunday, 11 January 1998 10:51
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello Listers,
} I would like to ask two questions:
}
} 1. I have done a lot of immunolabelling of TISSUE sections both for EM
and
} light microscopy. However, now in my new job I am faced with a problem of
} doing immunohistochemistry on cell cultures. Could somebody suggest a
good
} book on cell preparation; such as fixation, suitable substrates for
growing
} cells that allow subsequent immunowork, treatment of slides for cytospins
} etc? Frankly, I dislike the look of trypsinized and cytospinned cells
with
} very little identifiable morphology and the fact that there is no
inherent
} control in a homogeneous cell population as in tissue sections, where
some
} types of cells are expected to label while others are not.
}
} 2. Could somebody give me directions how to subscribe to HistoNet or any
} other histochemical or immunohistochemical list?
}
} Thank you for your answers,
}
} Sarka Lhotak
} Hamilton Cancer Center
} Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
} lhotaks-at-mcmaster.ca
}




From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 98 10:48:06 -0500
Subject: LM and SEM particle characterization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Thomas Geer, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, wrote:
==================================================
........ I am looking for coverslips or slides that will enable me to record
the exact location of an object (calcite crystal) when viewed with a light
microscope. I then would like to image the same crystal with an SEM, to view
the morphology of the crystal. I have heard of slides or coverslips with
grids that are labeled for just this purpose. I have not been able to find
slides or coverslips for sale in any catalogs or on the web. I have also
searched the archives with no luck. Perhaps someone has had similar
experiences or knows just just what I am looking for. If so please let me
know.
=================================================
There are two "quick and dirty" (e.g. cheap and inexpensive) solutions to
this kind of need, depending on particle size of the calcite crystals, as
follows:

If less than about 5 um in size:
======================

a) Take a TEM index grid, however, our preference is for what we call our
SPI Asbestos Index Grid because each square is precisely the same open area
and with a very small standard deviation and with a few tiny (and I mean
tiny) drops of a five minute epoxy, it is "glued" down to a glass cover slip
. The generous "rim" area makes this quite easy. Another coverslip is
placed over the whole set up in order to make the grid as flat as possible
on the substrate cover slip. A "Teflon" coated part of a slide is what we
have used in the event too much epoxy was used which could cause sticking if
any other interface was used. The weights are placed on top of that Teflon
coated part of a slide.

b) After the epoxy has cured, then disperse the calcite crystals preferably
from some dilute non-interacting liquid suspension, preferably from an
aerosol dispersion method (such as what is offered by Ernest F. Fullam, Inc.
) in order to minimize surface tension forces that could tend to drag the
particles to the grid bars.

You now have exactly what you wanted, the particles mounted on a substrate
that is clearly indexed, and something that can be put into either an LM or
SEM and the same identical particle easily re-identified. And you have done
this for almost no money at all!

If larger than 5 um:
=============

Then the easiest way to do with is with the use of our own Tacky Dot Slides
(TM). It is very easy to index each "dot" in the orthogonal matrix of
"dots" and you can readily relocate the same dot in either the LM or SEM.
And while the slides do cost "something" we are still talking about very low
cost.

Information about the products mentioned in this posting can be found on our
website given below. Both approaches easily lend themselves to quantitative
microscopy. As a bonus benefit, if you weigh the Tacky Dot Slide before
and after particles are attached, you can also do particle density
calculations, something not otherwise easily done.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers both the asbestos TEM grid product and the
Tacky Dot Slide products and would have a vested interest in seeing more
people adopting their use for this kind of sample preparation requirement.
We have no commercial interest in the promotion of the Fullam product, it is
just that our own in-house experience has shown us that it is the best
available.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: Tom DeVrie :      TomDeVrie-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 1998 16:09:06 EST
Subject: LM-Leitz Orthoplan Docs, Config

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I recently obtained a Letiz Orthoplan scope from a biomedical colleague. I
intend to use it for micropaleontological research, specifically, the
identification of the siliceous skeletons of diatoms.

The scope is currently configured with a dark-field condenser and arc lamp for
flourescence microscopy. I plan to reconfigure the scope for bright-field DIC
and/or phase contrast work, as well as simple bright-field illumination.

The scope came with no documentation. As I prepare to reconfigure the scope
with Leitz parts, I need to learn what lenses, condensers, and other
components were once available. I wish to inquire if any listserv subscribers
know where such a 20-year-old catalog might be found.

Once I have a better idea of what components I need, I will be interested in
effecting an exchange of the fluoresence parts that I don't need (e.g., arc
lamp power supply, lamp casing, two fluorescence objectives) for parts that
will be useful for my intended use of the microscope.

I'll be looking for local advice (Seattle-Tacoma area) on the use of the scope
and the Orthomat photographic system that came with it, but I'd also be
grateful for any leads on documentation for this Orthoplan scope. I'd be
willing to pay reasonable photocopy costs for manuals and catalogs.

For the next couple of days, please respond off the listserv, since I have
very recently subscribed and may not yet be receiving all the listserv
messages.

Thanks.

Tom DeVries
Box 13061
Burton, WA 98013

tomdevrie-at-aol.com




From: Fredi Sanchez, Servicio Microscopia Electronica, Microbiologia, IVIC
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 08:59:32 -0400
Subject: cerebral tumors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello appreciated microscopist.
I am intested in entering in contac with some group that makes electronic
Microscopy of cerebral tumors with purposes of diagnostic. I work in a
service of Microscopy and I=A8m would want to put to disposition of
hospitals this service.

Tank you.





From: Paula Moore :      pmoore-at-isnet.is.bgsm.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 08:40:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: slotted grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Does anyone have any suggestions for mounting ultrathin sections on
} to carbon-coated, formar slotted grids?
} TIA
}
} Hank Adams
} EML
} New Mexico State University
}

First use a regular slotted grid(without formvar) and gently place it
over the sections you want. By water tension the sections will cling to
the grid. Then place slot of the regular grid over the slot of the
formvar coated grid, and using a piece of filter paper, wick the water
away. The sections will now be on your formvar grid.
It takes two sets of forceps, preferably the self-closing kind. As for
the regular grid(withour formvar) I also like to use the thicker
Snaptek(sp?) kind.
Good Luck!

Paula Webster Moore
Bowman Gray School of Medicine
Winston-Salem, N.C.
pmoore-at-bgsm.edu




From: Marti, Jordi :      Jordi.Marti-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 07:19:00 -0700
Subject: RE: TEM: ceramic powders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Priority normal



We have looked at a variety of powders ( including ceramic
powders) using similar techniques to the one you described. Keep in
mind that a lot of the agglomeration that you see is probably occurring
while the drop of the dispersion is drying on the grid and therefore
long times in the ultrasonic will not help. We often found that if the
particles are not sintered together, then a few minutes of sonication
will do.
Other points to keep in mind are:

Dilute your dispersion as much as possible( you should barely notice a
change in the turbidity of the liquid). This will minimize agglomeration
during drying. Generally, I do not wait for the liquid to completely
dry on the grid. Instead, after a few seconds ( 10-20 sec) , I remove
the excess liquid using the corner of a filter paper or tissue.

If this does not work you could try spraying the dispersion onto the
grids. Kits for doing this are available from various EM suppliers and
they will also help minimize agglomeration during drying.

Another way is to mount your carbon coated grids onto a rotating plate (
I have improvised with a Dremel tool) so that when you place a drop on
the grid it will spread out and minimize agglomeration.

I hope this helps

Jordi Marti





From: yuhui xu :      Yuhui=Xu%RES%DFCI-at-EYE.DFCI.HARVARD.EDU
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 98 9:31:17 EST
Subject: Dye Sublimation Printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Colleagues:
This is an old question but in an ever changing market: with a budget of
$8,000 to $15,000, which make or model of dye sublimation printer gives the
highest printing resolution? We will primarily use it for TEM B/W photos.
Any information is greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Yuhui Xu
EM Core, DFCI




From: SOBOCIG :      sobocig-at-aa.wl.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 11:33:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Apoptag labelling on Resin sections

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Reply to: RE} } TEM: slotted grids

Dear Hank,
If your grids are already formvar and carbon coated you can pick up the =
sections two ways. One way is to just come down on top of the floating =
sections gently and then bring them to the side of the boat removing =
excess water using the surface tension to pull water into the boat while =
moving the grid over the edge of the boat. The other is to go underneath =
the sections (immerse the whole grid into the water) and bring it up =
under the sections while keeping them in place using an eyelash. Then =
lift the grid with sections out of the boat and carefully remove excess =
water with filter paper.
Linda Chicoine
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale University
New Haven, CT 06520


--------------------------------------

} Does anyone have any suggestions for mounting ultrathin sections on
} to carbon-coated, formar slotted grids?
} TIA
}
} Hank Adams
} EML
} New Mexico State University
}

First use a regular slotted grid(without formvar) and gently place it
over the sections you want. By water tension the sections will cling to
the grid. Then place slot of the regular grid over the slot of the
formvar coated grid, and using a piece of filter paper, wick the water
away. The sections will now be on your formvar grid.
It takes two sets of forceps, preferably the self-closing kind. As for
the regular grid(withour formvar) I also like to use the thicker
Snaptek(sp?) kind.
Good Luck!

Paula Webster Moore
Bowman Gray School of Medicine
Winston-Salem, N.C.
pmoore-at-bgsm.edu

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IAA08871; Mon, 12 Jan 1998 08:40:06 -0500 (EST)

I have been trying to use an apoptag staining kit to label cells in
positive control tissue embedded in EM resins. I have attempted this procedure
on both Epon and LR white with and without osmium, in semithin and ultrathin
sections. Instead of the anti-digoxigenin-peroxidase-DAB reaction that we have
successfully used on the histological level in parafin, I am substituting an
anti-digoxigenin gold-cojugated label.

**The problem is that my staining labels ALL of the nuclei in the
section instead of just the apoptotic ones. Has anyone else out there tried
staining for apoptosis in resin embedded tissue or heard of successful
attempts? ANY possible explanations for my results?

I also recently tried using a biotinylated apoptag in situ end-labeling
kit from another company and had similar results.

Thanks for any help that you can offer.

Gregg Sobocinski
Parke-Davis
Pharmaceutical Research Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA
Sobocig-at-aa.wl.com

*** And I'm sure the lawyers would be happy if I include:
The views expressed above are my individual opinions and do not represent the
views or policies of Parke-Davis.





From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      AllanWojtasP-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 12:19:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Om Johari's Retirement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello, all, and Happy New Year.

Today I am contacting the list as a representative for our group the Food
Structure and Functionality Forum. After some discussion among
ourselves, we have agreed to reply to this group about our experience.

As you may remember, the very well respected and excellent quality
journal Food Microstructure (which later became Food Structure) grew
out of the Johari meetings and the associated Food Microstructure
Sessions. It was very unfortunate that, after a long and prosperous life,
the Food Microstructure Sessions were not well attended, and the Food
Microstructure journal was published sporadically, then, not at all. The
Food Structure Researchers dearly missed having the Meeting and the
Journal as places where they could present their work. Certain
hard-working individuals tried to keep the food structure folks together, but
it was difficult without a place to meet. Food journals were started in
Europe and in North America, but none were completely dedicated to
Structural studies.

The people at FAMS (Foundation for Advances in Medicine and Science)
kindly provided us with a place to meet by agreeing to include a Food
Structure and Functionality Session at their SCANNING 94 meeting in
Charleston. The "Food session" has been a regular session at the
SCANNING meetings ever since. The next year, the Food people met
again at our session at SCANNING95 in Monterey, and FAMS helped and
supported us to organize the Food Structure and Functionality Forum, and
we developed a mandate. Since then, the Forum has been trying to find
other food structure colleagues worldwide, compiling a mailing list. The
Forum is still under development right now.

The latest development has been recently. We have just found out that
this year's special issue of the Journal Scanning is being dedicated to
Food Structure and Functionality papers, especially the ones presented in
Baltimore at SCANNING 98.

Also, this year is the first year for another Food related session to be
presented - Applications of Microscopy in Agriculture.

Anyone wanting further information about the sessions or the Forum can
contact me or the FAMS website (http://www.scanning-fams.org).

Thanks for your interest and the opportunity to tell you about our
experience.

Paula Allan-Wojtas
Agricutlure and Agri-Food Canada
Kentville, Nova Scotia Canada B4N 1J5

Tel:(902) 679-5566
FAX(902) 679-2311

email: allanwojtasp-at-em.agr.ca




From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 12:38:03 -0500
Subject: Yuhui Xu: Dye-subs (Bad address)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I apolgize to the list but this is in answer to Yuhui Xu's request
for Dye-sub info. After 4 failed appemts to find a valid address
from him I've resorted to replying back to the list.


------- Forwarded Message Follows -------


To: yuhui xu {-at-EYE.DFCI.HARVARD.EDU:Yuhui=Xu%RES-at-DFCI}


This is very similar to the question I asked a couple of weeks ago.
The "Best resolution" is not really a good question. I think what
you really want is "the best image quality for publication", since
the printers in this range all seem to be 300DPI (The Epson Ink Jets
range from 720 - 1440 DPI at $250 - $420, and the $420 Photo Stylus
at 720DPI gives the best images of the group).


The simple answer is the Fuji Pictography at ~$13,500. It is NOT a
dye-sub printer it is a 'dry' silver photography printer (but it
needs to be fed water once a week). The next step down is the
Codonics NP1660 (fully networked) at ~$12,500 (Or the Kodak 86xx? at
a little less). The next step down is the Tektronics 650 at ~$9,000
(networked) but majority of the respondants thought the
Condonics/Kodak had better images.


If you would like specific information comparing these printers I'm
in the process of compiling the replies to my questions comparing the
printers and I can forward a copy along to you.


Good luck.

Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"WE ARE MICROSOFT.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE.
YOU WILL BE ASSIMILATED."




From: Margaret Springett :      hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 12:56:41 -0600
Subject: apoptosis methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would direct you to many publications by M Thiry who has extensively
examined the use of transferase-immunogold techniques in several embedding
resins. A recent article is found in Micros Res and Techniques 31:4-21,
1995, and he states that these techniques " are compatible with various
fixation and embedding conditions". (Epon, Lowicryl K4M or LR White) Take
this for what it's worth
Marge


Margaret Springett
e-mail hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
IEM Specialist at Mayo Foundation
1426 Guggenheim
Rochester, Mn. 55905






From: Charles R. Duvic :      mudbug1-at-ix.netcom.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 15:57:00 -0500
Subject: Ladd Research

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To All Our Friends,
Because of severe weather conditions in northern New England, Ladd
Research Industries has temporarily lost it's power and telephone
service. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.
Hopefully we will reopen for business tomorrow, January 13. In an
emergency, we may be reached at (802) 878-8074.
Sincerely,
Charles R. Duvic
Chief Chemist
Ladd Research Industries




From: Mary Huber :      kovex-at-spacestar.net
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 15:57:23 -0600
Subject: Employment Opportunity-St.Paul/Mpls,MN.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kovex Corporation, a rapidly growing high-tech manufacturer of surface
inspection equipment specializing in the development of state of the art
microscopy techniques, is looking for an engineering manager. See our
web page for more information: www.kovexcorp.com




From: Paul E. Fischione :      paul.fischione-at-internetmci.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 19:24:19 -0500
Subject: Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. is seeking a highly motivated individual
for the position of Sales and Marketing Manager. Duties will include the
maintenance of current and potential customer databases; trade show
coordination; maintenance of World Wide Web site; coordination of pricing
strategy; monitoring product performance with existing customers;
generation of press releases for both product and company news;
establishment of advertisements in trade publications;
continuous updating of advertising literature; coordination of activities
with foreign distributors and the establishment of new distributors;
obtaining field input for the development of future products; coordination
of direct mail campaigns; generation of sales projections, reports, and
budgetary information.

The candidate should possess a B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. in materials
science/engineering or physics and a Masters in Business Administration
(MBA) with a focus on sales and marketing activities. As the Sales and
Marketing Manager, a great deal of activity will focus on interactions with
both existing and potential customers. The position requires excellent
verbal
and written communication skills and a willingness to do extensive travel.

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. specializes in TEM specimen preparation
instrumentation and TEM specimen holders. The corporate headquarters is in
Export, Pennsylvania, approximately 23 miles east of Pittsburgh. For more
information, contact our web site at www.fischione.com.

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

Resumes should be sent to:

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc.
9003 Corporate Circle
Export, PA 15632 USA





From: Oozed :      Oozed-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 20:56:35 EST
Subject: Definitions and differences

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, I was wondering if someone could help me with small definitions of what
Scanning
Transmission X-ray Microscopy and X-ray Imaging Microscopy are. Thanks.
Scott




From: George Sibbald :      geos-at-goldrush.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 21:20:23 -0700
Subject: ASU/MI Winter Microscopy Workshop: In-Situ SPM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dr. Land

I would like to personally invite you to Arizona State University and
Molecular Imaging's "HANDS ON" workshop on High Resolution In-Situ Scanning
Probe Microscopy to be held in Phoenix, AZ; Feb. 4-11, 1998.
http://green.la.asu.edu/workshop

Where: Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; and Molecular Imaging
Corporation, Phoenix, AZ

Two focused sessions: Extended time to run your samples can be arranged.
(If you plan on bringing samples please contact session head to assure
adequacy of sample preparation)
- Electrochemical SPM (Feb 4-6), Poster/cocktails Faculty club Feb 5
Session head: Dr. Judy Zhu mailto:Judy-at-molec.com
- Biological SPM (Feb9-11), Poster/cocktails Faculty club Feb 10
Session head: Dr. Jun Li mailto:junli-at-molec.com

A general introduction to in situ SPM will start each session. Included
will be an overview of SPM theory, and an introduction to sample
preparation techniques for imaging under controlled atmosphere, in fluids,
under temperature or electrochemical control, and or high resolution
imaging and force measurement techniques (MAC Mode)
-----------------------------------------------
Workshop Goals:
The goal of this workshop is to provide a forum for presentations, hands on
training (on attendee samples), and discussion of recent developments in
research, instrumentation, current applications and future directions of
high-resolution in-situ STM and AFM. Some areas of particular interest are:
- Observing molecular conformational change in situ
- Magnetic AC imaging (MAC Mode)
- MAC Force measurements
- Corrosion studies
- Battery studies
- Biomolecular imaging and force/friction/electrical data analysis
(functionalized tips)
- In situ biomolecular research (gene therapy research, drug discovery,
drug delivery, diagnostic sensors)
- Micro manipulation (protein folding force, prolymer characterization)
- Environmental control
- Temperature control
- In-situ imaging, Sample preparation, SPM techniques (Tips and Tricks)
- New developments in instrumentation.
-----------------------------------------------
Session I: ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND IN-SITU IMAGING
This session focuses on SPM issues important to corrosion, catalysis, and
advanced battery research.
- Investigating potential dependant effects of surfaces and surface adsorbates
- Electrochemical theory and techniques in corrosion, Catalysis, and
battery technology
- Real time monitoring of surface morphology
} due to potential or
} electrolyte induced corrosion or
} during potential cycling and in presents of reactive species
- Investigating effects of corrosion inhibitors
- Preparing and working with air and moisture sensitive samples
- Monitoring the evolution of surface

Techniques Demonstrated:
Controlled environment, controlled temperature, in-situ, and
electrochemical STM and AFM

Research areas:
General electrochemistry, corrosion, catalysis, and battery research
-----------------------------------------------

Session II: BIOLOGY AND HIGH RESOLUTION IN SITU IMAGING AND CHARACTERIZATION
This session focuses on applications of high resolution SPM for studying
biological samples both in situ and ex situ.
- Applications of SPM in biological research
- Preparing and working with biological samples
- Low force biological imaging using magnetic AC
- In situ imaging of bio samples under environmental and temperature control
- Force measurement and sample characterization

Techniques Demonstrated:
Contact AFM, controlled temperature, in-situ MAC mode, MAC mode with
temperature control

Research areas:
Molecular and cell biology, structural biology, drug discovery and drug
delivery.
-----------------------------------------------

Speakers and Tutors:
- Prof. Stuart Lindsay, ASU
- Dr. Daphna Yaniv, MI
- Dr. Judy Zhu, ASU/MI
- Dr. James Hudson, ASU/MI
- Dr. Jun Li, ASU/MI
- Dr. Tainwei Jing, Cofounder of MI

Who should attend: Researchers and microscopists from beginner to expert.
Attendees will be grouped both by interest and ability. Groups will be 3-5
and each group will have a dedicated system for hands on experience.

Cost: $575 for one workshop session, $975 for both workshops sessions.
(Includes lunches, and evening program, and workshop materials)

TO SIGN UP or more information please go to http://green.la.asu.edu/workshop

For more information, e-mail:
- Elena Odenheim mailto:elena-at-molec.com or
- Prof. "Stuart Lindsay" mailto:stuart.lindsay-at-asu.edu


____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
George Sibbald, President
Molecular Imaging Corporation; Technology leader "in situ" SPM
9830A South 51st Street, Suite A124
Phoenix, AZ 85044, USA
Phone(602)753-4311, Fax(602)753-4312
http://www.molec.com/




From: George Sibbald :      geos-at-goldrush.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 22:15:53 -0700
Subject: ASU/MI Winter Microscopy Workshop: In-Situ SPM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To all SEM microscopists who have been waiting for scanning probe
microscopy to deliver unique capabilities. "High resolution in situ
imaging and sample characterization under 37 C controlled temperature".

I would like to personally invite you to Arizona State University and
Molecular Imaging's "HANDS ON" workshop on High Resolution In-Situ Scanning
Probe Microscopy to be held in Phoenix, AZ; Feb. 4-11, 1998.
http://green.la.asu.edu/workshop

Where: Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; and Molecular Imaging
Corporation, Phoenix, AZ

Two focused sessions: Extended time to run your samples can be arranged.
(If you plan on bringing samples please contact session head to assure
adequacy of sample preparation)
- Electrochemical SPM (Feb 4-6), Poster/cocktails Faculty club Feb 5
Session head: Dr. Judy Zhu mailto:Judy-at-molec.com
- Biological SPM (Feb9-11), Poster/cocktails Faculty club Feb 10
Session head: Dr. Jun Li mailto:junli-at-molec.com

A general introduction to in situ SPM will start each session. Included
will be an overview of SPM theory, and an introduction to sample
preparation techniques for imaging under controlled atmosphere, in fluids,
under temperature or electrochemical control, and or high resolution
imaging and force measurement techniques (MAC Mode)
-----------------------------------------------
Workshop Goals:
The goal of this workshop is to provide a forum for presentations, hands on
training (on attendee samples), and discussion of recent developments in
research, instrumentation, current applications and future directions of
high-resolution in-situ STM and AFM. Some areas of particular interest are:
- Observing molecular conformational change in situ
- Magnetic AC imaging (MAC Mode)
- MAC Force measurements
- Corrosion studies
- Battery studies
- Biomolecular imaging and force/friction/electrical data analysis
(functionalized tips)
- In situ biomolecular research (gene therapy research, drug discovery,
drug delivery, diagnostic sensors)
- Micro manipulation (protein folding force, polymer characterization)
- Environmental control
- Temperature control
- In-situ imaging, Sample preparation, SPM techniques (Tips and Tricks)
- New developments in instrumentation.
-----------------------------------------------
Session I: ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND IN-SITU IMAGING
This session focuses on SPM issues important to corrosion, catalysis, and
advanced battery research.
- Investigating potential dependant effects of surfaces and surface adsorbates
- Electrochemical theory and techniques in corrosion, Catalysis, and
battery technology
- Real time monitoring of surface morphology
} due to potential or
} electrolyte induced corrosion or
} during potential cycling and in presents of reactive species
- Investigating effects of corrosion inhibitors
- Preparing and working with air and moisture sensitive samples
- Monitoring the evolution of surface

Techniques Demonstrated:
Controlled environment, controlled temperature, in-situ, and
electrochemical STM and AFM

Research areas:
General electrochemistry, corrosion, catalysis, and battery research
-----------------------------------------------

Session II: BIOLOGY AND HIGH RESOLUTION IN SITU IMAGING AND CHARACTERIZATION
This session focuses on applications of high resolution SPM for studying
biological samples both in situ and ex situ.
- Applications of SPM in biological research
- Preparing and working with biological samples
- Low force biological imaging using magnetic AC
- In situ imaging of bio samples under environmental and temperature control
- Force measurement and sample characterization

Techniques Demonstrated:
Contact AFM, controlled temperature, in-situ MAC mode, MAC mode with
temperature control

Research areas:
Molecular and cell biology, structural biology, drug discovery and drug
delivery.
-----------------------------------------------

Speakers and Tutors:
- Prof. Stuart Lindsay, ASU
- Dr. Daphna Yaniv, MI
- Dr. Judy Zhu, ASU/MI
- Dr. James Hudson, ASU/MI
- Dr. Jun Li, ASU/MI
- Dr. Tainwei Jing, Cofounder of MI

Who should attend: Researchers and microscopists from beginner to expert.
Attendees will be grouped both by interest and ability. Groups will be 3-5
and each group will have a dedicated system for hands on experience.

Cost: $575 for one workshop session, $975 for both workshops sessions.
(Includes lunches, and evening program, and workshop materials)

TO SIGN UP or more information please go to http://green.la.asu.edu/workshop

For more information, e-mail:
- Elena Odenheim mailto:elena-at-molec.com or
- Prof. "Stuart Lindsay" mailto:stuart.lindsay-at-asu.edu


____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
George Sibbald, President
Molecular Imaging Corporation; Technology leader "in situ" SPM
9830A South 51st Street, Suite A124
Phoenix, AZ 85044, USA
Phone(602)753-4311, Fax(602)753-4312
http://www.molec.com/




From: focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au (Focus on Microscopy)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 18:23:37 +1000
Subject: Call4papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Meeting announcement - Focus on Microscopy 1998
Full details follow - best viewed in a monospaced font.

For a classier view see our web page created by Pal Fekete
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98

Online registration will be available on the web page soon but
you can also get a form (and any further details) by email from
focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au


Focus on Microscopy 1998
11th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
10th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy

April 14th-17th, 1998

University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
Royal Microscopical Society (UK)
Image Analysis Society of Australia

International Committee
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Andres Kriete, Liebig University, Giessen
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Alan Boyde, University of London
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University

Organising Committee
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Ms. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Pal Fekete, University of Sydney
Dr. Min Gu, Victoria University
Dr. Allan Jones, University of Sydney
Ms. Eleanor Kable, University of Sydney


Introducing Sydney

Sydney, Australia's largest city, is also one of the world's most beautiful
cities, built around the spectacular natural harbour which provided the
site for the first European settlement of the Australian continent. It
prides itself on its cultural diversity, offering a rich mix of European,
Asian and indigenous Australian experiences alongside the uniquely
Australian culture which has developed in the 200 years since the First
Fleet landed in Sydney Cove.

The University of Sydney is the oldest in the country, established as part
of the great English 19th century tradition of liberal enlightenment but
unashamedly modelled architecturally on the Oxbridge pattern. It has
retained both its prestige and its central location although its site has
expanded greatly over the years, now accommodating more than 20,000
students. The Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
(AKCMM) at the University of Sydney, which is hosting the Conference this
year, is the largest centre for microscopy in the Southern Hemisphere,
offering a wide range of optical and electron microscope facilities both to
the University and the wider community.

April is autumn (fall) in Sydney. The weather will be mild average
temperature for the month is 19 C (68 F). Sydney has both a lot of sun and
a high rainfall - rain can fall in any month so bring a waterproof. The
ocean will be warm and very pleasant for swimming and surfing.


Scientific Programme - 15-17 April

The scientific programme will consist of poster and spoken sessions.
Posters (1m x 1m) and contributed talks (15min) are invited on any of the
Conference topics:

* Advances in confocal microscopy
* Applications of confocal microscopy
* 3-dimensional optical imaging
* 3-D techniques in electron microscopy
* Other 3D imaging techniques
* Novel techniques in microscopy
* Near-field microscopy
* Multiple-photon microscopy
* Multiple-dimensional image processing
* Applications of image analysis


Short Courses & Workshops - 14th April

The following half-day short courses and workshops will be offered, subject
to both maximum and minimum numbers of participants. All are led by
internationally recognized experts in their respective fields. The cost is
$75 (Aust) per half-day course.

Morning
* Multiphoton microscopy
* Introductory confocal microscopy
* Deconvolution of 3D images
* Stereology

Afternoon
* Introduction to image processing
* Advanced confocal microscopy
* Introduction to digital imaging
* 3D image processing & visualization


Social Programme

These events are included in the cost of full and accompanying member
registration. A limited number of additional tickets will be available.

* Tuesday 14th April, 6pm. Welcome reception, exhibition area. Drinks and
simple snacks - an opportunity to meet old friends and to get to know
fellow delegates before the start of the formal business of the conference.
* Thursday 16th April, 7pm. Conference Barbecue Dinner. An informal
evening on an island in one of the most beautiful parts of Sydney Harbour.

Morning coffee, a light lunch, and afternoon tea are provided each day.
(For workshop registrants only on the 14th).


Abstracts

Extended abstracts, up to one A4 page in length, will be published in a
conference volume issued free to all delegates. Additional copies will be
available for sale. Micrographs and other illustrations (monochrome only)
are welcomed but must fit within the one page.

Manuscripts will be edited for format only. To simplify the editors' task
please follow these simple guidelines:
* Title in upper and lower case.
* Authors' names with initials first, presenting author in upper case.
* Full address and affiliation of all authors.
* Text in a 12pt font.
* References cited by name and date, not number.
* References at end - do not include titles. All authors (initials
first), then year, then journal citation.

All text must be submitted electronically, either as plain text, RTF or in
the format of a PC or Macintosh word processor. MS Word, Word Perfect,
Wordstar, MS Works, Claris Works, Write are all on site and most other
formats can be converted. Postscript files and TeX are not acceptable.
Illustrations should not be included within the word processor file; they
should be submitted either as separate files in any common format (not
postscript or eps) or as hard copy.

Send files :
* by email to focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au
* by anonymous ftp to ftp.emu.usyd.edu.au (directory \focus98)
ftp://ftp.emu.usyd.edu.au/focus98)
* on a floppy disk to the conference address, below.

Abstracts must be received by 31st January 1998 if they are to appear in
the published volume.


Conference Details

Conference sessions and a comprehensive manufacturers' exhibition will take
place in the Wentworth Building, levels 4 & 5. Some workshops will be held
in the AKCMM, Madsen Building. A footbridge across City Road provides
quick access between these buildings.

A discounted early registration fee applies to all registrations received
and paid by 31st January 1997. All prices given are in Australian dollars
- one Australian dollar is approximately 70c US.

Early Regular
Full registration $ 425 $ 475
Student registration $ 250 $ 300
Day registration $ 175 $ 175
Accompanying person $ 175 $ 175

Full registration covers conference volume, admission to all scientific
sessions, welcome reception, conference dinner, morning and afternoon tea,
and lunch.

Student registration includes all the above except the conference dinner.

Day registration covers conference volume, admission to scientific
sessions, morning and afternoon tea, and lunch on any one day.

Accompanying person's registration includes welcome reception, two
half-day tours and the conference dinner

Accommodation is available at St John's College, on the University campus,
for $60 per night including breakfast (single room, shared bathroom). For
those who prefer a hotel, Camperdown Travelodge is $125 per night (single
occupancy) or $135 (dual occupancy) including breakfast. These are
specially discounted rates - to obtain them you must book through the
conference.
The taxi fare from the airport to Wentworth Building, St. John's College or
the Travelodge is about $10.

Focus on Microscopy '98,
Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, F09,
University of Sydney, NSW 2006,
Australia.

Phone: +61 2 9351 3178
Fax: + 61 2 9351 7682
Email: focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98


Focus on Microscopy 1998

\ /
\ 1 99 99 88 /
\ 11 9 9 9 9 8 8 /
----} 1 MICROSCOPY 88 {----
/ 1 9 9 8 8 \
/ 1 9 9 88 \
/ \


Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
F09, University of Sydney
NSW 2006, Australia

Phone: +61 2 9351 3176
Fax: +61 2 9351 7682

http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98






From: focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au (Focus on Microscopy)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 18:24:00 +1000
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1998

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

REMINDER

Discounted registration for Focus on Microscopy 1998
-11th International Conference on 3D Image Processing
in Microscopy
-10th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
finishes on 31st January !

You have three more weeks to avoid paying full price.

Check out our web page:
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98

or email focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au

Guy Cox

Dr. Guy Cox, | ooOOOOOOoo
E.M. Unit, F09 | # oOOOO | | OOOOo #
Univ of Sydney | ### OOO| | | | | |OOO ###
NSW 2006, | ### OOO | | | | | | OOO ###
Australia | ### OO | | | | | | | | OO ###
Phone: | ##### | | | | | | | | #####
+61 2 9351 3176| =====#####============================#####=====
Fax: | ##### #####
+61 2 9351 7682| ~~#####~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~#####~~

Focus on Microscopy 1998

\ /
\ 1 99 99 88 /
\ 11 9 9 9 9 8 8 /
----} 1 MICROSCOPY 88 {----
/ 1 9 9 8 8 \
/ 1 9 9 88 \
/ \


Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
F09, University of Sydney
NSW 2006, Australia

Phone: +61 2 9351 3176
Fax: +61 2 9351 7682

http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98






From: csbeneas :      csbeneas-at-wiccmail.weizmann.ac.il
Date: 13 Jan 1998 11:15:32 +0200
Subject: RuRed penitration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear colleagues,
I'm trying to stain the mesodermal cells of sea urchin embryo with =
Ruthenium Red, in block. Does somebody now the way to destroy the tight =
junctions of epitelial cells to to make it easier for RuRed to enter the =
blastocoel. I'll appriciate any help or suggestions, thank you in =
advance, Elia


Elia Beniash
Structural Biology
Weizmann Institute of Science
Rehovot, Israel




From: isabeln-at-alfa.ist.utl.pt (Isabel Nogueira)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 07:29:17 -0600
Subject: Gold thin film EDS standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I need a gold standard to calibrate an EDS analytical system attatched to a
TEM.

I've contacted several suppliers but none of them have anything with gold
(pure or in a compound).

Does anyone know where or how I can get a thin film standard of pure gold
or of a compound including gold ?

Thanks in advance.


Isabel Nogueira
Instituto Superior T=E9cnico
Departamento de Materiais
Avenida Rovisco Pais,
1096 Lisboa Codex
PORTUGAL
telef: 351-1-8418124/0
fax: 351-1-8418120
e-mail: isabeln-at-alfa.ist.utl.pt






From: John Arnott :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 08:55:01 -0500
Subject: Ladd Research

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Folks,

As many of you know, northern New England was hit with the "ice storm of
the century" last week. Ladd Research and a good chunk of the rest of
this area lost power, heat and telephone systems on Thursday. As of now
(Tues, 8:30 AM EST) we just got our electricity back, but our phone
system is going in and out.
Hopefully by the time this message is posted they will have finished the
repairs and we will be fully operational. 1-800-451-3406 should get you
through, if not we have forwarded everything through the fax number that
doesn't go through the switchboard so you can call 802-878-8074. Once
everything is back that will once again be the fax number.
If you can't get thru by phone please either keep trying or e-mail us. I
have over 150 messages to go through but we will reply to everyone as
soon as possible.
To those who have been trying to fax please try again , that should be
operational now.
For those who have orders placed with us, we will be shipping today.

Thank you for being understanding during this disruption.

JD Arnott
Preident
Ladd Research




From: Anthony Domenicucci :      domenicu-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:12:41 -0500
Subject: Shared Facilities for STEM/TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am gathering information on Microscopy Facilities which rent time to
industry. I am interested in facilities which have the following capabilities
- e.g. High resolution TEM and STEM, EELS and Image Filtering, High Angle
Annular Dark Field. I would appreciate any help gathering this info.




From: GARONEL-at-cliffy.polaroid.com (LYNNE C GARONE)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 10:44:18 -0500
Subject: Request for Resumes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Please respond directly to me at the address below:


Job Description : Microscopist / Material Scientist

Scientist / Senior Scientist - Analytical and Materials
Characterization Laboratory - Polaroid Corp. Waltham, Ma.


The Analytical and Materials Characterization Laboratory at Polaroid
Corp. has a need for a microscopist with a background in Material
Science to join our Microscopy and Surface Analysis Group.

Strong problem solving, leadership, interpersonal, documentation and
communication skills are a prerequisite.

Skills in Atomic Force Microscopy and Light Microscopy as well as a
variety of sample preparation techniques i.e. microtomy are essential.

Strong computer skills with application to digital imaging, remote
imaging and image analysis are desirable.

Experience in scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron
microscopy, confocal microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
(XPS) and x-ray diffraction is desirable.

A background in fracture mechanics and/or process microscopy is also
desirable.

This position requires a Ph.D. in materials science, physics,
chemistry, or engineering or a M.S. with equivalent training.
Industrial experience is a plus.

Supervisor : Lynne Garone, e. mail: GaroneL-at-Polaroid.com

Location: W4-1D
1265 Main St.
Waltham, Ma. 02254
(781) 386-1446 Fax: (781) 396-0378






From: yuhui xu :      Yuhui=Xu%RES%DFCI-at-EYE.DFCI.HARVARD.EDU
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 98 10:45:02 EST
Subject: Thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Many thanks to those who responded to my layman's question on Dye Sub
printer. From what I understood from these responses, with a budget of under
$15,000, one has the choices of the following dye sub printers: Kodak 8650,
Mitrubishi S3600-40U, Tektronix 560, or Codonics NP1600 ( I was told by a
local salesman that this line of products have been discotinued. But
apparently they are still available from some dealers). The Fuji Pictography
is said to work by a different mechanism.
Here I have two more questions:

1) I learned from those responses that all dye sub printers print at 300 dpi
resolution. But the print out pictures look much smoother than those produced
by laser or Inkjet printers printed at much higher resolution. Is this due to
the difference in printing mechanisms? My understanding is that the space
between the 300 dots must has been "filled" by "continuous tone" with the
same information from the dots next by.

2) If the print out is only at 300 dpi, does that mean that we only need a
negative scanner that reads and inputs images at equal or slightly higher
than 300dpi?

Sorry for asking again these very basic quuestions.
Regards,

Yuhui Xu
EM Core, DFCI




From: SGKCCK :      SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 11:38:46 EST
Subject: Re: Gold thin film EDS standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have seen your message over the server. Here at Electron Microscopy
Sciences we can offer you a Thin film standard with pure gold. This is a
standard item of ours. Please see page 90 of our catalog or at our website at
www.emsdiasum.com.
Please let us know if we may be of further assistance to you.

Sincerely,

EMS
215-646-1566 (Tel)
215-646-8931 (FAX)




From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:40:16 -0800
Subject: Dye-sub vs. dithering

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

yuhui xu wrote:

} ...
} Many thanks to those who responded to my layman's question on Dye Sub
} printer. ...
} Here I have two more questions:
}
} 1) I learned from those responses that all dye sub printers print at 300 dpi
} resolution. But the print out pictures look much smoother than those produced
} by laser or Inkjet printers printed at much higher resolution. Is this due to
} the difference in printing mechanisms? My understanding is that the space
} between the 300 dots must has been "filled" by "continuous tone" with the
} same information from the dots next by.

The different "mechanism" is actually a different method of mixing cyan, magenta,
yellow ( and possibly black) to create the printable colors. Lasers and inkjets
use the "dithering" method and need to put C,M,Y & K dots very close together in
order to produce an illusion of the resultant color ("dithering" is the newspaper
method). Dye-subs on the other hand can actually "mix" C,M,Y & K to produce the
color ... ie, no dithering is needed. The result is at 300dpi dye-subs produce
much smoother colors than dithering, yet the new high-resolution Epsons (and HPs)
do a *very* good job, and the dithering is almost un-noticeable. Newer ink jets
have recently introduces 6color printing which add light cyan and magenta to the
dithering process ... this improves printing considerably ... and now you have a
high quality printer for less than $1000. For the sake of $$ per page, you might
want to consider this an addition printer to buy.

} 2) If the print out is only at 300 dpi, does that mean that we only need a
} negative scanner that reads and inputs images at equal or slightly higher
} than 300dpi?.

This would depend on the final size of your printed page. For example, if you
wanted an 8by10 printed from a 4by5 negative, then you'd want to scan it at
600dpi.

What is nice about dye-sub printing is that you don't have to be a mathematician
to calculate "lines-per-inch" which accounts for the size of the dithering
matrix. Yet, dithering printer manufacturers will suggest the "ideal" dpi for
photographic color printing ... for example, Epson suggests 240dpi for its 720dpi
printers. Since a dye-sub doesn't use a dithering matrix the printing resolution
of 300dpi is straight-forward.


... hope this helps :o)
cheerios, shAf
--
{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility at the University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu or mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu






From: Robin Schaublin :      res-at-psgi03.psi.ch
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 18:40:31 +0100
Subject: Swiss Society for Optics and Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear colleagues,

I draw your attention to the fact that the Swiss Society
for Optics and Microscopy has changed his Web site's address.
It was previously www.sgoem.ch - it is now:
www.ssom.ch

Thanks for you attention,
Best regards,

Robin Schaublin


--
-------------------------------------------------------------
Robin E. Schaeublin
Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas - EPFL
Fusion Technology - Materials Group
CH - 5232 Villigen - PSI, SWITZERLAND
Tel : + 41 56 310 40 82 and + 41 21 693 65 69
Fax : + 41 56 310 45 29 and + 41 21 693 37 51
-------------------------------------------------------------




From: Glen MacDonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:40:47 -0800
Subject: Re: LM-Leitz Orthoplan Docs, Config

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Tom,
The Leica rep. for our area is Bartels and Stout, in Issaquah,
(425)453-1705. They may be able to help you with manuals and technical
assistance. You might even be able to bring it in for a tutorial. The
Orthomat camera system is very reliable and easy to use. If all else
fails, I could give you a lesson. If you have extra parts, our lab
might be interested in them.

My mail server had problems with your email address yesterday, so I'm
sending a cc: to the list today.

Regards,
Glen MacDonald
Virginia Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
The box said "Requires Windows 95 or better.", so I bought a Macintosh.
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

On Sun, 11 Jan 1998 16:09:06 EST TomDeVrie-at-aol.com (Tom DeVrie) wrote:

}
} The scope came with no documentation. As I prepare to reconfigure the
} scope
} with Leitz parts, I need to learn what lenses, condensers, and other
} components were once available. I wish to inquire if any listserv
} subscribers
} know where such a 20-year-old catalog might be found.





From: Jill Craig :      jcraig-at-unbc.ca
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:42:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: SEM problem (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm having a strange problem with our Philips XL30. And, I
was wondering if anyone has had any similar difficulties, or
if anyone can offer any suggestions.

The problem is with either saving to .tif file or restoring
from it. The databar is restored unreadably. The image is
restored fine, and you can tell that the letters of the
graphic are restored, but the background is then distorted so
that the databar section is unreadable. The databar is fine
when the image is sent to the screen, videoprinter, or
camera. I have also tried to pull up the .tif file using
other programs with the same results.

Any and all suggestions will be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Jill Craig





From: John Arnott :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 12:43:09 -0500
Subject: Ladd Research Update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Just to keep all those interested informed,

We are nearly back all the way. 1-800-451-3406 will get you through, as
will 1-802-878-6711 for those not in the United States. Our fax,
1-802-878-8074 is also working again.

When they put the telephone poles back up outside our plant and turned
the power back on our phone system cpu was fried. We have rigged up a
quick fix, but only have half of our usual lines for now so you may get
a busy signal or no answer if the hunting lines are not set the way we
think they are, but rest assured we are operating.

Thank you again for your understanding in this matter.

JD Arnott
Ladd Research




From: Jill Craig :      jcraig-at-unbc.ca
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:47:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Edax? Windows? problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

There is some sort of minor software problem with our Edax
computer. A few times a day, during heavy use, the computer
will declare a general protection error. The only way out of
this error is to close all programs and exit windows and then
restart. After restart nothing appears to be strange, until
several hours later another general protection error occurs.
I have been looking for a pattern, but have been unsuccessful
to date.

Any and all suggestions are much appreciated.


Thanks,


Jill Craig
UNBC




From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 13:51:49 -0500
Subject: image processing terminology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello:

Is there a difference between histogram equalization and histogram stretching?

Owen



=============================
Owen P. Mills
Michigan Technological University
Metallurgical & Materials Engineering
Rm 512 MME Building
Houghton, MI 49931
906-487-2002
906-487-2934 FAX
opmills-at-mtu.edu




From: Larry Ackerman :      mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 11:18:20 -0800
Subject: Ergonomic Microscopy

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------- Forwarded Message Follows -------

Recently there have been some very good suggestions posted regarding posture
and positioning of the body during microscopy to minimize fatigue and
injury. However, no one has mentioned the design of microscopes. We seem to
be resigned to adjusting our bodies to fit this awkward instrument. I would
like to encourage microscope manufacturers to modify microscope designs to
fit our bodies. With our backs and necks straight we should be able to look
directly, or down a few degrees, into the eyepieces. The principle operating
controls, focus and stage, should be at a level near our waist so that our
arms are bent at the elbows 90 degrees or slightly more. In the case of
dissecting microscopes the stage level should be at this waist height. There
are many diagrams circulating showing how to best position the body while
using a computer. These also pertain to using other equipment such as
microscopes. I have already discussed these issues with some Nikon Product
Managers and encourage you to gently nudge manufacturers in this direction
before that soreness in the shoulders becomes a chronic pain.
Larry D. Ackerman (415) 476-8751
Howard Hughes Medical Institute FAX (415) 476-5774
UCSF, Box 0724, Rm U426
533 Parnassus Ave. mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
San Francisco, CA 94143





From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 12:18:18 -0800
Subject: Re: image processing terminology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Owen P. Mills wrote:

} ...
} Is there a difference between histogram equalization and histogram stretching?
} ...

The two terms are most commonly used interchangably, but there is a difference.
"Stretching" would simply expand the distribution of gray levels such that the
brightest is 0 and the darkest is 255 ... whereas, "equalization" is a bit more
difficult to describe. John Russ ("Computer Assisted Microscopy", Plenum, 1991)
puts it this way ...

"With this method, an equal number of pixels in the final image have each
available shade of gray. The shape of the transfer function can be
straightforwardly determined from the brightness histogram of the original image.
The method expands the contrast in regions of high gradients, so the details are
much easier to see"

His figures go a long way to make this clearer ... suffice to say it is not a
linear transfer function and dependent on the histogram gray level distribution
with regard to how many pixels are in dark areas versus how many are in bright
areas.

cheerios, shAf
--
{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility at the University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu or mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu






From: isabeln
Date: Tuesday, January 13, 1998 7:29AM
Subject: Gold thin film EDS standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would suggest using an aluminum thin film on a copper grid for your energy
calibration sample for the EDS sample. Bring your beam close to a grid bar
and you will get sizable Cu Ka and Kb peaks. You will be able to adjust the
energy scale quite easily and you will have a lower energy peak in the Al K
(and a Cu -L peak for light element detectors.) that you can also check.

By having two peaks that you can measure the FWHM on, you can determine what
the resolution of any peak in your system should be, e.g. Mn-Ka.

You can get both gold and aluminum thin films on copper grids from any EM
supplier.

-Scott Walck


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."




----------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.

I need a gold standard to calibrate an EDS analytical system attatched to a
TEM.

I've contacted several suppliers but none of them have anything with gold
(pure or in a compound).

Does anyone know where or how I can get a thin film standard of pure gold
or of a compound including gold ?

Thanks in advance.


Isabel Nogueira
Instituto Superior Ticnico
Departamento de Materiais
Avenida Rovisco Pais,
1096 Lisboa Codex
PORTUGAL
telef: 351-1-8418124/0
fax: 351-1-8418120
e-mail: isabeln-at-alfa.ist.utl.pt







From: csbeneas/inet-mime////////RFC-
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 05:51:26 +0900 (JST)
Subject: RuRed penitration

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Dear colleagues,
I'm trying to stain the mesodermal cells of sea urchin embryo with Ruthenium Red, in block. Does
somebody now the way to destroy the tight junctions of epitelial cells to to make it easier for RuRed to
enter the blastocoel. I'll appriciate any help or suggestions, thank you in advance, Elia


Elia Beniash
Structural Biology
Weizmann Institute of Science
Rehovot, Israel




From: focus98/inet-mime////////RFC-822/focus98#a#emu#f#usyd#f#edu#f#au-at-otms1.olympus.co.jp
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 05:57:03 +0900 (JST)
Subject: Call4papers

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Meeting announcement - Focus on Microscopy 1998
Full details follow - best viewed in a monospaced font.

For a classier view see our web page created by Pal Fekete
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98

Online registration will be available on the web page soon but
you can also get a form (and any further details) by email from
focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au


Focus on Microscopy 1998
11th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
10th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy

April 14th-17th, 1998

University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
Royal Microscopical Society (UK)
Image Analysis Society of Australia

International Committee
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Andres Kriete, Liebig University, Giessen
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Alan Boyde, University of London
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University

Organising Committee
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Ms. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Pal Fekete, University of Sydney
Dr. Min Gu, Victoria University
Dr. Allan Jones, University of Sydney
Ms. Eleanor Kable, University of Sydney


Introducing Sydney

Sydney, Australia's largest city, is also one of the world's most beautiful
cities, built around the spectacular natural harbour which provided the
site for the first European settlement of the Australian continent. It
prides itself on its cultural diversity, offering a rich mix of European,
Asian and indigenous Australian experiences alongside the uniquely
Australian culture which has developed in the 200 years since the First
Fleet landed in Sydney Cove.

The University of Sydney is the oldest in the country, established as part
of the great English 19th century tradition of liberal enlightenment but
unashamedly modelled architecturally on the Oxbridge pattern. It has
retained both its prestige and its central location although its site has
expanded greatly over the years, now accommodating more than 20,000
students. The Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
(AKCMM) at the University of Sydney, which is hosting the Conference this
year, is the largest centre for microscopy in the Southern Hemisphere,
offering a wide range of optical and electron microscope facilities both to
the University and the wider community.

April is autumn (fall) in Sydney. The weather will be mild average
temperature for the month is 19 C (68 F). Sydney has both a lot of sun and
a high rainfall - rain can fall in any month so bring a waterproof. The
ocean will be warm and very pleasant for swimming and surfing.


Scientific Programme - 15-17 April

The scientific programme will consist of poster and spoken sessions.
Posters (1m x 1m) and contributed talks (15min) are invited on any of the
Conference topics:

* Advances in confocal microscopy
* Applications of confocal microscopy
* 3-dimensional optical imaging
* 3-D techniques in electron microscopy
* Other 3D imaging techniques
* Novel techniques in microscopy
* Near-field microscopy
* Multiple-photon microscopy
* Multiple-dimensional image processing
* Applications of image analysis


Short Courses & Workshops - 14th April

The following half-day short courses and workshops will be offered, subject
to both maximum and minimum numbers of participants. All are led by
internationally recognized experts in their respective fields. The cost is
$75 (Aust) per half-day course.

Morning
* Multiphoton microscopy
* Introductory confocal microscopy
* Deconvolution of 3D images
* Stereology

Afternoon
* Introduction to image processing
* Advanced confocal microscopy
* Introduction to digital imaging
* 3D image processing & visualization


Social Programme

These events are included in the cost of full and accompanying member
registration. A limited number of additional tickets will be available.

* Tuesday 14th April, 6pm. Welcome reception, exhibition area. Drinks and
simple snacks - an opportunity to meet old friends and to get to know
fellow delegates before the start of the formal business of the conference.
* Thursday 16th April, 7pm. Conference Barbecue Dinner. An informal
evening on an island in one of the most beautiful parts of Sydney Harbour.

Morning coffee, a light lunch, and afternoon tea are provided each day.
(For workshop registrants only on the 14th).


Abstracts

Extended abstracts, up to one A4 page in length, will be published in a
conference volume issued free to all delegates. Additional copies will be
available for sale. Micrographs and other illustrations (monochrome only)
are welcomed but must fit within the one page.

Manuscripts will be edited for format only. To simplify the editors' task
please follow these simple guidelines:
* Title in upper and lower case.
* Authors' names with initials first, presenting author in upper case.
* Full address and affiliation of all authors.
* Text in a 12pt font.
* References cited by name and date, not number.
* References at end - do not include titles. All authors (initials
first), then year, then journal citation.

All text must be submitted electronically, either as plain text, RTF or in
the format of a PC or Macintosh word processor. MS Word, Word Perfect,
Wordstar, MS Works, Claris Works, Write are all on site and most other
formats can be converted. Postscript files and TeX are not acceptable.
Illustrations should not be included within the word processor file; they
should be submitted either as separate files in any common format (not
postscript or eps) or as hard copy.

Send files :
* by email to focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au
* by anonymous ftp to ftp.emu.usyd.edu.au (directory \focus98)
ftp://ftp.emu.usyd.edu.au/focus98)
* on a floppy disk to the conference address, below.

Abstracts must be received by 31st January 1998 if they are to appear in
the published volume.


Conference Details

Conference sessions and a comprehensive manufacturers' exhibition will take
place in the Wentworth Building, levels 4 & 5. Some workshops will be held
in the AKCMM, Madsen Building. A footbridge across City Road provides
quick access between these buildings.

A discounted early registration fee applies to all registrations received
and paid by 31st January 1997. All prices given are in Australian dollars
- one Australian dollar is approximately 70c US.

Early Regular
Full registration $ 425 $ 475
Student registration $ 250 $ 300
Day registration $ 175 $ 175
Accompanying person $ 175 $ 175

Full registration covers conference volume, admission to all scientific
sessions, welcome reception, conference dinner, morning and afternoon tea,
and lunch.

Student registration includes all the above except the conference dinner.

Day registration covers conference volume, admission to scientific
sessions, morning and afternoon tea, and lunch on any one day.

Accompanying person's registration includes welcome reception, two
half-day tours and the conference dinner

Accommodation is available at St John's College, on the University campus,
for $60 per night including breakfast (single room, shared bathroom). For
those who prefer a hotel, Camperdown Travelodge is $125 per night (single
occupancy) or $135 (dual occupancy) including breakfast. These are
specially discounted rates - to obtain them you must book through the
conference.
The taxi fare from the airport to Wentworth Building, St. John's College or
the Travelodge is about $10.

Focus on Microscopy '98,
Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, F09,
University of Sydney, NSW 2006,
Australia.

Phone: +61 2 9351 3178
Fax: + 61 2 9351 7682
Email: focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98


Focus on Microscopy 1998

\ /
\ 1 99 99 88 /
\ 11 9 9 9 9 8 8 /
----} 1 MICROSCOPY 88 {----
/ 1 9 9 8 8 \
/ 1 9 9 88 \
/ \


Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
F09, University of Sydney
NSW 2006, Australia

Phone: +61 2 9351 3176
Fax: +61 2 9351 7682

http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98






From: focus98/inet-mime////////RFC-822/focus98#a#emu#f#usyd#f#edu#f#au-at-otms1.olympus.co.jp
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 05:56:31 +0900 (JST)
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1998

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REMINDER

Discounted registration for Focus on Microscopy 1998
-11th International Conference on 3D Image Processing
in Microscopy
-10th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
finishes on 31st January !

You have three more weeks to avoid paying full price.

Check out our web page:
http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98

or email focus98-at-emu.usyd.edu.au

Guy Cox

Dr. Guy Cox, | ooOOOOOOoo
E.M. Unit, F09 | # oOOOO | | OOOOo #
Univ of Sydney | ### OOO| | | | | |OOO ###
NSW 2006, | ### OOO | | | | | | OOO ###
Australia | ### OO | | | | | | | | OO ###
Phone: | ##### | | | | | | | | #####
+61 2 9351 3176| =====#####============================#####=====
Fax: | ##### #####
+61 2 9351 7682| ~~#####~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~#####~~

Focus on Microscopy 1998

\ /
\ 1 99 99 88 /
\ 11 9 9 9 9 8 8 /
----} 1 MICROSCOPY 88 {----
/ 1 9 9 8 8 \
/ 1 9 9 88 \
/ \


Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
F09, University of Sydney
NSW 2006, Australia

Phone: +61 2 9351 3176
Fax: +61 2 9351 7682

http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/physopt/fm98






From: paul#f#fischione/inet-mime////////RFC-
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 05:52:48 +0900 (JST)
Subject: Position Available

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E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. is seeking a highly motivated individual
for the position of Sales and Marketing Manager. Duties will include the
maintenance of current and potential customer databases; trade show
coordination; maintenance of World Wide Web site; coordination of pricing
strategy; monitoring product performance with existing customers;
generation of press releases for both product and company news;
establishment of advertisements in trade publications;
continuous updating of advertising literature; coordination of activities
with foreign distributors and the establishment of new distributors;
obtaining field input for the development of future products; coordination
of direct mail campaigns; generation of sales projections, reports, and
budgetary information.

The candidate should possess a B.S., M.S., or Ph.D. in materials
science/engineering or physics and a Masters in Business Administration
(MBA) with a focus on sales and marketing activities. As the Sales and
Marketing Manager, a great deal of activity will focus on interactions with
both existing and potential customers. The position requires excellent
verbal
and written communication skills and a willingness to do extensive travel.

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. specializes in TEM specimen preparation
instrumentation and TEM specimen holders. The corporate headquarters is in
Export, Pennsylvania, approximately 23 miles east of Pittsburgh. For more
information, contact our web site at www.fischione.com.

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.

Resumes should be sent to:

E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc.
9003 Corporate Circle
Export, PA 15632 USA





From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 15:27:09 -0600
Subject: Re: Edax? Windows? problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have run into similar problems on at least three occasions where the
memory was (or was getting) flaky. Even though I ran several different
memory diagnostics, the problem resisted a solution. Finally, trying some
other memory SIMMs cleared the problem up. Memory is cheap enough now ($40
for 16 MB) that it is an inexpensive experiment. And you can always use more
memory someplace these days.

On my second experience with this, I had people from Microsoft and elsewhere
telling a colleague to reformat the hard drive and load a clean version of
the software (and other drastic advice). I felt vindicated when it turned
out to be simply the memory after having found that to be the solution the
first time. Then I ran into it a third time, and that was on a Mac.

There may be other explanations as well. I have seen cooling fans fail and
cause overheating in the processor. But that normally leads to a more severe
and abrupt failure in the software.

Hope this helps.

At 09:47 AM 1/13/98 -0800, you wrote:
} Hi,
}
} There is some sort of minor software problem with our Edax
} computer. A few times a day, during heavy use, the computer
} will declare a general protection error. The only way out of
} this error is to close all programs and exit windows and then
} restart. After restart nothing appears to be strange, until
} several hours later another general protection error occurs.
} I have been looking for a pattern, but have been unsuccessful
} to date.
}
} Any and all suggestions are much appreciated.
}
} Thanks,
} Jill Craig
} UNBC
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu (or: wes-at-ameslab.gov)
http://www.marl.iastate.edu/marl/ (re: SEM)
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~iprt_info/cfce/ (re: coal)

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Bart Cannon :      cannonmp-at-accessone.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 1998 13:29:08 -0800
Subject: Old Leitz parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Jan. 11 Tom deVries mailed, seeking a parts source for older Leitz
microscopes.

The Technical Instrument Co. of San Francisco, California is the best
source I know. Their phone number in 1995 was 415 431 8231.

Bart




From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.mil
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 16:58:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: image processing terminology

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On Tue, 13 Jan 1998, Owen P. Mills wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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}
} Hello:
}
} Is there a difference between histogram equalization and histogram stretching?
}
} Owen
}
}


Yes. In histogram stretching, you are simply stretching the outliers of
the pixel values to fit the dynamic range of the representation, and scaling
everything inbetween accordingly. The *relative* position of the pixels intensity
values will not change. With histogram equalization, you change the relative
positions in order to distribute the values more evenly within the representation.
Histogram equalization does not *necessarily* imply histogram stretch as well,
though most implementations go ahead and do it.


Here's an example.


Consider a histogram that looks like this:


Many
|
|
|
# of pixels | *
| ***
| B******
| ******B******
Few | ***********B*******
------------------------------------
Dark Light

Brightness


Note that the column denoted with "B"s instead of asterisks is roughly
in the middle of the distribution.

A histogram stretch will scale everything to go from the darkest possible
representation to the brightest possible representation:



Many
|
|
|
# of pixels | *
| * * *
| B * * * * * *
| * * * * * * B * * * * * *
Few |* * * * * * * * * B * * * * * * * *
------------------------------------
Dark Light

Brightness


Note that the column denoted by "B"s is still roughly in the middle.


Histogram equalization recognizes that, by some statistical measures the greatest
overall contrast enhancement (in terms, for instance, of information content) is
acheived if all the intensity values had the same number of pixels -- a flat
distribution. This assumes, by the way, that all intensity values are of equal
importance -- that light stuff is just as important as dark stuff.

So, to get that, you basically squeegee the values with low numbers of pixels
together and separate the ones with large numbers of pixels. If you take the
histogram-stretched distribution above and do a histogram equalization on it, you
might get something like this (this is done by eye, so *really* doing it
would likely be a little different)



Many
|
|
|
# of pixels | *
| * * *
| B * * * * * *
| ****** B * * * * * *
Few |********** B * * * * * * *
------------------------------------
Dark Light

Brightness


Note that the column with the "B"s is now moved to the left because of the
greater space given to the columns with the most pixels. Thus, the ordering of
the pixel intensity values is retained, but the relative positions are not.


Finally, there is a method called "local" or "adaptive" histogram equalization
in which equalization is not done for the entire image, but only within small local regions.
Some algorithms divide the image up into lots of little subimages, and some just look
in the region around each pixel. In either case, an equalization is done using only
a part of the image. Thus, a dark area in one part of the image will not "use up"
all the dark pixels in a bright area. This is useful in the processing of medical
images such as CT images. In these cases, the global ordering of the intensity values
is lost, but is retain locally.

Hope this helps

billo







From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.mil
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 98 20:56:35 -0500
Subject: Re: image processing terminology

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Hi, I was wondering if someone could help me with small definitions of what
Scanning
Transmission X-ray Microscopy and X-ray Imaging Microscopy are. Thanks.
Scott





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-acpub.duke.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 19:38:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: immunofluorescence - UNICRYL-problems

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You should microfuge your antibody solutions (especially if they have
been frozen or stored for a while). This should get rid of the floaters
that fluoresce and clutter up your field.


On Fri, 14 Nov 1997, Arthur Schuessler wrote:

} Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 18:18:08 +0100
} From: Arthur Schuessler {schueslr-at-sun0.urz.uni-heidelberg.de}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: immunofluorescence - UNICRYL-problems
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopists,
}
} since we have a serious problem with immunofluorescence, I hope somebody
} can help us.
} We used 0.5 and 1 micron sections of Unicryl embedded plant tissues for
} immunofluorescence. Sections were cut with an diamond knife / ultracut on
} water.
} We did labelings with second Antibodies (anti-rabbit) conjugated to FITC or
} Cy3. Once we had nice pictures, but 10 times we had
} --} } } } horrible spots ("stars") as background all over the regions the
} incubation drop was located, and very weak labeling. Also there are
} fluorescing droplets when using Cy3, I wonder if it is not ok. However, the
} FITC conjugated also shows the "stars". It really looks very bad - all is
} full of "dirt".
}
} What could be the reason? In controls without first antibody the sections
} are always clean. We use TBS with 0.1 or 1% Casein, polylysin coated or
} uncoated coverslips, heat dried or not heated etc. With no first antibody
} always no stars. Is the antigen floating around?
}
} Thanks a lot if there are any ideas ...
} Arthur
} Dr. Arthur Schuessler
} University of Heidelberg
} Zellenlehre
} D-69120 Heidelberg
} Germany
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 22:09:22 -0500
Subject: Phones/Faxes at MME

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Dear colleagues,

In the process of a move to our new facilities, our phones (which were
due to ring in both offices) have developed a mind of their own. We
apologize for any inconvenience that this might have caused. If you need
to get in touch with Barbara Foster or Ken Piel, please send us an email
message with your phone number and we will respond promptly.
for Barbara Foster: mme-at-map.com
for Ken Piel: kenpiel-at-map.com
Emergency phone: (413)736-4828

Many thanks for your patience.

Barbara Foster
MME
Moving from 53 Eton Street, Springfield, MA 01108 to
125 Paridon Street, Springfield, MA 01118

Phone: still (413)746-6931
Fax: still (413)746-9311 (we think!)





From: suelind-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (SueLind)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 15:37:43 +1000
Subject: Pumps for a VP SEM

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Hi everyone
I am looking the buy a variable pressure SEM in the near future. My
question to you all is this -
A few companies use the chilled differential pumps and state that this
type of pump is best when the SEM is in the Variable Pressure mode
while others use the Turbomolecular pumps which require only air as
it's cooling mechanism. I am asking What is the difference between the
pumps, which pump should be use when in VP mode and why?

Thanks

Sue




From: Hermann Reese :      iacsa_df-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 02:08:31 -0500
Subject: Re: Edax? Windows? problem

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The kind of problem Jill Craig describes can appear when Windows (3.1.x)
runs into the limit of system resources. This can, for example, be caused=

by some application programs that don't free system resources after being=

terminated, or, as Warren Straszheim points out, by faulty hardware (memo=
ry
etc.).
To check out the systems available resources, close all applications and
from the Program Manager select the Help menu and About Program Manager.
The window that appears will show the currently available system resource=
s.
If this value is below 30%, even with no application open, some program
grabbed a lot of memory and didn't free it after closing. If you restart=

Windows, resources will be available again and everything works normally,=

until you use again the program in question and afterwards any other
application could generate the General Protection Error.

There is one easy way to determine if it is hardware-memory related (chip=

failure): when Windows reports the General Protection Error, one can quit=

Windows and immediately afterwards run Defrag (form root directory). Defr=
ag
will test the system memory on start-up and generate a warning when it
finds faulty memory. If it finds no problems in memory, just exit Defrag
or, even better, run it in =

full-optimization mode (can only do good to your system).
If it does find a problem, it would indeed be best to buy new memory.

However, there is another, much simpler possibility: a bad contact on the=

memory modules themselves. Now, before you go out and buy new SIMM's, you=

may try this:
with the computer disconnected form the mains, take the SIMM's out of the=
ir
socket (avoid any source =

of static electricity when attempting this, wear cotton clothes etc.) and=

clean the module's contacts with the eraser of a pencil (a few passes wil=
l
do). Wipe off the eraser residues with a tissue and insert the SIMMs agai=
n
into their sockets, making sure that they are properly seated. This may
well solve the problem.

Sorry for the large explanation. I hope it's useful.


Hermann Reese
IACSA - Mexico City




From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 09:40:33 CET
Subject: Re: Ergonomic Microscopy

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*Subject: Ergonomic Microscopy



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 09:40:33 CET
Subject: Re: Ergonomic Microscopy

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Well, this is a good point. It seems to me that the
ergonomy of the products depends on the manufacturer and the
products itself.
Working over twenty years with two TEMs, one made by Philips and
other one by Jeol, I may say that the Philips manufactured
microscope is much more ergonomic.
One should take into account that these two are very old and now
might be different. I don't expect a huge change, for the
"tradition" and, so called, good name play an important role in
such case. On the other hand, some time ago, I've been working
with Philips CM30 and Jeol 3010 and my feeling stays the same.

I should maybe add that I don't have any financial interest
in posting this msg, just personal feeling.

Witold Zielinski
Warsaw University of Technology
Narbutta 85, 02-524 Warsaw
POLAND







From: weigert-at-cmns.mnegri.it (Roberto Weigert)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 14:01:51 +0200
Subject: TEM: negative staining

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Hi,

I am interesting in the negative staining technique on whole-mount
preparation and I have some questions:

1) I would like to know the mechanism by which the contrasters (PTA,
Uranyl acetate etc. ) interact with the biomembranes
2) What kind of artifacts could the contraster induce and how to avoid them ?
3) and the same question about the putative artifacts induced by the air drying

Thank you

Roberto

______________________________________________________________________________

Dr. Roberto Weigert
Consorzio Mario Negri Sud
Department of Cell Biology and Oncology
Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory
Via Nazionale
S.M. Imbaro, 66030 Chieti
Italy
Phone: 0039-872-570-354
Fax: 0039-872-578-240






From: Julia Gross :      jgross-at-neuron.uchc.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 09:02:46 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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I would like to subscibe to the MSA listserver.
jgross-at-neuron.uchc.edu





From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 08:28:41 -0600
Subject: Re: Edax? Windows? problem

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At 02:08 AM 1/14/98 -0500, Hermann Reese wrote:
} There is one easy way to determine if it is hardware-memory related (chip
} failure): when Windows reports the General Protection Error, one can quit
} Windows and immediately afterwards run Defrag (form root directory). Defrag
} will test the system memory on start-up and generate a warning when it
} finds faulty memory. If it finds no problems in memory, just exit Defrag
} or, even better, run it in
} full-optimization mode (can only do good to your system).
} If it does find a problem, it would indeed be best to buy new memory.

I will have to try this test at my next opportunity, although I am somewhat
doubtful that it will catch the error. I mentioned that I had used a variety
of utilites to check memory besides the initial memory test at boot up and
the himem memory test. I used a memory check within WinProbe and a couple of
DOS utility sets. They all reported the memory to be fine. However, certain
Windows applications (like MS Word) exercised the memory in a more stringent
manner and caused failures. Perhaps the newer crop of utilities does
exercise memory in the manner that 32-bit apps do and would catch such
problems.

And like Hermann said, running DEFRAG is a good thing anyway. Probably one
of the overlooked reasons for system slowdown. And his comments about
resource leaks is a good one. I know older versions of Microsoft Excel and
Trumpet Winsock for Win 3.x had such problems. I can pass along a shareware
app that can help you track the resources by type if it would be helpful to
anyone.
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu (or: wes-at-ameslab.gov)
http://www.marl.iastate.edu/marl/ (re: SEM)
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~iprt_info/cfce/ (re: coal)

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Joseph P. Neilly 847-938-5024 :      NEILLY.JOSEPH-at-igate.abbott.com
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 08:35:50 -0600 (CDT)
Subject: RE: Gold thin film EDS standard

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Isabel,

Have you tried sputter coating a carbon filmed TEM grid? A light
coating should be thin enough for TEM and the grid should be easy to
prepare if you have a sputter coater in the lab.

Joe Neilly
Microscopy and Microanalysis D-45M
Abbott Laboratories AP31
Abbott Park, IL 60064





From: Joseph P. Neilly 847-938-5024 :      NEILLY.JOSEPH-at-igate.abbott.com
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 08:43:09 -0600 (CDT)
Subject: RE: SEM problem (fwd)

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Jill,

In the DATABAR dialog box (under the In/Out pull down menu) there is a
check box that allows you to remove the black background. Try removing
the background and saving a file and see if the the problem is
eliminated. This would give you a temporary fix until the problem is
solved. It may also indicate that the problem is in the microscope
control software.

Joe Neilly
Abbott Laboratories





From: NICOLA BOCK :      EMZNJB-at-emn1.mateng.nottingham.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 15:35:17 GMT
Subject: tem of co/cu thin film

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Dear Microscopists
I have been asked to examine a sample of Co/Cu sputter deposited onto
a Ga/As wafer substrate. The film is apparantly 50-100nm thick so
should be electron transparant, but what is the best method of
removing the film from the substrate and getting it onto a grid?
I am a bit of a novice with this type of sample, having trained as an
em operator in biological sciences and recently transferred to a
materials science dept, and thus far have only dealt with alloys
which can be electropolished.
I thought it might be possible to remove the film by plunging into LN2
but I'm not sure if this will work.
All advice will be much welcomed.

Cheers
Nikki

****************************
Nikki Bock
EM technician
Dept. of Materials Engineering & Materials Design
University of Nottingham
(0115) 9513759
emznjb-at-emn1.nott.ac.uk




From: Ann-Fook Yang (Ann-Fook Yang) :      YANGA-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 10:40:40 -0500
Subject: Edax? Windows? problem -Reply

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Jill Craig wrote:


Hi,

There is some sort of minor software problem with our Edax
computer. A few times a day, during heavy use, the
computer
will declare a general protection error. The only way out of
this error is to close all programs and exit windows and then
restart. After restart nothing appears to be strange, until
several hours later another general protection error occurs.
I have been looking for a pattern, but have been unsuccessful

to date.

Any and all suggestions are much appreciated.


Thanks,


Jill Craig
UNBC
============================================

I experience "general protection error" after I have an upgrade
of my computer. The pc-support guy tried all the tricks he
had and could not solve the problem. I finally seek second
opinion and the problem was solved.

The problem was that the cd drive was not set up as a slave
drive. I hope this helps.

Ann Fook
Ann Fook Yang
EM Unit,
Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre,
Agriculture Agri-Food Canada,
Central Experimental Farm,
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0C6

Tel: 1-613-759-1638
Fax: 1-613-759-1701
e-mail: yanga-at-em.agr.ca




From: Kirk J C Czymmek :      kirk-at-udel.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 10:44:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Low-temperature SEM

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Dear Cryo-microscopists,

I am looking for suppliers of low-temperature modules for doing CRYO-SEM
on a JEOL or Hitachi field emission SEM. I am very interested in getting
feedback (positive or negative) on cost, reliability and ease of use from
those who have experience with such equipment. Manufacturers are welcome
to contact me offline. Thank you very much in advance for your help.

Regards,

Kirk J. Czymmek
Biological Electron Microscopy Facility
University of Delaware
email: kirk-at-udel.edu
phone: (302) 831-1158
FAX: (302) 831-2281






From: hadams-at-NMSU.Edu ()
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 09:56:42 +0000
Subject: TEM: slotted grids

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I wanted to thank everyone with their suggestions for placing
sections on formvar slotted grids. We were trying to mount rather
large sectins onto the film. The suggestions and a little practice
produced excellent results.
Hank Adams
EML
New Mexico State University




From: James Shannon Mulroy :      jmulroy-at-emory.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 13:39:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Separating Epon resin from glass

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Dear Microscopists,
Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
Thank you,
James Mulroy






From: Beverly E Maleeff -at- SB_PHARM_RD
Date: 14-Jan-98 07:04:05 PM
Subject: MSA Professional Technical Staff Awards - Call for Applications

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To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com-at-inet
cc:

The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) and the MSA Technologists' Forum
are the sponsors of the Professional Technical Staff Awards (PTSA) to
provide assistance on a competitive basis to full-time professional staff
who submit papers for presentation at Microscopy and Microanalysis '98.
The following information also appears in the Registration Bulletin and
Call for Papers.

Awardees will be selected based on the quality of a first-authored paper
submitted for presentation at Microscopy and Microanalysis '98. It is the
intent of this award to stimulate attendance for professional technical
staff who ordinarily might not participate in the meeting, and to encourage
employers to support their staff in professional activities. The awards
consist of free full registration for the meeting, a copy of the
Proceedings and the Sunday evening social event. MSA will reimburse
awardees up to $600 for travel, lodging and other expenses. Applicants
must be full paid-up members of MSA at the time of application. Abstracts
will be judged by the MSA Technologists' Forum. The applicant must be the
first author of the submitted paper. There will be four awards, two in the
biological sciences and two in the physical sciences. Successful
applicants must present their papers personally at Microscopy and
Microanalysis '98 in order to receive the award. They are expected to
attend and participate in the entire meeting. Former winners will not be
eligible for another award. Applications shall consist of: (1) A copy of
the Abstract and Data Form to be sent to the Technologists' Forum committee
by FEBRUARY 1, 1998 for judging. Judgment will be made and awardees
notified by February 15. Those not receiving awards will be notified in
time to retract the original Abstract and Data Form, if desired; [NOTE: An
original Abstract and Data Form must be submitted to The Meeting Managers
by FEBRUARY 1, 1998 as well.] (2) A supporting letter from the applicant's
employer, manager or supervisor, attesting to the applicant's status as a
full-time, professional staff member. Send a copy of the Abstract, a copy
of the completed Data Form, along with the supporting letter from your
employer, manager or supervisor, to arrive by FEBRUARY 1, 1998 to the Chair
of the Technologists' Forum: Ms. Beverly Maleeff, SmithKline Beecham
Pharmaceuticals, Toxicology-US, UE0462, 709 Swedeland Road, King of
Prussia, PA 19406; Phone: 610/270-7987, Fax: 610/270-7202, E-mail:
Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com. The award will be presented at the
Presidential event.








From: Linda Iadarola :      linda.iadarola-at-yale.edu
Date: 14 Jan 1998 14:27:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Separating Epon resin from glass

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From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 19:43:50 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Low-temperature SEM

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Reply to: RE} Separating Epon resin from glass

Dear James,
You may want to try running some liquid nitrogen over the glass to cause =
it to break away from the epon. This works for glass coverslips on flat =
embedded epon samples. And remember, wear safety glasses and appropriate =
gloves for cold temps. while doing this. Good Luck.
Linda Chicoine
Yale Univ.
Center for Cell Imaging
New Haven, CT USA

--------------------------------------

Dear Microscopists,
Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
Thank you,
James Mulroy



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Without a doubt the best and most reliable cold stage for an SEM
including a FEG SEM is the CM1500 made by Oxford Instrument. All other
manufacturers pale into insignificance. I speak from experience and you
are welocme to come to Cambridge and have a go with our system on a
Phlips FEG-SEM

Best wishes

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences
University of Cambridge UK

On Wed, 14 Jan 1998, Kirk J C Czymmek wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Cryo-microscopists,
}
} I am looking for suppliers of low-temperature modules for doing CRYO-SEM
} on a JEOL or Hitachi field emission SEM. I am very interested in getting
} feedback (positive or negative) on cost, reliability and ease of use from
} those who have experience with such equipment. Manufacturers are welcome
} to contact me offline. Thank you very much in advance for your help.
}
} Regards,
}
} Kirk J. Czymmek
} Biological Electron Microscopy Facility
} University of Delaware
} email: kirk-at-udel.edu
} phone: (302) 831-1158
} FAX: (302) 831-2281
}
}
}





From: MELSEN :      MELSEN-at-microbio.emory.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 98 15:01:29 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM: negative staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com

Roberto,
The interaction of the negative stains which you have in question is as
follows:
1. Uranyl Acetate acts as a mild fixative stabilizing the lipids within
the membrane, It will bind to carboxyl and phosphate groups to some
extent. The specific protein interactions are detailed in several
handbooks covering staining sectioned materials. Artifacts are usually a
needle shaped precipitate= indicating the stain is too old. We make ours
when we are going to use it and never save it more than half a day.
2. PTA has little defined interaction with the membrane. The stain
occurs much as a snowfall over the features of the sample. Artifacts
include clumps of stain which can be removed with a light wash with
distilled water. Our experience has taught us to pH the stain with
ammonium hydroxide rather than the customary potassium. A 2% solution
will last for as long as 12 months without any problem. The disruptive
nature of the NHPTA is far less significant than the KPTA and the
granular dimensions are finer give higher resolution. We also see better
penetration into the fine details of surfaces similiar to what one sees
with ammonium molybdate.

To address the air drying one would need to know the composition of the
specific sample. Lability to air drying has been documented in handbooks
detailing working with whole cells for SEM. Viruses and bacteria are not
as subject to adverse effects from air drying. Some damage can be
reduced with a light fixation of the sample after it has been attached to
the grids and before drying begins.

Hope this Helps, Regards, Skip


MELSEN-at-MICROBIO.EMORY.EDU





From: Sally Shrom :      sally-at-retina.anatomy.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 15:34:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Separating Epon resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi James,
I had a lot of trouble removing glass coverslips from epon resin. I tried
immersing the epon-glass in liquid nitrogen without any luck. Finally I
made sure that I "undercooked" the epon. Then, I was able to remove the
glass from the "soft" epon after immersing the combo in liquid nitrogen.
In fact I nearly injured myself- the glass really flew off at me. From now
on I will wear a face shield. After I removed the glass, I had to put the
epon back in the oven to finish the polymerization process. You also can
heat up the epon-glass combo before dumping the combo into liquid
nitrogen.

Be careful,
Sally

On Wed, 14 Jan 1998, James Shannon Mulroy wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopists,
} Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
} How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
} Thank you,
} James Mulroy
}
}
}





From: Vickie Frohlich :      vickie-at-MACC.WISC.EDU
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 14:52:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Separating Epon resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Linda's suggestion to use liquid nitrogen is a good one. I've had very
good success with this method. Separation is alot easier if the glass is
pre-coated with either a siliconizing solution or spray or better yet a
very thin coating of evaporated carbon. Also, try to keep the epon from
spilling over the edge of your glass surface and wicking underneath. This
makes separation more difficult. Good luck.
Vickie Frohlich
********************************************************************************
Victoria Centonze Frohlich
Deputy Director, IMR
University of Wisconsin, Madison
P(608) 263-6288
F(608) 265-4076
********************************************************************************

} Reply to: RE} Separating Epon resin from glass
}
} Dear James,
} You may want to try running some liquid nitrogen over the glass to cause
} it to break away from the epon. This works for glass coverslips on flat
} embedded epon samples. And remember, wear safety glasses and appropriate
} gloves for cold temps. while doing this. Good Luck.
} Linda Chicoine
} Yale Univ.
} Center for Cell Imaging
} New Haven, CT USA
}
----------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopists,
} Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
} How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
} Thank you,
} James Mulroy
}
}
}


********************************************************************************
Victoria Centonze Frohlich
Deputy Director, IMR
University of Wisconsin, Madison
P(608) 263-6288
F(608) 265-4076
********************************************************************************






From: Mike Mizell :      mizell-at-sgi.net
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 16:52:11 -0500
Subject: Personal SEM School Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopist;
R.J. Lee Group, Inc is now offering a course on computer controlled
scanning electron microscopy. This is an intensive hands-on course (no
more than three student per microscope) to introduce you to or improve
your skills on the Personal SEM. Much of the instruction is performed on
sample material that the students are requestedto provide in advance of
the course. Topics covered include: image acquisition, variable-pressure
options, file saving and printing options, image functions, optical
pre-review, semi-quantitative analysis, computer-controlled analysis
(Automated Feature Analysis), routine maintenance, and sample
preparation. With the small class size, the course can be matched to
meet the participants' specific analytical needs. Over 100 pages of
lecture notes (including laboratory exercises), a computer program
illustrating various Graphical User Interface (GUI) functions, and a
book (BASIC SEM - An Introduction to the PERSONAL SEM by Fred Schamber0
are provided.
R.J. Lee Group will be conducting the course quarterly (Feb 16-20, 1998;
May 18-22, 1998; Aug 17-21, 1998) at the RJ Lee Group facility in
Monroeville, Pa, and additional courses can be scheduled if there is a
need.
To enroll please contact Barbara Smith at RJ Lee Group (412-325-1776,
bsmith-at-rjlg.com) or Doris Allison at RJ Lee Instruments (412-744-0100,
allison-at-sgi.net) or reply to this email message and I will pass the
information on to them. Also, if you have any course-specific questions
feel free to contact Dr. Steven Kennedy at RJ Lee Group (412-325-1776,
skennedy-at-rjlg.com).

--
Michael Mizell 412-744-0100 x224
RJ Lee Instruments, Ltd. 412-744-0506 Fax
515 Pleasant Valley Rd. mizell-at-sgi.net
Trafford, PA 15085





From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:53:52 +1100
Subject: Re: Separating Epon resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dunk it into liquid nitrogen for a half a minute, let it warm and it will
just peel off.
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au


}
} Dear Microscopists,
} Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
} How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
} Thank you,
} James Mulroy
}
}




From: Kevin Brent Smith :      kbsmit01-at-homer.louisville.edu (by way of Nestor
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 22:31:13 -0600
Subject: RE: Edax? Windows? problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Echoing the bad RAM possibility, a friend who works in the computer
business is convinced that 90% of computer problems can be blamed on bad or
intermittently flaky RAM.
However, I have also read recently that the Microsoft IE4.0 cache can (with
the default setup) consume vast quantities of hard drive real estate. As
the hard drive runs out of room, the Windows system cache gets squeezed.
Those problems described in the original post can also be caused when the
Windows cache is insufficient. This problem might be eliminated by simply
clearing the IE4.0 cache or by changing the settings to control the cache.
Kevin Brent Smith
University of Louisville Biology Dept.






From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 21:31:15 -0800
Subject: Re: tem of co/cu thin film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Nicola,
When I am asked to analyse something like this, I always ask the researcher
to stick a carbon-film-coated TEM grid onto his Ga/As substrate, so it
intercepts the sputtered film. I have had good success using this method to
study sputtered films. In your case, where you want to remove a film already
in place, the classic Materials Microscopy method is the etch the substrate
with a suitable chemical etchant, which will release the film. I am not sure
if the Co/Cu film will hold together on its own, the usual is to sputter
onto a carbon film, which helps hold it together. But you can try, amd pick
up any film that floats up off the substrate.
You wrote:
} Dear Microscopists
} I have been asked to examine a sample of Co/Cu sputter deposited onto
} a Ga/As wafer substrate. The film is apparantly 50-100nm thick so
} should be electron transparant, but what is the best method of
} removing the film from the substrate and getting it onto a grid?
} I am a bit of a novice with this type of sample, having trained as an
} em operator in biological sciences and recently transferred to a
} materials science dept, and thus far have only dealt with alloys
} which can be electropolished.
} I thought it might be possible to remove the film by plunging into LN2
} but I'm not sure if this will work.
} All advice will be much welcomed.
}
} Cheers
} Nikki
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca





From: Marcel Paques :      Marcel.Paques-at-unilever.com
Date: 1/14/98 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: Low-temperature SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk (IPM Return requested)
cc: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com (IPM Return requested)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


The Oxford system is of excellent quality, but you should request for
information on the new CRESSINGTON system. I consider it as an
instrument of a new technical generation. In particular when you are
interested in real high resolution work it is a must to inform
yourself about the Cressington.

Contact Dr. P. Walley, Cressington Scientific Instruments Ltd,
Tel. 1923 220499 in the UK,
or A. Berginc, Tel (412) 772-0220 in the USA

Success

Marcel Paques
Unilever Research
The Netherlands


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Without a doubt the best and most reliable cold stage for an SEM
including a FEG SEM is the CM1500 made by Oxford Instrument. All other
manufacturers pale into insignificance. I speak from experience and you
are welocme to come to Cambridge and have a go with our system on a
Phlips FEG-SEM

Best wishes

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences
University of Cambridge UK

On Wed, 14 Jan 1998, Kirk J C Czymmek wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Cryo-microscopists,
}
} I am looking for suppliers of low-temperature modules for doing CRYO-SEM
} on a JEOL or Hitachi field emission SEM. I am very interested in getting
} feedback (positive or negative) on cost, reliability and ease of use from
} those who have experience with such equipment. Manufacturers are welcome
} to contact me offline. Thank you very much in advance for your help.
}
} Regards,
}
} Kirk J. Czymmek
} Biological Electron Microscopy Facility
} University of Delaware
} email: kirk-at-udel.edu
} phone: (302) 831-1158
} FAX: (302) 831-2281
}
}
}




From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 08:17:40 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: tem of co/cu thin film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
Thu, 15 Jan 1998 08:17:41 +0000
Received: from localhost (rdoole-at-localhost) by ermine.ox.ac.uk (1.1/8.8.3)
with SMTP id IAA07027 for {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} ;
Thu, 15 Jan 1998 08:17:40 GMT

On Wed, 14 Jan 1998, NICOLA BOCK wrote:
Hi Nikki,

I assume that you don't have a carbon underlayer on your
substrate, in which case you are unable to float the film off. Try
sticking a small piece of sellotape firmly onto the film and quickly
ripping it off. This should remove some film and the sellotape can be
dissolved on chloroform and the film pieces picked up from the solvent
onto a grid.

Good luck.
Ron

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopists
} I have been asked to examine a sample of Co/Cu sputter deposited onto
} a Ga/As wafer substrate. The film is apparantly 50-100nm thick so
} should be electron transparant, but what is the best method of
} removing the film from the substrate and getting it onto a grid?
} I am a bit of a novice with this type of sample, having trained as an
} em operator in biological sciences and recently transferred to a
} materials science dept, and thus far have only dealt with alloys
} which can be electropolished.
} I thought it might be possible to remove the film by plunging into LN2
} but I'm not sure if this will work.
} All advice will be much welcomed.
}
} Cheers
} Nikki
}
} ****************************
} Nikki Bock
} EM technician
} Dept. of Materials Engineering & Materials Design
} University of Nottingham
} (0115) 9513759
} emznjb-at-emn1.nott.ac.uk
}

==========================================================================
=
Mr. Ron Doole e-mail ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
Department of Materials, phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
University of Oxford, fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
Parks Road.
Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
==========================================================================
==





From: Christian MATHIEU :      mathieu-at-univ-artois.fr
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:59:24 +0100
Subject: re: pump in the vpsem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Sue,


Where the microscope is in the Variable pressure mode, the pressure
inside the specimen chamber is comprised between 1 to 270 Pa. The low vacuum
pumping line is only composed of rotary pump.
I wrote a paper in microscopy and analysis intitled "priciples and
applications of the vpsem".
reference C mathieu european microscopy and analysis, september 1996, 43,13
If you want I can send you this publication.=20

Yours sincerely,

Dr C mathieu
Universit=E9 d'artois
Facult=E9 jean perrin SP 18
62307 lens cedex France
phone 33 3 21791710 fax 33 3
21791755
email mathieu-at-univ-artois.fr





From: XOrm3AIZ6-at-1nashvill.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:59:24 +0100
Subject: re: pump in the vpsem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

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busy, please keep trying, as bulk mailing is growing fast.
We do want to work with you to advertise your product.

To have your name removed, call our processing office.
Any negative responses will be dealt with accordingly.




From: Robert H. Olley :      R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:11:23 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: contra LN2 for Separating Epon resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear fellow microscopists,

Sorry to perhaps raise again an old chestnut, but ....

* You may want to try running some liquid nitrogen over the glass to cause
* it to break away from the epon. This works for glass coverslips on flat
* embedded epon samples. And remember, wear safety glasses and appropriate
* gloves for cold temps. while doing this. Good Luck.

Gloves with liquid nitrogen are NOT a good idea. A BRIEF contact with LN2
on skin of hands does little harm, but if it freezes the surface of the
glove this may stick to you and give frostbite, and even worse if it gets
down inside the glove.

I learned this from a lecture on "The Physics of Ice Cream" by
Peter J.Barham of Bristol University. Rapid freezing works !!!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"The ideas in this essay are as chaotic as the moon system of Uranus !!"

"But Professor ....."

"Come on, pull yourself together, Miranda !!"

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+







From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:32:38 +0000
Subject: RSI-Microscopy-Ergonomics-'summary'

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have now completed the microscopy workstation assessment form for
our Intranet system. It was called for as a preventative against the
development of postural problems. Once you delve into this, it appears
that these are not uncommon in our line of work. They are best avoided.
Basically, it is a safety check-list where a "No" response can be
detected automatically to flag a problem that someone needs to address.

The form for use is a four-column table with "Yes" coming before the "If,
no" and "No" columns. The idea is to prompt people to sort out their
problems themselves where possible, before answering "No". The
version below is simply more readable in e-mail. Maybe you can copy it
and format it further in a WP package.

Alternatively: it is available as a MS Word 6 file and there is also a
wonderful new drawing showing how to sit at a microscope (by me!). I
hope it is correct. This is available in Windows Draw 3 .drw and TIF
format, from {k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk} .

I will send these files automatically to those acknowledged in the
Acknowledgemnts section below. Many thanks to those who responded
via the "Microscopy", "Histonet", Safety, and "Sorehand" Lists.

My background is 29 years in microscopy (mostly EM) and 5 years as a
safety advisor (part-time). I knew something "official" about setting up pc
workstations, but reviewing microscopy set-ups was interesting.

"Thank you" to those who responded, I picked up a new point or two!
(old dogs and new tricks?)
______________________________________________________
e-mail version
Workstation assessment for
Safe Use of Microscopes

Introduction. Looking through a microscope for extended periods is not
what we were designed for. It requires holding our bodies in an
unnaturally rigid position. An ergonomically designed microscope would
have eyepieces at about 90* from vertical. It is important to adopt a
correct, ergonomic working posture. This means fitting the workstation to
the worker, not vice versa. It is also important to take regular breaks.

Ideally, the microscope should be on a bench which is adjustable for
height: first, the seating position is adjusted (steps 2-8 below) followed
by the bench height and subsequent steps (11-22 below). The following
is based on a fixed work bench. See Fig. 1.

Before entering *No' to the following questions, attempt to rectify the
problem.


1. Have you been show how to use the microscope, including how to
align the optical path to optimise performance?
If no, seek this training before continuing. Otherwise, poor results and
eye strain may ensue.

2. Are you sitting back in the chair, rather than perching on it?
If no, sit back into the chair.

3. Is the height of the chair adjusted so that your feet are resting
comfortably, flat on the floor?
If no, adjust the chair height appropriately.

4. Is there an even pressure along the backs of the thighs?
If no, check if the seat platform can be tilted appropriately for comfort. If
not, consider readjusting the height slightly.

5. Does the chair support your back in an upright position? Ideally, it
should support to beyond the level of the shoulder blades.
If no, adjust chair back appropriately.

6. Does the chair back give support in the lumbar region?
If no, check the chair's back adjustment again, possibly adjusting the tilt
control. Or, obtain a separate lumbar cushion.

7. Are you now sitting with your back upright? Ask a colleague to
comment.
If no, repeat steps 2-6 above.

8. Are the microscope eye-pieces in line with, or extending over, the
front edge of the bench?
If no, move the microscope towards you appropriately (caution - you
may need skilled assistance)

9. Is the vertical position of the eye-pieces a little high for comfort, so
that your head is upright? Initially, this will feel unnatural.
If no, raise the microscope vertically to a suitable height at which you are
are forced to sit upright. This can be done with layers of plywood etc. If
you are using the microscope long-term, get the workshop to make a
suitable stand.

10. Can you see at all into the eye-pieces of the microscope?
If no, raise the chair height appropriately and obtain a suitable footrest.

11. Are you gazing slightly downwards into the eye-pieces, as
opposed to tilting your head and *looking straight-ahead' into them?
If no, you are not sitting upright enough. The back should be *vertical' and
the neck and head upright. Holding the head tilted for long periods will
induce neck and shoulder-ache. Repeat steps 2-10.

12. Is the leg-well clear of clutter so that your legs and feet are not
impeded when sitting at the bench?
If no, clear the clutter.

13. Are your thighs clear of the under-surface of the bench?
If no, the bench is unsuitable for microscopy work. Have it modified or
seek another site for the microscope.

14. When operating the focus and stage controls, are your forearms
resting on something, either the bench or microscope arm rests?
If no, obtain arm rests, perhaps sloping. Holding the arms off the bench
for long periods will induce static loading problems. The most comfortable
position for the hands is as for when shaking hands. A commercial
source for arm rests is: http://members. aol.com/rdergo2/msm.htm.

15. Are the eyepieces set correctly for your inter-pupillary distance?
If no, set this distance properly - the oculars should move towards or
away from each other. This reduces eye-strain.

16. Are the eyepieces parfocal?
If no, adjust them individually so that the image is sharp in each. This
reduces eye-strain.

17. Are the eyepieces clean, for both optical and hygeine reasons?
If no, ensure that they are cleaned. Be aware that communicable eye
diseases such as conjunctivitis can be transmitted by contact.

18. Before you begin microscope work for the first time, are you free
from pre-existing visual problems?
If no, you should see an optician in case you have astigmatism, fusion
insufficiency (poor eye co-ordination) or simple long/short sight.
Microscopy work may make these problems more obvious.

19. Are your surroundings free from glare and reflections?
If no, try to remove light sources from the visual field by re-positioning
the workstation, removing highly reflective surfaces, using blinds,
curtains or other screens.

20. Is the image in the microscope free from glare and reflection?
If no, adjust the internal lighting so that there is not an uncomfortably high
level of light or contrast. This may be done by regulating the transformer
or by using appropriate filters.

21. Are you satisfied with other environmental factors, such as
temperature, humidity, draughts, ventilation, ambient lighting?
If no, try to sort problems locally yourself or discuss them with line
management. Beyond that, see your union safety representative or local
safety advisor. Humidity (and dry eyes) are aided by watering plants,
where appropriate.

22. Will you be focusing your eyes to distant vision periodically, e.g.
through a window?
If no, you should take regular breaks from the work and look at
something distant. This is prevent headaches/eye strain

23. Are you/will you be taking regular breaks from the microscope, e.g.
two or three minutes every half-hour, or rotating jobs?
If no, this needs urgent consideration. Breaks are necessary to prevent
RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury), WRULD (Work-Related Upper Limb
Disorders) or CTD (Cumulative Trauma Diseases). Discuss it with your
manager, union safety representative or local safety advisor. Computer
users are recommended to take five minutes every hour, microscopy
work is probably more posturally demanding.

24. When taking breaks from the microscope, will you be doing
stretching exercises?
If no, refer to the article *Applying ergonomics to improve microscopy
work* by Helen Haines and Lyn McAtamney in Microscopy and Analysis,
Issue 36 (July 1993), 15-17 (available from your local safety advisor).
You should do these exercises to relieve the static loading fatigue/stress
on the body. This applies equally to computer users.


Acknowledgements: this assessment document was compiled with
reference to the UK Health & Safety (Display Screen Equipment)
Regulations 1992 and the article *Applying ergonomics to improve
microscopy work* by Helen Haines and Lyn McAtamney (University of
Nottingham, UK). Members of the *Safety*, *Sorehand*, *Microscopy* and
*Histonet* Internet Lists also made helpful comments, particularly Bob
Chiovetti (E. Licht Co., USA), Barbara Foster (Pres., Microscopy/
Microscopy Education, Springfield, MA, USA), Dan Kallin (Bose
Corporation, Framingham, MA, USA), Bob Morency (R&D Ergonomics Inc,
Freeport, ME, USA), Philip Oshel (Champaign, IL, USA), Sue Reilly (James
Cook Univ. NQ, Australia), John Shane (McCrone Research Institute,
Chicago, USA), and especially Stephen Shaffer (MicroDataware,
Berkeley, CA, USA).


Keith Ryan
Plymouth Marine Lab., UK





From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 14:03:36 +-100
Subject: AW: Separating Epon resin from glass // TEM/Spec. prep. embdding: pop-off techn.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


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Salzburg, 15th of Jan, 1998, 12.25 local time

Dear James,
the problem you describe seems to have a solution named =
"pop-off"-technique.
Depending on glass quality of your object slide (not all brands seem to =
be the
same quality and therefore display variable physical properties) you can
separate postpolymerized (e.g. EPON)-specimen blocks of varying area =
size
from object-slides, including a selected area of your former semithin =
section or
the whole area (as used in reembedding techniques, which I assume is the
purpose you have asked the question).

If your concern is:
=20
Re-embedding of (immuno-) histochemical reacted LM-sections from e.g. =
thick
paraffin section (10-40 =B5m):

after several steps of processing like: incubations, washing, =
osmication,
dehydration,----intermedium------intermedium/resin-----resin pure: =20

if you place a polymerized resin block over the selected section area ( =
e.g. also
reembeddings of bigger LM-/Histological sections), be sure that you have
flushed/ infiltrated the area repeatedly with fresh resin (complete with =
hardener/accelerator) after an intermedium/solvent (e.g. =
propyleneoxide-PO,
PO:resin, etc...) step to get rid of any trace of solvent. This repeated =
exchange
of resin should be done by only dropping fresh resin into the middle of =
the
section area to be re-embedded: the former resin would be transferred to =
the
outer margins of the area to be re-embedded.

Polymerize the resin block (with a clean! and plane/smooth block-face) =
on your
section to be re-embedded for correlative LM/TEM at least for 1.5 hours =
at only
37 degr. C., then you are up to polymerize at higher temperatures, say 1 =
h at
80-90 degr. C.

Let cool down the "combo" of resin block-intercalated section-glass =
surface to
room temperature.

Prescore by means of a scalpel blade (be careful) the four sides of the =
resin
block (try to cut through resin remnant "walls" down to the glass slide =
surface).

If you were lucky with that without hurting you (depends on the =
scalpel-knife-
handle and the eye protection you should use), two choices:

first:
=20
-(faster) flat container made from styrene foam is filled about 1 cm =
high with LN2
(liquid nitrogen)
-dip ONLY the object slide in the LN2, sufficiently long (usually until =
evaporation
and bubbling of N2 Gas has stopped). If the surface of the object slide =
gets a
little bit of LN2 it wouldn't matter.=20
-put out of the LN2 the "combo" and either let warm up (resin block in =
between
your fingers !): at a time you will hear the "popping click" or try =
then to
apply "shearing force" to the block to separate the resin block from =
the object
slide.

second:
-(needs another time for warming up your "combo" in an oven): warm up =
the
"combo", say up to 80 degr. C.for about 10-15 minutes, then, proceed as
above.

NOTE: depending on the quality of glass slides (physical properties) and
(individual) technique used
the separation process is or may not be not uniform, i.e. there =
sometimes is
left some glas particles on the block surface after separation or no =
separation
at all. Elegant separation normally takes a few tests or trials. So =
don't use
important or valuable tissue/section preparations for your first or =
second
attempt.
If nothing changes and separation is not performed think of a spraying =
or a
"finely dispersed pasting" of your object slides using separation media =
(e.g.
Teflone-spray, silicone pasting) before mounting your sections to be =
re-
embedded.
Another *important* point is that if you're dipping the whole "combo" =
(resin
block- at least at its end- connected to the glass slide) into the LN2 =
to cool it
down you might have big problems due to *cracking* of the resin block =
which
might interfere with your considerations on cutting the whole areas you
selected to be sectioned (I have done "reembeddings for TEM" of 2 =B5m =
to 40=B5m
thick immunohistochemically reacted tissue cryosections =
=3D=3D=3D"pre-embedding
labeling techniques"=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D up to section areas of 5x5 mm, and =
it worked most
of my attempts, but: it is very, very tricky and good results seem to =
depend on
the day-time, or at least on how you stood up in the morning (you know: =
left
foot first!).

The effect of separation ("pop-off-technique") is explained by the =
difference of the
coefficient of expansion of glass versus resin. Since glass has another
coefficient compared to resin formulations, glass contracts on low =
temperature
and expands on warming up in another fashion like the resin used and =
vice
verse.

Hope this helps anyway and doesn't come too late
If any questions, please contact me by e-mail.

Best regards
Dr. Wolfgang MUSS
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")




----------
Von: James Shannon Mulroy[SMTP:jmulroy-at-emory.edu]
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 14. J=E4nner 1998 14:39
An: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: Q: Separating Epon resin from glass TEM/Spec. prep. embdding: =
pop-off techn.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

Dear Microscopists,
Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for =
you.
How do you separate Epon resin from glass? =20
Thank you,
James Mulroy




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From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:26:12 -0600
Subject: Intensive SEM Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

For those who are DEEPLY involved in SEM there is a course which will
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From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-WPO.NERC.AC.UK
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 15:55:05 +0000
Subject: help labelling carbonic anhydrase

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Microsopy world

I would apreciate comments on fluorescently labelling carbonic
anhydrase and I am not an immuno person (yet!).

Keith Ryan
Plymouth Marine Lab., UK




From: Margaret Springett :      hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 09:57:00 -0600
Subject: separating resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If you have access to dry ice set the coverslip or slide on the dry ice for
2-3 minutes, the resin block will pop off with no damage to specimen. If
you avoid excess resin on the glass, this method will work with several
resins. If the glass has been warmed on a hot plate before exposure to dry
ice, this procedure is extremely effective.

Margaret Springett
e-mail hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
IEM Specialist at Mayo Foundation
1426 Guggenheim
Rochester, Mn. 55905






From: Birgit Neubohn :      neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 17:15:52 +0100
Subject: Zeiss EM902

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Hello,

we have a Zeiss EM902A. When using Ni-grids I observe that they stick to
the specimenholder. Cu-grids do not. Both are formvar-coated.
Has someboby regarded the same phenomenon?
Does this mean that the specimenholder is magnetic?
Or do you have any other ideas.

Thanks in advance

Birgit


Dr. Birgit Neubohn
Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK)
Corrensstr. 3
D-06466 Gatersleben-Deutschland

Tel.: (+49) 039482 5447
Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de







From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 10:43:38 -0600
Subject: LM/ dealer of Aus Jena parts??

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Greetings,
Anyone out there know of a dealer who handles Aus Jena stock? As
you may know, Aus Jena what was the East German branch of Zeiss was called
after the second world war and until the recent reunification of the
companies (a few years after the country). I have a stand made by Jena that
I'd like a part for, but Zeiss is no longer selling them.
Thanks in advance for any leads,
Tobias Baskin

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University ofMissouri
/ | / / \ \ \ BiologicalSciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211-7400 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123






From: Ray Bowman :      RayBowman-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 12:24:46 EST
Subject: Observing Swelled Gel Particles

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Help! My company needs to visually assay highly-swelled particles of cross-
linked carboxymethylcellulose in various mixes of water and ethylene glycol
(up to 80% EG). The swelled particles are large enough to be easily seen with
10 to 100 power magnification - except that they are essentially invisible due
to having virtually the same index of refraction as the liquid. I know this
is not an unusual problem, but I do not know how to make the particles visible
(except by draining off enough liquid that the particles emerge, which is
something we can not routinely do). I assume (hope) that there is some stain
that will make these particles visible. If not, perhaps there is some
polarizing technique that would make them visible. Any suggestions would be
appreciated.

Ray Bowman




From: PAMELA.F.LLOYD-at-monsanto.com
Date: 15 Jan 1998 11:05:47 -0600
Subject: MSA Traveling Poster Exhibit

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From: PAMELA.F.LLOYD-at-monsanto.com
Date: 15 Jan 1998 11:05:47 -0600
Subject: MSA Traveling Poster Exhibit

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

The 1997 MSA Traveling Exhibit is sponsored by the Education Committee
of The Microscopy Society of America. It consists of the top ten
posters (five Biological Science and five Physical Science) chosen by
a committee of judges at the annual meeting of Microscopy &
Microanalysis '97 in Cleveland Ohio. This is an excellent opportunity
for our Local Affiliate Societies to receive this exhibit and display
it at their local meeting for members to see some "state of the art
research" that our colleagues are conducting in facilities throughout
the world. The only cost to a local society is to ship the exhibit on
to the next destination. I am accepting requests and will try to
accomodate as many as possible, while allowing time for shipping.
Please contact me as soon as you have a meeting date with your request
so that I can place your event on the calendar. This years posters are
listed on the MSA web page.

I can be reached via telephone, fax, e-mail or postal mail at the
following new address:

Pamela F. Lloyd
Research Associate
Monsanto Co.
800 N. Lindbergh Blvd.
U1E
St. Louis, MO 63167
Phone: (314)694-6527
Fax: (314)694-8065
e-mail: Pamela.F.Lloyd-at-Monsanto.com




From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 10:54:52 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Separating Epon resin from glass

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James-
it kinda depends on the resin & the glass,
but if it's epon and a slide, like re-embedding, we use a low heat flame
(alcohol burner), hold the slide (with pliers) over the flame 5-10 sec.
then use another pair of pliers to snap the capsule off from the glass
slide.
if you situation is something other than this, you may find some solvents
to remove resin from glass.
-MR

On Wed, 14 Jan 1998, James Shannon Mulroy wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopists,
} Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
} How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
} Thank you,
} James Mulroy
}
}
}





From: lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu (Lucille A. Giannuzzi)
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 14:25:55 -0500
Subject: Orlando, FL, meeting in February!!

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26th Annual Symposium of the Florida Chapter of the American Vacuum Society
and
16th Annual Meeting of the Florida Society for Microscopy

February 23 - 26, 1998
at
University of Central Florida
Student Union Building
Orlando, Florida

Co-Sponsored by

FL AVS, FSM, UCF, Cirent Semiconductor


Technical Sessions
(No Registration Fee-Please Pre-register)

The technical program will be held on Monday and Tuesday February 23 and
24. There will be 6 oral sessions and a joint poster session. A keynote
address will start the conference on Monday morning. The rest of the
morning session will be on Vacuum Technology in parallel with the FSM
Biological Division session. The afternoon will have the AVS session on
Thin Films followed by a joint poster session. The Tuesday morning program
will be a joint session with the FSM Physical Division and the AVS session
on Surface Science and Analysis. The technical program will concludes in
the afternoon with the AVS session on Electronic Materials.

For further information contact the session chairpersons:

Vacuum Science: Art Fuente, 813-962-2812, fuentea-at-aol.com
FSM-Biological: Jo Ann Moore, 813-974-9446,
jamoore-at-coml.med.usf.edu
Thin Films: Maggie Puga-Lambers, 352-392-7973,
mpugal-at-grove.ufl.edu
Surface Science: Rich Irwin, 407-345-7625, irwin-at-lucent.com
FSM-Physical: Lucille Giannuzzi, 407-823-5770,
lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu
Electronic Materials: Drew Hoff, 813-974-4958, hoff-at-eng.usf.edu
Student Posters: Larry Plew, 407-345-6915, plew-at-lucent.com



AVS National Short Course Program

A short course program will be presented from Monday February 23 through
Thursday February 26, 1998. The program consists of 1 or 2 day courses
taught by leading experts in their fields. The courses Monday and Tuesday
will be at the UCF Student Union and the courses Wednesday and Thursday
will be at the UCF Holiday Inn. Here is a list of when the courses will be
offered along with the instructors:

An Overview of Applied Vacuum Technology, Woody Weed, Monday and Tuesday
Sputter Deposition, William Westwood, Monday and Tuesday
CVD for Microelectronics, J. William Rogers, Monday
Operation and Maintenance of Vacuum Pumping Systems, Paul Holloway,
Wednesday and Thursday
Plasma Etching and RIE, John Coburn, Wednesday and Thursday
Thin Film Vapor Deposition and Patterning Techniques, Robert Waits,
Wednesday and Thursday
Vacuum Leak Detection, Rudold (Rudy) Schubert, Thursday
Introduction to Contamination Control in Semiconductor Manufacturing
Equipment, Gordon Johnson, Tuesday
Optical Diagnostic Techniques for Plasma Processing, Gary Selwyn, Monday
Surface Preparation for Thin Film Deposition, Gary McGuire, Tuesday
An Introduction to Surface Analysis Techniques, John Grant, Wednesday

For further information or to register for short courses, contact Margaret
Stringer of the American Vacuum Society at 212-248-0326, 212-248-0245
(FAX), or margaret-at-vacuum.org. Course descriptions, additional
information, and electronic registration will be available through the AVS
home page, http://www.vacuum.org.





Hotel Reservations

A block of rooms have been reserved at the Holiday Inn UCF, 12125 High Tech
Ave., Orlando, FL 32817, 407-275-9000. Please contact the hotel directly
to reserve your room prior to the CUTOFF DATE of January 30, 1998. Ask for
the special rates for the Florida Chapter of the American Vacuum Society.
The room rate is $79 per night plus tax. This rate is available for
extended stays from Saturday February 21 through Friday February 27, 1998.

Invited Speakers

Keynote (Monday Morning): Dr. John Hitt, President, University of Central
Florida


Monday Morning

Vacuum Technology:
Dr. H.F. Dylla, Jefferson Lab
Dr. R.E. Ellefson, Leybold-Inficon

FSM-Biological: Dr. Ralph Albrecht, U. of Wisconsin
Dr. Clinton Dawes, U. of South Florida
Dr. Dale Johnson, U. of South Florida
Dr. Johannes Rhodin, U. of South Florida

Monday Afternoon

Thin Films: Dr. Patricia Athey, PPG Industries
Dr. James Harper, IBM
Dr. Gary McGuire, MCNC
Dr. Steve Pearton, University of Florida

Tuesday Morning

Surface Science & FSM-Physical:
Dr. Ronald Anderson, IBM
Dr. Terry Barr, U. of Wisconsin
Dr. Vimal Desai, U. of Central Florida
Dr. Robert Hull, University of Virginia
Dr. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Labs
Dr. Robert Wallace, Texas Instruments
Dr. Anthony Warwick, U. of California

Tuesday Afternoon
Electronic Materials:
Dr. Carlye Case, Lucent Technologies
Dr. Joe Greene, University of Illinois
Dr. Gerald Lucovsky, NC State University
Dr. Bill Rogers, University of Washington


Equipment Exhibit
(No Admission Fee)

On Monday and Tuesday, there will be over 40 equipment vendors displaying
and describing their latest product lines. The current list of vendors who
have reserved booths is:


Amray
A&N
CAMECA
CTI Cryogenics
Denton Vacuum
Digital Instruments
Ebara
EMS
Emitech
FEI

FIL-Tech
GATAN
Hitachi Scientific Instr.
ICMAS, Inc.
JEOL
J&L Optical
Kratos Analytical
Kurt J. Lesker
Leybold Inficon
Lighthouse Marketing

Micro Optics
Milliken & Co.
MKS Instruments
Oxford Instruments
Pascal Technologies
Physical Electronics
Sales Advantage Group
Schoonover
Sealey (Alcatel)
SPECS USA

Spectra International
Surface Interface
Televac
The Sales Advantage Group
TOSOH SMD
UC Components
UCF
Varian
VAT
VWR


Demonstrations of the Hitachi Variable Pressure SEM will be held February
23-25, from 8 am to 5 pm. Contact Dr. Lucille Giannuzzi for details.

Meeting Participant Registration Form



Name:

Company:

Address:





Phone:

Fax:

E-mail:

Days Attending: Monday ( ) Tuesday ( )
Symposium Registration - FREE
Monday Night Banquet ($20.): Yes ( ) No ( )



There is no charge for the symposium, equipment exhibit, or lunch (Monday
and Tuesday). However, pre-registration is required for getting meal
counts, making ID badges, and information packets. The symposium banquet
will be held Monday evening at UCF; tickets covering the cost of the meal
($20.00) will be sold at the registration desk. Send the completed form to
Rich Irwin, Cirent Semiconductor, 9333 S. John Young Parkway, Orlando, FL
32819, 407-345-6999 (FAX), or irwin-at-lucent.com.






From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 21:45:19 +0100
Subject: Re: LM/ dealer of Aus Jena parts??

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Tobias,

Word 'Aus' is German word and mean 'From'. In the Jena is now
headquarters of company Carl Zeiss.

Henrik Kaker
SEM-EDS Laboratory
Slovenia


Tobias Baskin wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Greetings,
} Anyone out there know of a dealer who handles Aus Jena stock? As
} you may know, Aus Jena what was the East German branch of Zeiss was called
} after the second world war and until the recent reunification of the
} companies (a few years after the country). I have a stand made by Jena that
} I'd like a part for, but Zeiss is no longer selling them.
} Thanks in advance for any leads,

--
Henrik Kaker
SEM-EDS Laboratory
Metal Ravne d.o.o.
Koroska c. 14
2390 Ravne
Slovenia
Tel: +386-602-21-131
Fax: +386-602-20-436
SEM-EDS Lab
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/index.html
MVD Database
http://www.kaker.com/mvd/vendors.html
Kaker.Com
http://www.kaker.com




From: Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) :      ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 98 14:25:46 EST
Subject: SEM Course Inquiry (Semiconductors)

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I'm posting this as a favor to the individual named below.
She asked me for info on possible SEM courses and I was not able
to help. Excerpts from her notes are below. She has already contacted
Lehigh regarding their courses.

Marisa Ahmed wrote:

I work in the lab of an engineering company in Kanata, ON and want
information/training on sample preparation and delayering
of IC's (for SEM mostly) for failure analysis-type work.
If, as Prof Lyman suggested, you could help me locate such a possible
course or resource I would appreciate it.

-------------
And then a day later after I told her my course was TEM prep...
-------------

You are correct, I am not specifically looking for a course for TEM
prep (especially since we don't have a TEM here), although I would be
interested in knowing what was included in your course and where it is
being taught for future reference. I am actually hunting for something
to brush up my SEM sample prep (for topo views and delayering of IC's
mostly, not so much cross-sectioning). I also want to learn
something about the replica-stripping technique that I believe is used
for STEM and some SEMwork for radioactive samples.

If you could post my query I would much appreciate it. Respondants can
reach me at mahmad-at-semiconductor.com

Thank-you again,

Marisa

((Sounds interesting. Please also copy me on responses. Ron A.))




From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 98 15:03:45 -0500
Subject: Gold standards

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Isabel Nogueira wrote:
=======================================
I need a gold standard to calibrate an EDS analytical system attatched to a
TEM.

I've contacted several suppliers but none of them have anything with gold
(pure or in a compound).

Does anyone know where or how I can get a thin film standard of pure gold or
of a compound including gold ?
========================================
SPI Supplies has up on our website (for address, see below) a number of
different gold "standards" and "aids" for calibration purposes, including
Prickley Gold on Copper and our Combined Test Specimen of small gold islands
on a carbon film. If the data is taken near a grid bar you will be seeing
data from both gold and copper. Micrographs accompany each product listing
so you can see exactly what you are getting. We also offer thin microtomed
sections of foils spanning the atomic number range for checking with other
elements (e.g. besides gold).


Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is a manufacturer and distributor of these
standards and calibration items as well as one-off custom made products for
others.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: James Shannon Mulroy
Date: Wednesday, January 14, 1998 10:39AM
Subject: Separating Epon resin from glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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James,
Although I can't comment on the use of liquid nitrogen to resolve your
present problem I can suggest a possible alternative. In our lab we
have been embedding various specimens in Araldite epoxy resin. Rather
than glass we deposit the epoxy resin onto another such featureless
surface, that being a material made by DuPont having the trade name
"TEDLAR", which I am told is a titanized mylar. Once the epoxy has
cured it is easily removed from this material. I didn't purchase this
material myself and the small roll of this film that we have been
using seems to have been around for a number of years. I don't know if
your basic mylar sheet would do the trick. Perhaps there is someone
out there who can provide further information. If not, try contacting DuPont.

Good luck
Paul
----------

Dear Microscopists,
Hi - I am new to this area but hopefully have a simple question for you.
How do you separate Epon resin from glass?
Thank you,
James Mulroy






From: John Arnott :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:06:16 -0500
Subject: Ladd Research

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Just one last update,

We are fully up and running and I believe we have responded to all the
people we know were trying to reach us. If you haven't heard from us and
thought you had left a message, please try again at the usual places.

Thanks,

JD Arnott
Ladd Research
13 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US)
TEL 1-802-878-6711
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail ladres-at-worldnet.att.net




From: Peter Steele :      STEELEP-at-allkids.org
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:41:35 -0500
Subject: Separating Epon resin from glass -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I find that by heating the glass, the epon block can be gently pried off. Heat
quickly on a warm to hot heat plate for 15 s to 3 m. If you pry too hard, you
risk breaking the glass, or pulling a bit of the block off. When warm, the
glass will usually pop off readily. It is best not to use the super-adhesive
glass slides often employed in immunohistochemistry, - if you have an
option.

And of course, the converse, i.e., liquid nitrogen, also works well but
infrequently there is a risk of cracking the block.

Peter O. Steele, Ph.D. PMIAC
Pathology,
All Children's Hospital
St. Petersburg, Fl.




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:56:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Zeiss EM902

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Birgit,
}
} we have a Zeiss EM902A. When using Ni-grids I observe that they stick to
} the specimenholder. Cu-grids do not. Both are formvar-coated.
} Has someboby regarded the same phenomenon?
} Does this mean that the specimenholder is magnetic?

That would be my guess. I have often seen "non-magnetic" stain-
less steel become magnetic after machining. You may be able to demagnet-
ise the holder, so you might try putting a Ni grid in to see it stick,
then de-gauss and see if it comes free.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 17:03:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Observing Swelled Gel Particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Ray,
}
} Help! My company needs to visually assay highly-swelled particles of cross-
} linked carboxymethylcellulose in various mixes of water and ethylene glycol
} (up to 80% EG). The swelled particles are large enough to be easily seen with
} 10 to 100 power magnification - except that they are essentially invisible due
} to having virtually the same index of refraction as the liquid. I know this
} is not an unusual problem, but I do not know how to make the particles visible
} (except by draining off enough liquid that the particles emerge, which is
} something we can not routinely do). I assume (hope) that there is some stain
} that will make these particles visible. If not, perhaps there is some
} polarizing technique that would make them visible. Any suggestions would be
} appreciated.
}
If you "stain" the water, i.e., disolve something colored which will
not enter the CMC particles, like blue dextran, will that allow them to be
observed? Enough solute to make a large change in the refractive index of
the water could also work; again, you may have to arrange things so that the
solute does not enter the CMC. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Annette M. Andrews :      aandrews-at-NCTR.FDA.GOV
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:18:30 CST
Subject: Film Scanner Recommendations

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Hello Fellow Microscopists,

I would like to know your recommendations for a TEM and SEM Film
Scanner. The film sizes are 3 1/4 x4" and 4x5" black and white. Any
suggestions would be most appreciated. The output will be to a
personal computer.

Thank you.


Annette Andrews, EM Lab.
PAI -NCTR
3900 NCTR Road
Jefferson, AR 72079




From: Annette M. Andrews :      aandrews-at-NCTR.FDA.GOV
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:24:22 CST
Subject: Film Scanner Recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,

I just posted a request for information/recommendations for film
scanners but neglected to post my e-mail address, it is listed below.

Thanks.

Annette Andrews, EM Lab.
PAI - NCTR
3900 NCTR Road
Jefferson, AR 72079
e-mail: aandrews-at-nctr.fda.gov
Phone: 870-543-7039




From: Marti, Jordi :      Jordi.Marti-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 15:14:00 -0700
Subject: Carbon black

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello!

I'm looking for a reference ( or an explanation) as to why graphite
sheets, in partially graphitised carbon black ( or turbostratic carbon,)
have a tendency to curve. Is there a fundamental reason for this ?
Is a closed loop structure (energetically) more favorable than a flat
sheet configuration with open ends ? I would appreciate any references
or comments dealing with this.

Thank you,

Jordi Marti




From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 00:14:21 +-100
Subject: AW: Zeiss EM902

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------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2213.B2CF6060
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Salzburg, 16th Jan, 1998, local time 00.15 p.m.

Dear Dr. Neubohn,
isn't it a great pleasure to have sticky grids *on the specimen holders* =
of the EM? You won't loose any grid in the EM itself when viewing.
Also you have to grip for them individually for removal from the holder =
with tweezers.

Why a pleasure ?(IMO=3D in my opinion): due to static load (of my own, =
lab-room, etc.) I saw a lot of grids (even Cu-grids) flying around when =
trying to get them into the holder, in and out of the gridbox.=20

More of a "sticking" problem for me were the tweezers I used:
Nickel-grids are somewhat curious: if you use "isolated tweezers" =
(isolated handles, say for electronic purposes) you will see static =
loading and therefore sticking of grids to the tip of tweezers. You =
won't be able to detach them readily to the holders grid receptaculum. =
Sometimes this also happens if you use "normal" (i.e. made from ordinary =
steel) tweezers (mine were originally supplied from ZEISS 17 years ago). =
Maybe you will transfer static loading via the tweezer tips to your grid =
box, made of plastic: have you seen grids, jumping out of the grid =
hole??
To overcome that problem I bought (due to a friends suggestion) curved =
tweezers made from "titan". You can purchase such tweezers (especially =
if you have to work predominantly with Nickel-grids) (e.g. tweezers, =
"Curved tips, Biological, Ti") from the major EM-suppliers (in Germany: =
see for instance: PLANO-PLANNET, MARBURG FRG; BALTEC maybe....)
If you need addresses of supplier(s), please require by e-mail.

Best regards
good luck und "gute Nacht"

Dr. Wolfgang MUSS=20
("driving license" for a ZEISS (T)EM 109 with "top entry")=20
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")



DISCLAIMER

Disclaimer:
The views expressed in this E-mail message do not necessarily represent =
the official views of the Dept. Pathology LKA, from which this message =
was conveyed.
No commercial interest in products/product lines, company/-ies, if such =
names are mentioned or such are refered to.



----------
Von: Birgit Neubohn[SMTP:neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de]
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 15. Janner 1998 17:15
An: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: Q: Zeiss EM902

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

Hello,

we have a Zeiss EM902A. When using Ni-grids I observe that they stick to
the specimenholder. Cu-grids do not. Both are formvar-coated.
Has someboby regarded the same phenomenon?
Does this mean that the specimenholder is magnetic?
Or do you have any other ideas.

Thanks in advance

Birgit


Dr. Birgit Neubohn
Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK)
Corrensstr. 3
D-06466 Gatersleben-Deutschland

Tel.: (+49) 039482 5447
Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de





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From: Osman Gurdal :      o-gurdal-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 21:19:25 -0600
Subject: Re: Film Scanner Recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

{html}
Hi Annette: {br}
{br}
I use here in the lab "Leafscan 45" which is relatively
good.  It works {br}
with Adobe Photoshop. {br}
{br}
Regards, {br}
{br}
-Osman Gurdal {br}
{br}
-- {br}
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign {br}
1101 W. Springfield Ave., ESB #1-133 {br}
Urbana, IL 61801 U.S.A. {br}
Tel: (217) 333-7080 (o) {br}
Tel: (217) 355-2933 (h) {br}
Fax: (217) 244-1631 {br}
E-mail: o-gurdal-at-uiuc.edu {br}
URL :
{a href=3D"http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~o-gurdal" eudora=3D"autourl"} {font=
color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} http://www.students.uiuc.edu/~o-gurdal {br}
{br}
{/a} {/font} {/u} {font color=3D"#000000"} > {br}
>Hello Fellow Microscopists, {br}
> {br}
>I would like to know your recommendations for a TEM and SEM Film
{br}
>Scanner.=A0 The film sizes are 3 1/4 x4" and 4x5" black and
white.=A0 Any {br}
>suggestions would be most appreciated.=A0 The output will be to a=20
{br}
>personal computer. {br}
> {br}
>Thank you. {br}
> {br}
> {br}
>Annette Andrews, EM Lab. {br}
>PAI -NCTR {br}
>3900 NCTR=A0 Road {br}
>Jefferson, AR 72079 {br}
> {/font}
{BR}
{/html}




From: Zhengyu Wang :      zywang-at-leland.stanford.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 19:24:20 -0800 (PST)
Subject: About graphite samples for AFM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi, all.
As you know, graphite is a good sample for AFM and STM while testing
their resolution.
Recently we want to buy some of graphite samples. But after I contacted
with a few graphite companies, none of them would like to sell me a little
amount of single crystal graphite sample. (or, they dont have single
crystal graphite at all).

Does anyone know where can I buy a little amount of this stuff?
Thanks so much and my best regards!


Zhengyu










. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Zhengyu Wang

zywang-at-stanford.edu

Address: Telephone No.:
Escondido Village 33B, (H) (650) 497-2060
Stanford, CA 94305 (O) (650) 723-3209

Limits exist only in your mind.

:-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)





From: Albert Romano-Rodriguez :      romano-at-iris1.fae.ub.es
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 08:17:37 +0000
Subject: Re: Film Scanner Recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Annette,

We are using Polaroid SprintScan 45 with very good results. The
only drawback in our case, although I read in this list that some
people solved this with Polaroid, is that the negative holders
supplied with the equipment are not exactly the size of our
negatives. We us a larger holder that helds the negatives only
between 2 sides of the holder and the negatives almost do not bend.
We decided to buy this scanner because, after testing some high
resolution TEM negatives with some scanners, we came to the
conclusion that the minimum resolution we required was above 1.200
dpi.
We too use Adobe Photoshop to control the scanner and to
process the pictures.
I hope this helps.






From: Marcel Paques :      Marcel.Paques-at-unilever.com
Date: 1/15/98 9:34 PM
Subject: Gold standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
cgarber-at-2spi.com (IPM Return requested)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear Isabel,

Just make your own standard.
Adsorb colloidal gold particles to a poly-l-lysine coated formvar
stabilised carbon support film on a TEM grid. Depending on what you
want you can select Cu or an other material (carbon, nylon....) for
the grid.
Colloidal gold is available in ranges of sizes. Your calibration
purpose needs large particles, which are up to about 40 nm
commercially available (Aurion, Sigma, Amersham, Nanoprobe....).

Success,

Marcel Paques
Unilever Research


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Isabel Nogueira wrote:
=======================================
I need a gold standard to calibrate an EDS analytical system attatched to a
TEM.

I've contacted several suppliers but none of them have anything with gold
(pure or in a compound).

Does anyone know where or how I can get a thin film standard of pure gold or
of a compound including gold ?
========================================
SPI Supplies has up on our website (for address, see below) a number of
different gold "standards" and "aids" for calibration purposes, including
Prickley Gold on Copper and our Combined Test Specimen of small gold islands
on a carbon film. If the data is taken near a grid bar you will be seeing
data from both gold and copper. Micrographs accompany each product listing
so you can see exactly what you are getting. We also offer thin microtomed
sections of foils spanning the atomic number range for checking with other
elements (e.g. besides gold).


Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is a manufacturer and distributor of these
standards and calibration items as well as one-off custom made products for
others.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: Tom Ivar Eilertsen :      tomivar-at-fagmed.uit.no
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 10:40:45 -0200
Subject: Gold standards

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unsubscribe





From: Michel Deschuyteneer :      deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 98 09:46:52 +0100
Subject: Re: Observing Swelled Gel Particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ray,

The solution to your problem is DIC (differential interference contrast).

Regards,
Michel

****************************************************
Michel Deschuyteneer, Ph.D. deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Scientist Electron Microscopy Laboratory

SmithKline Beecham Biologicals
Rue de l'Institut, 89 B1330 Rixensart, BELGIUM
Tel: +32-2-656 9290 Fax: +32-2-656 8164
****************************************************
Standard disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this
communication are my own and do not necessarily
reflect those of SmithKline Beecham.
****************************************************





From: Luc Harmsen :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 13:31:04 +0200
Subject: Service Engineer Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anaspec South Africa, has an opening for an E.M. service engineer.

The position requires a person with tertiary electronics training or / =
and E.M. experience on a technical basis.
The job involves the maintenance and support of our customers E.M. =
systems.
This maintenance covers electronic, mechanical and P.C. repairs.
We maintain a number of systems from various manufactures, Hitachi, Leo, =
Topcon, Jeol, Philips EDAX, Oxford etc.

The support of our customers involves technical advice on E.M. matters =
including operation, maintenance and special operating techniques.
We also regularly present courses our offer in-house training.

Our customer base covers Southern Africa and a number of countries =
internationally. Thus travel locally and internationally is part of the =
job description. The applicant must therefor have a valid passport, a =
reliable motor vehicle and be willing to travel when the need arises.

The remuneration package will depend on the experience of the applicant. =
We offer commission on work done, Medical aid, life policies and car =
insurance.

Please contact us on the numbers below if you are interested.

Luc Harmsen
Anaspec, South Africa
Technical support for E.M. operators, world wide.
Anaspec-at-icon.co.za
TEL: ++ 27 (0) 11 476 3455
FAX: ++ 27 (0) 11 476 7290=20






From: samuelsson.sj-at-pg.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 8:53:00 -0500
Subject: Film/Print Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am interested in acquiring a high resolution scanner. Is there one (e.g. Agfa
DuoScan) that will scan both positive and negative originals AND provide crisp,
high resolution scans? The DuoScan specs state that it will interface with UNIX
workstations as well as PC and Mac.

Thanks for any and all feedback, Steve.

Steve Samuelsson, Ph.D.
Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
PO Box 8006
Mason, OH. 45040-8006
(513) 622-1753 office
(513) 622-1752 lab
(513) 622-1196 fax
samuelsson.sj-at-pg.com




From: Mike Coviello :      Coviello-at-mae.uta.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 08:34:05 -0600
Subject: Re: Film scanner recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Folks:
I am also interested in negative scanners. If possible, could the
respondees to Annette's question include approximate prices (in US$) and
system requirements, and their experience with output quality from inkjet
printers, such as the Epson stylus. Also, if you could give your opinion
of the system for materials science applications, it sure would be
appreciated.

Thank You in Advance,

Michael Coviello
UT Arlington Materials Science Program
Arlington, TX
USA






From: Mark Farmer :      farmer-at-emlab.cb.uga.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 10:19:09 +0000
Subject: Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have been VERY pleased with the results from my UMAX 2000 scanner
that does everything from prints to 35mm negatives. I have seen it
recently advertised for as low as $2650. It has true 1000 X 2000 DPI
resolution and will run from PC or Mac.

I have no financial interest in UMAX.

Mark A. Farmer
Director, Ctr. Ultrastructural Research
University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
(706)542-4080 Voice (706)542-4271 FAX
farmer-at-emlab.cb.uga.edu

(This message is made of 100% recycled electrons)




From: Brandon Poe :      bpoe-at-bgsm.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 10:59:07 -0800
Subject: Thin Sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--
Constance Linville
Dept. Neurobiol. & Anat.
Wake Forest University
School of Medicine
Winston-Salem, NC 27157
email: clinvill-at-bgsm.edu

I am presetly involved in a study where I need to pick up serial pairs
and they must stay connected! Sometimes they do great, sometimes they
don't. I am very careful to have neat, smooth, and parallel block edges.
I have also tried adjusting the water level. I need to find a technique
that will increase the chances that when I cut, and pick up, the
sections will stay together. I am collecting on formvar coated slot
grids.




From: Sutherland-ENV, Lara :      Lara.Sutherland-at-state.ma.us
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 98 11:08:49 EST
Subject: LM less toxic stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Microscopists. This may interest histologists or others involved in
biological samples. I want to ask for your input. The Massachusetts
Office of Technical Assistance for Toxics Use Reduction is sponsoring a
conference on Pollution Prevention Strategies for the Health Care
Industry. We are issuing a call for papers (below). Some papers will be
accepted for presentation and others for publication in a booklet to be
distributed at the conference. We are looking for people who are using
methods to reduce the use of formaldehyde, re-distilling their solvents,
using dyes with fewer heavy metals or less toxicity, and other practices
which reduce the toxicity of waste products or reduce the production of
waste in general. Feel free to call or email me with questions, or if
you have ideas for presentation or know of people from whom we might wish
to solicit papers. Lara Sutherland, 617-727-3260. Email:
Lara.Sutherland-at-state.ma.us.


CALL FOR PAPERS
POLLUTION PREVENTION STRATEGIES
FOR THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY

The Massachusetts Office of Technical Assistance for Toxics Use
Reduction, inconjunction with the Massachusetts Water Resources
Authority, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the
Medical, Academic and Scientific Community Organization, and the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, will be hosting a conference on
pollution prevention strategies for medical and dental facilities
October 7, 1998, in Tyngsborough, MA. A booklet of short papers will be
published, and a number of longer papers will be presented. Papers
should be of a technical nature, focusing on true pollution prevention
opportunities available to the health care industry. Conference focus
will be the reduction of mercury, dioxin-forming incinerables,
formaldehyde, solvents, and other materials of concern. Also covered
will be recycling, reforms in purchasing and inventory,
institutionalizing or improving environmental management systems, and
overcoming barriers to organizational change. Vendor presentations of a
strictly technical nature will be considered for conference booklet
inclusion or session presentation. Abstracts (maximum length two pages) are
due April 1, 1998, to Rick Reibstein, Office of Technical Assistance,
Rm 2109, 100 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02202. Inquiries may be directed to
Mr. Reibstein, Lara Sutherland, or Scott Fortier, at 617-727-3260 x 688,
696 and 695 respectively. Vendors of products and/or services relating
to pollution prevention in these facilities are invited to submit offers
by June 1, 1998 to exhibit at a trade show associated with the
conference. Offers should include sufficient information to characterize the
technical and preventative nature of the product or service and should be
directed to Joseph Paluzzi at the Office of Technical Assistance (address
above, x693). This information is also
available at OTA's website www.magnet.state.ma.us/ota/.




From: fhayes-at-dow.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 10:17:16 -0600
Subject: camera/microtome attachments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Is anyone out there recording images through the oculars on the
microtome? If so, I would be interested in knowing your setup. I would
like to record surface and polished defects after microtoming, through
the oculars, without having to remove the sample thereby maintaining
alignment/orientation. Can anyone recommend a digital camera which
could fit onto the ocular?

Fred Hayes
The Dow Chemical Co
Analytical Sciences
Midland, MI
517-839-4373






From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 98 11:17:00 PST
Subject: flatbed scanners-Are negative carriers in focus

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I have a question about flatbed scanners that maybe some of our high
resolution friends might be able to answer if they have scanned Hi res
images on a flatbed.

If you put a negative directly on the glass of a flatbed with a transparency
adapter, you can get interference patterns in the scanned images. If you
put them in a negative carrier to get them off of the glass you eliminate
them. The thickness of my carrier is about 1 mm. The question that I have
is does raising the negative off of the glass affect the focus of the
scanned image? Is it blurred? Is there a depth of field associated with he
optics of the scanner?

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)







From: John Shane :      jshane-at-mcri.org
Date: 16 Jan 98 09:54:41 +0000
Subject: LM/ dealer of Aus Jena parts??

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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable



From: John Shane :      jshane-at-mcri.org
Date: 16 Jan 98 09:54:41 +0000
Subject: LM/ dealer of Aus Jena parts??

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Tobias Baskin wrote:

"Greetings,
=09 Anyone out there know of a dealer who handles Aus Jena stock? As
you may know, Aus Jena what was the East German branch of Zeiss was calle=
d
after the second world war and until the recent reunification of the
companies (a few years after the country). I have a stand made by Jena th=
at
I'd like a part for, but Zeiss is no longer selling them.
=09Thanks in advance for any leads,"
=09=09=09=09=09Tobias Baskin
+++++++++++++++++++++++++

Tobias,

I know of a person who handled quite a bit of Jena scopes. His name is Ar=
t Waldeck, Micro-Tech Instraments, 8031 North Academy Blvd., Colorado Spr=
ings, CO 80902. His phone number is 719-495-8011 (v) and fax is 719-495-8=
008.

I think Art would be a very good place to start.

Also, the Seiler Instrument Co. in St. Louis, MO handled most? of the dis=
tributorships in the country. They can be contacted at 314-968-2282.

I hope this helps.

John Shane
McCrone Research Institute
Chicago, IL




From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 08:59:04 -0800
Subject: Re: flatbed scanners-Are negative carriers in focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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by darkwing.uoregon.edu (8.8.8/8.8.8) with ESMTP id IAA05661;
Fri, 16 Jan 1998 08:59:05 -0800 (PST)
Message-ID: {34BF91D7.60ABAB0-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu}

Walck. Scott D. wrote:

} ...
} I have a question about flatbed scanners that maybe some of our high
} resolution friends might be able to answer if they have scanned Hi res
} images on a flatbed.
}
} If you put a negative directly on the glass of a flatbed with a transparency
} adapter, you can get interference patterns in the scanned images. If you
} put them in a negative carrier to get them off of the glass you eliminate
} them. The thickness of my carrier is about 1 mm. The question that I have
} is does raising the negative off of the glass affect the focus of the
} scanned image? Is it blurred? Is there a depth of field associated with he
} optics of the scanner?
}
} ...

You ^should^ see moire patterns ... afterall, you are superimposing one
orthogonal scan on another. I suspect your 1mm thick carrier is affecting focus
and reducing the effect ... though its is an interesting remedy for the
problem. If your resulting images are not as sharp as you'd like, you might try
scanning your negatives at (eg) a 15degree angle, and then rotating them back to
horizontal with your favorite image editor ... though this may also introduce an
"un-sharpening" effect.

... hope this helps :o)
cheerios, shAf
--
{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility at the University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu or mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu






From: Brad Storey :      bstorey-at-awmailhost.anlw.anl.gov
Date: 16 Jan 98 11:10:15 -0700
Subject: Scanners

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

The Leafscan 45. Is in beta format and is about to be sold by Bremson
Data Systems for about $28,000. You can reach them at 913-492-8900. I
have no connection to them in any way; I am just ineterested in their
system also. I believe they have upgraded the scanner quite a bit in
terms of speed and color capability from the old Leafscan system.

Brad Storey
Materials Scientist
Argonne National Lab - West
P.O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Ph. 208-533-7685 (office)
Ph. 208-533-7439 (lab)
Fax 208-533-7683
brad.storey-at-anl.gov





From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 13:13:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Thin Sectioning

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by welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (8.8.7/8.8.5) with SMTP id NAA03927;
Fri, 16 Jan 1998 13:13:17 -0500 (EST)

Brandon,
Try coating the top and bottom edges of the trimmed block with
grid glue (double stick tape dissolved in choroform), the right
concentration should make your serial sections stick.

Mike D.






From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 08:42:51 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Zeiss EM902

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} } we have a Zeiss EM902A. When using Ni-grids I observe that they stick to
} } the specimenholder. Cu-grids do not. Both are formvar-coated.
} } Has someboby regarded the same phenomenon?
} } Does this mean that the specimenholder is magnetic?
}
Birgit-

I believe you have the Zeiss top-loading specimen holder with the screw-on
cap, correct? Grids occasionally stick in the caps for several
(non-magnetic) reasons. Formvar grids, especially, may have a tiny sticky
tail that sticks in the cap. If you are seeing this only with the Ni
grids, my guess is that the grids themselves are slightly different than
your copper grids, perhaps ever so slightly larger, and that this, coupled
with the formvar, makes them stick. Also, when this begins to happen, try
carefully cleaning the tiny grooved seat in the cap under a microscope.
Tiny bits of formvar may be wedged in the cap, enhancing the stickiness.

Aloha,
Tina
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 14:47:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: STEM image capture: SemAfore

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Hello All,
A couple of weeks ago I asked for opinions on the JEOL 'SemAfore'
system they sell to take digital images off their SEM/STEMs. I received 14
replies:

2 were interested in the other replies;
1 saw the system at a demo, thought it was good but out of range of his
budget;
1 said it wasn't as good as some other systems,
1 was about to install; he said it looked like it was good on image capture
but pretty basic on image processing,
2 talked about digitising TEM images (I should have been clearer in my post -
I'm already setting up a negative scanner for TEM);
2 users recommended other systems, i.e. semicaps and ImageSlave; and
6 tried to sell me some other system. Only one quoted a price.

I was a bit surprised not to find _anybody_ who has a working system of
SemAfore. (Or perhaps it's not surprising, given the great diversity of
systems out there, unless JEOL is pushing hard for this they won't sell many.)
Or perhaps all the users are so pleased with their SemAfore system they spend
all their time on the microscope and don't look at their e-mail. However, I
think the main reason is that you get image capture automatically with a
modern EDS system, so unless you're really strapped for cash you don't need to
worry about it. That being the case, it seems to me that one should either go
for the cheapest image capture system available that will do the job or get a
decent EDX.

Looking forward to some more debate,

Richard Beanland
GMMT Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ





From: Jill Craig :      jcraig-at-unbc.ca
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 11:34:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: thanks -SEM, EDAX problems

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Thank you to all who answered!

The response was overwhelming! I'm trying to sort through the
responses and try the suggestions until the problem is
solved. Sorry I didn't reply personally to each one.

Thanks again,

Jill Craig




From: wise-at-vaxa.cis.uwosh.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 10:28:22 -0600 (CST)
Subject: fluorescence quenching?

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,

Does oxygen quench rhodamine fluorescence? I have read a few
papers that used an oxygen scavenging system in their fluorescence
experiments but I can't tell if that was to inhibit quenching or for some
other reason particular to that system.

Bob


Dr. Robert R. Wise, Director
UW-Oshkosh EM Facility
Department of Biology and Microbiology
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Oshkosh, WI 54901

(920) 424-3404 tel
(920) 424-1101 fax
wise-at-uwosh.edu
www.uwosh.edu/departments/biology/wise/wise.html






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 04:45:23 -0600
Subject: LM: detecting dead plant cells

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A colleague in Plant and Soil Science needs a method to detect dead plant
cells in soybean root tissues. The tissues would be sectioned and then
examined by light microscopy looking for numbers of dead versus live cells.
Any stains available for this?

His address is: yluo-at-siu.edu

Many thanks.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: Jerome Jasso :      jjasso-at-akron.infi.net
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 23:06:13 -0800
Subject: Fixative Alternatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Fellow Microscopists:

I am looking for an inexpensive alternative fixative for gross
anatomical specimen storage. Presently, these specimens are stored in
heat-sealed plastic bags containing 10% NBF. Some of these specimens
are periodically removed from bag storage for teaching purposes.

I would appreciate any useful comments sent to the listserver, or
telephoned / e-mailed to me directly.

Best regards,

Jerome Jasso
Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Ohio
(330) 379-8279




From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 19:59:03 +1100
Subject: Re: camera/microtome attachments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fred:
I have not done this particular "stunt", but I know about ultramicrotomy
and photomicrography and see no particular difficulty.
You will require/find an adaptor tube with a thread that is often used for
small movie cameras. They called C- mount and these are used with most
digital cameras and any digital camera with a removable lens should do the
job.
It is important to use a very low power ocular in the C-mount tube (one or
two times).
Why such a low power photo ocular and several other matters relevant to
digital microscopy are explained on our Pixera page in our online
catalogue.

ProSciTech is an agent for digital cameras.

Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au


} Is anyone out there recording images through the oculars on the
} microtome? If so, I would be interested in knowing your setup. I would
} like to record surface and polished defects after microtoming, through
} the oculars, without having to remove the sample thereby maintaining
} alignment/orientation. Can anyone recommend a digital camera which
} could fit onto the ocular?
}
} Fred Hayes
} The Dow Chemical Co
} Analytical Sciences
} Midland, MI
} 517-839-4373
}
}




From: Michael J. Lyon, Ph.D. :      lyonm-at-vax.cs.hscsyr.edu
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 09:49:17 -0600
Subject: Frame grabbers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I know that this has been discussed in the past. But since I wasn't in the
market at the time I didn't pay much attention. I would like to get some
opinions on the Scion Corp and Data Translation frame grabbers. NIH image
is setup for the Scion and Image Tool recommends the Data Translation
board. I have been in contact with Scion and they are recommending their
CG-7 board since it has oversampling capabilities its resolution may be
greater. The Data translation board is the DT3155. Any one have anything
to say about either system.

I would also like to get opinions on the Cohu 4910 series of monochrome
CCD. Both of the above companies suggest that camera.

My main usage would be monochrome densitometry but the sections are small
so I need good resolution without spending big bucks. A few thousand is
all that I can come up with at the present time. This equipment would be
on a Pentium PC. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks

Michael J. Lyon, Ph.D.
Associate Professor






From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 98 10:56:19 -0500
Subject: HOPG availability question

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Zhengyu Wang wrote:
================================================
As you know, graphite is a good sample for AFM and STM while testing
their resolution. Recently we want to buy some of graphite samples. But
after I contacted with a few graphite companies, none of them would like to
sell me a little amount of single crystal graphite sample. (or, they dont
have single crystal graphite at all).

Does anyone know where can I buy a little amount of this stuff? Thanks so
much and my best regards!
================================================
Actually what you really should be using is not what one might call
(ordinary) graphite but "highly ordered pyrolytic graphite" or HOPG. This
is a specialty item made in only a few manufacturing plants in the world.
It is not something that is made by the traditional "graphite suppliers".
It has very interesting and unique properties, one of the best known being
its ability to undergo a micaceous type of cleavage, with new layers being
exposed with a "Scotch tape stripping" process.

There seem to be subtle differences between the HOPG materials made from the
two main manufacturing sources. We are convinced these are not "quality"
differences, but material from the two different sources is indeed not
exactly the same. However, each of the two manufacturing sources offers
HOPG in several different grades as measured by what is called the "mosaic
spread". It is an over simplification to say this is just a measure of
disorientation, but to the first approximation, you could think of it in
that way.

This is all explained on the SPI website in some detail. HOPG from both of
the two major "sources" of HOPG is available, and for calibration purposes,
we strongly recommend the highest quality (a.k.a. most expensive) grade be
used, or putting it another way, the product grades with the very tightest
"mosaic spread". For general research purposes, we recommend the next most
highly ordered grade (some researchers prefer the more expensive grade even
for general research work) and for classroom demonstrations and routine
student use, the lowest priced quality should be considered. One important
note here: As the mosaic spread becomes comes tighter and therefore more
expensive, one also gets more "strippings" per "block". Therefore the price
differential is less than at first it might appear.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers HOPG to those doing SPM and thin film
coatings research seeking to try new and innovative substrate materials.

Chuck


===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: dbac-at-orbitworld.net () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 10:25:14 -0600
Subject: Help: Making glass slides permanent?

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Colleagues....

I do not know the answer to this question. Would a few of you
like to try and help a budding microscopist.

Nestor


Email: dbac-at-orbitworld.net
Name: David Bacque

Question: Dear Sirs:

I am new to this, both the internet and microscopy so if my questions are
inappropriate for this forum, please excuse me and discard.

My son Paul is 11 and received a good student microscopy for Christmas a
year ago. He is an avid science student and is currently making slides of
every feather he can find and is interested in his slides being more
permanent.
I have been trying to help him, but have not had much success. We started
with the gum spirit in the Edmund Sci. microscope slide kit, but it takes
forever to dry and seems to shrink as it dries causing terrible bubbles. I
finally got some Cytoseal 60 locally and have had much more success however
we still have problems with air bubbles creeping in from the edges days or
weeks later.
Are we using too much or not enough cytoseal? Do we need to seal the edges
with something else? Is heating suggested to fully cure? How long should
it take to dry? I thought this stuff was supposed to be fast, but it seems
like days or weeks later the interior of the slide is still liquid. (or is
it supposed to stay that way?) After drying should the specimen be soaked
in solvent and if so which one?

Any other tips for making simple slides would be appreciated. I've been
hunting the net and found lots of good information, but not the answers to
these.

Thank you in advance and Paul also thanks you.

David Bacque
Proud father and mentor of an avid young scientist


---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: DUNN TEM :      DUNNTEM-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 16:36:14 EST
Subject: Charge for EMail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I received the following EMail from someone and thought it might be of
interest to this List.

Ted Dunn
Maui, Hawaii


{Tell your friends, tell everyone who uses E-Mail.. This is to inform
you of a very important matter currently under review by the FCC.
Your local telephone company has filed a proposal with the FCC to
impose per minute charges for your internet service. They contend that
your usage has or will hinder the operation of the telephone
network.} E-Mail, in my opinion, will diminish if users were required
to pay } additional per minute charges. The FCC has created an email
box for your comments, responses must be received by February 13, 98.
Send you comments to ""isp-at-fcc.gov"" tell them what you think. Every
phone } company is in on this one, and they are trying to sneak it
in just under the wire for litigation. Let everyone you know hear
about this one. Get e-mail address to everyone you can think of.
FCC E Mail address -- isp-at-fcc.gov

Guys, this is really important. If we have to pay for e-mail , the
cost is going to skyrocket. It's about the only thing now that is
cost-effective. Please make your opinions known to the FCC.}
_____




From: David Campbell :      davidcamp-at-igc.apc.org
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 15:04:44 -0800
Subject: air pollution

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I am looking for images of air pollution (dust particles, etc). I am an
architecture student researching air contamination. I am not a
scientist so I don't know under what type of microscopy discipline this
would fall under.

Any leads or sources would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

David Campbell






From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 17:37:54 -0800
Subject: Re: Help: Making glass slides permanent?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Email: dbac-at-orbitworld.net
} Name: David Bacque
}
} My son Paul is 11 and received a good student microscopy for Christmas a
} year ago. He is an avid science student and is currently making slides of
} every feather he can find and is interested in his slides being more
} permanent.
} I have been trying to help him, but have not had much success. We started
} with the gum spirit in the Edmund Sci. microscope slide kit, but it takes
} forever to dry and seems to shrink as it dries causing terrible bubbles.

} Any other tips for making simple slides would be appreciated. I've been
} hunting the net and found lots of good information, but not the answers to
} these.

Paul -

Have you tried clear nail polish? Feathers are dry enough that it
might work. You might need to thin it a bit with polish remover. Be
careful when adding the corslip to lower it gently at an angle, rather than
just dropping it flat; that is a sure way to get air bubbles.
Please look at the Project MICRO bibliography (web address below).
You'll find a lot of neat books listed, that have many ideas for things to
do. Don't miss Devora Molitor's book, and the manual published by Usborne.
Don't bother to print the booklist out if your dad is a member of
MSA; members will be getting a copy in the mail later this month.
[Listserver readers please note - the MICRO bibliography has been revised
recently and is worth a return visit!]

Caroline


Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.MSA.microscopy.com/ProjectMICRO/Books.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/






From: Harrison :      littlebear-at-mindspring.com
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 18:43:44 -0700
Subject: Re: Charge for EMail

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Hi ,

This is a story that's been circulating for some time, but it's not
accurate.

Here's what the FCC says:


"Q: Is the FCC considering allowing local phone companies to impose
access charges on ISPs?


A: The FCC requested public comment in December 1996 on whether ISPs
should pay current access charges, and more generally on how Internet and
interstate information services that use local telephone networks should
be treated. The Commission concluded on May 7, 1997 that ISPs should not
be subject to interstate access charges. There is currently no open
comment period on this issue.




Q: Does the FCC currently have an ongoing proceeding on Internet and
interstate information services?


A: The FCC issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in December 1996, at the same
time as it asked for comment on whether ISPs should be subject to access
charges. The NOI asked generally about how to create incentives for
companies to make the most efficient use of the telephone network for
Internet and other information services. The comment period for the NOI
is closed, but the FCC has stated that it plans to issue a Notice of
Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) asking for comment on more specific proposals
based on the responses to the NOI. {bold} The NPRM will consider actions
other than imposition of per-minute access charges on ISPs {/bold} ."


Quoted from: Fact Sheet on The FCC, Internet Service Providers, and
Access Charges

See the complete text at:
http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Common_Carrier/Factsheets/ispfact.html


Dave Harrison

Site Manager

JEOL USA, INC



At 04:36 PM 1/17/98 EST, you wrote:

} I received the following EMail from someone and thought it might be of

} interest to this List.

}

} Ted Dunn

} Maui, Hawaii

}

}

} { {Tell your friends, tell everyone who uses E-Mail.. This is to inform

} you of a very important matter currently under review by the FCC.

} Your local telephone company has filed a proposal with the FCC to

} impose per minute charges for your internet service. They contend that

} your usage has or will hinder the operation of the telephone

} network.} E-Mail, in my opinion, will diminish if users were required

} to pay } additional per minute charges. The FCC has created an email

} box for your comments, responses must be received by February 13, 98.

} Send you comments to ""isp-at-fcc.gov"" tell them what you think. Every

} phone } company is in on this one, and they are trying to sneak it

} in just under the wire for litigation. Let everyone you know hear

} about this one. Get e-mail address to everyone you can think of.

} FCC E Mail address -- isp-at-fcc.gov

}

} Guys, this is really important. If we have to pay for e-mail , the

} cost is going to skyrocket. It's about the only thing now that is

} cost-effective. Please make your opinions known to the FCC.}

} _____

}




From: Steven Robertson :      phantom-at-owlnet.rice.edu
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 21:38:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Charge for EMail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} {Tell your friends, tell everyone who uses E-Mail.. This is to inform
} you of a very important matter currently under review by the FCC.
[snip]
} Please make your opinions known to the FCC.}

I received this same e-mail on another mailing list which I am a member
of, and it was revealed there that this is an urban myth. Here's the
relevant portion of the reply offered on that list...

---------------------------Start Reply Here-----------------------------------
As for this particular case, a quick check of the FCC web site reveals
nothing of the sort, with that address being the comment address for
something that is not all that related (in fact, it looks like the FCC is
considering dropping interstate rates for ISPs...).

A quick check of my memory reveals that this particular urban legend of a
data usage fee actually pre-dates the internet, and goes back to the days
of BBS systems on 300 baud modems.

A check through the web turns up a small blurb on it at

http://www.qnet.com/~lindellj/spam/other/#Modem Tax

Where the last time the FCC actually considered this was in 1987. Little
over a decade off. :-)

David Zeiger dzeiger-at-the-institute.net
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anyways, please don't spam the FCC about this. No point in ticking them
off and making them actually consider this. :-)

Steven Robertson The Colvin Group
phantom-at-owlnet.rice.edu nanonet-at-ruf.rice.edu
http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~phantom http://nanonet.rice.edu






From: Azriel Gorski :      azrielg-at-cc.huji.ac.il
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 11:33:24 +0200
Subject: Re: Help: Making glass slides permanent?

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} My son Paul is 11 and received a good student microscopy for Christmas a
} year ago. He is an avid science student and is currently making slides of
} every feather he can find and is interested in his slides being more
} permanent.
} I have been trying to help him, but have not had much success. We started
} with the gum spirit in the Edmund Sci. microscope slide kit, but it takes
} forever to dry and seems to shrink as it dries causing terrible bubbles. I
} finally got some Cytoseal 60 locally and have had much more success however
} we still have problems with air bubbles creeping in from the edges days or
} weeks later.
} Are we using too much or not enough cytoseal?

To try to describe an elephant while blindfolded, it sounds like your
specimens are too thick. As the mountant dries the solvent dries out and
thus the amount of mountant shrinks. This is accompanied by air spaces
forming from the side. Depending on your specimens this may be very hard to
overcome except by adding more mountant to the side of the cover slip at a
corner of a "bubble" and letting it "wick" into the bubble.

} Do we need to seal the edges
} with something else? Is heating suggested to fully cure? How long should
} it take to dry? I thought this stuff was supposed to be fast, but it seems
} like days or weeks later the interior of the slide is still liquid. (or is
} it supposed to stay that way?)

Remember that the mountant dries for the outside in, and thus the center
will take some time to dry. That, and many mounting media are made to stay
soft in the center for various reasons.

After drying should the specimen be soaked in solvent and if so which one?

Depends upon the mounting medium and the specimen. "Most" mounting media
have a Xylene base and xylene is a commonly used as a pre-mount solvent.

} Any other tips for making simple slides would be appreciated. I've been
} hunting the net and found lots of good information, but not the answers to
} these.

There are several tricks to making good slides, like the one Caroline
Schooley mentioned of starting at an angle and slowly bringing the cover
slip down.

I personally am a big user of Micro-miniature disposable wooden spatulas
(commonly called flat toothpicks) as an aid in microscopy. They are great
for slowly lowering the cover slip and other uses. Then you throw them
away, no cleaning, very available and relatively inexpensive. And for those
trying to quit smoking great to chomp on while thinking.

Pre-cut strips of filter paper (approx. 2 X 4 cm) are great to have on hand
when you want to move, remove or clean liquid mounting medium from a slide.

Mounting medium cleans up a lot faster and easier when dry than when wet.
Let it dry and then "chip off" with a No 11 scalpel.

Remember that Xylene, like all chemicals, should be treated with respect.
Among other things, you don't want to breath too much of it, it is
flammable, and can be problematic by causing discoloration to clothing and
some work surfaces.

There is a mounting medium on the market that work on heat. (Commercial
information provided by direct email if interested.) Heat it and it
softens, let it cool to room temperature and it is set. The problem is that
it is a PCB. While I do not worry about using it ,due to the extremely
small quantities and shortness of contact, you may not desire to have your
son use it.

A good safety feature is a plastic jar with a mouth wide enough to throw
the to be disposed of slides and other glassware in. Keep it right where
you work. This will save you a lot of broken glass to clean up and
hopefully some cuts.

On making "good slides" there is nothing that beats, practice, practice,
and more practice. That and cleaning up a lot of mountant drops and smears
and throwing away a lot of your first experiments.

Good luck and Shalom from Jerusalem
Azriel

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Azriel Gorski, Head
Fibers and Polymers Laboratory
Division of Identification and Forensic Science
Israel National Police
Jerusalem, ISRAEL

azrielg-at-cc.huji.ac.il ICQ User ID No. - 1750739

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny
matters compared to what lies within us.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 1998 11:40:31 -0800
Subject: Re: Help: Making glass slides permanent?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Azriel Gorski wrote:

{snip of opening}

} There are several tricks to making good slides, like the one Caroline
} Schooley mentioned of starting at an angle and slowly bringing the cover
} slip down.

{snip of balance}
Another tip that Azriel uses, I'm sure, and just forgot to mention is weighting
the cover slip. A bit of lead, like a fishing sinker or a bullet (if you happen
to
have any handy!) works well. When I worked in a crime lab I kept a dozen or
so .45 ACP cartridges at my sample prep bench and weighted all cover slips
put over solvent-based mounts. These seemed to be a good weight for 18-22 mm
square cover slips. I'd use two if using 22X40 cover slips. (I didn't use them
on
my other then-current practice of mounting in Aroclor.) You may need to leave
the weights in place for several days, depending on how long it takes for the
prep
to become relatively solid.

Best of luck!
--
**********************************************************
Stephen A. Shaffer sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
MicroDataware http:www.microdataware.com
(Under reconstruction and temporarily out of service)
Personal stuff: steve_shaffer-at-compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/
**********************************************************






From: dmrelion-at-world.std.com (donald j marshall)
Date: 97-12-31 09:38:47 EST
Subject: Temp controlled Stages and Flow cells

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Dear Microscopy World :

1- Linkam of UK {A HREF="http://www.linkam.co.uk/"} Linkam Scientific
Instruments Ltd Home Page {/A} makes an observation cell that can be used with
SAXS (or light analysis) ; that is temperature-controlled to do cooling-
heating. Would any one know of a US-based company that carries the similar
equipment?

2- Would any one know of companies that use flow cells
,(fabricate/customize to fit client' s needs) either as a cell for UV-Vis &/or
for Light microscopy (dimensions ~ 1 sq.in.) ?


THANKS for the reply given to previous inquiry by :
Subj: Re: Videomicroscopy and In-situ crystal growth

1993 address is Surey, England, FAX 44 737-363480
Phone 44 737-363476

Don Marshall
RELION INdustries
(cathodoluminescence instruments)





From: Michel Deschuyteneer :      deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 98 15:18:39 +0100
Subject: Summary: EM atlas of virus morphology

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Thanks all for the replies to my query regarding the existence of a good
atlas of virus morphology. For those interested, here is the summary (some
lines deleted).

Interestingly, there does not seem to exist a recent book (editors please
take notice!) but there is obviously a lot of data online. Hence, happy
browsing!

Best regards,
Michel

************************************************************
I tried some WWW searches, might try some of the following site, it looks=
good:

http://www.Tulane.EDU:80/~dmsander/garryfavweb.html

Lou Ann
************************************************************
Perhaps this is not what you are specifically looking for, but our group has
imaged virus in the cryo stage of our Hitachi S-900 FESEM. I believe Ya
Chen, our SEM coordinator, has included some of the virus work in our web
page, found in my signature below.

Sincerely,

Colleen Lavin
Integrated Microscopy Resource
1675 Observatory Dr.
Madison, WI 53706
608-263-8481 voice
608-265-4076 fax
lavin-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/home2.htm
************************************************************
The Atlas of Virus Diagrams, Hans-W. Ackermann and Laurent
Berthiaume, CRC press,Inc., 1995 seems to be up to date with the Pox
family. There are no micrographs only diagrams.
Andy

Andrea Weisberg
NIH/NIAID/LVD
Build. 4/ Rm. 210
4 Center Drive
Bethesda, Md 20892-0445
(301) 435-1977 Office
(301) 480 1147 Fax
aweisberg-at-nih.gov
************************************************************
Yes, there is a problem in getting nice EM pictures using cryo-EM. Most EMs
are from the old "garde", they are still pretty good and I have been trying
during the last 2 years to "unearth" some of the originals to scan them in
and to put them on the Web. I have started with a virus "gallery", but not
all of them are good. My principle interest is to have a good image of each
virus genus at least.
Have a look at http://life.anu.edu.au/viruses/Images/ or at
http://www.tulane.edu/~dmsander/Big_Virology/BVHomePage.html. The later one
is using a lot of my images and my virus system, but that is ok.

If you find nice images, please let me know.

Warm greetings from down-under
Cornelia

Dr Cornelia B=FCchen-Osmond Bioinformatics Group
Research School of Biological Sciences Phone: 61 (02) 6249-4842
The Institute of Advanced Studies Fax: 61 (02) 6249-4437
The Australian National University E-mail buchen-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
GPO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
http://life.anu.edu.au/viruses/welcome.htm

=20


****************************************************
Michel Deschuyteneer, Ph.D. deschuyt-at-sbbio.be=20
Scientist Electron Microscopy Laboratory

SmithKline Beecham Biologicals =20
Rue de l'Institut, 89 B1330 Rixensart, BELGIUM
Tel: +32-2-656 9290 Fax: +32-2-656 8164
****************************************************
Standard disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this
communication are my own and do not necessarily
reflect those of SmithKline Beecham.
****************************************************





From: Craig Lending :      clending-at-acs.brockport.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 11:15:23 -0500
Subject: Colloidal Gold Congugates -- preferences?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am about to purchase some goat-anti-rabbit 5 and 10 nm colloidal gold =
conjugates for immunolabelling, and was wondering if anyone had any =
comments about specific vendors re: quality, uniformity, labeling =
intensity, stability, etc.

Please send comments directly to me, and I will compile a list and post =
it to the listserver.

Thanks in advance!

Craig R. Lending
Department of Biological Sciences
SUNY Brockport
Brockport, NY 14420

voice: 716-395-5755
fax: 716-395-2741
e-mail: clending-at-acs.brockport.edu






From: Brad Storey :      bstorey-at-awmailhost.anlw.anl.gov
Date: 19 Jan 98 09:53:32 -0700
Subject: Scanners

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I have received several questions about the Leafscan 45. I don't have
one and I have no financial interest in the company. Call them, not me.
I have seen the scanner in action at ANL and LBL. Both places are very
picky about image quality and they are happy with the scanner (last time
I checked). It is not a drum scanner and yes it is about 28k it used to
be about 17k. It is a lot of $, but it isn't a cheap multipurpose
flatbed desk scanner.

Call the company not me (i don't have time to respond to everyone). I
guess the number of responses I got is a testament to the size of this
listserver.

Brad Storey
Materials Scientist
Argonne National Lab - West
P.O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Ph. 208-533-7685 (office)
Ph. 208-533-7439 (lab)
Fax 208-533-7863
brad.storey-at-anl.gov





From: Jill Craig :      jcraig-at-unbc.ca
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 12:25:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Thanks

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id UAA18351 (from jcraig-at-unbc.ca); Mon, 19 Jan 1998 20:25:58 GMT


Hi all,

I'm resending this so I appologize if you've already received
it. Thank you to everyone who replied to my Edax/Windows
problem and SEM software problem. The number of replies was
astonishing and very helpful.

Thank you!!

Jill Craig
UNBC




From: WINDLAND-at-odin.ssec.honeywell.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 15:41:54 -0600
Subject: Inquiry on type of oxide etcher

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We have a benchtop March Instruments parallel plate etcher. We are currently
using it to etch off layers of dielectric between metal layers on our
semiconductors. We are interested to find out if anyone has an etcher for a
similar purpose and what instrument they are using. We have not been able to
find any small etchers other than the March Inst. model. Thanks for your
input.
Mark Windland
Analytical Services
Solid State Electronics Center
Honeywell
Minneapolis, Minnesota
612-954-2845
fax 612-954-2040
e-mail: windland-at-ssec.honeywell.com




From: Mark Wall :      wall1-at-llnl.gov
Date: 19 Jan 1998 14:41:53 -0800
Subject: Frontiers Meeting venders i

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1/19/98
2:27 PM
Frontiers Meeting venders info

To all electron microscopy venders:

As a reminder The Seventh Conference of Electron Microscopy in Materials
Science is being held at Kloster Irsee Irsee, Germany. The dates for the
meeting are April 19-24th 1998. The vender session will once again be a single
day table top exhibit only. The tentative date for the vender session will be
Monday the 20th and will be an evening session following dinner. We will most
likely be limiting the number of exhibitors to #197# 15. The cost is $600 US.
Please contact Joe Mayer at JMAYER-at-vaxww1.mpi-stuttgart.mpg.de for
reservations and details. There will also be advertising space in the
preprinted abstracts. If you cannot attend the meeting but would like your
product information to be available please contact me at the below address.
You can also get more details about the meeting at
http://multiscale.llnl.gov/femms98/default.html.

Thanks,

Mr. Mark A. Wall
L-350
Chemistry & Materials Science Dept.
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
7000 East Ave
Livermore, CA 94550 USA
ph. 510 423-7162
fx. 510 422-6892
e-mail. mark.wall-at-quickmail.llnl.gov





From: jkchen-at-erenj.com (J.K.Chen)
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 18:08:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM - Postdoctoral position in physical metallurgy

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Mon, 19 Jan 1998 18:08:52 -0500 (EST)



Post Doctoral Position
TEM in Physical Metallurgy
Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon Research & Engineering Co.
Route 22E Clinton Township, Annandale, NJ 08801

A post doctoral position is available immediately in the Advanced
Materials Section of the Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon Research and
Engineering Company.

The position requires demonstrated expertise and experience in the
analytical and high resolution transmission electron microscopy
characterization of microstructures and fine precipitates in ferrous and
other alloy systems. A broad physical metallurgy background, including
structure-property relations, phase transformations, and phase stability is
also required. The employee will be expected to contribute to the
development of new high strength steels tailored for applications in oil and
gas industries. In a multidisciplinary and cooperative research environment,
the employee should be able to work effectively in a team and should have
good interpersonal and communication skills.

Exxon's Corporate Research Laboratory is located in scenic, rural
western New Jersey, about an hour west of New York City and 45 minutes
northwest of Princeton. The laboratory performs basic and applied research
in support of Exxon Corporation's worldwide scientific, technological, and
business needs. We offer an excellent working environment.

Qualified applicants should send their resume to the above address or
to fax 908-730-355 before February 1, 1998. Enquiries can be made by calling
Dr. J.K.Chen at Tel: 908-730-2756 or E-mail: jkchen-at-erenj.com



Exxon is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V







From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 10:22:52 +1100
Subject: Western dot / Immuno

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I have been asked and I do not have experience in this matter:

"Could you give me advice on which gold-anti human IgG Ab and
gold-streptavidin could be used for Wester/dot blots (should be of high
sensitivity).

Is ist possible to gold-label p-aminophenyl-phosphoryl choline for usage
in Western / dot blots. Thanks."

I would appreciate your help
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au




From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 01:27:33 +-100
Subject: Re: TEM atlas of virology

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------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2542.961B9060
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

SALZBURG, 20th of Jan, 1998, local time: 01.10 a.m.

Dear Michel, dear Dr. Deschuyteneer,
unfortunately I'm a little bit too late with my reply. But maybe it would be interesting to know of the
following books:
1) Erskine L. PALMER & Mary Lane MARTIN (Eds):
An Atlas of Mammalian Viruses
CRC PRESS, BOCA RATON, FL, C: 1982, 2nd ed.: 1985
ISBN 0-8493-6628-3 (154 pages incl. subject index, and a lot of
B/W-micrographs, good quality, "the elder bestseller")
2) David O. WHITE & Frank J. FENNER (Eds):
Medical Virology, 4th Ed.
ACADEMIC PRESS, San Diego, N.Y., etc. 1994
ISBN: 0-12-746642-8 (603 pages incl. subject index, but some less B/W micrographs
than above compared to the overall pages; good
quality)
3) F. FENNER & A. GIBBS (Eds):
Portraits of Viruses: A History of Virology
KARGER, Basel (Switzerland), Munich, etc., 1988
ISBN: 3-8055-4819-2 (344 pages, incl. subj. index; only 45 figures B/W, not all
correspond to virus figures; and 9 tables)

Hope to add some new to the list
Best regards and "Good night, America"

Dr. Wolfgang MUSS
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")


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------ =_NextPart_000_01BD2542.961B9060--





From: Bill Neill :      110155.1253-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 01:01:39 -0500
Subject: Service engineer wanted

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Need a good (what else!) SEM service person for Southern Ca.
Please contact me direct.
Bill Neill




From: Energy Beam Sciences, Inc. :      ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 07:52:42 -0500
Subject: oxide etchers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear fellow microscopists,

At 03:41 PM 1/19/98 -0600, Mark Windland asked:
} We have a benchtop March Instruments parallel plate etcher. We are currently
} using it to etch off layers of dielectric between metal layers on our
} semiconductors. We are interested to find out if anyone has an etcher for a
} similar purpose...
{snip}

VG Microtech, in the UK, manufactures a plasma etcher for this application.
We (Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.) distribute this instrument in the United
States. I would be happy to send product or applications information to
anyone who contacts me directly. Information is also available, on-line, at
our WWW site: http://www.ebsciences.com

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: DrJohnRuss :      DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 08:01:05 EST
Subject: 2ND ANN: Image analysis workshops

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Workshops on Quantitative Image Analysis

May 21-23 and May 25-27, 1998
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

and

June 15-18, 1998
Danish Technological Institute
Taastrup, Denmark

This highly regarded hands-on course taught by expert faculty has
been presented annually for more than 15 years. It deals with all phases
of quantitative and computer-assisted imaging from acquisition and
processing through measurement and stereological interpretation.
Attendees receive The Image Processing Handbook plus a CD-ROM
containing images, algorithms (Photoshop-compatible for Mac and
Windows) and an extensive on-line tutorial and course notes on
stereology and statistical analysis. The course is appropriate for scientists,
technicians and administrators using or intending to use these techniques.
Attendees typically come from materials science, geology, biological and
medical sciences, pharmaceuticals, food science, industrial quality control,
remote sensing, and other disciplines. You are encouraged to bring your
own images for the hands-on lab sessions.

For detailed information and registration contact Alice Warren,
Dept. of Continuing and Professional Education, N. C. State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7401, 919-515-8171, fax 919-515-7614,
email: kelly_mcdowell-at-ncsu.edu

Information is available on-line at the following sites:

http://members.aol.com/IPCourse/
http://vims.ncsu.edu/matsci/IPCourse.html
http://evu.dti.dk/hojslet/ipcourse.htm




From: weigert-at-cmns.mnegri.it (Roberto Weigert)
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 14:13:33 +0200
Subject: TEM: support film for negative staining technique

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear colleagues,

I am working with isolated Golgi membranes deposited on 300 mesh nickel
grids covered with 1% formvar (+/- carbon film), then fixed and stained
with a negative contraster. The problem is that the membranes are not
strongly attached to the film and due to the air drying they glide and
cluster togheter creating a big problem in the evaluation of the results.

Have anyone of you the solution for my problem ?

Thank you un advance

Roberto

______________________________________________________________________________

Dr. Roberto Weigert
Consorzio Mario Negri Sud
Department of Cell Biology and Oncology
Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory
Via Nazionale
S.M. Imbaro, 66030 Chieti
Italy
Phone: 0039-872-570-354
Fax: 0039-872-578-240






From: jkchen-at-erenj.com (J.K.Chen)
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 08:38:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM: Postdoc position in physical metallurgy <- fax no. corrected

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Post Doctoral Position
TEM in Physical Metallurgy
Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon Research & Engineering Co.
Route 22E Clinton Township, Annandale, NJ 08801

A post doctoral position is available immediately in the Advanced
Materials Section of the Corporate Research Laboratory, Exxon Research and
Engineering Company.

The position requires demonstrated expertise and experience in the
analytical and high resolution transmission electron microscopy
characterization of microstructures and fine precipitates in ferrous and
other alloy systems. A broad physical metallurgy background, including
structure-property relations, phase transformations, and phase stability is
also required. The employee will be expected to contribute to the
development of new high strength steels tailored for applications in oil and
gas industries. In a multidisciplinary and cooperative research environment,
the employee should be able to work effectively in a team and should have
good interpersonal and communication skills.

Exxon's Corporate Research Laboratory is located in scenic, rural
western New Jersey, about an hour west of New York City and 45 minutes
northwest of Princeton. The laboratory performs basic and applied research
in support of Exxon Corporation's worldwide scientific, technological, and
business needs. We offer an excellent working environment.

Qualified applicants should send their resume to the above address or
to fax 908-730-3355 before February 1, 1998. Enquiries can be made by calling
Dr. J.K.Chen at Tel: 908-730-2756 or E-mail: jkchen-at-erenj.com



Exxon is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V



--------------------------------------------------------------
J.K.Chen, PhD | Postdoctoral Fellow
Exxon Research & Engineering Co. | jkchen-at-erenj.com
Route 22 E, Clinton Township | Tel: +1-908-730-2756
Annandale, NJ 08801 | Fax: +1-908-730-3355






From: David L Johnson :      jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 08:23:59 -0600
Subject: high vacuum evaporator parts needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Community--
We have a Kinney High Vacuum Evaporator (Model SC-2), and I'm trying to
locate an OFEC Hi Vacuum Globe Valve, size 1" (sweat type, straight
through). This is for the Backing circuit--the seat is OK, but the
brass bellows on the valve has given up. I contacted Kinney (now part of
Tuthill Corp) and they know nothing....
jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu
thanx






From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 09:31:39 -0600
Subject: Re: high vacuum evaporator parts needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Responding to the message of {v03007807b0ea63f8760a-at-[206.69.208.21]}
from David L Johnson {jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu} :

} Dear Community--
} We have a Kinney High Vacuum Evaporator (Model SC-2), and I'm trying to
} locate an OFEC Hi Vacuum Globe Valve, size 1" (sweat type, straight
} through). This is for the Backing circuit--the seat is OK, but the
} brass bellows on the valve has given up. I contacted Kinney (now part of
} Tuthill Corp) and they know nothing....
} jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu
} thanx

David,

I have a Kinney evaporator model KSE-2A-M. A few decades back the Kinney line
was taken over by Sharon Vacuum, Sharon Machine Co., Inc, 69 Falmouth Ave.,
Brockton, Mass. 02401. (617)588-2323.

I last ordered parts from them in 1980 (!), and my machine has been working like
a charm ever since. I have no idea if they are still in business, but give it a
try.

Good luck,

Gib Ahlstrand, Minnesota Micoscopy Society Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu

"Give me ambiguity or give me something else."





From: tflore-at-lsumc.edu (Flores, Teresa)
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 12:14:15 -0600
Subject: Fire Hazard EM Processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Fellow histoneters,
I am patiently waiting for the Leica rep to come and remove the thermal
unit from my EM auto processor! I was informed, no loaners available! If
you have a service contract, a loaner is shipped out immediately. Which is
great when they have a loaner. Except for the fact that the processors
weigh alot, or it seems like it especially when lifting from floor. I also
have to use the same box to ship "sick processor" to them. That means,
lifting, packing, etc.
Twice (within span of 2 months) I have walked into the em lab, with the
processing vial melted inside the thermal unit, solution evaporated, of
course (temps hi enough to melt vial) thank God it was not Acetone, but 50%
ethanol. The screen is blank. I, nor any one else in immediate surrounding
area, heard any warning sound or beeping sound.
I am not sure if anyone else is having this very serious problem. If so,
did it help to remove the thermal unit?
Teresa







From: tlong-at-wlgore.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 14:01:59 -0500
Subject: recommendation of flatebed scanners for EM micrographs and image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am in the market for a flatbed scanner and would like to here your
opinion regarding choices of
flatbed scanners (such as specific brand, model, cost,...etc). The scanner
will be used for digitizing the EM micrographs or images which are to be
either archived or used for quantitative image analysis.

I know that this is an old subject for this group, can someone help
me find a summary list of the scanners that were discussed previously by
this group? Lastly, Is there any new and better model available since the
subject was last discussed? Your information will be greatly appreciated.

Tsuey-Chen Long
WL Gore and Associates






From: Karen Rethoret :      rethoret-at-yorku.ca
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 14:14:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Help with UNICRYL embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Help!

Anyone out there using UNICRYL embedding resin as an alternative to
LR-WHITE for immunogold labelling?

We need to thin-section through an embedded cell monolayer grown on
glass coverslip and have been unsuccessful in

1) getting the resin to polymerize properly at 4C with UV and

2) Removing the embedded layer from glass (HF destroys (softens) the
resin rendering it useless for sectioning). These cells will only
adhere to either glass or polystyrene.

Any feedback with useful tips or your opinions on the use of these 2
resins would be appreciated.

Thanks, Karen Rethoret
York University











From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 16:08:13 -0600
Subject: Re: recommendation of flatebed scanners for EM micrographs and

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If you are digitizing prints, the requirements are probably not that great.
To get a 2000x1600 pixel image from a 4x5 inch print only requires 400 dpi
of resolution. And depending on your application, that may be more
resolution than you need. If you are working from negatives or smaller
formats, then you would have more stringent requirements.

We have used the HP series of scanners with good success. We also purchased
a cheaper model and had some regrets. Even our old HP IIcx was quite a bit
faster than the new one, and the HP user interface was more intuitive and
well behaved. I would strongly look at those two factors and insist on a
demo before making a choice.

At 02:01 PM 1/20/98 -0500, you wrote:
} I am in the market for a flatbed scanner and would like to here your
} opinion regarding choices of
} flatbed scanners (such as specific brand, model, cost,...etc). The scanner
} will be used for digitizing the EM micrographs or images which are to be
} either archived or used for quantitative image analysis.
}
} I know that this is an old subject for this group, can someone help
} me find a summary list of the scanners that were discussed previously by
} this group? Lastly, Is there any new and better model available since the
} subject was last discussed? Your information will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Tsuey-Chen Long
} WL Gore and Associates
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Emitech-at-ix.netcom.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 16:26:26 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Low-temperature SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Dr. Echlin:

I would like to address your comments regarding the most reliable cold stage for an SEM. I
appreciate your loyalty to your Oxford equipment but I wonder if you have had the opportunity
to operate the Emitech cold stage. I'm afraid that we cannot help but take offense at your
comment that we "pale into insignificance". The Emitech cold stage has been on the market for
serveral years with a great deal of success and our customers seem very pleased with its ease
of operation and reliability.

We understand that it is not appropriate for vendors to use the ListServer to "toot our own
horn" but felt that we could not take this slam against our equipment, as well as other
manufacturer's equipment, without some response.

Regards,

John Fitzpatrick
President and CEO
Emitech U.S.A., Inc.
(281)893-2067





From: MICHELLE CARNEY :      CARNEY-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 09:54:24 +1100
Subject: Seeking MT-2 Vise-type specimen holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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TO: microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com
SUBJECT: Seeking MT-2 Vise-type specimen holders

We are looking for new or used vise-type / flat specimen
holders/chucks for the Sorval MT-2 series of ultramicrotomes. If
anyone has any stuck away in a drawer that they are no longer using
we would be very interested in working out some kind of a deal. If
anyone knows of a comercial source for buying new/used vise-type
holders we also be very grateful.

Please respond directly to me at: carney-at-marshall.edu





Michelle D. Carney
Zill Lab
Marshall University - School of Medicine
Department of Anatomy, Cell and Neurobiology
1542 Spring Valley Drive
Huntington, WV 25755
Phone: (304) 696-7384
fax (304) 696-7290
E-Mail: carney-at-marshall.edu OR carney-at-zoomnet.net




From: garyliechty-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 18:33:32 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM Course Inquiry (Semiconductors)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ronald M. Anderson (1-914-892-2225) wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm posting this as a favor to the individual named below.
} She asked me for info on possible SEM courses and I was not able
} to help. Excerpts from her notes are below. She has already contacted
} Lehigh regarding their courses.
}
} Marisa Ahmed wrote:
}
} I work in the lab of an engineering company in Kanata, ON and want
} information/training on sample preparation and delayering
} of IC's (for SEM mostly) for failure analysis-type work.
} If, as Prof Lyman suggested, you could help me locate such a possible
} course or resource I would appreciate it.
}
} -------------
} And then a day later after I told her my course was TEM prep...
} -------------
}
} You are correct, I am not specifically looking for a course for TEM
} prep (especially since we don't have a TEM here), although I would be
} interested in knowing what was included in your course and where it is
} being taught for future reference. I am actually hunting for something
} to brush up my SEM sample prep (for topo views and delayering of IC's
} mostly, not so much cross-sectioning). I also want to learn
} something about the replica-stripping technique that I believe is used
} for STEM and some SEMwork for radioactive samples.
}
} If you could post my query I would much appreciate it. Respondants can
} reach me at mahmad-at-semiconductor.com
}
} Thank-you again,
}
} Marisa
}
} ((Sounds interesting. Please also copy me on responses. Ron A.))
Dear Marisa,

In response to Ron Anderson's posting on the listserver, I believe we,
Allied High Tech Products, Inc., have what you are looking for. We
offer courses for SEM sample preparation and delayering of IC's. In
addition, we offer courses, not specifically for, but include: PRE-FIB
Thinning for TEM, Backside Sample Prep for Package Devices that includes
cross sectioning C4 devices, TEM Sample Preparation, and basic
metallography.

We also manufacture equipment that includes our NEWEST Polishing
Machine, "TechPrep8" and "MetPrep8", our Variable Speed Sectioning Saw,
"TechCut", and a Positioning Device designed for precision lapping and
polishing of microelectronic devices and die, "MultiPrep". The
positioning device features a universal mount for using several
different types of sample fixtures.

If you would like more information, please contact us at 1-800-675-1118,
and I will be glad to discuss your specific interest. I can also mail
you some literature on our products and equipment if you give me your
address and phone number. Our WebSite contains photo's of our new
equipment with the exception of the TechCut, which will be posted soon.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Gary Liechty
Product Application Specialist
Allied High Tech Products, Inc.
2376 E. Pacifica Pl.
Rancho Dominguez, Ca. 90220
1-800-675-1118
1-310-762-6808 Fax
www.AlliedHighTech.com

Products for Materiallographic, SEM and TEM Sample Preparation




From: Stuart McClure :      Stuart.McClure-at-adl.clw.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 14:39:35 +0900
Subject: image capture cards for pc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

hi all,
I am seeking information,
the current image capture card has died
and I am looking for a replacement.

What is the colective wisdom on image capture
cards. The pro/cons of different makes.


Stuart
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stuart G. McClure, || Post small : P.Bag #2, Glen Osmond,
CSIRO Land and Water, || S.A. , AUSTRALIA, 5064.
Adelaide Laboratories, || Post large : Waite Rd, Urrbrae,
S.A., Australia || S.A., AUSTRALIA, 5064.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Phone: (08) 8303-8484 International replace 08 with 61-8
Fax: (08) 8303-8550
Email: Stuart.McClure-at-adl.clw.csiro.au
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"There is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow;
If it be now, it is not to come;
If it be not to come, it will be now;
If it be not now, yet it will come:
The readiness is all."
Hamlet
---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Andrey L. Chuvilin :      dusha-at-catalysis.nsk.su
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:24:29 +0600 (GMT)
Subject: Ion millers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear list,
I was very fast to delete summary of (or detailed replay to) request for
ion millers producers some time ago. Would someone not so quick forward
me that message (or any additional oppinions) off-list.

TIA

Andrew





From: William Chung :      willyc-at-jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 01:42:06 -0800
Subject: Ion millers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi. I am very interested in doing a thorough quantitative study on the
objective lens of the TEM. I am just
getting started on my study and am putting together a proposal on what I
want to cover in my study. I would
like as many pointers and suggestions from anyone familiar in this field.
I am also interested in the pos-
siblity of getting my hand on a spare/retired piece or parts of the
objective lens. I would appreciate any
suggestions on this subject as well.
As I have already mentioned, I am just getting started. Any suggestions
would be very very helpful.
Thank you.

William Chung
willyc-at-jhu.edu
______________________________William Chung____________________________

Johns Hopkins University, Biomedical Engineering

3003 North Charles Street
Apt #316C
Baltimore, MD, 21218
USA

Phone # (410) 516-2448
(410) 516-2449


Homepage: jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu/~wc7/index.htm



..::''''::..
.;'' ``;.
:: ::
:: :: :: ::
:: .:' `:. ::
:: : : ::
:: `:. .:' ::
`;..``::::''..;'
``::,,,,::''







From: svepet :      svepet-at-ikp.liu.se
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 09:38:55 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Textbook in SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am planning to give a graduate course on Applications of scanning electron
microscopy in materials science and asking if there is any literature,
textbook that can be recommended.

Sten Johansson





From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 08:41:34 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Low-temperature SEM

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Dear Mr. Fitzpatrick:

Thank you for your message about Low Temperature Microscopy and the
equipment that is available. I have indeed used the Emitech Equipment
and the equipment made by other vendors.I have over the past thirty years
built cold stages for a number of different microscopes. I stick by what I
said but if you would like me to give you a frank assessment of the
Emitech equipment, please write to me.

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences
University of Cambridge
CAmbridge CB2 3EA
United Kingdom


equipment stagesOn Tue, 20 Jan 1998 Emitech-at-ix.netcom.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Dr. Echlin:
}
} I would like to address your comments regarding the most reliable cold stage for an SEM. I
} appreciate your loyalty to your Oxford equipment but I wonder if you have had the opportunity
} to operate the Emitech cold stage. I'm afraid that we cannot help but take offense at your
} comment that we "pale into insignificance". The Emitech cold stage has been on the market for
} serveral years with a great deal of success and our customers seem very pleased with its ease
} of operation and reliability.
}
} We understand that it is not appropriate for vendors to use the ListServer to "toot our own
} horn" but felt that we could not take this slam against our equipment, as well as other
} manufacturer's equipment, without some response.
}
} Regards,
}
} John Fitzpatrick
} President and CEO
} Emitech U.S.A., Inc.
} (281)893-2067
}
}





From: Daniele Spehner :      daniele.spehner-at-etss.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 09:37:16 +0100
Subject: reTEM: support film for negative staining technique

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Roberto,

I suggest that you coat your formvar grids with an antibody directed
against the Golgi membranes for half an hour, wash and afterwards
deposit your membranes. You can also glow discharge before the deposit.
Hope this helps,
Daniele
-- =

**************************************************************
* Dani=E8le SPEHNER, CJF 94-03 INSERM *
* Etablissement de Transfusion Sanguine de STRASBOURG *
* 10 rue Spielmann, B.P. 36- 67065 Strasbourg-Cedex, FRANCE. *
* Tel : (33) 03 88 21 25 25 - Fax : (33) 03 88 21 25 21 *
**************************************************************




From: Stephan Helfer :      S.Helfer-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:44:25 BST
Subject: Re: Low-temperature SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Chaps

Horses for courses, is aIl can say to this.

Stephan Helfer




From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:58:36 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Textbook in SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

With reference to a suitable text book for the SEM of Material I would
suggest "Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis" written
by Goldstein et al Plenum Press New York 1992 (2nd Edition)ISBN
0-306-441175-6

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Science
University of Cambridge
Cambridge CB2 3EA UK

On Wed, 21 Jan 1998, svepet wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am planning to give a graduate course on Applications of scanning electron
} microscopy in materials science and asking if there is any literature,
} textbook that can be recommended.
}
} Sten Johansson
}
}





From: kroez-at-patho.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de (Monika Kroez)
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 06:25:54 -0600
Subject: Re: Help with UNICRYL embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Anyone out there using UNICRYL embedding resin as an alternative to
} LR-WHITE for immunogold labelling?
}
} We need to thin-section through an embedded cell monolayer grown on
} glass coverslip and have been unsuccessful in
}
} 1) getting the resin to polymerize properly at 4C with UV and
}
} 2) Removing the embedded layer from glass (HF destroys (softens) the
} resin rendering it useless for sectioning). These cells will only
} adhere to either glass or polystyrene.
}
} Any feedback with useful tips or your opinions on the use of these 2
} resins would be appreciated.
}
} Thanks, Karen Rethoret
} York University
}
}


Dear Karen,

We have been usigng Unicryl for post-embedding reactions on animal
tissues.

- If the resin doesn't cure, you may try to place the UV-lamp closer to
your object.

- We found that some specimen holders (e.g. microtiter-plates) absorb
UV-radiation. Therefore it might help to place the lamp in a way that
puts nothing between your specimen and the UV-source (irradiation from
above or below...)

- Your UV-lamp might be old! Our experience, based on information from
a friend with a fish-basin, is that the UV-part of the lamp decreases
with longer usage.

- Oxygen also keeps the resin from curing properly. You could put a lid
on or try a nitrogen-atmosphere.

Hope this helps,
Monika
kroez-at-patho.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de






From: Manuela Finke :      M.Finke-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 06:54:08 -0600
Subject: small droplets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

I started working with an AFM recently. In connection with
my topic I need to be able to produce small droplets
(approximately 100 nm in height and a few micrometers in
diameter) on a ceramic surface.
These droplets have to stick well, since they have to
undergo a variety of abrasive procedures. Moreover am I
seeking for a substance which - does not shrink
- does not swell in water and
- does not react with acids.
Any advice on a suitable substance and how to apply it is
highly appreciated!
Thanks
Manuela

----------------------
Manuela Finke
M.Finke-at-bris.ac.uk






From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 21 Jan 1998 15:05:51 +0100
Subject: microtomy of microcrystals

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Memo : microtomy of microcrystals 21-01-1998 15:01

Dear all,

we are looking for recent papers, review articles, books or proceedings on
microtomy of solid state crystals. The type of crystals are of micron scale
and dispersed in a plastic block. As we want to do high resolution electron
microscopy we need to have very thin sections of the order of 10 to 50 nm, if
possible.

Places in Europe where we could get some training could also be interesting.

Thanks for your time,

Nick Schryvers


Dr. Dominique Schryvers
University of Antwerp, RUCA - EMAT
Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)
Tel: 32-3-2180247 Fax: 32-3-2180257
e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
homepage: http://www.ruca.ua.ac.be/~EMAT/Schryvers.html




From: RAHBARI, RAMIN :      RAHBARR-at-wolf.research.aa.wl.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:01:44 -0500
Subject: Contact Ultraclone

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for {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:01:32 -0500
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Message-Id: {5F511CF194BDD011B16100805FFEB541A5308A-at-coyote.research.aa.wl.com}
CONFOCAL-at-LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU, forens-l-at-ACC.FAU.EDU,
gumshoes-at-UserHome.com, Infobroker-list-at-virtuallibrarian.com,
imagepro-users-at-mediacy.com, ipox-l-at-pathserv.Stanford.EDU

Hello list members

I wonder if anyone could help me get in contact with Ultraclone Limited.
They are the named producer of a particular antibody in an experiment I
am trying to duplicate.

Ultraclone Limited
Rossiters Farm House
Wellow, Isle of Wight
PO 401-OTE, UK

I have contacted them by snail-mail and had no response. Can anyone
provide an e-mail address or telephone or fax number?

Any help or information would be greatly appreciated.

Ramin Rahbari
Tel. 313-998-3383






From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/20/98 1:01 PM
Subject: recommendation of flatebed scanners for EM micrographs and i

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have used both Umax and Microtek and have been happy with each.
For evaluation reports you might try:
http:\\www.zdnet.com
This is the entry point. Couldn't get the exact (further into
site) address while at work... Think java was crashing the NS 2.0
we run at work :(


Woody White, Electron Microscopist SEM/EDS/WDS

Work:
Mcdermott Technology, Inc.
woody.n.white-at-mcdermott.com
http://www.mtiresearch.com/

Home
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722



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_________________________________


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I am in the market for a flatbed scanner and would like to here your
opinion regarding choices of
flatbed scanners (such as specific brand, model, cost,...etc). The scanner
will be used for digitizing the EM micrographs or images which are to be
either archived or used for quantitative image analysis.

I know that this is an old subject for this group, can someone help
me find a summary list of the scanners that were discussed previously by
this group? Lastly, Is there any new and better model available since the
subject was last discussed? Your information will be greatly appreciated.

Tsuey-Chen Long
WL Gore and Associates




From: tflore-at-lsumc.edu (Flores, Teresa)
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:29:01 -0600
Subject: nocardia control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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release (PO205-101c) ID# 0-42511U8000L8000S0) with SMTP
id AAA180; Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:29:01 -0600
X-Sender: tflore-at-pop3.lsumc.edu
Message-Id: {v01510102b0eb8f3dee0d-at-[155.58.72.72]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
To: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu

A histotechnologist phoned me with this question and does not have e-mail
available so I thought I would place this for any help.
A surgeon asked pathologist in her group if a control "nocardia" was
being used when doing Fite, Lepro or Ziel stain. The tech has phoned
surrounding hospitals and no one seems to know or have any such control.
Is there anyone who has used or worked with this type of control?
Thanxs, in advance, Teresa






From: Fredi Sanchez, Servicio Microscopia Electronica, Microbiologia, IVIC
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 13:06:08 -0400
Subject: nucleic acids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello friends microscopist.

I want to now the best method for observation nucleics acids for electron
microscopy. I want details.

Thank.






From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:41:25 -0600
Subject: Kevex 8000 SyQuest Drives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We finally (thank god!) replaced our 10MByte Bernoulli disk drives on
our Kevex 8000 system with SyQuest drives. Kevex supplied us with a
program that converts spectra and images to .tiff files. Has anyone had
experience with sending these files to a Windows-based pc? How is it
done? Do I need Kermit or is there a simpler way?




From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-botanica.ufrgs.br
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 16:08:22 -0200
Subject: RE: Help with UNICRYL embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Karen,

Use a polypropylene or polyetylene substrate. I work with the growth of
pollen tubes in culture medium and I had excellent results using these
plastic materials as a subtrate for the medium with Spurr's resin. I am
working with Unicryl and I haven't any problems during the
polymerization under 4 C with UV.


Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
Dept. of Botany
Universidade federal do Rio Grande do Sul
Brazil
e-mail: rinaldop-at-botanica.ufrgs.br




From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 12:27:35 -0600
Subject: Re: Kevex 8000 SyQuest Drives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You will need some sort of communication program. Kermit works as well as
anything for serial lines to another platform. I seem to recall that Kevex
had some utility of their own, but we never ordered it for our Kevex Delta.
We put an Ethernet card in ours and used FTP software to ship files back and
forth. Whereas Kermit approaches 1 kbyte per second at 9600 baud, FTP was a
couple of orders of magnitude faster. But then there was the extra cost of
the card and software. And how many files do you have to ship anyway?
Shipping a batch overnight works pretty well.

As far as the utility to convert things to TIFF, we wrote our own. When
doing so, I found that not all applications see all TIFF files the same way.
Some features we built in were not recognized by some programs, or those
programs insisted on a different tag for the purpose. So try the files with
another program if it doesn't work with the first program you try.

On the side, how big a Syquest cartridge does your system handle? I thought
the DEC architecture was limited to 32 MBytes per disk chunk unless you got
some special drivers. But even 32 MBytes was a lot of space in those days.

At 11:41 AM 1/21/98 -0600, you wrote:
} We finally (thank god!) replaced our 10MByte Bernoulli disk drives on
} our Kevex 8000 system with SyQuest drives. Kevex supplied us with a
} program that converts spectra and images to .tiff files. Has anyone had
} experience with sending these files to a Windows-based pc? How is it
} done? Do I need Kermit or is there a simpler way?
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Matthias Ochs :      mochs-at-gwdg.de
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 20:23:12 +0100
Subject: LM - Staining of type II pneumocytes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists,

we are currently trying to establish a specific stain for type II
pneumocytes in the mammalian lung. Has anybody experience with alkaline
phosphatase staining of these cells and could give some practical details?
Or are there any other suggestions for stains/markers for type II pneumocytes?
Thanks in advance,

Matthias
Matthias Ochs, M.D.
Dept. of Anatomy
Div. of Electron Microscopy
University of Goettingen
Kreuzbergring 36
D-37075 Goettingen
Germany
Phone: +49 551 397036
Fax: +49 551 397004
Email: mochs-at-gwdg.de




From: weimer :      weimer-at-antibodies-probes.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 14:33:55 -0400
Subject: Re: Contact Ultraclone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

R.Rahbari, the last contact we had with Ultraclone was at the address
you listed and their FAX is 44.1983.760263. This and 4700 other biotech
companies contact info may be found at 'Company Index Search' at the
website www.antibodies-probes.com. There are NO passwords necessary to
use the address database. If you find any errors, please bring them to
my attention via email. Thanks, Bob Weimer



RAHBARI, RAMIN wrote:
}
} Hello list members
}
} I wonder if anyone could help me get in contact with Ultraclone Limited.
} They are the named producer of a particular antibody in an experiment I
} am trying to duplicate.
}
} Ultraclone Limited
} Rossiters Farm House
} Wellow, Isle of Wight
} PO 401-OTE, UK
}
} I have contacted them by snail-mail and had no response. Can anyone
} provide an e-mail address or telephone or fax number?
}
} Any help or information would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Ramin Rahbari
} Tel. 313-998-3383




From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/20/98 1:01 PM
Subject: recommendation of flatebed scanners for EM micrographs and i

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Correction:

http://www.zdnet.com




______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I have used both Umax and Microtek and have been happy with each.
For evaluation reports you might try:
http:\\www.zdnet.com
This is the entry point. Couldn't get the exact (further into
site) address while at work... Think java was crashing the NS 2.0
we run at work :(


Woody White, Electron Microscopist SEM/EDS/WDS

Work:
Mcdermott Technology, Inc.
woody.n.white-at-mcdermott.com
http://www.mtiresearch.com/

Home
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722



______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I am in the market for a flatbed scanner and would like to here your
opinion regarding choices of
flatbed scanners (such as specific brand, model, cost,...etc). The scanner
will be used for digitizing the EM micrographs or images which are to be
either archived or used for quantitative image analysis.

I know that this is an old subject for this group, can someone help
me find a summary list of the scanners that were discussed previously by
this group? Lastly, Is there any new and better model available since the
subject was last discussed? Your information will be greatly appreciated.

Tsuey-Chen Long
WL Gore and Associates




From: Ridolfi, Christine :      CRIDOLFI-at-BICS.BWH.HARVARD.EDU
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 15:30:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: recommendation of flatebed scanners for EM micrographs and i

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
id CY63T4XR; Wed, 21 Jan 1998 15:29:01 -0500

Hi, I work at Brigham & Women's Hospital, E.M. Lab in Pathology and Steve Mello
from Histology gave me your e-mail about your problem with the thermal unit on
your Lynx. I had the same problem several months ago and called for service
because I have a service contract, but before the srevice tech. came we
discovered the problem. There is a contact on the back of the unit for the
thermal unit that became loose. It did not fall off so the alarm did not sound
but it gave an incorrect reading to the unit and I cooked a few biopsies
because of it. My telephone # is 1-617-732-7527 if you want to ask me anything
about what happened. Christine Ridolfi






From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/21/98 11:41 AM
Subject: Kevex 8000 SyQuest Drives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Serial transfer using Kermit is one way but there is another. The
alternate is costlier, but faster - the "sneaker net". A similar
(or same if you want to swap a lot) Syquest drive can be installed
on a PC platform and special Kevex software used to cross copy
files between the DEC format disk and the PC world. Such an
installation requires a SCSI card in your PC and the Kevex programs
RTCOPY and RTDIR (ectory). I am using the Adaptec 1542 SCSI
adapter. Others may work, but have no experience or data. The
programs run in DOS (or in W95 DOS window) and work much like the
DOS commands "copy" and "dir". Syntex example from C:} ....

rtcopy dl2:name.typ c:\whatever\name.typ

A batch file to handle multiple files wouyld be handy, but I never
conjured up one... Wild cards (*) are implemented in a limihed
fasion... The pgm will interrogate you on each file to copy, like
it or not.

Let me know if you have any other questions.... Woody


Woody White, Electron Microscopist SEM/EDS/WDS

Work:
Mcdermott Technology, Inc.
woody.n.white-at-mcdermott.com
http://www.mtiresearch.com/

Home:
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722



______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

We finally (thank god!) replaced our 10MByte Bernoulli disk drives on
our Kevex 8000 system with SyQuest drives. Kevex supplied us with a
program that converts spectra and images to .tiff files. Has anyone had
experience with sending these files to a Windows-based pc? How is it
done? Do I need Kermit or is there a simpler way?




From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 16:43:41 -0500
Subject: Oxide Etcher

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Mark:

South Bay Technology manufactures a research level parallel plate oxide
etcher and complete data on the system will be mailed this afternoon for
your review. Our unit is very comparable to the system you mentioned.

The South Bay Technology system, model number PE-150, is designed with a
150 watt, 13.56 MHz RF power supply and a six inch diameter electrode. U=
p
to a full six inch diameter sample can be used in this instrument. Two
independent interlocked gas controls are included as well as digital
displays for vacuum, forward power, reflected power, DC bias and time.
Termination of the plasma discharge is by time and the unit includes a
front panel set timer. All stainless steel construction is used and comm=
on
gases such as CF4, C3F6, Ar, and other chlorine or flourine based
chemistries can be utilized. The system is table top mounted and include=
s
a two stage direct drive corrosive series rotary vane pump. Base pressur=
e
is typically 15 millitorr and operating pressure ranges from 60 millitorr=

to over 200 millitorr depending on the application.

Please feel free to call Steve Collins in our East Coast offices at
703-486-7999 or email at scollins-at-southbaytech.com . You can also reach =
me
in California at the numbers below. Information will be mailed including=

etch rates, uniformity of etch and general product design data. =


I hope this helps!

Best regards-

David =

Writing at 1:27:28 PM on 1/21/98
=

*************************************************************************=
**
************************

David Henriks TEL: =

800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-714-492-1499=

San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com=


*************************************************************************=
**
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by INTERNET:WINDLAND-at-odin.ssec.honeywell.com
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =


We have a benchtop March Instruments parallel plate etcher. We are
currently
using it to etch off layers of dielectric between metal layers on our
semiconductors. We are interested to find out if anyone has an etcher fo=
r
a
similar purpose and what instrument they are using. We have not been abl=
e
to
find any small etchers other than the March Inst. model. Thanks for you=
r
input.
Mark Windland
Analytical Services
Solid State Electronics Center
Honeywell
Minneapolis, Minnesota
612-954-2845
fax 612-954-2040
e-mail: windland-at-ssec.honeywell.com
{




From: Ricky L Vaughn :      RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 16:08:19 -0600
Subject: Cryo EM on agarose pellets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have references for cryo EM using the Tokuyasu method, but my
question is at what step of fixation / cryoprotectant can you store
tissues, and for how long? I realize there will be variations with tissue
and antigen, and whether you are using glut., but what about straight
Para-form? The other question is cryo EM on cell culture. I typically
pellet into agarose rather than trying to get the cells to hold themselves
together. Has anyone done cryo with agarose? Thanks.

Rick L. Vaughn




From: bch183-at-nwu.edu ()
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 19:45:09 -0600
Subject: Etchant for mullite Fibers?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: bch183-at-nwu.edu
Name: Benjamin Cho

Question: I am planning to perform EBSP on mullite fibers mounted in
cold-set. What is a suitable etchant? I have been recommended HF but what
concentration and etching time is required?
Are there any alternatives to HF?
Thanks


---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: bent-at-unixg.ubc.ca () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 19:44:11 -0600
Subject: staining fungal tissue?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: bent-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Name: Elizabeth Bent

Question: Hi- I came across this and am wondering if you could
reccomend 1) a good way to stain fungal tissue for
visualization with confocal laser scanning microscopy
2) a good manual which deals with various fixation/
staining techniques for CSLM & epifluorescence. I'll
bet this is interesting work for y'all.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: George Sibbald :      geos-at-goldrush.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 20:10:47 -0700
Subject: In-situ Biomolecular Imaging @ 37C

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Hands On Experience And in Sunny Warm Arizona

ASU/MI Winter Workshop on In-Situ Scanning Probe Microscopy

Feb 9 - 11 (Biology)

http://green.la.asu.edu/workshop/




From: a.harris-at-mirinz.org.nz
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 16:51:20 +1200
Subject: High resolution phase contrast microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Some 5 years ago I read a review article on high resolution phase
contrast microscopy I think down towards 10nm resolution, unbelievable
as that may seem. I think that the article was from Eastern Europe.

Is there any one out there currently working in high resolution phase
contrast microscopy? We may have some funding in this area looking for
a researcher. We are in New Zealand if that is any incentive! I look
forward to hearing from you.

I can be contacted at a.harris-at-mirinz.org.nz






From: chatti kiranam :      kiranam-at-mailexcite.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 03:32:13 -0700
Subject: Unsubscribe please -- urgent

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Dear Sir/Madam,
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From: Linda Iadarola :      linda.iadarola-at-yale.edu
Date: 22 Jan 1998 07:48:32 -0500
Subject: Re: Cryo EM on agarose pellets

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"Ricky L Vaughn" {RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU}
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From: Mark E. Darus (216) 266-2895 General Electric Co. :      darus-at-cle.dnet.ge.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 98 08:45:30 EST
Subject: Switching from secondary to backscatter

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Reply to: RE} Cryo EM on agarose pellets

Dear Ricky,
It is safe to store the tissues in formaldehyde for extended periods of =
time. If they are fixed in glutaraldehyde, you can safely store them in =
buffer. We have stored the pieces of tissue in sucrose cryoprotectant =
for about a week without problems, but be sure to mix the sucrose =
solution while infiltrating to avoid sucrose gradients from forming in a =
stationary tube. For the cell pellets, we generally use 10% gelatin to =
hold them together and then treat the pellet the same as a tissue sample =
(cut into pieces, infiltrate and freeze).
Linda Chicoine
Center for Cell Imaging
Yale Univ. Dept. of Cell Biology
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
203-785-3646 phone
203-785-7226 fax
--------------------------------------

I have references for cryo EM using the Tokuyasu method, but my
question is at what step of fixation / cryoprotectant can you store
tissues, and for how long? I realize there will be variations with =
tissue
and antigen, and whether you are using glut., but what about straight
Para-form? The other question is cryo EM on cell culture. I typically
pellet into agarose rather than trying to get the cells to hold =
themselves
together. Has anyone done cryo with agarose? Thanks.

Rick L. Vaughn

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Greetings,
When I switch from observing a secondary image to a backscattered one,
in what direction to I go to get the best image? Is the accelerating
voltage, working distance, tilt, spot size, final aperture and so on
increased or decreased? If this depends on the sample, still is there some
general directions to take when switching from a secondary analysis to a
backscattered one?

Thanks, Mark Darus




From: valdemar :      valdemar-at-fast.net
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 09:12:27 -0500
Subject: Materials, Steel, Porosity, Auger SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues.

I need advice on how to determine contents of 1-10 micron sized pores
formed in steel.

The pores appear only after a particular sequence of heat treatments and
are always associated with corners of cuboidal titanium nitride
precipitates. We believe that for certain duration of time during the heat
treatment the steel is under tension in the regions of pore formation.

We have speculated that
(1) the pores may contain vacuum and nucleate and grow by coalescence of
vacancies in regions of tensile stress concentration,
(2) are filled with hydrogen coming out of solution in steel,
(3) are filled with nitrogen from decomposition of the titanium nitrides
(my sense is that thermodynamically this is unlikely).
Any ideas on how to differentiate among these scenarios and/or can you
suggest other possibilities?

The only method that I could come up with is by Auger spectroscopy on
gas molecules adsorbed on surfaces of pores in samples broken in situ under
vacuum, but I have no experience with high vacuum SEMs or with Auger.
Would it work? Is any one aware of equipment capable of this in NE or Mid
Atlantic USA?

I will be grateful for any thoughts, suggestions and leads.

Valdemar-at-fast.net

Valdemar Furdanowicz
Homer Research Labs G165
Bethlehem Steel Co
Bethlehem PA 18016.




From: Fredi Sanchez, Servicio Microscopia Electronica, Microbiologia, IVIC
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 10:53:49 -0400
Subject: nucleic acids

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Hello friends microscopist.

I want to now the best method for observation nucleics acids for electron
microscopy. I want details.

Thank.









From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 08:56:14 -0600
Subject: Re: Switching from secondary to backscatter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hmmm, best image? That would depend on your definition of best. I will
define "best" as good signal-to-noise at lower mags.

Signal is MUCH improved with reduced working distance (~1/r**2). This
assumes that your detector is mounted under the pole piece (as many are) and
that you are not simply running your E-T detector in BSE mode. There should
be no resolution sacrifice.

Signal will go up with beam current (~I) (spot size, final aperture) with
some loss in spatial resolution.

The signal generally goes up with increased accelerating voltage but spatial
resolution may decrease due to a larger scattering volume.

Generally, we have to open the beam up quite a bit to get enough BSE signal.
We measure a current of ~0.3 nA at 20 kV and 25 or 39 mm WD. I would like to
reduce working distance, but we are often doing EDS simultaneously and thus
it is fixed by our detector.

Hope this helps.

At 08:45 AM 1/22/98 -0500, you wrote:
} Greetings,
} When I switch from observing a secondary image to a backscattered one,
} in what direction to I go to get the best image? Is the accelerating
} voltage, working distance, tilt, spot size, final aperture and so on
} increased or decreased? If this depends on the sample, still is there some
} general directions to take when switching from a secondary analysis to a
} backscattered one?
}
} Thanks, Mark Darus
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 10:24:19 -0500
Subject: Aclar film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hey, y'all -

Does anyone have experience sectioning tissue on Aclar film? I getting
ready to embed some pollen that has been stuck to Aclar film. I want to
know if Aclar is easy to embed and section. I'm use to sectioning tissue
grown on dialysis tubing.
Your comments are greatly appreciated.

best regards,
beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
**************************************






From: paqui-at-iris1.fae.ub.es
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 04:14:58 +0000
Subject: TEM of fluorides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Colleagues,

I'm going to be involved in TEM characterisation of
coatings for working on the ultraviolet range. The materials
extensively used as UV-Coatings are fluoride compounds as Mg2F,
AlF3, LaF3 and related...I know that these materials should be
hygroscopic and instable.

Any help on material preparation for TEM examination will be
extremely appreciated.

Thank you very much in advance

F. Peir=F3
*******************************+
Francesca Peiro

EME, Enginyeria i Materials Electronics
Dpt. Fisica Aplicada i Electronica
Universitat de Barcelona
Avda. Diagonal 645-647
08028 Barcelona, Spain

Tel. (34-3) 402 11 39
Fax. (34 3) 402 11 48
e-mail: paqui-at-iris1.fae.ub.es
****************************





From: Robert Mixon :      mixonr-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 08:27:17 -0800
Subject: Reply: Fungal stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In response to request for fungal stain. One should be able to use a Gomori
Methenamine Silver stain(called GMS stain). The silver helps visual fungal
hyphae and should provide differential contrast both photons (light micros.) and
electrons (E-M). Worst case scenario you might have to remove the plastic if
embedded in epon-araldite (for example) prior to staining. Also look under
methenamine silver staining for EM as this has been used for glycosaminoglycans
and should stain fungi nicely too.

bob m
OHSU




From: Becky Smith :      bssvpisu-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 10:54:08 CST
Subject: Re: nocardia control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If you find a source, let me know where too!!!Thanks.
Becky Smith
Veterinary Pathology
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50011
bssvpisu-at-iastate.edu




From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/22/98 7:44 AM
Subject: Switching from secondary to backscatter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A complete answer would make a book.... Depends on the examination
goals (penetration, Z-range etc.), the specimen, detector type,
etc. Generally BSE will require more beam current than SE. An
untilted (normal to beam) specimen surface will typically maximize
collection of BSEs. I could go on, but....


Woody White, Electron Microscopist SEM/EDS/WDS

Work:
Mcdermott Technology, Inc.
woody.n.white-at-mcdermott.com
http://www.mtiresearch.com/

Home:
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722




______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


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Greetings,
When I switch from observing a secondary image to a backscattered one,
in what direction to I go to get the best image? Is the accelerating
voltage, working distance, tilt, spot size, final aperture and so on
increased or decreased? If this depends on the sample, still is there some
general directions to take when switching from a secondary analysis to a
backscattered one?

Thanks, Mark Darus




From: Andrey V. Zagrebelny :      zagrebel-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 11:16:05 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

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(1.37.109.15/16.2) id AA043139365; Thu, 22 Jan 1998 11:16:05 -0600

unsubscribe



Andrey Zagrebelny

___________________________________________________________

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
421 Washington Ave. SE
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA

phone: 612-626-7942
fax: 612-626-7246
e-mail: zagrebel-at-cems.umn.edu





From: Schibler, Matthew :      mschibler-at-bri.medsch.ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 09:39:15 -0800
Subject: RE: staining fungal tissue?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Elizabeth,

I found this review paper sitting on my desk:

Czymmek, K.J., J.H. Whallon and K.L.Klomparens. 1994. Confocal
Microscopy in Mycological Research. Exper. Mycol. 18: 275-293.

It should have some references on staining fungi.

Hope it helps.

Matthew J. Schibler Ph.D.
UCLA Brain Research Institute
73-384 CHS 951761
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1761

(310) 825-9783
FAX (310) 206-5855
E-mail: mschibler-at-bri.medsch.ucla.edu

} -----Original Message-----
} From: bent-at-unixg.ubc.ca [SMTP:bent-at-unixg.ubc.ca]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 1998 5:44 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: staining fungal tissue?
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
} Email: bent-at-unixg.ubc.ca
} Name: Elizabeth Bent
}
} Question: Hi- I came across this and am wondering if you could
} reccomend 1) a good way to stain fungal tissue for
} visualization with confocal laser scanning microscopy
} 2) a good manual which deals with various fixation/
} staining techniques for CSLM & epifluorescence. I'll
} bet this is interesting work for y'all.
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -----
}




From: jhumenansky-at-brauncorp.com
Date: 1/22/98 11:16 AM
Subject: Switching from secondary to backscatter

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=20


______________________________ Reply Separator ____________________________=
_____


----------------------------------------------------------------------
-- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of=20
America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to=20
ListServer-at-MSA=2EMicroscopy=2ECom=20
----------------------------------------------------------------------
=20
Mark Darus wrote:
=20
Greetings,
When I switch from observing a secondary image to a backscattered one,
in what direction to I go to get the best image? Is the accelerating=20
voltage, working distance, tilt, spot size, final aperture and so on=20
increased or decreased? If this depends on the sample, still is there some=
=20
general directions to take when switching from a secondary analysis to a=20
backscattered one?
=20
Thanks, Mark Darus
=20
=20
BSE imaging is usually employed to observe differences in atomic=20
number contrast=2E Therefore the conditions to excite more BSE's can=20=
be=20
used=2E Working distance and probe current are probably the most=20
important=2E The shorter working distance is important because BSE's=20
can be considered a line of sight signal and the closer you get the=20
source of BSE's to the detector the stronger is the signal=2E Unlike=20
the E-T detector which has a voltage applied to attract SE's, the BSE=20
detector, if your using a solid state type does not attract BSE's by=20
using a bias voltage, but by proximity to the sample=2E Increasing th=
e=20
probe current by changing the spot size or increasing the primary beam=
=20
electrons getting to the sample by using a larger aperture will also=20
improve the BSE signal=2E If you also need good resolution with BSE=20
then some compromises will need to be made=2E =20
=20
Since the BSE's come from an area of the sample where the beam is=20
beginning to spread the BSE resolution will not be as good as SE=20
imaging in most cases but if you are using lo kv where spreading is=20
less the BSE and SE resolution will be similar=2E
=20
If you are doing EDS along with BSE and SE imaging you will most=20
likely be using 15-25 keV to excite x-rays=2E In this situation, the=20
easiest way to get a good BSE image to correlate with the SE image is=20
just to use a larger apreture without changing anything else=2E =20
=20
Hope this helps
=20
John Humenansky
Braun Intertec
6875 Washington Ave=2E So=2E
Minneapolis, MN 55439





From: Ray Bowman :      RayBowman-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 15:38:18 EST
Subject: Thanks for Info on Seeing Swelled Gell Particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I want to thank everyone who responded to my request for techniques to make
swollen gel particles visible. Very helpful information - I will make use of
it.

A couple of responders volunteered to do a few tests on samples. I will
contact you about this soon.

Ray Bowman




From: valdemar
Date: Thursday, January 22, 1998 9:12AM
Subject: Materials, Steel, Porosity, Auger SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How about trying this.

Cut some small notched samples, have a cooling device arrangement for them
to get them under the ductile-brittle transition temperature in a vacuum,
and break them with an impact hammer in a vacuum chamber that has an
residual gas analyzer. You should be able to see what gas is trapped in the
pores by the increase in the peak pressures. However, the diffusion of
hydrogen in steels is very high and you probably will not see an increase in
the hydrogen from this.

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."





----------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.

Dear Colleagues.

I need advice on how to determine contents of 1-10 micron sized pores
formed in steel.

The pores appear only after a particular sequence of heat treatments and
are always associated with corners of cuboidal titanium nitride
precipitates. We believe that for certain duration of time during the heat
treatment the steel is under tension in the regions of pore formation.

We have speculated that
(1) the pores may contain vacuum and nucleate and grow by coalescence of
vacancies in regions of tensile stress concentration,
(2) are filled with hydrogen coming out of solution in steel,
(3) are filled with nitrogen from decomposition of the titanium nitrides

(my sense is that thermodynamically this is unlikely).
Any ideas on how to differentiate among these scenarios and/or can you
suggest other possibilities?

The only method that I could come up with is by Auger spectroscopy on
gas molecules adsorbed on surfaces of pores in samples broken in situ under
vacuum, but I have no experience with high vacuum SEMs or with Auger.
Would it work? Is any one aware of equipment capable of this in NE or Mid
Atlantic USA?

I will be grateful for any thoughts, suggestions and leads.

Valdemar-at-fast.net

Valdemar Furdanowicz
Homer Research Labs G165
Bethlehem Steel Co
Bethlehem PA 18016.





From: CANTINO-at-ORACLE.PNB.UCONN.EDU (MARIE CANTINO)
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 16:45:32 -0400
Subject: TEM-Hydrofluoric acid protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A student in our EM lab would like to try out a protocol which involves use
of hydrofluoric acid. The protocol calls for single cells, attached to a
glass cover slip, to be frozen, freeze dried, and rotary shadowed. The
replica is then released by immersion of the cover slip in hydrofluoric
acid. I hear that HF is nasty stuff, and would like to hear from anyone
who has experience with 1) this particular application (concentrations,
times, rinsing) and 2) safety issues relating to the use of HF in general.
What precautions should we take, how worried should we be, etc.

Thanks for your help.

Marie

Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology, U-131
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269
Ph: 860-486-3588
Fax: 860-486-1936







From: Hermann Reese :      iacsa_df-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 18:12:34 -0500
Subject: Switching from secondary to backscatter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There are many reasons why one would want to switch from SE to BSE
observation. As it was already mentioned, this topic can easily fill a
book.

I just wanted to point out one more aspect: on some SEM's there is the
possibility to mix SE and BSE signals with variable ratio, thus increasin=
g
the perceived image quality.
The advantages are (to name just a few): lower impact of those
high-contrast areas that frequently appear in the SE-only images; lower
signal from the sample's background (lines and cracks on the adhesive
(carbon) tape; the "flat" BSE image gets some topographic contrast from t=
he
SE portion; etc.

This works especially good with things like diatomes, radiolarians etc.,
which are difficult to coat completely with carbon or metal, and therefor=
e
can produce ugly highlights when observed with SE alone.



Hermann Reese
IACSA - Mexico City




From: Swab, Phil :      pswab-at-art-inc.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 18:13:52 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM of fluorides

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Quidado.
You are correct, Mg2F, AlF3, and LaF3 are unstable, susceptible
to beam damage, and difficult to work with. They easily dissociate =
into
metal rich phases and evolve fluorine. I've found a number of =
published
images of MgF2 that are primarily artifacts of sample preparation and
beam damage. =20

Due to the chemical nature of the instability, I've chosen to
prepare TEM cross-sections of UV coatings (Mg2F, AlF3, and LaF3) using
ultramicrotomy with a diamond knife. There are two things that are
essential for sectioning hard materials (including thin films, small
particles and crystals):
1) Minimize the amount of material to be cut. Prepare samples
with a minimum amount of substrate, and orient them in the embedding
media for a cross-sectional view. Cut the blockface on a microtome
taking small cuts to reduce stress to the interface between epoxy and
sample. End up with a blockface of less than 100 um across (50 um
preferred!).
2) Improve the adhesion of the embedding media to the sample.
Many embedded hard materials fail by pulling out when sectioned due to
poor adhesion. First, I have found that Spurrs works best but there =
are
other compounds that may work. Second, it's essential to improve the
adhesion of the epoxy using an adhesion promoter such as Z-6040 from =
Dow
Corning (a silane copolymer).

To minimize artifacts these unstable fluorides require careful
TEM techniques working under minimum dose conditions. As a reference,
you should always first take very low magnification images of your
sections and work up to higher magnifications. Don't focus at higher
magnifications to improve lower mag images.

good luck,
Phil Swab
Advanced Coatings Division, ART inc.

} ----------
} From: paqui-at-iris1.fae.ub.es[SMTP:paqui-at-iris1.fae.ub.es]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 1998 11:14 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com;
} Microscopy.com-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: TEM of fluorides
} =20
} =
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} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
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} =20
} Dear Colleagues,
} =20
} I'm going to be involved in TEM characterisation of=20
} coatings for working on the ultraviolet range. The materials=20
} extensively used as UV-Coatings are fluoride compounds as Mg2F,=20
} AlF3, LaF3 and related...I know that these materials should be=20
} hygroscopic and instable.
} =20
} Any help on material preparation for TEM examination will be=20
} extremely appreciated.
} =20
} Thank you very much in advance
} =20
} F. Peir=F3 =20
} *******************************+
} Francesca Peiro
} =20
} EME, Enginyeria i Materials Electronics
} Dpt. Fisica Aplicada i Electronica=20
} Universitat de Barcelona
} Avda. Diagonal 645-647
} 08028 Barcelona, Spain
} =20
} Tel. (34-3) 402 11 39
} Fax. (34 3) 402 11 48
} e-mail: paqui-at-iris1.fae.ub.es
} ****************************
} =20




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 18:09:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM-Hydrofluoric acid protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Marie,
}
} A student in our EM lab would like to try out a protocol which involves use
} of hydrofluoric acid.
[snip]
} and 2) safety issues relating to the use of HF in general.
} What precautions should we take, how worried should we be, etc.
}
HF is, indeed, nasty. Obviously do everything in a hood. HF
does not eat polyethylene, so use poly gloves. That said, HF is just
a mineral acid, so there is no need to panic. The fumes are bad, but
so are those from HCl, HNO3, etc. If the protocol calls for dilute HF
(~1N), there is less concern than if it calls for concentrated HF.
Once the HF has been diluted from stock, the gloves and a well-ventil-
lated hood should be sufficient precautions. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: RCHIOVETTI :      RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 18:17:48 EST
Subject: Re: Aclar film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Beth,

Yes, Aclar film is relatively easy to section. I've cut lots of cells and
tissues which have been on the stuff. What I find helpful is as follows:

1. Flat-embed the specimen and polymerize as usual (assuming you want to cut
the Aclar in cross-section.

2. Orient and trim, preferably using precision trimming on the microtome with
glass knives or an old diamond knife, so that all sides are clean and
"polished".

3. Cut sections the long way. Trim the block so the first and last parts to
contact the knife are the ends of the Aclar, then make sloping cuts at the top
and the bottom of the block so the face gradually makes a transition from
resin+specimen+Aclar to just Aclar by itself. This means the block face will
be rather tall and narrow...just the opposite of the way you trim most blocks!

3. Then, come in from the underside of the Aclar, trimming away about half of
its thickness. The idea here is to make the top, bottom and one side of the
block face pure Aclar, and the reason to do so is to minimize curling of the
sections and splitting of the Aclar away from the main part of the section.
Below is my feeble attempt to "draw" the block face:




_
/| |
/ | |------Aclar, with specimens surrounded by resin
/ | | (this "bottom" side is trimmed to half-thickness)
| *| |
| *| |
| *| |
| *| |
| | |
\ | |
\ | |
\|_|
|
| Sectioning direction
V
________________________ Knife


If your e-mail reader rearranges all of my fancy artwork, please contact me
off-list. I can fax you the drawing.

Best of luck!
Bob
*********************************
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti
E. Licht Company / 1-800-865-4248
rchiovetti-at-aol.com

*********************************
Cryostats / Microtomes / Tissue Processors / Embedding Centers / Slide
Stainers / Glass Coverslippers / Microscopes (Representing Leica since 1967) /
Fiber Optic Systems / Linear Measuring / Micromanipulation (Linear Encoded,
Video) / Image Analysis, Archiving, Capture / Video & Video Printers (Cooled
CCD, Digital, RGB, Super VHS, 3-chip) / Vibration Isolation Systems /
Programmable Stages / Heating & Cooling Stages




From: Venera A. Jouraeva :      vajourae-at-mailbox.syr.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 19:08:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: x-Ray deconvolution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopists,

I am new to the field and am wondering if there is any software for X-ray
deconvolutions for EDXA-SEM system? IF it has to be done manually, could
you give any refences on how to do it best?

I also would like to get in touch with people who study particles on
vegetative surfaces to learn and share some thoughts.

Thank you in advance,

Venera Jouraeva.





From: Olivia, Lisa :      LOlivia-at-FEICO.COM
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 17:30:06 -0800
Subject: FIB/SEM Applications Engineer position at FEI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

FEI Company in Hillsboro, Oregon has the following position available:


FIB / SEM Applications Engineer

Job Summary: Develop and demonstrate to various customers the full
capabilities of FEI FIB and SEM systems and related equipment

Responsibilities:

* Demonstrate system and operation and applications
* Assist staff and customers in developing applications
* Act as an internal resource for helping resolve system problems for
internal and external customers
* Conduct on-site and remote customer training
* Other duties as temporarily assigned by immediate supervisor

Minimum Qualifications:

* BS/equivalent in Physics, Material Science or related discipline
* 2 years experience operating SEM, TEM, EDS
* Exceptional interpersonal communication skills
* Computer literate, experience with MS Windows programs including but
not limited to MS Word, Excel, and Visual Basic
* Willing to work in clean rooms
* Eligible to work in the United States
* Eligible for passport and willing to travel up to 25%, domestic and
overseas
* FEI Company is a world leader in providing superior field emission
products and applications to our customers throughout the world. We
build world-class electron microscopes and related products using ion
and electron beam technologies. Our products are used by the
semiconductor and material science industries as well as various medical
and scientific institutions. We're located in the midst of the Silicon
Forest, near the intersection of Highway 26 and Cornelius Pass. FEI is
headquartered in Hillsboro, OR with nearly 1,000 worldwide employees.

Employees at FEI work in an open, team oriented environment and have the
opportunity to apply their skills to a wide variety of challenging
problems in manufacturing, engineering and business. Work alongside
some of the world's foremost experts in the area of field emission
technology!

Join FEI Company and benefit from out compensation and benefits packages
which include fully paid medical, dental, vision, and life for employees
and their families, profit sharing, tuition assistance, wellness program
and 401(k) with match.

Please submit resume to Lisa Olivia either by FAX: 503.640.7509 or
email: lolivia-at-feico.com.


Lisa Olivia
Recruiter
FEI Company
PH) 503.844.2601
FAX) 503.640.7509
email: lolivia-at-feico.com





From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 21:11:04 -0600
Subject: Re: Switching from secondary to backscatter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Greetings,
} When I switch from observing a secondary image to a
} backscattered one,
} in what direction to I go to get the best image? Is the
} accelerating voltage, working distance, tilt, spot size, final
} aperture and so on increased or decreased? If this depends on the
} sample, still is there some general directions to take when
} switching from a secondary analysis to a backscattered one?
}
} Thanks, Mark Darus
}

You'll need to be more specific regarding the materials and goals of
your work if you want more specific answers. Basically, by it's
nature, BSE is a three dimensional process with interactions taking
place beneath the surface of your sample. Like x-ray production in
a sample, the BSE electrons can come from a volume within the sample
much larger than the exciting electron diameter. This effect will be
enhanced by higher accelerating voltages.

For best spatial resolution you might want to experiment with higher
sample tilt. The simplest explaination here is that at high tilt
angles, BSE electrons scattered at greater depths in the sample will
have to come through increasingly larger amounts of sample material
to reach the detector, leaving the majority of detected electrons
those emitted from near the surface.

This brings us to a second concern - the detection efficiency.
Backscatter detectors vary greatly in their collection efficiencies.
Older, or less expensive, detectors are often much less efficient
at collecting BSE and produce a much grainier image than secondary
detectors at a given set of operating conditions. Decreasing the
condensor currents can produce a higher beam current, and thus
higher electron emission and 'smoother' looking images, but at the
expense of spatial resolution. Ditto increasing final apeture size.
BSE collection will be adversely affected by higher tilt angles.

Remember that the slow scan speeds used taking a micrograph create a
much smoother photographic image than the visual rate image you use
when setting up for taking the photo. Generally, when looking for
the best resolution in any micrograph you'll want to work with a visual
rate image that is very grainy, yet just good enough to accurately
focus and stigmate on. Using slower visual rates can help here.

Finally, remember the signal contrast mechanisms of BSE. Average
atomic number spatial differences provide the primary contrast,
while surface topology is a secondary contributor. BSE yield is
higher as the average atomic number increases. Contrast in a BSE
image increases as localized differences in average atomic number
increase. Don't expect to be able to produce much of an image if you
are looking at purely biological materials. While antigen-labeled
gold microspheres will show up very well against tissue, you won't
see much detail in the tissue itself. Metallic grains can show very
well, but you will have to use a high electronic amplification
(gain) to bring out the contrast in many structures.


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, IL 60174
PH 630.513.7093 FAX 630.513.7092 Email: ars-at-mcs.net
WWW: http://www.mcs.net/~ars
Analytical instrument maintenance services




From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 22:32:13 -0500
Subject: MT-2 Vise Type Holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michelle D. Carney

RMC manufactures new Universal Specimen Holders that will fit your MT-2B
(also all subsequent models by DuPont and RMC as well as Ultracuts with =
a
$28 adapter).
This holder will accept flat blocks and both sizes of Beem blocks.

The part number is 70930, cost is $215, they are in stock. =


There is a second version that has a conical mirror behind the block and =
a
port for a light pipe to provide transillumination. You obviously need a
light source to make this work.

Steve Miller
RMC
Phone: 520-903-9366
Email: Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com
Website: http://www.RMC-Scientific.com/microtomes/




From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 22:32:16 -0500
Subject: High Vacuum Bellows Repair

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

TO: David Johnson
FROM: Steve Miller
RE: Bellows repair

If you are not successful in locating a complete assembly it is possible =
to
repair the bellows yourself. It requires purchasing the bellows material
and using a hot plate and holding jig but nothing exotic. =


See if you can remove the defective bellows from the machined end pieces =
by
heating to melt the solder.

Contact me off line for complete instructions.

Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com
Phone:520-903-9366
Website: http://www.RMC-Scientific.com/microtomes/




From: wgong :      wgong-at-unm.edu -at-UNM.EDU
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 20:42:06 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Help!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear folks,

I am planning to order a high-enegy mill to prepare powders with size
down to at least 0.05 microns. If you happen to know this kind of
machinces and the producers, please tell me a little detailed imformation
on the model, price, company and company phone number.

You help will be greatly appreciated!

Weiliang Gong
Ph.D.




From: fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu (Kim DeRuyter)
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 19:05:16 -0900
Subject: TEM of Otoliths

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Microscopists,
I am being asked to fix and section fish otoliths for TEM. Does anyone
have a protocol? Or opinions? For instance do I have to decalcify? If so
is formic acid better than EDTA? How do I determine the end point of
decalcification. Can I use Epon or would another embedding media work
better? How much damage can I expect this to do to my diamond knife? I
did get a few tips from the University of Florida's web site but would
value input from anyone experienced in working with bone. Thanks very
much! Kim

-------------------

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy
PO Box 755780
University of Alaska
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5780
fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu
(907)-474-5452






From: L.D.Marks :      ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 05:29:46 -0600 (CST )
Subject: Re: TEM-Hydrofluoric acid protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am afraid that the hazards of HF were understated.
A decent spill on your body can be lethal. The "appropriate"
labwear apparently is a full body apron, gloves and a protective
visor -- remember the potential legal issues. You also need a
neutralizer (which costs a bit).

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60208-3108
tel: (847) 491-3996
fax: (847) 491-7820
email: l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http: //www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++





From: mks-at-mail.lanline.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 1998 06:59:42 +0000
Subject: Seeking older Philips SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking for an older Philips SEM in any condition. The vintage
I am interested in includes the models 515, 525 and 535. Please
contact me by e-mail or phone if you have any leads. Thanks, Al
Sicignano, mks-at-cyburban.com, phone/fax 914 241 0864.




From: Sally Shrom :      sally-at-retina.anatomy.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 09:25:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Aclar film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Thu, 22 Jan 1998, Beth Richardson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hey, y'all -
}
} Does anyone have experience sectioning tissue on Aclar film? I getting
} ready to embed some pollen that has been stuck to Aclar film. I want to
} know if Aclar is easy to embed and section. I'm use to sectioning tissue
} grown on dialysis tubing.

Hi Beth,
I have used Aclar many times. It is perfect! It embeds beautifully. It
reacts with nothing. It sections beautifully. It easily peels off the
polymerized epon if you want. I love it.
Sally Shrom


} Your comments are greatly appreciated.
}
} best regards,
} beth
}
} **************************************
} Beth Richardson
} EM Lab Coordinator
} Botany Department
} University of Georgia
} Athens, GA 30602
}
} Phone - (706) 542-1790
} FAX - (706) 542-1805
} Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
} **************************************
}
}
}





From: Giles Sanders :      pazghs-at-pan1.pharm.nottingham.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 14:33:25 GMT0BST
Subject: Contact for Cargille's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopists,

Do any of you have a contact telephone number for distributors of
Cargille's Immersion oil. A number in the UK/Europe would be ideal.
I have tried Nikon U.K., but they only stock type DF oil and I am
looking for the non-autofluorescing type.

Many thanks

Dr. Giles Sanders
Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis
School of Pharmacy
University of Nottingham




From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 10:33:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Hydrofluoric acid hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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After reading Laurie Marks' post I went to the safety office and
looked up HF in the CRC Handbook of Laboratory Safety. Laurie was correct
about the hazards of HF, and I understated them. The Handbook says, "It is
an extremely dangerous material and all forms, including vapors and solu-
tions, can cause severe, slow-healing, burns to tissue. At concentrations
of less than 50%, the burns may not be felt immediately, and at 20% the
effects may not be noticed for several hours." Also, "Fluoride ions readily
penetrate the skin and tissue and, in extreme cases, may result in necrosis
of the subcutaneous tissue which eventually may become gangrenous. If the
penetration is sufficiently deep, decalcification of the bones may result."
It goes on to say, "Dilute solutions and vapors may be absorbed by clothing
and held in contact with the skin, which will probably not result in an
immediate sensation of pain as a warning but eventually may lead to skin
ulcers which, again, may take some time to heal. A generalization might be
made here about absorbant clothing. In many instances, as in this case,
absorbant clothing which can retain toxic materials and maintain them in
close contact with the skin may be worse than no protection at all, changing
the exposure from a transient phenomena (sic) to a persistant one." I'm
sorry about my earlier post.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Zhiyu Wang :      wangz-at-hera.wku.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 09:43:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: TEM of Otoliths

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Kim:

I have been working on ultrastructure and micro-chemistry of fish
otolith for many tears in Hawaii. I have developed a protocol especially
for ultramicrotoming of undecalcified otolith. The following is my method:

1) Double embedding: Pick up a small piece of otolith ( {0.5mm),
embede it with Epon resin. Grind (#600 through #1200 sand paper). As soon
as the grinding plane reaches the otolith, stop. Put a drop of Spurr
resin on top and cure it. Then go grind-embed back and forth 3-5 times.
By doing this, the resin around otolith is compressed and stronger support
could be achieved.

2) Sectioning: I used Ultracut E for sectioning and it worked very well.
Use very low cutting speed, low level of water surface, and diamond knife.
Due to the high hardness of otolith, the otolith is acturally not
sectioned, but micro-broken. The enhanced embedding procedure can
prevent otolith from movement and turning, and hold the material of
otolith on wherever it was in otolith. You can see crystal-composed image
under TEM. The daily increment rings also can be seen in details under
x10K. The sections are suitable for EDS and EELS analysis as well as
element filter mapping.

3) Decalcification: Fish otolith is high calcified material with about
90% of inorganic. After decalcification, without support from inorganic
crystalls, the organic residure will be in form of pieces or dissolved. It
can not form a solid structure represent the structure of otolith.
Therefore, young otolith from few-day's larvae may have more organic
materials in otolith. After decalcification, you can see something left,
but it is in the form of gel. It is impossible to go through
fixation-dehydration and embedding procedure. I have never been
succesfull for decalcified otolith. You can decalcify otolith on surface
of sectioned block, then go through the fixation-dehydration and embedding
procedure on top of block. But for otolith research, the information
of micro-chemical components, location and distribution is much more
important than ultrastructure. The number of grow rings and its structure
can be better determined by light microscope with polarized ligh source
and SEM with SEI or BEI image models.

Hope it helps.
******************************************
Zhiyu Wang
Electron Microscope Lab and Imaging Center
Western Kentucky University(WKU)
Bowling Green KY 42101

Phone: (502)745-5993(office)
******************************************

On Thu, 22 Jan 1998, Kim DeRuyter wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Microscopists,
} I am being asked to fix and section fish otoliths for TEM. Does anyone
} have a protocol? Or opinions? For instance do I have to decalcify? If so
} is formic acid better than EDTA? How do I determine the end point of
} decalcification. Can I use Epon or would another embedding media work
} better? How much damage can I expect this to do to my diamond knife? I
} did get a few tips from the University of Florida's web site but would
} value input from anyone experienced in working with bone. Thanks very
} much! Kim
}
} -------------------
}
} Kim DeRuyter
} Histology and Electron Microscopy
} PO Box 755780
} University of Alaska
} Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5780
} fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu
} (907)-474-5452
}
}
}





From: Emitech-at-ix.netcom.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 10:33:22 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Low-Temperature SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Dr. Echlin,

Thank you for your correspondence regarding the Emitech cryo system.
We do not have an Emitech cryo system at the University of South
Africa in Durban. I believe you were operating a competitive system
that is in excess of 11 years old that was interfaced to a JSM35. So
the problems you encountered were not that of the Emitech system.

If you would like to have the opportunity to evaluate our system, we
would be more than happy to accomodate you.

Regards,

John Fitzpatrick
President & CEO
Emitech U.S.A., Inc.





From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 08:48:03 -0800
Subject: Re: Contact for Cargille's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dr. Sanders, try the following for Cargille RI Liquids:

Sara Mark
McCrone Scientific, Ltd.
McCrone House
155A Leighton Road
London NW5 2RD
UNITED KINGDOM

011 441 71 267-7199 voice
011 441 71 267-3383 fax

Dr. Giles Sanders wrote:

} Dear Microscopists,
}
} Do any of you have a contact telephone number for distributors of
} Cargille's Immersion oil. A number in the UK/Europe would be ideal.

{snip}

--
**********************************************************
Stephen A. Shaffer sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
MicroDataware http:www.microdataware.com
(Under reconstruction and temporarily out of service)
Personal stuff: steve_shaffer-at-compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/
**********************************************************






From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 12:00:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Contact for Cargille's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Giles,

The US office of Cargille's can probably help you. Their number is
201-239-6633. Jean Behlen is a good contact.

Get back to us if we can be of further assistance.

Regards,

Elinor Solit
The Microscope Book
800-440-0311

On Fri, 23 Jan 1998, Giles Sanders wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Microscopists,
}
} Do any of you have a contact telephone number for distributors of
} Cargille's Immersion oil. A number in the UK/Europe would be ideal.
} I have tried Nikon U.K., but they only stock type DF oil and I am
} looking for the non-autofluorescing type.
}
} Many thanks
}
} Dr. Giles Sanders
} Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis
} School of Pharmacy
} University of Nottingham
}





From: Julia Gross :      jgross-at-neuron.uchc.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 12:32:10 -0500
Subject: Decalcifying otoliths

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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See article by Bohne and Harding in Hearing Research 109(1997) 34 - 45.
On page 39 she describes taking thin, Durcupan embedded segments of
mouse cochlear duct and decalcifying them in EDTA(0.2M) THROUGH
the polymerized plastic. These are were viewed with LM and TEM.
Julie Gross
Dept. of Anatomy
University of CT Health Center
Farmington, CT 06030
860-679-2463
jgross-at-neuron.uchc.edu





From: Scott Whittaker :      sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 13:43:40 -0500
Subject: Sem Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The EM Core lab at the Interdiciplinary Center For Biotechnology Research,
University of Florida will be holding a 4 day Short course on Scanning
Electron Microscopy for Biologists Mar 9-12 1998. For more information
please check the following web site. Have a good day.


www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/news/course.html




} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {
GO GATORS
Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
EM Technician Gainesville, FL 32610
University Of Florida ph 352-392-1295
ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
The home of " Tips & Tricks "









From: Kathi Alexander :      akx-at-ornl.gov
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 14:20:46 -0400
Subject: Microscopy & Microanalysis '98

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All-
Remember that abstracts are due on FEBRUARY 1st (in nine days!) for the
Microscopy and Microanalysis '98 meeting to be held in Atlanta GA from July
12-16th, 1998. Check out the website at :

http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html

for more details on planned symposia as well as abstract submission.
Kathi

Kathleen B. Alexander
Metals and Ceramics Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
P.O. Box 2008 MS-6376
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376
PH (423) 574-0631
FAX (423) 574-0641







From: Ronn Wade :      rwade-at-umaryland.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 14:24:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Fixative Alternatives

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To: Jerome Jasso
Microscopy ListServer
Mike Dauzvardis

Mike forwarded Jerome Jasso's note to me for comment regarding Formalin
(HCOH) fixed gross anatomical specimens. The Anatomy Board administers
the Body Donor program and prepares cadavers and specimens for medical
education programs and research studies. Here at the Univ. of MD,
Anatomical Division, I also perform special preparations of gross
specimens including plastination.

In many research and tissue preparation labs there is still a need and use
for the aldehydes, whether it be Formaldehyde in path, Gluteraldehyde for
EM, or Paraformaldehyde for histology, etc. In "gross anatomy" study
labs, there is the need to prevent the dessication of the already
anatomically fixed or embalmed specimen while it is out for extended time
for study use. We use a "wetting fluid" to keep the specimens moist,
inhibiting dessication /dehydration and to alos prevent
airborne or cross contamination.

The Maryland Anatomical Embalming Fluid is composed of the histoic
chemical ingredients: Phenol (5.3%), Formaldehyde (1.8), Alcohol (10%)
and Glycerine (10%) by volume. The Fluid is shipped as a concentrate (1
part MAEF/ 2 parts H2O. I don't pay to ship water! We order in 50 gallon
drums but it can also be ordered in smaller quanites, 20 liter carboys,
for example. The Board has not compounded its formula for many years.
Instead we have a commercial chemical company (Hydro Chemical Co. -at-
800-345-8200 in Pennsylvania compound it for us. This is for both
reasons of staff safety and it is more cost-effective. You can call them
for information.

The "Maryland Wetting Solution" is the same formula as the Embalming
Fluid, only there is "NO" Formaldehyde in the solution at all. Phenol is
a far better agent that is cidal to all virus, bacteria, fungi, and molds
at the percent used in the formula. Formaldhyde can not make the same
claim...molds can still grow and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob (slow-virus) has
been shown to be Formalin resistent. Phenol (liquid carbolic acid) as the
Chlorosptic Throat Wash commercial states.....there's nothing better to
kill the bugs! Check the ingredients in it .. I was surprized.

The wetting fluid is not used for BRAIN. We fix whole brains in a 20%
HCOH Solution (Formalin) and after a thorough fixation (which can be
speeded up with glacial acetic acid, i.e. Dietrich's Solution)). The
"wet" brains can be stored in a 1-2% Formalin solution, or can be
plastinated whoe, in part, or sliced to render dry, fumeless, durable,
NON-TOXIC specimens that can be handled.

There are other non-formalin solutions available, many adveritse as
"Formaldehyde free" , such as NO-TOX, many are alcohol based. I have
found that some may work for histology (depending on the tissue) but most
don't work for gross specimens. There are solutions now avialable that
will "wash out" the HCOH in the tissue to reduce extended toxic exposure.
INFUTRACE (tm) BY S&S Co. of Georgia, distributed by Action Products, Att:
Mr. Gaylan Hayes -at- 800 862-5326.

I could go on but I hope this will answer some of the concerns.

Ronn Wade



Ronald S. Wade, Director (I.S.P. Treasurer)
Anatomical Services Division / State Anatomy Board
School of Medicine, University of Maryland
655 West Baltimore St. BRB B-024
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1559
Phone: Voice: (410) 706-3313
(410) 547-1222 (Anatomy Board)
Fax: (410) 706-8107
Home: (410) 987-1869

Email: RWADE-at-umarylandedu









From: Annette M. Andrews :      aandrews-at-NCTR.FDA.GOV
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 13:45:42 CST
Subject: Thank You

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Hello,

I'd like to extend my "THANK YOU" to all that replied to my request
for film scanner recommendations. I received some very helpful
information and have requested more information from specific
vendors.

Again, THANK YOU very much.


Annette Andrews, EM Lab.
PAI - NCTR, MC923
3900 NCTR Road
Jefferson, AR 72079
e-mail: aandrews-at-nctr.fda.gov
Phone: 870-543-7039




From: Rajesh Patel :      rpatel-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 16:11:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Sea Urchin sperm

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I am looking for a protocol for processing sea urchin sperm
for TEM/SEM and immunogold label. I'm interested in actin/
microtubules in the tail region.






********************************************************
* Raj Patel *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Robert Wood Johnson Medical School *
* 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854 *
* *
* voice (732) 235-4648; Fax -4825 *
* E-Mail rpatel-at-umdnj.du *
********************************************************





From: O'Neil, David :      David.O'Neil-at-nrc.ca
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 17:54:13 -0600
Subject: In situ hybridization

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To: Listserver


We are trying to accomplish In situ hybridization on LRWhite thick
sections on gelatin coated slides (slides are immersed in 1% gelatin
sol'n and baked at 60C overnight) but they always float off. We cannot
heat the sections; any suggestions?

David O'Neil tel: (902) 426-8258
National Research Council of Canada fax: (902) 426-9413
Institute for Marine Biosciences
1411 Oxford St.
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3Z1
Canada
email: david.o'neil-at-nrc.ca






From: Ron Oleka :      roleka-at-octonline.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 20:35:35 -0500
Subject: Bernoulli Storage Media

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Hello all

Is any one putting to pasture their Bernoulli 44 or 90 or 150Mb removable
media hard drives? Is there a chance you are willing to part with any of
the removable cartridges? Or do you know anyone who is?

Thanks in advance for any direct responses.
Ron Oleka
roleka-at-octonline.com
Tel 905-297-2222 ext2304






From: David Campbell :      davidcamp-at-igc.apc.org
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 17:49:06 -0800
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe





From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 11:54:41 +1100
Subject: Re: TEM of Otoliths

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Kim -
For the uninitiated, otolith is a bone in fish's ear, now used to estimate
the age of fish. Otolith have growth rings somewhat like trees).
I doubt that there will be anything left after decalcification. Try it. I
suggest that you use say 10% ascorbic acid in buffer, it's milder but EDTA
certainly will do.
A diamond knife will cut undecalcified otolith better than bone, but use a
"hard" mixture of whatever your favourite embedding medium. Block size
should be very small, but it would be anyway unless you are working on
whales.

Microprobe analysis suggests that the rings are visible because of
differing crystalline conditions as no elemental variations is detectable
across the otolith. Since spatial resolution of X-rays is much better in
TEM, you may be able find elemental variation and certainly you should
obtain greater morphological details then is possible in SEM.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au

--------------------------
} Microscopists,
} I am being asked to fix and section fish otoliths for TEM. Does anyone
} have a protocol? Or opinions? For instance do I have to decalcify? If so
} is formic acid better than EDTA? How do I determine the end point of
} decalcification. Can I use Epon or would another embedding media work
} better? How much damage can I expect this to do to my diamond knife? I
} did get a few tips from the University of Florida's web site but would
} value input from anyone experienced in working with bone. Thanks very
} much! Kim

} Kim DeRuyter
} Histology and Electron Microscopy
} PO Box 755780
} University of Alaska
} Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5780
} fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu
} (907)-474-5452
}
}




From: dC30gl8z0-at-astimay1.com
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 11:54:41 +1100
Subject: Re: TEM of Otoliths

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From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 98 02:06:42 -0500
Subject: Embedding porous polymers

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Mark Krass wrote:
=====================================================
I have a question regarding the sectioning of brittle polymers. I am
interested in observing the interior sectioned structure of a particular
polymer and examine by SEM. I don't believe this material can be embedded
in epoxy due to its porous and brittle nature. Any suggestions would help
along with a technique to observe the interior morphology.
=====================================================
Whether you can or can not embed the polymer depends mainly on the nature of
the porosity, that is, is it open celled or closed cell. It if it open
celled, you do have a good chance of success, if closed, then less of a
chance to zero chance. Second concern is to make sure your embedding system
is not in any way swelling or other wise interacting with the polymer system
under study. If that is happening, at least it has been our experience, it
is difficult to detect by SEM. That is why you should save the sections
that come off for possible examination by TEM at some later time. Such
interactions, if occurring, are much more readily seen by TEM than SEM.
Lastly, if you do the embedding under vacuum, you should in most cases be
able to get good infiltration and a good "block". We ourselves use our own
SPI-Pon 812 brand of resin but most of the so-called "Epon substitute"
resins would probably work in an equivalent way. We like this system for
this particular application because there seems to be less interaction with
the polymer being embedded.

Finally, you will increase your chances still further by using a diamond
knife as opposed to glass knives.

Disclaimer: Structure Probe, Inc. performs these kinds of studies for
clients as a laboratory service.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 09:06:22 +0000
Subject: Re: Hydrofluoric acid hazards

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} After reading Laurie Marks' post I went to the safety office and
} looked up HF in the CRC Handbook of Laboratory Safety. Laurie was correct
} about the hazards of HF, and I understated them. The Handbook says, "It is
} an extremely dangerous material and all forms, including vapors and solu-

snips ...

} made here about absorbant clothing. In many instances, as in this case,
} absorbant clothing which can retain toxic materials and maintain them in
} close contact with the skin may be worse than no protection at all, changing
} the exposure from a transient phenomena (sic) to a persistant one." I'm
} sorry about my earlier post.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol

I read up a safety book on HF years ago. The details were bad enough but
what really turned my stomach was the recommended treatment - immediate
injection into the centre of burns or suspected burns of calcium gluconate
(??).

I've never gone anywhere near the stuff since then - I sooner work with
high activity radiated material, or cyanide.

Regards,


--
Larry Stoter
17, Rocks Park Road, Uckfield, E. Sussex, TN22 2AT, UK
email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Phone/Fax: +44 (0)1825 767967






From: Lucio Mulestagno :      luciom-at-NEWTON.UMSL.EDU
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 09:07:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: unsubscribe

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Please unsubscribe

Dr.Lucio Mule'Stagno
MEMC Electronic Materials Inc University of Missouri -St.Louis
Silicon Materials Research Group Physics Dept.,
501 Pearl Dr., 8001 Natural Bridge rd.,
St.Peters, St.Louis
MO 63376 MO 63121
tel: 314 279 5338 314 516 5931/3
fax: 314 279 5363 314 516 6152
email: lmulestagno-at-memc.com luciom-at-newton.umsl.edu





From: Roy Klein :      RKlein-at-cmiinternational.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 09:08:57 -0600
Subject: Postion Opening: X-ray System Design Engineer

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Colleagues:

I am posting this for a local company in the ChicagoLand Area.
Please reply directly to them and not the ListServer.

Nestor

========================================================

Postion Opening: X-ray System Design Engineer

========================================================

We are seeking a Senior Circuit Design Engineer for the design of coating
measurement instruments. The technologies involved are x-ray fluorescence,
eddy current, Beta backscatter, and ultrasound.

Some experience with x-ray detector electronics, preamplifiers, and MCA
electronics is desired. Experience with eddy current and ultrasonic
circuitry is a plus.

Our company, CMI International, is one of the largest manufacturers of
coating measurement equipment. Our growth rate has been double digits for
over 10 years. Our location is Elk Grove Village, IL. See our Web site at
cmiinternational.com

Please send resume to rklein-at-cmiinternational.com or fax to Human Resources
Manager at 847-439-4425.






From: O. Stache :      questor-at-pegasus.dvz.fh-aachen.de
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 16:41:18 +0200
Subject: actin fluorescence

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Dear Madams and Sirs,

I'm doing my thesis at the Aachen University of Applied Sciences.
My research involves the actin-network in human blood cells.
I've been desperately seeking for a method to stain the actin network of
lymphocytes with a fluorescence in LIVING cells, but i can't
find a method.

Does anyone know about a method of staining the actin-network of living
cells for fluorescence mikroskopy ?

Oliver Stache




From: Grazyna Maria Tokarczyk :      misiak-at-is2.dal.ca
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 12:58:12 -0400 (AST)
Subject: imaging sodium

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Dear Microscopists,
Is there a method which would allow to measure, or preferably,
image in situ sodium concentrations in ACIDIC compartments of a cell? The
expected concentrations are in the millimolar range.

Grazyna Tokarczyk
Dept. Oceanography,
Dalhousie University,
Halifax, Canada

misiak-at-is2.dal.ca





From: Klaus D Jandt :      K.Jandt-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 07:58:34 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: SPM in Biomaterials Science

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Meeting announcement:

Meeting title:
"Scanning Probe Microscopy in Biomaterials Science, Dentistry and Medicine"

Aim:
The aim of this meeting is to give an overview of the use of scanning probe microscopy (SPM)
in biomaterials science, biotechnology, dentistry and medicine. Beginners in
the field of SPM and experts will be brought together. The meeting will be
rounded off with practical demonstrations.

Meeting Format:
A one day meeting with invited presentations, posters and practical demonstrations.

Date
2 April 1998

Venue
Redwood Lodge Hotel and Country Club, Bristol, UK.

Fees
There will be a registration fee of 10 GBP per delegate to be paid on arrival
at the meeting. Digital Instruments (UK) Ltd. have kindly agreed to sponsor the
rest of the costs of the meeting.

Expected Audience:
The meeting is aimed at a distinguished academic and industrial audience
with an interest in biomaterials science, biotechnology, dentistry and medicine.

Speakers:
High calibre international and national speakers. A list of speakers is available
under http://www.dent.bris.ac.uk/research/materials/Speakers.html

Organisers
Dr. rer. nat. Klaus D. Jandt, Mr. Richard W. Vowles (University of Bristol);
Digital Instruments (UK) Ltd.

More Information/ Registration/ Programme:
Can be found under
http://www.dent.bris.ac.uk/spm.htm









From: Daniele Spehner :      daniele.spehner-at-etss.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 14:18:22 +0100
Subject: re :actin fluorescence

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Dear Oliver,

I have a catalog of "proteins and reagents for investigating the
cytoskeleton". In France the products are sold by TEBU but you can find
all the information you need :
by phone : cytoskeleton , Denver USA : (303)322 2254
by e-mail : technical service : tservice-at-cytoskeleton.com
customer service : cservice-at-cytoskeleton.com

I never tested any of these products up to now so let me know if some
products work very well
Have a nice day,
-- =

**************************************************************
* Dani=E8le SPEHNER, CJF 94-03 INSERM *
* Etablissement de Transfusion Sanguine de STRASBOURG *
* 10 rue Spielmann, B.P. 36- 67065 Strasbourg-Cedex, FRANCE. *
* Tel : (33) 03 88 21 25 25 - Fax : (33) 03 88 21 25 21 *
**************************************************************




From: Ronn Wade :      rwade-at-umaryland.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 09:03:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Fixative Alternatives

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Regarding my previous note...There was a typo on the phone number for Mr.
Gaylan Hayes of Action Products in Virginia Beach, VA. It should be
800-865-5326 or 804-498-2623 or FAX 804-496-3894.


Ronald S. Wade, Director (I.S.P. Treasurer)
Anatomical Services Division / State Anatomy Board
School of Medicine, University of Maryland
655 West Baltimore St. BRB B-024
Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1559
Phone: Voice: (410) 706-3313
(410) 547-1222 (Anatomy Board)
Fax: (410) 706-8107
Home: (410) 987-1869

Email: RWADE-at-umaryland.edu





From: Peter Steele :      STEELEP-at-allkids.org
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 11:15:48 -0500
Subject: TEM - SERVICE Contracts

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Our annual service contract on our JEOL TEM 1210 is coming up for renewal. =
I am investigating third-party service contracts and third-party demand =
service. I am eager to hear other transmission microscopists=27 experience=
s with service contracts, particularly third-party service.

I also invite vendors providing service in West Central Florida to contact =
me via E-mail at this address (off the list).

Thanks,

Peter O. Steele, Ph.D., PMIAC

E-mail: steelep=40allkids.org




From: Randy Nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 10:24:04 -0600
Subject: Contrasting plant cuticle

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Hello,
I have a project in the plans that will require me to visualize the
cuticle of a plant leaf at the TEM. I intended to cut sections via
cryoultramicrotomy, and was hoping someone could suggest a reagent to
stain the cuticular layer. Anyone done this?
--
Randy Nessler rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Views expressed are my own.




From: Klaus D Jandt :      K.Jandt-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:08:02 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: SPM in Biomaterials Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Meeting announcement:

Meeting title:
"Scanning Probe Microscopy in Biomaterials Science, Dentistry and Medicine"

Aim:
The aim of this meeting is to give an overview of the use of scanning probe microscopy (SPM)
in biomaterials science, biotechnology, dentistry and medicine. Beginners in
the field of SPM and experts will be brought together. The meeting will be
rounded off with practical demonstrations.

Meeting Format:
A one day meeting with invited presentations, posters and practical demonstrations.

Date
2 April 1998

Venue
Redwood Lodge Hotel and Country Club, Bristol, UK.

Fees
There will be a registration fee of 10 GBP per delegate to be paid on arrival
at the meeting. Digital Instruments (UK) Ltd. have kindly agreed to sponsor the
rest of the costs of the meeting.

Expected Audience:
The meeting is aimed at a distinguished academic and industrial audience
with an interest in biomaterials science, biotechnology, dentistry and medicine.

Speakers:
High calibre international and national speakers. A list of speakers is available
under http://www.dent.bris.ac.uk/research/materials/Speakers.html

Organisers
Dr. rer. nat. Klaus D. Jandt, Mr. Richard W. Vowles (University of Bristol);
Digital Instruments (UK) Ltd.

More Information/ Registration/ Programme:
Can be found under
http://www.dent.bris.ac.uk/spm.htm









From: Michael J. Lyon, Ph.D. :      lyonm-at-vax.cs.hscsyr.edu (by way of Nestor
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 07:49:02 -0600
Subject: Light Boxes

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Does anyone know of a source for light boxes comparable to the one offered
by Imaging Research: Northern Light desktop illuminator? The price that
they want is very high around $2000.

Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks

Michael J. Lyon, Ph.D.






From: Augusto A. Morrone :      amorr-at-mse.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 07:53:36 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM - SERVICE Contracts

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Peter:
Just over a year ago, we switched some of our instruments to a service
provider called CIC that works as an HMO. CIC has a much larger contract
with the university covering all sorts of items that may need service. The
motivation for the switch is that while it saves us much needed money, this
arrangement is supposed to be transparent to us in the sense that we just
call the usual service provider when the intrument is down, and the service
provider bills CIC directly. In this way, the quality of service should not
be affected. However, I already experience two shortcomings: One due to the
fact that if the estimated cost of repair is above $5,000.- prior approval
from CIC is required to conduct the service. If the cost is substantially
higher, CIC may decide to get a "second opinion" from a repair service of
their choice (imagine the delays and consequences of having many "experts"
try their hands at your fine instrument!). Recently, I requested approval
on a repair that was estimated at $8,600 for parts only, and got approval
within a couple of days over the phone, calling CIC's toll free number.
That initial repair only helped pinpoint the problem, and the instrument is
still down. We are waiting for a new estimate, which in turn may lead to a
request for a "second opinion" ... The other is due to the fact that
instrument manufacturers will give priority to their contract customers. In
our case, we put two JEOL instruments, a microprobe and a HRTEM, under CIC
coverage, and continued JEOL contracts on two other JEOL instruments
(wisely, our director did not put all the eggs in one basket!). Generally,
we get reasonably fast service from JEOL on the last two (the instruments,
not the eggs), but a little slower response on the microprobe. It was a lot
harder, however, to get service for the more complex HRTEM. We called for
service on the HRTEM on November 17, work started on January 8, and after
some interruptions (it is still down) we are waiting for a new estimate to
report to CIC. When all intruments were on JEOL contracts we were getting
equally fas service.

I hope you get more information on this issue regarding other manufacturers
as well as JEOL, and make an informed decision. Good luck!

Augusto


At 11:15 AM 1/26/98 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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From: tflore-at-lsumc.edu (Flores, Teresa)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:00:29 -0600
Subject: Portable/Tabletop Cryostat

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}
} To:histonet
} From:tflore-at-lsumc.edu (Teresa Flores)
} Subject:Portable/Tabletop Cryostat
}
} Goodmorning Histoneters.
} Are any portable cryostats (tabletop) being manufactured? This portable
} cryostat should be able to go from hospital to hospital.
} If any have been invented, How much does it weigh? How much does it cost?
} Can disposable knives be used? Any special adaptors needed?
} A pathologist from Santiago, Chile has asked my boss to help him.
} The Pathologist from Chile is now using a CO2 tank that attaches to a
} sliding microtome which he takes from hospital to hospital.
} ( I am assuming its like the one the pathologist used to frozen section a
} piece of tissue, remove the section from the knife with his finger, place
} the tissue on a section on a glass bowl and with a glass rod pick it up
} and roll the tissue onto a paragon stain, pick tissue up and roll it onto
} water, pick up the section on a slide, place a drop of glycerine,
} coverslip it and view it w while my supervisor frozen sectioned another
} piece of tissue (in one of the first tissue tex cryostats (in 1969)) I was
} a med tech student.
} Anyway, any help would be appreciate it. I have a call into Leica also.
} Thanx for all you help and imput.
} Teresa Flores
} FAX:504-568-6037
}






From: GARONEL-at-cliffy.polaroid.com (LYNNE C GARONE)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:39:42 -0500
Subject: Software for modeling crystal structure

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My colleague is looking for software to model the crystal structure
obtained after microtoming her sample. She would like to know that she
has indeed found the center of a f.c.c. crystal. She wishes to
identify the section relative to the entire crystal morphology.

Thank You,
Xiu-Lin Gao
Lynne Garone




From: Jurgen Paetz :      JPaetz-at-amplats.co.za
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 15:58:59 +0200
Subject: Soft material sample prep.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear friends

We frequently have problems preparing materials which include soft
phases such as sulphate-complexes (sulfates for the Americans). The
polished sections are prone to ripping when prepared in the usual
manner. We have tried various different solvents as opposed to water
with varying degrees of success.

I am interested in finding out whether anybody uses special equipment or
has a special technique that they use for the preparation of soft
material samples.

Thanks in advance.

Jurgen Paetz
ARC Mineralogy
JHB
South Africa






From: Jurgen Paetz :      JPaetz-at-amplats.co.za
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 15:52:06 +0200
Subject: Image Analysis Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear fellow colleagues

Can anybody recommend a good image analysis course - preferably a hands
on workshop type rather than purely lectures. Tropical climate and
close proximity to beautiful beaches preferable.

We have recently purchased OPTIMAS and intend to utilise the system for
general modal abundance phase characterisation and quality control of
converter matte.

Thanks in advance

Jurgen Paetz
Senior Mineralogist
ARC
Johannesburg
sunny South Africa.







From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 09:49:27 -0500
Subject: Thin Sectioning, Serial Sectioning Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Constance Linville expressed problems with getting thin sections to stick=

together during sectioning. =


One of our applications staff suggested trying a very thin layer of a
dilute solution of rubber cement on the top and bottom faces of the block=

after trimming.

Let us all know how you do. =


(Your only problem might be getting sections apart after that!)

Steve Miller
Director of Sales North America
RMC
3450 S. Broadmont
Tucson, AZ 85713

We are a manufacturer of equipment for Electron Microscopy Specimen
Preparation.

Email: Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com
Website:http://www.RMC-Scientific.com/microtomes/




From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 09:49:29 -0500
Subject: TEM of Powders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You don't mention in your posting what the .05 um powders are composed of=
=2E
If you have not considered microtomy as an alternative please contact us
off line for a discussion of how they might be prepared for thin
sectioning.

Don't be discouraged if they are hard materials, Phil Swab has published =
a
paper showing BN on CVD diamond on Si thin sectioned for TEM.

Steve Miller
RMC
Email: Steve.Miller-at-RMC-Scientific.com
Website:http://www.RMC-Scientific.com/microtomes/




From: Gerroir,Paul :      Paul_Gerroir-at-xn.xerox.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 07:26:02 PST
Subject: LM/EM - Help with plant tissue culture?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello all,
Having little, (meaning 'virtually none') experience in preparing and
cultivating tissue samples I was hoping someone could suggest basic
reference materials/texts that might help me out here. I would be
especially interested in any related work on the subject of perennial
plants so that I might be of assistance to some young and aspiring
botanists/microscopists.

Thanks,
Paul Gerroir




From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 10:40:31 -0500
Subject: Conference Deadlines

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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REMINDER.. REMINDER.. REMINDER..


MSA
Microscopy and Microanalysis '98
Atlanta July 12 to 16

There are now only three working days to the February 1 deadline for
submission of abstracts.

=85=85=85=85=85.

ICEM
14th International Congress on Electron Microscopy
Cancun August 31 to September 4

Deadline for submission of abstracts is February 15 - but allow time for
mailing to Mexico. Details are to be found at http://icem.inin.edu
I have copies of the Second Circular and Call for Papers which I can send
if you need one.

=85=85=85=85=85.

Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From: Patricia Santiago :      santiago-at-lanl.gov
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:53:39 -0700
Subject: unsuscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Unsuscribe

Patricia Santiago
Center for Materials Science
M.S. K765
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos, N.M. 87545
Phone: (505)665-3035
Fax: (505)665-2992






From: PATRICIA SANTIAGO JACINTO :      psj-at-nuclear.inin.mx
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 09:56:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Subscribe

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Subscribe





From: J.F.Bailey :      JFB-at-novell.uidaho.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:50:48 PST
Subject: used TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking to obtain a used TEM of late 80's - early 90's vintage.
I would like EDX capabilities included, but not a necessity. If you
know of such an instrument, please Email me at jfb-at-uidaho.edu.

Franklin Bailey




From: Terry L Randall :      tlrandal-at-crnotes.cca.rockwell.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:19:12 -0600
Subject: used TEM

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unsubscribe






From: Bill Neill :      110155.1253-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 12:23:23 -0500
Subject: SEM networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Any smart computer folks out there who know if it is possible to run two
different (ethernet and token ring) =

network cards at the same time in a Wintel platform?
I'm trying to get an SEM on to two networks at the same time, or more
specifically, I'm trying to get the SEM pc to act as an intermediary link=

btween an EDX (ethernet) and the lab (token ring).
Thanks
Bill Neill




From: Bill Neill
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 13:07:10 -0500
Subject: SEM networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes.

It is possible to operate two network environments on the same machine. =
What confinguration do you have, are you running, OS2, NT, 95 or 3.1?

Evex Ananlytical


----------

Any smart computer folks out there who know if it is possible to run two
different (ethernet and token ring)=20
network cards at the same time in a Wintel platform?
I'm trying to get an SEM on to two networks at the same time, or more
specifically, I'm trying to get the SEM pc to act as an intermediary =
link
btween an EDX (ethernet) and the lab (token ring).
Thanks
Bill Neill






From: Ronnie Houston :      rhh1-at-airmail.net
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 12:24:17 -0800
Subject: EM on Perpiheral Nerve

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Could anyone share their processing cycle for human and animal nerve,
and also a reliable and reproducible staining technique for thick
sections? Thanks in advance for any help.
Ronnie Houston
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
Dallas




From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 12:24:12 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would think it should be possible with Windows 95 and maybe with 3.x
machines. My Windows 95 network setup would allow me to allow another
adapter (e.g., an IBM Token Ring card). Then the appropriate protocol would
have to be loaded and assigned to that card. I could imagine Windows would
get confused when it was called to do the same protocol on two different
adapters. But then I know that I can have NetBeui or TCP/IP set up on both
my ethernet card and my dial up adapter (i.e., modem). Normally, I would
suppose you would use one protocol on your token ring network and a
different one on your ethernet network.

That should allow the PC to be an intermediate stop on the way from one net
to the other. You should be able to mount network drives (one from each
side), and copy files back and forth while sitting at that PC. If you wanted
to make the machines on one side directly visible to machines on the other,
then you would need something to act as a bridge or gateway. That might
require a different kind of box or more special purpose software, maybe
something under Windows NT. But I will leave that to those who know more
than I do.

At 12:23 PM 1/27/98 -0500, you wrote:
} Any smart computer folks out there who know if it is possible to run two
} different (ethernet and token ring)
} network cards at the same time in a Wintel platform?
} I'm trying to get an SEM on to two networks at the same time, or more
} specifically, I'm trying to get the SEM pc to act as an intermediary link
} btween an EDX (ethernet) and the lab (token ring).
} Thanks
} Bill Neill

BTW, what do you mean "Wintel" machine? Do I understand you have an ethernet
link between the EDS PC and the SEM PC and that the SEM PC is also hooked up
to the lab token ring? I might have hooked the EDS PC to both sides, but
then our SEMs do not have full-blown PCs inside them yet anyway.

Hope this helps some.
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Jette Wendt-Larsen :      wendt-larsen-at-dou.dk
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 20:20:53 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: actin fluorescence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Oliver
I think the only possible way of staning the cytoskeleton of live cells is
to use microinjection, but the small size of your cells makes this very
difficult. I do not know much about the technique but even if you succeed
in loading some cells, the injection can cause "stress" and I think small
cells are more likely to react in this way. Check with experts.
The alternative is labelling fixed cells. Check out "Molecular Probes"
on www and search the net in general on this issue.
I have just been through it myself searching for tubulin specefic dyes.
I wanted to stain my cells live too, but have to live with
immunolabelling of fixed cells (flagellates).
You are welcome to e-mail me if you have any questions.

Best regards Jette

Note: I have no financial interest in any firms mentioned.

On Sun, 25 Jan 1998, O. Stache wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Madams and Sirs,
}
} I'm doing my thesis at the Aachen University of Applied Sciences.
} My research involves the actin-network in human blood cells.
} I've been desperately seeking for a method to stain the actin network of
} lymphocytes with a fluorescence in LIVING cells, but i can't
} find a method.
}
} Does anyone know about a method of staining the actin-network of living
} cells for fluorescence mikroskopy ?
}
} Oliver Stache
}









From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 16:57:19 -0500
Subject: Re: Light Boxes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Michael,
I just bought a light box from:

Aristo Grid Lamp Products, Inc.
35 Lumber Rd
Roslyn, NY 11576-2105

email: sales.agp-at-mail.aristogrid.com
or http://www.aristogrid.com

They will send you product literature. Hope this helps you in your search.

best regards,
beth



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
**************************************






From: George Sibbald :      geos-at-goldrush.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 17:04:33 -0700
Subject: Re: Soft material sample prep.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jurgen Paetz

If you have soft samples you should be aware of this microscopy
breakthrough that will give Bio-SEM labs new capabilities.

Magnetic AC Mode finally makes AFM a need tool for microscopy labs.

First Application http://green.la.asu.edu/pubs/nature/nature.html
Technique http://green.la.asu.edu/pubs/APL122396/magneticprobes.html
Review Article http://molec.com/educ/review1/review.html
New Data acquisition http://green.la.asu.edu/pubs/MACforce/index.html
http://molec.com/apps/csafm/CSAFM-app1.html

Highest resolution in situ atomic force microscopy.

Molecular imaging:
- Under biological buffers
- At 37C temperature control (or hot or cold)
- Surface characteristics
. force measurements in reaction to functionalized probes
. viscoelasticity
. thermal conductivity
. capacitance (dielectric)
. impedance
. electrostatic force and surface potential
. electrical conductivity
. magnetic



At 03:58 PM 1/27/98 +0200, Jurgen Paetz wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From: John Chandler :      chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 17:45:38 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM - SERVICE Contracts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Peter:
} Just over a year ago, we switched some of our instruments to a service
} provider called CIC that works as an HMO. CIC has a much larger contract
} with the university covering all sorts of items that may need service.

*** some deleted ***

} request for a "second opinion" ... The other is due to the fact that
} instrument manufacturers will give priority to their contract customers.

*** more deleted ***

This is why we have not gone with such an insurance company for our
electron microscopes. The Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Colorado State
University uses one for almost all their equipment, I'm told, and it works
for them. We didn't want to risk it, though. When you go with an
insurance company, you will not be on service contract with the
manufacturer. Just my $0.02's worth.

John
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU






From: Fjhblazq :      Fjhblazq-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 19:33:11 EST
Subject: LM: Microtome pour glicolmetracrilate en France

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bonjour messieurs dames histologistes ou patologistes=0A=0AJe travaille =
=E0 Lyon, France, avec mat=E9riel biologique (tissu animal) inclus en=0Ag=
licol metacrilate, mais je n'ai pas microtome pour couper mes bloques de=
=0Ar=E9sine. Je voudrais savoir si vous avez un microtome avec l'accessoi=
re pour=0Autiliser le couteau de verre ou le couteau de diamant pour coup=
es de 1-2=0Amicrons et si vous pouvez me laisser couper le mat=E9riel en =
votre microtome.=0AJ'ai les couteaux. J'ai besoin de ces coupes pour ma r=
echerche post-doctoral. =0AJe vous remercie.=0A=0AFrancisco Javier Hernan=
dez Blazquez=0AUniversit=E9 Claude Bernard I - Lyon=0AFacult=E9 de Medici=
ne=0A=0ATelefone/Fax (33) 4 78490449=0Afjhblazq-at-aol.com=0A=0A





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 98 00:51:00 -0500
Subject: Light boxes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Michael J. Lyon, Ph.D. wrote:
=========================================
Does anyone know of a source for light boxes comparable to the one offered
by Imaging Research: Northern Light desktop illuminator? The price that
they want is very high around $2000.
=========================================
Most of the suppliers of consumables and accessories for microscopy
laboratories offer light boxes of varying types, sizes and costs. The light
boxes offered by SPI can be found on our website.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From: Luc Harmsen :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 10:32:56 +0200
Subject: More details when asking for Equipment.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am sure this has come up before, but could subscribers asking for =
equipment or technical assistance give a bit more information about =
themselves.
Someone asking for a second-hand TEM, for instance, but does not mention =
where in the world they are, makes it difficult to know if some of us =
out side of the USA should assist.
I realise that this is the USA listserver, but there is a whole other =
part of the world out side of the USA who get involved with the USA.

Thanks=20

Luc Harmsen
Anaspec, South Africa
Technical support for E.M. operators, world wide.
anaspec-at-icon.co.za
TEL: ++ 27 (0) 11 476 3455
FAX: ++ 27 (0) 11 476 7290=20

=00




From: Deutschlaender, Norbert, Path. :      DEUTSCHLAE-at-MSMPFEI.Hoechst.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 10:54:00 +0100
Subject: More details when asking for Equipment.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Unsubscribe.




From: Gary Dietrich Chinga :      garyc-at-stud.ntnu.no
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 11:55:12 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Thin Sectioning, Serial Sectioning Problems

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On Tue, 27 Jan 1998, Steven W. Miller wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Constance Linville expressed problems with getting thin sections to stick
} together during sectioning.
}
} One of our applications staff suggested trying a very thin layer of a
} dilute solution of rubber cement on the top and bottom faces of the block
} after trimming.
}
} Let us all know how you do.
}
} (Your only problem might be getting sections apart after that!)
}
} Steve Miller

I am using mounting media in toluene (1:1) only in the bottom
face of the block. It gives very good results!

-----
Gary.
NTNU
Norway






From: Energy Beam Sciences, Inc. :      ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 07:30:46 -0500
Subject: Microtome pour glicolmetracrilate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists,

At 07:33 PM 1/27/98 EST, Francisco Javier Hernandez Blazquez asked about
microtomes for plastic (glycol methacrylate) sections.

Energy Beam Sciences manufactures the JB-4 and JB-4A microtomes for this
purpose. Interested parties can find information about these instruments at
our web site (http://www.ebsciences.com) or may contact me directly
back-channel.

Best regards,
Steven E. Slap, Vice-President
********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Adding Brilliance To Your Vision
ebs-at-ebsciences.com
http://www.ebsciences.com/
********************************





From: Randy Tindall :      rtindell-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 09:19:38 -0700
Subject: SEM, dispersal agents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings,

We're preparing to do a protocol for viewing of mycorrhizal hyphae in SEM
and in going over some literature we were puzzled by an instruction that
called for 2 g samples of soil to be "dispersed in 200 mils of 0.1% Decon".
I assume that we're not talking about rat poison here, and we've been
unable to locate anything under the name Decon in the standard chemical
supply catalogs.

Has anybody heard of this? Can other standard dispersal/deflocculation
agents be substituted?

Thanks for any advice.

Randy


Randy Tindall
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003

rtindell-at-nmsu (work)
nrtindall-at-zianet.com (home)




From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 12:03:49 -0600
Subject: TEM?s

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,
1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric discharge between
film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the film plates to a
box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while separating the
sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets. Sometimes quite a
show but at the expense of data.

2. Not so long ago we replaced our LaB6. The image of the filament was a
very nice cross with a well defined point in the center. Hi-Res work
was better than ever before, in fact GREAT. The filament image held for
several 2-300 hours. Then it changed overnight, blooming in the
center. Ok, I thought this is awful soon & abrupt for such a failure
but onward through the fog. A few days later the image became a sharp
pretty well defined line. I do not believe this was an astigmatism in
the optical system as I could obtain symmetrical expansion of the spot
(accepting it's geometry). Last night I began to see changes to the
line. I should point out that the imaging is in general still pretty
good, off a bit perhaps & I have had to increase the bias voltage to get
beam current up to the desired level (10uA). The instrument is a Jeol
2010 & the filament Kimball Phy. 60-06.
Can anyone tell me that I have other than a filament problem? Is
there a source on modes of filament failures about?

3. I thought that I understood the origin of the cross in the filament
image with our Denka but the Kimball Phy. geometry is that of a
sharpened cylinder. Is this due to crystal orientation rather than
physical geometry?


Thanks
Bruce Brinson
Rice U.






From: GARONEL-at-cliffy.polaroid.com (LYNNE C GARONE)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 13:08:28 -0500
Subject: Qualification-need for software for modeling Xtal structure

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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My colleague, Xiu-lin Gao asked me to qualify the recent request made
by her to the list server regarding software for modeling crystal
structure as follows:
I am looking for a software, which performs 3D-simulation of crystal
shape and identify crystal structure of cross-section after
microtoming the individual crystal from crystal surface with different
cutting angles.
Thanks,
Lynne Garone
Polaroid Corp.
GaroneL-at-Polaroid.com
GaoX-at-Polaroid.com




From: Janine Sherrier :      djs56-at-mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 18:51:47 +0000
Subject: Re: LM/EM - Help with plant tissue culture?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Paul,
There are lots of good references about preparing plant material for
microscopy. Do you want to do TEM or SEM or LM? Immunolabelling? What
kind of samples do you want to use? Tissue cultured cells, pieces of whole
plants? If you can be a bit more specific with your request I can send you
loads of references. If you're not sure right now, let me know, and I'll
recommend some more general material.

Best wishes,
Janine Sherrier
djs56-at-mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
University of Cambridge
England
} Hello all,
} Having little, (meaning 'virtually none') experience in preparing and
} cultivating tissue samples I was hoping someone could suggest basic
} reference materials/texts that might help me out here. I would be
} especially interested in any related work on the subject of perennial
} plants so that I might be of assistance to some young and aspiring
} botanists/microscopists.
}
} Thanks,
} Paul Gerroir
}
}





From: Beverly E Maleeff -at- SB_PHARM_RD
Date: 28-Jan-98 07:45:43 PM
Subject: Looking for opinions on CD-R

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To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com-at-inet
cc:

Colleagues:

I'm dredging up an old question, but here goes. We're looking to add a
CD-Recordable unit to an existing image analysis workstation. I'd like to
hear comments, good or bad, about any CD-Rs with which you've had some
experience. TIA.


Regards,
Bev Maleeff

SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals
Toxicology-US, UE 0462
709 Swedeland Road
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610/270-7987
610/270-7202 fax
Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com








From: Michael OKeefe :      Michael_OKeefe-at-macmail.lbl.gov
Date: 28 Jan 1998 11:19:19 -0700
Subject: TEM Sectioning (large)

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All-

We have a LARGE sectioning problem. To create a
display showing the internals of a TEM, we need
to section the whole microscope column.

Ideally, we would like to remove a 120deg wedge,
but 90deg would be acceptable (we have been told
that 180deg would cause things to fall apart).

Does anyone know who might be able to carry out
such a sectioning job? We would prefer someone
close to Berkeley rather than have to ship the
TEM too far.

Thanks for your (anticipated) help.
-Mike O'Keefe
(now to get back to the MSA abstract. . .).

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Michael A. O'Keefe, Deputy Head
National Center for Electron Microscopy
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS72
University of California
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, California 94720
tel: (510) 486-4610
fax: (510) 486-5888
email: maok-at-lbl.gov
http://ncem.lbl.gov/
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++






From: Kathi Alexander :      akx-at-ornl.gov
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 14:48:02 -0400
Subject: Microscopy & Microanalysis '98

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by cosmail1.ctd.ornl.gov (PMDF V5.1-10 #23475)
with ESMTP id {0ENI00M1MEXOO2-at-cosmail1.ctd.ornl.gov} for
microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.com; Wed, 28 Jan 1998 14:46:38 -0500 (EST)

All-

******* LAST REMINDER !!! ********

Abstracts are due on FEBRUARY 1st (in five days!) for the Microscopy and
Microanalysis '98 meeting to be held in Atlanta GA from July 12-16th, 1998.
Check out the website at :

******* LAST REMINDER !!! ********


http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html

for more details on planned symposia as well as abstract submission.

Kathi

Kathleen B. Alexander
Metals and Ceramics Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
P.O. Box 2008 MS-6376
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376
PH (423) 574-0631
FAX (423) 574-0641







From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 14:43:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM?s

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Bruce,

} 1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric discharge between
} film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the film plates to a
} box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while separating the
} sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets. Sometimes quite a
} show but at the expense of data.
}
Ah, yes, Kurlian microscopy. If you think it's bad using SO163,
wait till you try Lo Dose! One possibility is to leave the film in the
(metal?) plates and transport in a bigger box.
I have often had discharge problems while putting film into the
plates--it's worst in winter when the ambient air is dryest. I've found
that wearing a synthetic-fiber lab coat is detrimental. The best way I've
found to separate films is to hold my left thumb firmly on the stack of
sheets--emulsion down, of course--and lift a corner of the top sheet with
my right hand. I can then peel the sheet off the stack and release it
from my thumb without causing a discharge. The secret is not to slide
the top sheet over the rest of the stack. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Stan Jones :      srjones-at-ktc.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 14:04:34 -0600
Subject: TEM collaboration

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0058_01BD2BF5.A966A420
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am seeking a student enrolled in a TEM course, interested in =
collaborating on a study of spermatogenesis in a fly (Diptera) species. =
I would provide the material, which is soft tissue, easily fixed, =
stained, and sectioned. This would be an excellent study for someone =
new to TEM, and would lead to a co-authored publication, and some very =
interesting micrographs.

If you are interested, or know of someone who might be, please contact =
me at:

srjones-at-ktc.com
Stan Jones, Ph.D.

------=_NextPart_000_0058_01BD2BF5.A966A420
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charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

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{/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#c8e0d8}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} I am seeking a student enrolled in a =
TEM course,=20
interested in collaborating on a study of spermatogenesis in a fly =
(Diptera)=20
species.  I would provide the material, which is soft tissue, =
easily fixed,=20
stained, and sectioned.  This would be an excellent study for =
someone new=20
to TEM, and would lead to a co-authored publication, and some very =
interesting=20
micrographs. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} If you are interested, or know of =
someone who=20
might be, please contact me at: {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {A=20
href=3D"mailto:srjones-at-ktc.com"} srjones-at-ktc.com {/A} {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Stan Jones, =
Ph.D. {/FONT} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_0058_01BD2BF5.A966A420--





From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 14:25:31 -0600
Subject: Nanoplast resin, TEM

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Dear fellow E-Microscopists:
I'm having some difficulties cutting sections with my newly achieved Nanoplast
FB101 and I am wondering if there is anyone who has experience with that
particular resin. My problem is, that the cured resin seems to be extremely hard
and very brittle. It shatters when I attempt to cut sections of 100 nm with a
diamond knife. This problem occurred after I proceeded with the embedding and
hardening as follows:
First I prepared MME/ catalyst mixtures using three different concentrations of
the catalyst: 0.15, 0.2 and 0.25 g B52 per 10 g MME 7002. Then I pipetted my
samples--unicellular algae--into the tip of a size '0' BEEM capsule, and I added
just enough resin-mix to fill the cone on the tip of the capsule. Then I
dehydrated the samples for two days at 40 oC and cured them for another two days
at 60 oC. However, the oven went up to 80oC during the last 48hrs and maybe that
caused the problem. In order to support my Nanoplast blocks, I then filled the
BEEMs up with Spurr's resin that I cured overnight at 70 oC. As I already
mentioned, the resin blocks turned out to be superhard and, in our experience,
too brittle for cutting sections. Supposedly the resin should be 'as hard as
glass', according to its developers. Is it maybe too hard by nature for cutting
with a conventional diamond knive or did something go wrong? If that's the case,
what went wrong? In order to find out, I'm trying to control the temperature
more rigidly and to use smaller catalyst concentrations.
Does anyone have different suggestions for emendations? similar experiences?
ideas how to emulate the resin performance? I'd be more than happy if you could
share your thoughts and ideas with me.
Thanks very much,
Thomas Jabusch



Gib Ahlstrand, Minnesota Micoscopy Society Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu





From: fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu (Kim DeRuyter)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 11:38:52 -0900
Subject: Otolith Thanks

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Thanks to everyone who has so generously sent protocols and refrences in
regaurd to my fish otolith questions. Kim

-------------------

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy
PO Box 755780
University of Alaska
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5780
fnksd1-at-aurora.alaska.edu
(907)-474-5452






From: bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu (JIM ROMANOW)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 15:53:21 -0400
Subject: Pentium/edx interfacing?

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I would like to upgrade my edx system by replacing the original Tracor
Northern TN2000 processing hardware with a Pentium based system (not yet
purchased). I am using Kevex model 3201-C-VS detector/2003 preamp (yes, a
Kevex detector on a TN system OEM). Can someone please guide me to a
reliable vendor of the best PC edx interfacing boards and software for this
kind of modification? The detector will have to stay for now due to cost
restrictions. This seems like the least expensive way to upgrade. What is
your experience? I intend to upgrade the detector eventually.

This system is mounted on a Zeiss/LEO DSM982 Gemini FESEM.

Thank you.
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-131
Storrs, CT 06269
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax






From: Scott Whittaker :      sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 16:29:09 -0500
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

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Just had our 2 year old HP go bad. Decided to get a Dynatek, but it's not
in yet. Our olympus is running strong though.



At 02:45 PM 1/28/98 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {
GO GATORS
Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
EM Technician Gainesville, FL 32610
University Of Florida ph 352-392-1295
ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
The home of " Tips & Tricks "









From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 16:33:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Pentium/edx interfacing?

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} I would like to upgrade my edx system by replacing the original Tracor
} Northern TN2000 processing hardware with a Pentium based system (not yet
} purchased). I am using Kevex model 3201-C-VS detector/2003 preamp (yes, a
} Kevex detector on a TN system OEM). Can someone please guide me to a
} reliable vendor of the best PC edx interfacing boards and software for this
} kind of modification?

Dear Jim and List,
I too have a TN2000 with a Kevex detector, and I'd be interested
in the replies. TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Terry L Randall :      tlrandal-at-crnotes.cca.rockwell.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 15:42:42 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 04:10:54 -0600
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

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} I'm dredging up an old question, but here goes. We're looking to add a
} CD-Recordable unit to an existing image analysis workstation. I'd like to
} hear comments, good or bad, about any CD-Rs with which you've had some
} experience. TIA.


We are happy with our 1.5 yr old Pinnacle Micro CDR burner but if I were
buying another one today I would probably buy the APS brand. They make a
nice compact combo unit consisting of a Jaz drive and the CD Burner for
less than we paid for the Pinnacle alone.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 17:13:40 EST
Subject: Re: Soft material sample prep.

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Jurgen,

Just a thought on soft materials and their sectioning: Several investigators
have had success in the materials sciences by using cryoultramicrotomy. I
think this would be worth investigating for your project as well.

Frozen ultrathin sectioning is the way to go for many samples including
rubbers, plastics, polymers and other materials which may be flexible or
pliable at room temperature and that do not embed well in plastic.

An additional benefit is that you can alter the sectioning properties of the
material by simply changing the temperature of the cryochamber, the knife, or
both. Most synthetics have fairly well-defined transition temperatures and
seem to section best at or near their transition temperatures. I don't know
if this would hold true for your specimens, but it is something to think
about.

If you need additional information, feel free to contact me off-list.

Best regards,
Bob
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti
E. Licht Company / 1-800-865-4248
rchiovetti-at-aol.com

*********************************
Leica (Wild, Leitz, Bausch&Lomb, Cambridge, AO, Reichert-Jung) / Technical
Instrument Company / American Volpi / Fostek / Stocker and Yale / AEI North
America / OptiQuip / Dolan-Jenner / Osram / G.E. / Philips / Ushio / Boeckler
Instruments / Heidenhain / Narishigi / Colorado Video / Visual Environments of
California, Inc. / Kinetic Systems / Pacific Precision Laboratories, Inc. /
Pryor Scientific / Compumotor / Sutter Instrument Co. / Advanced Database
Systems / Cohu / Javeline Electronics / Optronics / Diagnostic Instruments,
Inc. / Dage MTI / Hitachi / Panasonic / Polaroid / Kodak / Mitsubishi / Sony




From: Greg Strout :      gstrout-at-ou.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 17:03:40 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM?s

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When it absolutly has to be static discharge free I'll leave the film in
my dessicator overnight after removing it from the camera. It seems to
me that the film experiences this problem most often right out of the
microscope where it has been exposed to the most dry, dessicated
conditions that film will ever see. Overnight in the film dessicator
(rotary pumped chamber) and the film is less apt to have static
discharges. Hope this helps.
Greg Strout

}
} Dear Bruce,
}
} } 1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric discharge between
} } film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the film plates to a
} } box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while separating the
} } sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets. Sometimes quite a
} } show but at the expense of data.
} }
}
--
========================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not neccessarily
those of the University of Oklahoma
========================================================




From: Randy Tindall :      rtindell-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 16:40:09 -0700
Subject: TEM?s

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Hello All,
} 1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric discharge between
} film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the film plates to a
} box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while separating the
} sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets. Sometimes quite a
} show but at the expense of data.

This generally seems to happen more low-humidity environments. You might
try adjusting the humidity of your work space, if possible. You might also
try working with your films on a grounded anti-static mat, like those made
for working with sensitive electronic components and computer parts. Don't
know what they cost, but they seem to help. Also, m-o-v-e s-l-o-w when
working with films. Shuffling them around fast is guaranteed to generate
lightning storms.
}
} 2. Not so long ago we replaced our LaB6. The image of the filament was a
} very nice cross with a well defined point in the center. Hi-Res work
} was better than ever before, in fact GREAT. The filament image held for
} several 2-300 hours. Then it changed overnight, blooming in the
} center. Ok, I thought this is awful soon & abrupt for such a failure
} but onward through the fog. A few days later the image became a sharp
} pretty well defined line. I do not believe this was an astigmatism in
} the optical system as I could obtain symmetrical expansion of the spot
} (accepting it's geometry). Last night I began to see changes to the
} line. I should point out that the imaging is in general still pretty
} good, off a bit perhaps & I have had to increase the bias voltage to get
} beam current up to the desired level (10uA). The instrument is a Jeol
} 2010 & the filament Kimball Phy. 60-06.
} Can anyone tell me that I have other than a filament problem? Is
} there a source on modes of filament failures about?
}

Just curious---is your filament voltage stable? (I don't mean accelerating
voltage here.) As I recall, LaB6 filaments come with a maximum voltage
written on the box, determined by the manufacturer. On some Hitachi
scopes, voltage can be set on the configuration menu and has a big effect
on how saturation and bias affect the filament image. You can adjust this
if, for example, you're getting a shadow at what should be full saturation.
Take great care not to set it higher than the manufacturer's
recommendation, however, or you can damage the crystal.
}
}
Randy Tindall
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003

rtindell-at-nmsu (work)
nrtindall-at-zianet.com (home)




From: Stuart McKernan :      mckernan-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 18:16:26 -0600
Subject: MSA Bits and Pieces

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Greetings,

1) A new season of MSA Bulletins is about to begin. As you have all been going
through your negatives looking for the perfect images to include in your
abstracts - see 3 - this is a good opportunity to remind you that the Bulletin
is always looking for fun, interesting, humerous, witty, etc. images to liven up
the content. If you have any such material in almost any form, they can be sent
to me at the address at the end of this message.

2) Those of you who are MSA members should have recieved a Project Micro special
issue with your recent copy oc Microscopy and Analysis.

The Minnesota Microscopy Society web page has recently been updated for those
of you interested in showing kids (of any age) the sort of thing that
microscopes can do for you can check out our mi=onthly exploration at:

http://resolution.umn.edu/MMS/ProjectMicro/gallery.html

3) Obligatory reminder (as program vice-chair elect):

__________________________________________________________________________
Abstracts are due on FEBRUARY 1st (this weekend!) for the Microscopy and
Microanalysis '98 meeting to be held in Atlanta GA from July 12-16th, 1998.
Check out the website at :

http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html

for more details on planned symposia as well as abstract submission.





__________________
Stuart McKernan stuartm-at-tc.umn.edu
Microscopy Specialist
CIE Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota Phone: (612) 626-7594
100 Union Street S. E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 Lab: (612) 624-6590





From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 08:07:39 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM:static discharges

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} } 1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric discharge between
} } film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the film plates to a
} } box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while separating the
} } sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets. Sometimes quite a
} } show but at the expense of data.
} }
} Ah, yes, Kurlian microscopy. If you think it's bad using SO163,
} wait till you try Lo Dose! One possibility is to leave the film in the
} (metal?) plates and transport in a bigger box.
} I have often had discharge problems while putting film into the
} plates--it's worst in winter when the ambient air is dryest. I've found
} that wearing a synthetic-fiber lab coat is detrimental. The best way I've
} found to separate films is to hold my left thumb firmly on the stack of
} sheets--emulsion down, of course--and lift a corner of the top sheet with
} my right hand. I can then peel the sheet off the stack and release it
} from my thumb without causing a discharge. The secret is not to slide
} the top sheet over the rest of the stack. Good luck.

A shocking state of affairs. I got a charge out of this message.

I hearily second W. Tivol's recommendations - especially about NOT sliding
one sheet of film over another. In addition, we do the following:

1. Work on top of a grounded surface. We use carbon-impregnated 3 x 3 ft
mats attached to a grounding strip. Computer people use them in order to
work on electronic components that are sensitive to static. It is also a
good idea (in high static situations) to wear a grounding strap on your
wrist -- again just like the computer types. All negs are transported to
and from the strip in metal containers so that when one places the
container down on the strip, the static is discharged from the exterior of
the container onto the mat.

2. The area around the mat is wet wiped with a lintless or cotton towel in
order to generate a humid environment nearby. This really helps. You should
take care, however, not to place any of your films or containers onto the
moist zones. Work on the mat. If you suspect static buildup, you can
dissipate the charge by breathing onto the film prior to handling - -} like
you were trying to fog your glasses in order to clean them.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 21:23:19 -0600
Subject: PLM wavelength shift.

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To All,

Over the years, and today too, I have learned that when taking polarized
light microscopy micrographs on Ektachrome 64T there is a color shift
depending on how much the polarizer and analyzer are crossed; i.e. if the
polarizer and analyzer are parallel to each other, then there is little
color shift in the color slide. However, as the polarizer and analyzer are
brought to the crossd (perpendicular) position, the background takes on a
very definite green hue, almost as if the filters are selectively removing
the blue and red portions of the spectrum.

Can anyone explain to me why these two supposedly neutral filters when
brought nearly to the crossed position, say within 6-12 degrees of being
crossed, cause the micrograph to take on a green cast that requires a 15M
to make the background a more neutral gray?

Thanks in advanace for explaining either a very complex or very simple
question. {As long as the answer is simple, I'll be OK :-)}

Damian Neuberger
neuberd-at-baxter.com
or
dneuberger-at-mindspring.com




From: Randy Tindall :      rtindell-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 23:43:23 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM?s

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At 10:33 PM 1/28/98 -0600, you wrote:
} Randy,
} The only feed back I would have on the filament heater current would be in the
} beam current readout. Beam current is very steady. Thanks for the suggestion,
} I'll prod the field engineer when he arrives. With respect to saturation, the
} image is reasonable, just constantly evolving geometry.
}
}
Peter,

I'm not talking about the filament heating current, but rather the voltage
applied to the filament. I'm not an electronics guru, nor am I familiar
with JEOL scopes, but with regard to the filament, you have filament
current, filament voltage, gun bias, and accelerating voltage, and they are
all different. I don't know much more than that, unfortunately. The only
LaB6 I've worked with was on a Hitachi H7100FE, and as long as we didn't
exceed the recommended voltage supplied by Hitachi, we could often get rid
of unwanted filament shadows and weird shapes seen at cross-over. These
things definitely changed as the filament aged. Wish I was more informed.
Please let me know what you find out, because I'm curious, too.

One final thought. When we have seen really strange sights at crossover,
like straight lines, etc., very often the condenser stigmators were way off.
You might check this. If you can't get decent stigmation, look into some
kind of contamination in the gun area or on one of the column apertures. A
chunk of something nasty in an aperture can really El Nino your day, if you
catch my drift.

Best of luck and let me know what happens.

Randy

Randy Tindall
2017 Princess Jeanne
Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001-4157

rtindell-at-nmsu.edu (work)
nrtindall-at-zianet.com (home)





From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 02:28:16 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM Sectioning (large)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm sorry I don't recall the name of the gentleman responsible, but
at least a few EMs were sectioned here in the midwest a couple of
decades ago. I have seen the results both at the Museum of Science
and Industry in Chicago and at the former Center for Electron
Microscopy at the University of Illinois. I have no contacts for
the Museum, but either Dr. Richard Crang or Dr. Birute Jakstys, who
are both I believe still with the University of Illinois, could
possibly give further information.

As I recall, the first step was to stabilize the internal electron
optic column parts by vacuum impregnation of a plastic or epoxy.
After all of the internal spaces were filled, a simple series of
longitudinal saw cuts were made to section the instrument followed
by a polishing of the exposed surfaces. With attention to detail,
you could probably manage to have all of the work done locally. It
may be easier to do the impregnation in-house and use a good local
contract machine shop for the actual sectioning and surface
finishing. With the impregnation, a 180 degree cut should not be a
problem, and the complementary section could perhaps be donated to a
local museum.

If you have any problems, or find the project too daunting, let me
know. I could certainly complete the project here, at a price ;)

} All-
}
} We have a LARGE sectioning problem. To create a
} display showing the internals of a TEM, we need
} to section the whole microscope column.
}
} Ideally, we would like to remove a 120deg wedge,
} but 90deg would be acceptable (we have been told
} that 180deg would cause things to fall apart).
}
} Does anyone know who might be able to carry out
} such a sectioning job? We would prefer someone
} close to Berkeley rather than have to ship the
} TEM too far.
}
} Thanks for your (anticipated) help.
} -Mike O'Keefe
} (now to get back to the MSA abstract. . .).
}
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Michael A. O'Keefe, Deputy Head
} National Center for Electron Microscopy
} Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS72
} University of California
} 1 Cyclotron Road
} Berkeley, California 94720
} tel: (510) 486-4610
} fax: (510) 486-5888
} email: maok-at-lbl.gov
} http://ncem.lbl.gov/
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
}
}
Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, IL 60174
PH 630.513.7093 FAX 630.513.7092 Email: ars-at-mcs.net
WWW: http://www.mcs.net/~ars
Analytical instrument maintenance services




From: Wolf Schweitzer :      wschweitzer-at-access.ch
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:45:36 +1000
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:33:17 +1000
} To: Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com
} From: Wolf Schweitzer {wschweitzer-at-access.ch}
} Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R
} Cc:
} Bcc:
} X-Attachments:
}
} The Philips CDD 2660 seems to work alright as a writer/reader device. I
} use Apple Macintosh System 7.6.1 and Astarte Toast Software which came
} with the lot, which seems to be sold by Adaptec www.adaptec.com, nowadays.
}
} However, the Philips CD-recordables I purchased at a regular price (not a
} cheap offer), and used them for Data Backup, have now 6-9 months after
} purchase/burning, unfortunately developed several (about 2 to 25 per
} CD-recordable) small, unrecoverable (hardware)-holes (degradation ?
} contamination ?) of up to 0,5-1,0 mm diameter in the GREEN SURFACE which
} as of my knowledge, holds the data. NOT affected under completely (sic!)
} SIMILAR storage/use conditions were CD-recordables manufactured by
} Traxdata, Kodak, Ritek and 3M.
}
} All of my PHILIPS-CD-recordables have been affected, in different degree
} according to their age. They also have stopped working and lost data in
} different amounts, which gave me the clue that the green surface holes
} might have something to do with it. There existed a correlation between
} the degree of dysfunction and the number of hole present.
}
} A request to the manufacturer, Philips, by E-Mail, has been unanswered up
} to now, so I assume they consider themselves, or me, dead in this sector
} anyway. Perhaps it is their attitude, which prevents them of at least
} sending an excuse.
}
} It has cost me considerable time to recover most/some of the data off
} these Philips CD-recordables, where the Philips CD-writer/reader CDD 2660
} proved to be more error tolerant than the internal Power Mac 8600 CD
} reader. So I was quite happy to have this company's hardware, though.
} Unfortunately, the Macintosh was crashed so many times while trying to
} recover the data, it was f**** up totally, I had to completely reinstall
} the complete system /applications / data, which were fortunately on Kodak
} CD-recordable by then.
}
} It appears to be necessary to regularly (2-3 months) check the
} CD-recordables, and make double/triple burns on CD-rec'ables of different
} manufacturers in order to avoid unpleasant surprises. Also, I will be
} going for a TAPE backup as soon as I get the money to get a good one, as
} DAT tapes still seem to be more reliable and cheaper on the long run.
}
} Perhaps you search for CD FAQ on Internet, using some sophisticated Web
} Crawler. There are some pretty desillusionizing ( {---?grammar) views out
} there.
}
} So long,
} Wolf
}
}
}



------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wolf Schweitzer, MD, Swiss Research Fellow, mailto:wschweitzer-at-access.ch
Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Southbank/Melbourne, Australia






From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 03:25:23 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM - SERVICE Contracts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A new creature on the market, these organizations seek to justify
themselves by providing a reduction in service costs by reducing the
'insurance' inherent in a service contract and by trying to
artificially increase competition. They basically work by providing
service on a billable, rather than contract, basis. They will use
whatever service provider they deem reasonable and cheap. When you
sign up with them, you are turning over to them any and all
decisions over who will actually provide service on your instrument
and what time frame the service will be performed in.

While this approach might be acceptable for health related expenses
(certainly open to conjecture) - for a field as esoteric as
analytical instrumentation, it really doesn't hold up. There simply
aren't that many service providers available to foster the
competative pricing that this approach requires. In the health
field, there is sufficient quantity and profit margin to warrant
third party competition in areas such as MRI, CAT and PET service.
That is not true in analytical instrumentation.

The analytical service organizations that you will find are
generally small businesses that are in business because they enjoy
the instruments and are disenfranchised by the manufacturers. While
there is considerable headroom in the profit margins of analytical
instrument manufacturers, there is a lack of third party service
providers. That being said, you should still be able in most cases
to reduce your maintenance costs by 20% by considering third party
sources.

The 'HMOs' will, however, protect themselves against any potential
large scale problems, more so than the small providers. I am, of
course, biased by the nature of my business, but I feel that if you
aggressively seek out a third party source of service, and
intelligently decide for yourself who can provide the best service
at the most reasonable price, you will be able to reduce your costs
considerably while ensuring a reasonable level of service.

In support of this, be aware that most small service providers are
much more flexible in their contract services, and can usually
provide services tailored to your maintenance needs - i.e. can adjust
their contracts to your requirements for preventative maintenance,
emergency service and replacement parts needs. Like most service
providers, I have standard service packages. However, like most
independent service providers, I am always willing to provide
customized contracts designed to reduce your maintenance costs.

} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
}
} Peter:
} Just over a year ago, we switched some of our instruments to a
} service provider called CIC that works as an HMO. CIC has a much
} larger contract with the university covering all sorts of items that
} may need service. The motivation for the switch is that while it
} saves us much needed money, this arrangement is supposed to be
} transparent to us in the sense that we just call the usual service
} provider when the intrument is down, and the service provider bills
} CIC directly. In this way, the quality of service should not be
} affected. However, I already experience two shortcomings: One due
} to the fact that if the estimated cost of repair is above $5,000.-
} prior approval from CIC is required to conduct the service. If the
} cost is substantially higher, CIC may decide to get a "second
} opinion" from a repair service of their choice (imagine the delays
} and consequences of having many "experts" try their hands at your
} fine instrument!). Recently, I requested approval on a repair that
} was estimated at $8,600 for parts only, and got approval within a
} couple of days over the phone, calling CIC's toll free number. That
} initial repair only helped pinpoint the problem, and the instrument
} is still down. We are waiting for a new estimate, which in turn may
} lead to a request for a "second opinion" ... The other is due to
} the fact that instrument manufacturers will give priority to their
} contract customers. In our case, we put two JEOL instruments, a
} microprobe and a HRTEM, under CIC coverage, and continued JEOL
} contracts on two other JEOL instruments (wisely, our director did
} not put all the eggs in one basket!). Generally, we get reasonably
} fast service from JEOL on the last two (the instruments, not the
} eggs), but a little slower response on the microprobe. It was a lot
} harder, however, to get service for the more complex HRTEM. We
} called for service on the HRTEM on November 17, work started on
} January 8, and after some interruptions (it is still down) we are
} waiting for a new estimate to report to CIC. When all intruments
} were on JEOL contracts we were getting equally fas service.
}
} I hope you get more information on this issue regarding other
} manufacturers as well as JEOL, and make an informed decision. Good
} luck!
}
} Augusto
}
}
} At 11:15 AM 1/26/98 -0500, you wrote:
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----.
} }
} } Our annual service contract on our JEOL TEM 1210 is coming up for
} } renewal.
} I am investigating third-party service contracts and third-party
} demand service. I am eager to hear other transmission
} microscopists' experiences with service contracts, particularly
} third-party service. } } I also invite vendors providing service in
} West Central Florida to contact me via E-mail at this address (off
} the list). } } Thanks, } } Peter O. Steele, Ph.D., PMIAC } } E-mail:
} steelep-at-allkids.org } }
} ____________________________________________________________________
} _____ Augusto A. Morrone 107D-MEL, P.O. Box 116400
} MAIC Materials Science and Engineering
} University of Florida
} Gainesville, FL 32611
} (352) 392-1497 or 6985
} Fax: (352) 392-0390
} amorr-at-mse.ufl.edu
}
}
}
Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, IL 60174
PH 630.513.7093 FAX 630.513.7092 Email: ars-at-mcs.net
WWW: http://www.mcs.net/~ars
Analytical instrument maintenance services




From: Dan Hill :      dh2-at-mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 10:16:12 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: SEM, dispersal agents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

Decon is the registered trade mark of Decon Laboratories Ltd and in this
case probably refers to Decon liquid which is a general purpose surfactant
used for cleaning glassware in biological and radioactive work. It can be
ordered through Fisher Scientific. Hope this helps.

Dan Hill
Department of Biochemistry
Cambridge University
UK



On Wed, 28 Jan 1998, Randy Tindall wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Greetings,
}
} We're preparing to do a protocol for viewing of mycorrhizal hyphae in SEM
} and in going over some literature we were puzzled by an instruction that
} called for 2 g samples of soil to be "dispersed in 200 mils of 0.1% Decon".
} I assume that we're not talking about rat poison here, and we've been
} unable to locate anything under the name Decon in the standard chemical
} supply catalogs.
}
} Has anybody heard of this? Can other standard dispersal/deflocculation
} agents be substituted?
}
} Thanks for any advice.
}
} Randy
}
}
} Randy Tindall
} Electron Microscope Laboratory
} Box 3EML
} New Mexico State University
} Las Cruces, NM 88003
}
} rtindell-at-nmsu (work)
} nrtindall-at-zianet.com (home)
}






From: Gary Dietrich Chinga :      garyc-at-stud.ntnu.no
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 11:40:40 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Wed, 28 Jan 1998 Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com wrote:
}
} I'm dredging up an old question, but here goes. We're looking to add a
} CD-Recordable unit to an existing image analysis workstation. I'd like to
} hear comments, good or bad, about any CD-Rs with which you've had some
} experience. TIA.
}
}
} Regards,
} Bev Maleeff

We are using a sony 2X with the Easy CD-Pro 1.5 software. It is OK.

Gary.





From: Johncatino :      Johncatino-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 06:47:58 EST
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have used a Smart and Friendly CD-R for 3 years with no problem. The latest
software is impoved from when I first purchased the CD-R.

John Catino
Union Camp
Princeton, NJ

_______
The above reflects the opinion of John Catino and does not necessarily
represent Union Camp.




From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-botanica.ufrgs.br
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 10:46:54 -0200
Subject: Mgw Lauda Ultra-kryomat

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have a old Mgw Lauda Ultra-Kryomat K40D and my question is:

Which fluid should be used in the cold reservatory? Ethanol?
Isopropanol? Other liquid ? The lower temperature in the reservatory is
-130 C.

Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
UFRGS - Brazil




From: Raul VERSACI :      versaci-at-cnea.edu.ar
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:49:28 -0800
Subject: quality manual.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Does anybody have a quality manual model to Electron Microscopy Lab or e
guide to make. The same about a guide to make quality system in it.

Matilde Peretti
peretti-at-cnea.edu.ar




From: Wolf Schweitzer
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:01:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We too have purchased the Philips CDD 2600. With alittle more than a =
years worth of operations it continue to function as expected. But on =
the other hand, we have upgraded to the Adaptec Easy Creator version =
3.0. We find this software to be easyier to use and compatible with =
Windows NT 4.0.


Peter Tarquinio
Evex Ananlytical
www.evex.com

----------

} Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:33:17 +1000
} To: Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com
} From: Wolf Schweitzer {wschweitzer-at-access.ch}
} Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R
} Cc:
} Bcc:
} X-Attachments:
}
} The Philips CDD 2660 seems to work alright as a writer/reader device. I
} use Apple Macintosh System 7.6.1 and Astarte Toast Software which came
} with the lot, which seems to be sold by Adaptec www.adaptec.com, =
nowadays.
}
} However, the Philips CD-recordables I purchased at a regular price (not =
a
} cheap offer), and used them for Data Backup, have now 6-9 months after
} purchase/burning, unfortunately developed several (about 2 to 25 per
} CD-recordable) small, unrecoverable (hardware)-holes (degradation ?
} contamination ?) of up to 0,5-1,0 mm diameter in the GREEN SURFACE =
which
} as of my knowledge, holds the data. NOT affected under completely =
(sic!)
} SIMILAR storage/use conditions were CD-recordables manufactured by
} Traxdata, Kodak, Ritek and 3M.
}
} All of my PHILIPS-CD-recordables have been affected, in different =
degree
} according to their age. They also have stopped working and lost data in
} different amounts, which gave me the clue that the green surface holes
} might have something to do with it. There existed a correlation between
} the degree of dysfunction and the number of hole present.
}
} A request to the manufacturer, Philips, by E-Mail, has been unanswered =
up
} to now, so I assume they consider themselves, or me, dead in this =
sector
} anyway. Perhaps it is their attitude, which prevents them of at least
} sending an excuse.
}
} It has cost me considerable time to recover most/some of the data off
} these Philips CD-recordables, where the Philips CD-writer/reader CDD =
2660
} proved to be more error tolerant than the internal Power Mac 8600 CD
} reader. So I was quite happy to have this company's hardware, though.
} Unfortunately, the Macintosh was crashed so many times while trying to
} recover the data, it was f**** up totally, I had to completely =
reinstall
} the complete system /applications / data, which were fortunately on =
Kodak
} CD-recordable by then.
}
} It appears to be necessary to regularly (2-3 months) check the
} CD-recordables, and make double/triple burns on CD-rec'ables of =
different
} manufacturers in order to avoid unpleasant surprises. Also, I will be
} going for a TAPE backup as soon as I get the money to get a good one, =
as
} DAT tapes still seem to be more reliable and cheaper on the long run.
}
} Perhaps you search for CD FAQ on Internet, using some sophisticated Web
} Crawler. There are some pretty desillusionizing ( {---?grammar) views =
out
} there.
}
} So long,
} Wolf
}
}
}



------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wolf Schweitzer, MD, Swiss Research Fellow, mailto:wschweitzer-at-access.ch
Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Southbank/Melbourne, Australia








From: Bill Neill
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:11:06 -0500
Subject: SEM networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If the PC Network/Token Ring is small enough.

Assign TCP/IP address to the client machines, assign TCP/IP address the =
primary server machine that will coordinate the client machines. =20
Install a the token ring card in the server machine, and assign it the =
TCP/IP address for the token ring network. This is most efficiently =
accomplished with Windows NT.



Peter Tarquinio
Evex Analytical
www.evex.com

----------

Any smart computer folks out there who know if it is possible to run two
different (ethernet and token ring)=20
network cards at the same time in a Wintel platform?
I'm trying to get an SEM on to two networks at the same time, or more
specifically, I'm trying to get the SEM pc to act as an intermediary =
link
btween an EDX (ethernet) and the lab (token ring).
Thanks
Bill Neill






From: Beverly E Maleeff -at- SB_PHARM_RD
Date: 28-Jan-98 07:45:43 PM
Subject: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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FWIW, My HP has been working well. Thought about purchasing a Phillips,
since
it offered additional record mode, but price won.
A couple of notes:

Compare software bundles and the various write modes allowed by the
hard/software combination.

Beware of system performance requirements. For example, to copy another CD
(without first moving contents to a HDD) a fast SCSI CD rom is usually
required.

As the CD-R write speed increases, the demand on the source HDD can be
significant. Slow IDE systems may cause buffer underuns (in such a case,
you
just made a frisbe). Safer ( and costly) is a fast SCSI HDD. Along the
same
line, the more buffer in the CD-R, the better. Most have 1 MB, some more.


Woody White, Electron Microscopist

McDermott Technology, Inc. http://www.mtiresearch.com

Me: http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722

______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com-at-inet
cc:

Colleagues:

I'm dredging up an old question, but here goes. We're looking to add a
CD-Recordable unit to an existing image analysis workstation. I'd like to
hear comments, good or bad, about any CD-Rs with which you've had some
experience. TIA.


Regards,
Bev Maleeff

SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals
Toxicology-US, UE 0462
709 Swedeland Road
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610/270-7987
610/270-7202 fax
Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com




From: JIM ROMANOW [SMTP:bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu]
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:18:42 -0500
Subject: Pentium/edx interfacing?

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by smtp.uky.edu (8.8.8/8.8.5) with ESMTP id IAA01805;
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id IAA04847; Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:20:07 -0500 (EST)
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Message-ID: {01BD2C8E.87C27C10.naresh-at-pop.uky.edu}
{microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}

Just yesterday, I noticed an ad in Microscopy Today (issue #98-1) by Noran
(formerly Tracor Northern) announcing digital microanalysis system for
windows NT. May be they can give you a reasonable trade-in value for your
TN2000.


-----Original Message-----

I would like to upgrade my edx system by replacing the original Tracor
Northern TN2000 processing hardware with a Pentium based system (not yet
purchased). I am using Kevex model 3201-C-VS detector/2003 preamp (yes, a
Kevex detector on a TN system OEM). Can someone please guide me to a
reliable vendor of the best PC edx interfacing boards and software for this
kind of modification? The detector will have to stay for now due to cost
restrictions. This seems like the least expensive way to upgrade. What is
your experience? I intend to upgrade the detector eventually.

This system is mounted on a Zeiss/LEO DSM982 Gemini FESEM.

Thank you.
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-131
Storrs, CT 06269
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax






From: corwinl-at-pt.cyanamid.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: PLM wavelength shift.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The color filtering with nearly crossed "plastic" polarizers (where
the birefringent material that is separating the light into two
polarized rays and losing one) will depend on the type and quality of
the material and its history. Edmund Scientific offers both brown and
gray polarizers. I don't know if crossed Nicols (calcite) give colors.



Leonard Corwin
Fort Dodge Animal Health,
Animal Health Research Analytical
Princeton, NJ 08543-0400 corwinl-at-pt.cyanamid.com





From: Steven W. Miller :      Steven_W_Miller-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:29:04 -0500
Subject: Cross Sectioning a TEM Column

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There are three RMC TEMs cross sectioned now:
- AFIP Medical Museum, Wash. D.C.
- Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago
- University of Illinois, Urbana, Center for Electron Microscopy (at leas=
t
it was a year ago)

These were all done Raymond J. Miller (my father), I helped only
occasionally so I don't know all the details. Here are some.

It took up to FIVE columns to get a single good one. The lenses were
drilled and tapped, top and bottom, high pressure fittings were threaded
in. A combination of pressure and vacum was used to infiltrate the
thousands of turns of very fine wire. =


Ray. ended up going to the president of DoAll saw company to get help wit=
h
the cross sectioning. The problem is that the very soft copper wire pulls=

out easily and leaves voids. It is my recollection that Ray ended up usin=
g
extremely slow speeds with the finest tooth blades available. =


If you wish more information please contact me off line, Steve Miller, =

RMC, Tucson, AZ 520-903-9366, fax 520-903-0132.





From: cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov (Cynthia J. Zeissler)
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:54:39 -0500
Subject: Re: PLM wavelength shift.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is a discussion of this phenomenon, called "Green Disease" on p.
85-87 in "Polarized Light Microscopy", by W. C. McCrone, L. B. McCrone, and
J. G. Delly, Ann Arbor Science Michigan, 1978. The problem is attributed
to a reciprocity failure of the film even in the range of normal exposure
times. This in turn, is attributed to cases where the light intensity
ratio of the brightest to darkest objects exceeds 3:1. This means that the
film may work well for brightfield situations, but will work poorly in
crossed polarized light situations. I am no expert on this, so I refer you
to the reference. Several brands of film are discussed. Hope this helps.

} To All,
}
} Over the years, and today too, I have learned that when taking polarized
} light microscopy micrographs on Ektachrome 64T there is a color shift
} depending on how much the polarizer and analyzer are crossed; i.e. if the
} polarizer and analyzer are parallel to each other, then there is little
} color shift in the color slide. However, as the polarizer and analyzer are
} brought to the crossd (perpendicular) position, the background takes on a
} very definite green hue, almost as if the filters are selectively removing
} the blue and red portions of the spectrum.
}
} Can anyone explain to me why these two supposedly neutral filters when
} brought nearly to the crossed position, say within 6-12 degrees of being
} crossed, cause the micrograph to take on a green cast that requires a 15M
} to make the background a more neutral gray?
}
} Thanks in advanace for explaining either a very complex or very simple
} question. {As long as the answer is simple, I'll be OK :-)}
}
} Damian Neuberger
} neuberd-at-baxter.com
} or
} dneuberger-at-mindspring.com

Cynthia J. Zeissler
Physical Scientist
National Institute of Standards and Technology
cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov
301-975-3910






From: Ann-Fook Yang (Ann-Fook Yang) (Ann-Fook Yang) :      YANGA-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:55:24 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM?s -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I used to have similar problem with Eastman positive release
film 5302 (35 mm) when the bulk film was stored in a
desiccator. The problem was due to dryness. We just leave
the bulk film in atmospheric condition these days.

We also use Kodak SO163 but never experience this
problem. Perhaps you can leave the films in the dark room
for a while so that they can pick up some moisture before
doing processing.

Hope this helps

Ann Fook
========================================== }
} 1. Does anyone have a solution for static electric
discharge between
} } film sheet? Using Kodak SO163, I transfer it from the
film plates to a
} } box, then off to the dark room where on occasion while
separating the
} } sheets there is a visible discharge between sheets.
Sometimes quite a
} } show but at the expense of data.
} }
}
--
========================================================





From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Yvonne_K=FCster_=3CY.Kuster=40amc.uva.nl=3E?=-at-AMC.UVA.NL
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 17:13:32 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM?s

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Return-path: {Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 23:43:23 -0700
} From: Randy Tindall {rtindell-at-NMSU.Edu}
} Subject: Re: TEM?s
} X-Sender: rtindell-at-cnmailsvr.nmsu.edu
} To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Yvonne_K=FCster_=3CY.Kuster=40amc.uva.nl=3E?=-at-AMC.UVA.NL
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 17:13:32 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM?s

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





From: Christian Zuppinger :      zuppinge-at-cell.biol.ethz.ch
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 17:42:56 +0200
Subject: ReRe: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} }
} } The Philips CDD 2660 seems to work alright as a writer/reader device. I
} } use Apple Macintosh System 7.6.1 and Astarte Toast Software which came
} } with the lot, which seems to be sold by Adaptec www.adaptec.com, nowadays.
} }
} } However, the Philips CD-recordables I purchased at a regular price (not a
} } cheap offer), and used them for Data Backup, have now 6-9 months after
} } purchase/burning, unfortunately developed several (about 2 to 25 per
} } CD-recordable) small, unrecoverable (hardware)-holes (degradation ?
} } contamination ?) of up to 0,5-1,0 mm diameter in the GREEN SURFACE which
} } as of my knowledge, holds the data. NOT affected under completely (sic!)
} } SIMILAR storage/use conditions were CD-recordables manufactured by
} } Traxdata, Kodak, Ritek and 3M.
} }

} } manufacturers in order to avoid unpleasant surprises. Also, I will be
} } going for a TAPE backup as soon as I get the money to get a good one, as
} } DAT tapes still seem to be more reliable and cheaper on the long run.

I am using the same CD-Writer with my Power Macintosh 7500 and System 8.1
at home for burning CR-recordables using Astarte Toast. Now after about
half a year after purchase, the only problems I had from time to time
were errors reported by the drive and subsequent loss of that CD's which
were due to the brand of CD used. Thats my explanation for the moment,
because after I switched from Imation CD's (cheap, green) to Kodak (more
expensive, golden) and also altered my SCSI chain, I had no more problems.

You say you want to go for tape (DAT I assume): That's were I came
from and it was hopeless, with a drive at home connected to the macintosh and
also with a drive of a SGI workstation in the institute !

Christian






Dipl Biol
Christian Zuppinger
ETH Hoenggerberg
Institut fuer Zellbiologie, HPM F27
CH-8093 Zurich
Switzerland

Tel: + 441 1 633 33 54
Fax: + 441 1 633 10 69
Email: zuppinge-at-cell.biol.ethz.ch
or czuppinger-at-access.ch
WWW: http://www.access.ch/whoswho/showwho?czuppinger







From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 08:47:15 -0800
Subject: Re: PLM wavelength shift.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

dneuberger-at-mindspring.com wrote (in part):

} Can anyone explain to me why these two supposedly neutral filters when
} brought nearly to the crossed position, say within 6-12 degrees of being
} crossed, cause the micrograph to take on a green cast that requires a 15M
} to make the background a more neutral gray?

Yep. John Delly can. Although he wrote the following paragraphs some years
ago, "the more things change, the more they stay the same." Here's what he had

to say about reciprocity failure and "green disease" in the Particle Atlas:

"Reciprocity failure

"The reciprocity law states that the exposure density is proportional to the
intensity times the duration. Therefore, equivalent exposure densities should
be obtained by proportionately increasing the exposure time with a lower light
intensity. Reciprocity failure means that equivalent exposure densities are not

obtained for a given intensity and exposure time. This failure generally
occurs with exposures less than one one-thousandth of a second or greater than
one second. Such short exposures are not usually encountered in
photomicrography, but long exposures are quite common. These require not only

greater than calculated exposure times but also additional color-correcting
filters. Most films require color-correction filters with exposure times
greater than one second. When anticipated exposure times exceed 10 seconds, it

is best to choose a more intense light source to avoid sample vibration and the

lengthy procedure of selecting the proper color-correcting filters.

" 'Green disease'

"Photomicrographers face an uncommon problem when using slightly uncrossed
polars. They get a bluish-green to green background on the transparency,
instead of the gray observed in the microscope field. The problem is related
to reciprocity failure even though it occurs with normal exposures of 1/10 to
1/124 sec.

"Most color films cannot accurately reproduce all colors if the light intensity

ratio of the brightest to the darkest objects exceeds 3:1. If this ratio is
exceeded, exposures correct for the bright objects will result in underexposed,

"off-color" dark objects. With slightly uncrossed polars, the intensity ratio
of interference colors to background is often as great as 15:1. Since our
exposures are chosen to be correct for the interference colors of anisotropic
particles, the background is underexposed and off-color green instead of gray.
Transparencies of colorless isotropic particles that appear green cannot be
used as reference standards or as records of visual microscopy. The appearance

of colored isotropic particles is also masked or altered. Anisotropic
particles, however, show correct colors within the limits of film fidelity.
These green backgrounds have been called the 'green disease.' "

Thanks John. And now you know, Damian.

(For more information about the Particle Atlas Electeonic Edition, email me at
sshaffer-at-microdataware.com .)

--
**********************************************************
Stephen A. Shaffer sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
MicroDataware http:www.microdataware.com
(Under reconstruction and temporarily out of service)
Personal stuff: steve_shaffer-at-compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/
**********************************************************






From: Arthur Schuessler :      schueslr-at-sun0.urz.uni-heidelberg.de
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 17:55:26 +0100
Subject: TEM on tabacco seeds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Can anybody tell us, what is the best way to fix and embedd tabacco seeds
for transmission electron microscopy?
We tried 2-times without success. One of these was by using seeds which
were pierced with a needle to get better penetration. We used relative long
times for dehydration/embedding.
Probably seeds were not fixed and/or lipid not penetrated by the embedding
medium. The lipid came out during sectioning.
Do we have to cut them completely to get penetration? If yes, how to avoid
the swelling and thus disturbing of parts of the seeds? Special procedures?
Is Epon better because of the lipids?
I have no experience with seed embeddings - unfortunately.

Arthur
Dr. Arthur Schuessler
University of Heidelberg
Zellenlehre
Im Neuenheimer Feld 230
D-69120 Heidelberg
Germany

Fax: 06221 544913




From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 09:57:03 -0800
Subject: MMS website,

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stuart -
Wow! I've just looked at the "Gallery" that you described on the
listserver earlier today. I guess you Minnesotans are so quiet because
you're busy DOING things. It is by far the best outreach image collection
I've seen on the web, and I've looked at a lot of them. So many are just
"gee whiz" collections of images, without a progression of magnifications
and clear explanation. I hope that you'll consider publishing the whole
collection as a MSA Bulletin issue; it would be great for use in microscopy
outreach. We aren't yet in a world with a computer in every classroom, or
a color printer down the hall...

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.MSA.microscopy.com/ProjectMICRO/Books.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/






From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 12:07:20 -0600
Subject: Re: Pentium/edx interfacing?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ah, yes, the TN2000 with a Kevex detector! We used to have one of those on a
JEOL JSM-U3. That was before Tracor did their own detectors.

I can't say for sure, but I would suppose that the system is a good
candidate for an upgrade. Ours used a Kevex pulse processor in the Tracor
chassis.

We recently upgraded a Kevex Delta to an IXRF Systems unit. We kept the
detector, pre-amp, and pulse processor from the old system. The box from
IXRF included the MCA electronics and the necessary interface to the PC. The
price for our fairly full-blown system upgrade was under $40,000 including
the cost of the Pentium PC.

Disclaimer:
In addition to IXRF, there are other good systems that retain your old
detector and electronics. I happen to be pleasantly biased since we went
with IXRF.

We bought At 03:53 PM 1/28/98 -0400, you wrote:
}
} I would like to upgrade my edx system by replacing the original Tracor
} Northern TN2000 processing hardware with a Pentium based system (not yet
} purchased). I am using Kevex model 3201-C-VS detector/2003 preamp (yes, a
} Kevex detector on a TN system OEM). Can someone please guide me to a
} reliable vendor of the best PC edx interfacing boards and software for this
} kind of modification? The detector will have to stay for now due to cost
} restrictions. This seems like the least expensive way to upgrade. What is
} your experience? I intend to upgrade the detector eventually.
}
} This system is mounted on a Zeiss/LEO DSM982 Gemini FESEM.
}
} Thank you.
} Jim
}
} James S. Romanow
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: Bill Hardy :      bhardy-at-qtmsys.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:11:36 -0500
Subject: Pentium Upgrades - a solution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

ANS offers a complete line of upgrade solutions for all manufacturers
systems. For those interested please contact sales-at-ansxray.com or visit
our web site at www.ansxray.com.
*************************************************
* Bill Hardy, President *
* American Nuclear Systems, Inc. *
* 1010 Commerce Park Dr., Suite G *
* Oak Ridge, TN 37830-8026 *
* (800) 980-9284 FAX: (423) 482-6253 *
* www.qtmsys.com Email: bhardy-at-qtmsys.com *
*************************************************




From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 10:29:08 -0800
Subject: ReRe: Looking for opinions on CD-R

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Christian Zuppinger wrote:

} ... Now after about
} half a year after purchase, the only problems I had from time to time
} were errors reported by the drive and subsequent loss of that CD's which
} were due to the brand of CD used. Thats my explanation for the moment,
} because after I switched from Imation CD's (cheap, green) to Kodak (more
} expensive, golden) and also altered my SCSI chain, I had no more problems.
} ...

Your point about altering your SCSI chain reminds me of a period of
trouble-shooting various problems on several computers ... In the end I realized
high quality cables should be considered as part of any initial SCSI investment
... you won't be sorry.
cheerios, shAf
--
{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility at the University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu or mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu






From: DanCTSC-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:04:14 EST
Subject: Please subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Subscribe




From: bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu (JIM ROMANOW)
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:50:48 -0400
Subject: More CD-R info

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} } Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:33:17 +1000
} } To: Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com
} } From: Wolf Schweitzer {wschweitzer-at-access.ch}
} } Subject: Re: Looking for opinions on CD-R
} } Cc:
} } Bcc:
} } X-Attachments:
} }
} } The Philips CDD 2660 seems to work alright as a writer/reader device. I
} } use Apple Macintosh System 7.6.1 and Astarte Toast Software which came
} } with the lot, which seems to be sold by Adaptec www.adaptec.com, nowadays.
} }
} } However, the Philips CD-recordables I purchased at a regular price (not a
} } cheap offer), and used them for Data Backup, have now 6-9 months after
} } purchase/burning, unfortunately developed several (about 2 to 25 per
} } CD-recordable) small, unrecoverable (hardware)-holes (degradation ?
} } contamination ?) of up to 0,5-1,0 mm diameter in the GREEN SURFACE which
} } as of my knowledge, holds the data. NOT affected under completely (sic!)
} } SIMILAR storage/use conditions were CD-recordables manufactured by
} } Traxdata, Kodak, Ritek and 3M.
} }

To all CD-R users

Please read a series of articles on CD-R by Stephen St. Croix in Mix
magazine (a pro audio publication) October, February, March and July 1994
issues (July is the most informative). He has researched the different
reactive-dyes used in making CD-Rs. The green cyanine can be very
unreliable (1 year shelf life, 5 year data storage life). Do not leave them
in the sunlight ever. Use the yellow-gold phthalocyanine disks instead (100
year claimed shelf and data life).


James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-131
Storrs, CT 06269
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax






From: Steven D. Majewski :      sdm7g-at-Virginia.EDU
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 14:13:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Pentium/edx interfacing?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The newer 4pi SE-II boards, although developed for the Mac,
are PCI bus boards.

I've only used the Mac versions, but their FAQ page at
{http://www.4pi.com/information/faqs/generalfaq.shtml#eds}
says:

Does 4pi provide an EDS system for IBM-compatible PCs?(updated 10/26/97)
Not as a complete solution; however, the SEII PCI card
will work unmodified in a PC-compatible computer. 4pi supplies the
necessary DLLs and drivers for using the SEII in a Wintel box, which
will allow anyone to write their own PC-based EDS application for use
with the SEII. 4pi can make the SEII PCI card available on an OEM basis
for incorporation into PC-based systems. Please contact sales for more
information.

I don't know about the status of higher level software:
I've been using NIH-Image and XlispStat on the Mac.
XlispStat is portable to many systems but would require Windows
specific DLL's instead of the Mac ones to interface to the board.
There is a PC version of NIH-Image, but I'm sure it also needs
a different set of PC Plug-in's. ( I'm considering using Java
and Image/J for the next iteration of this system, but even
this would probably require some specialized native code. )


( But if you just get a Mac, you can use that and DTSA and FLAME
and Photoshop and ... ;-)


---| Steven D. Majewski (804-982-0831) {sdm7g-at-Virginia.EDU} |---
---| Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics |---
---| University of Virginia Health Sciences Center |---
---| P.O. Box 10011 Charlottesville, VA 22906-0011 |---
All power corrupts and obsolete power corrupts obsoletely." - Ted Nelson





From: Joe Fu :      jofu-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 15:15:26 -0500
Subject: need light bulb suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Does anyone still have the supplier list for the light bulb that used for
the optical microscope? TIA.

Joseph Fu
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Room A117, Building 220
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-0001

Tel:301-975-3495
e mail: jofu-at-nist.gov
Fax: 301-869-0822




From: jeharper-at-amoco.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 15:06:53 -0600
Subject: RGB values to estimate retardation PLM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

ICAgICBJIHdhbnQgdG8gb2JzZXJ2ZSBpbnRlcmZlcmVuY2UgY29sb3JzIHVzaW5nIHBvbGFy
aXplZCBsaWdodCBtaWNyb3Njb3BlIAogICAgIGFuZCBjYXB0dXJlIHRoZSBpbWFnZSB1c2lu
ZyBhIHZpZGVvIGNhbWVyYS4gIFVzaW5nIEltYWdlVG9vbCwgSSBjYW4gCiAgICAgb2J0YWlu
IFJHQiB2YWx1ZXMgb2YgdGhlIGNvbG9ycyBhdCB2YXJpb3VzIHBvaW50cyBvZiB0aGUgaW1h
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aGVuICJwaWNrIiB0aGUgY29ycmVjdCB2YWx1ZSBiYXNlZCBvbiBteSBrbm93bGVnZSBvZiB0
aGlja25lc3MsIAogICAgIHR5cGljYWwgYmlyZWZyaW5nZW5jZSB2YWx1ZXMgZm9yIHRoZSBt
YXRlcmlhbCwgZXRjLgogICAgIAogICAgIFF1ZXN0aW9uOiBjYW4gYW55b25lIGltYWdlIGEg
Y29udmVyc2lvbiBmcm9tIFJHQiB2YWx1ZXMgdG8gcmV0YXJkYXRpb24gCiAgICAgdmFsdWVz
PwogICAgIAogICAgIEppbSBIYXJwZXIKICAgICBBbW9jbyBGYWJyaWNzIGFuZCBGaWJlcnMg
CgoK





From: GANTZ-at-med-biophd.bu.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 14:20:02 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: LAB6 Behavior in TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Bruce Brinson:
In regard to variability in partially saturated crystal images, I've
received excellent info and recommendations from the people at Kimball
Physics, Inc. (603-878-1616). We are running a style 90-15 crystal in our
Philips CM-12 TEM. The first crystal lasted 3000hrs, the second about 1000hrs,
and so far current one about 1000hrs. Although usually initial tip image was
a classic maltese cross, it rarely remained so. After several hundred hours
we usually see some tip "walking" which requires pulling the cathode and
mechanically recentering the crystal. We always keep beam current low,
3 to 4 microamps at 120kv and bias 1 to enhance crystal life. We find that
small black lines in the tip image can be removed by adding beam current but
oversaturation may result. We always saturate using the light meter after
making sure the image is centered electronically and the meter is of course
a good way to monitor intensity loss over long periods of time. If we need
a lower KV to enhance contrast we still try to keep filament current under
10 microamps although I think oversaturation is more likely to reduce crystal
life.
As to the static electricity problem, we work in a 10% RH environment
because of cryo sample transfers. We leave the negs in metal holders until
ready for transfer into plastic racks for processing. We used to obtain
discharges as the films were dropped into the plastic racks until we started
to prewet the racks. Sometimes the fireworks were a welcome distraction
from the constant scratching!
Don Gantz
Boston Univ School of Medicine
gantz-at-med-biophd.bu.edu




From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 14:49:45 -0800
Subject: Re: need light bulb suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jo, there is a company called Lamp Technologies Inc with a web page and
on-line catalog at http://www.lamptech.com/info.html . The company supplies
all kinds of lamps and has a special section on Microscope Lamps.

Joe Fu wrote:

} Does anyone still have the supplier list for the light bulb that used for
} the optical microscope? TIA.

--
**********************************************************
Stephen A. Shaffer sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
MicroDataware http:www.microdataware.com
(Under reconstruction and temporarily out of service)
Personal stuff: steve_shaffer-at-compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/steve_shaffer/
**********************************************************






From: Scott Robinson :      RobinsoS-at-smtpgate.umkc.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 98 17:01:36 CDT
Subject: supplier of rubber desiccator rings?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Over 10 years ago, in another lab, I ordered and received rubber rings
designed to stretch-fit onto the outer rim of the lid of the round
Pyrex glass vacuum desiccators. A lid could then be placed onto its
base with the rubber ring establishing the seal, allowing one to forgo
the use of vacuum grease and better protecting both components from
damage. Because I used few of my desiccators to actually pull a
vacuum, the seal was perfectly adequate. Are these still available?
(Was it Denton Vacuum? Tousimis?) Surely someone will know and
perhaps other labs besides mine will benefit.

Thank You

Scott Robinson
EM Lab., UMKC Dental School, 650 E. 25th St.
Kansas City, MO 64108 tel. 816-235-2072
robinsos-at-smtpgate.ssb.umkc.edu





From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 16:34:47 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: contamination on semiconductor

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Hello to the Microscopy group!

A friend asked if I might know of a method to detect the
identity of small contaminants (about one tenth to three
tenths of a micron) on the surface of a photoresist coating
on silica wafers. They have no good clues as to what it
is, though it would help to know if it is organic. I have
no experience with materials microscopy, though with a
background in biological EM I wondered if OsO4 might be
useful, since bound OsO4 could be detected via EM
microanalysis. Perhaps there is a fluorescent dye which
binds generic organics? If anyone has a suggestion, I would
be very happy to take notes.

Many thanks,

Doug
----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
Portland, Oregon 97201
DRK-at-shcc.org





From: aitouche-at-cemes.fr (Aitouchen Abdelaziz, CEMES-CNRS)
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 02:04:47 +0200
Subject: help

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Dear all,

can any one give me a adress where i can found some bourse proposition to
doing a post doc in USA .
thanks to all






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: January 28, 1998 8:29 PM
Subject: Re: Pentium/edx interfacing?

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Dear Jim, William and list,
I operate a TN5500 with a TN micro ZII detector. Could I ask you to keep me
copied with the optioned offered to you?
Thanks Ron Oleka
-----Original Message-----





From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 15:00:12 +1100
Subject: Re: TEM on tabacco seeds

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If the seed can be inbibed for a day or so fixation should easy, but of
course this will cause physiological and structural changes. For dry seeds I
would forget about glutaraldehyde fixation and use OsO4 at 30 degrees C. Try
15, 30 and 60 minutes. Be careful with the OsO4 fumes.
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Can anybody tell us, what is the best way to fix and embedd tabacco seeds
} for transmission electron microscopy?
} We tried 2-times without success. One of these was by using seeds which
} were pierced with a needle to get better penetration. We used relative long
} times for dehydration/embedding.
} Probably seeds were not fixed and/or lipid not penetrated by the embedding
} medium. The lipid came out during sectioning.
} Do we have to cut them completely to get penetration? If yes, how to avoid
} the swelling and thus disturbing of parts of the seeds? Special procedures?
} Is Epon better because of the lipids?
} I have no experience with seed embeddings - unfortunately.
}
} Arthur
} Dr. Arthur Schuessler
} University of Heidelberg
} Zellenlehre
} Im Neuenheimer Feld 230
} D-69120 Heidelberg
} Germany
}
} Fax: 06221 544913
}





From: Jim Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 15:26:44 +1100
Subject: Re: supplier of rubber desiccator rings?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scoot:
Cannot help with your rubber ring problem specifically, however, I note that
you and most users of desiccators do not require a vacuum but just a dry
atmosphere. Desiccating cabinets, especially the automatic ones which
regenerate the desiccant used are the answer and a much better, maintenance
free solution to dry storage than the quaint desiccators.

Disclaimer: ProSciTech supplies a large range of desiccating cabinets.
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 77 740 370 Fax: +61 77 892 313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
************************ http://www.proscitech.com.au

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Over 10 years ago, in another lab, I ordered and received rubber rings
} designed to stretch-fit onto the outer rim of the lid of the round
} Pyrex glass vacuum desiccators. A lid could then be placed onto its
} base with the rubber ring establishing the seal, allowing one to forgo
} the use of vacuum grease and better protecting both components from
} damage. Because I used few of my desiccators to actually pull a
} vacuum, the seal was perfectly adequate. Are these still available?
} (Was it Denton Vacuum? Tousimis?) Surely someone will know and
} perhaps other labs besides mine will benefit.
}
} Thank You
}
} Scott Robinson
} EM Lab., UMKC Dental School, 650 E. 25th St.
} Kansas City, MO 64108 tel. 816-235-2072
} robinsos-at-smtpgate.ssb.umkc.edu
}
}





From: nan h. laudenslager :      nhl-at-early.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 01:19:04 -0500
Subject: Printer "Enhancer"

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_004E_01BD2D1D.0D9AEB40
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Having just read the most recent "Net Notes" in Microscopy and =
Microanalysis...could someone explain what a printer "enhancer" is?? Can =
I use it in conjunction with a pre-existing network card??

We have an HP LaserJet IV series and we use it as a network printer. It =
would be great if I could "beef" it up to reduce our Polaroid budget.


Nan H. Laudenslager
Research Testing Group
Specialty Minerals, Inc.
Easton PA 18042

------=_NextPart_000_004E_01BD2D1D.0D9AEB40
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

{!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"}
{HTML}
{HEAD}

{META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
http-equiv=3DContent-Type}
{META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=3DGENERATOR}
{/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Having just read the most recent =
"Net=20
Notes" in Microscopy and Microanalysis...could someone explain what =
a=20
printer "enhancer" is?? Can I use it in conjunction with a=20
pre-existing network card?? {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} We have an HP LaserJet IV series and =
we use it=20
as a network printer. It would be great if I could "beef" it =
up to=20
reduce our Polaroid budget. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Nan H. Laudenslager {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Research Testing Group {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Specialty Minerals, =
Inc. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Easton PA =
18042 {/FONT} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_004E_01BD2D1D.0D9AEB40--





From: Brandon j Hernandez :      brandon-at-gotnet.net (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 02:25:06 -0600
Subject: FIB Info.?

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Hello my name is Brandon Hernandez, I am currently a student at SJ Delta
college's electron microscopy program. I was wondering if anyone has any
information about FIB techniques, and theory. Is there a book? Any free
information?
Please contact me at brandon-at-gotnet.net
Thank You!







From: Brandon j Hernandez :      brandon-at-gotnet.net (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 02:24:16 -0600
Subject: FIB Info.?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello my name is Brandon Hernandez, I am currently a student at SJ Delta
college's electron microscopy program. I was wondering if anyone has any
information about FIB techniques, and theory. Is there a book? Any free
information?
Please contact me at brandon-at-gotnet.net
Thank You!







From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 30 Jan 1998 04:46:27 -0800
Subject: Need spectra,DTSA

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hi Everyone,
DTSA is Desktop Spectra Analyzer which is a Mac program developed by =
Chuck Fiori that is good for teaching EDS purposes but does not have =
several examples of multielement spectra in it for teaching purposes. It =
does, of course, have pure element standards.

I need to have sample spectra so the students can practice the various =
routines. We have a Kevex 8000 and Noran 5500 both of which are not =
transferable to Mac systems (without adding an expensive board into the =
system).

If there is someone out there in cyberspace that could send me spectra =
that can go into DTSA, we would appreciate it.
Thank You in advance for any help.

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
Stockton, CA
209/954-5284




From: Lee, Ki Ho :      KLee-at-dexteraxle.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 08:02:21 -0500
Subject: used SEM

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I am looking to obtain a used SEM preferrably with EDS. The instrument
will mainly used for metallurgical failure analysis. If you know of any
instrument available, please contact me.

Ki Ho Lee
Lab Manager
Dexter Axle Division

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{P} {FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial"} I am looking to obtain a used SEM =
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failure analysis. If you know of any instrument available, please =
contact me. {/FONT} {/P}
{BR}
{P} {FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial"} Ki Ho Lee {/FONT}
{BR} {FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial"} Lab Manager {/FONT}
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From: Augusto A. Morrone :      amorr-at-mse.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 14:45:21 -0500
Subject: Re: FIB Info.?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 09:53:55
} To: "Brandon j Hernandez" {brandon-at-gotnet.net} (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
} From: "Augusto A. Morrone" {amorr-at-mse.ufl.edu}
} Subject: Re: FIB Info.?
}
} Brandon:
}
} You may start looking up several papers on FIB sample preparation in
"Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials",
MRS Symposium Proceedings,Vol 480, Edited by Ron Anderson and Scott Walck
(1997). This proceedings has several papers on the technique (Gianuzzi et
al, Phaneuf et al, Su et al, Shaapur et al, Tsujimoto et al) describing its
application to various materials/site specific/XTEM/etc.
}
} Augusto
}
} At 02:24 AM 1/30/98 -0600, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
(352) 392-1497 or 6985
Fax: (352) 392-0390
amorr-at-mse.ufl.edu





From: jeharper-at-amoco.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 08:13:44 -0600
Subject: PLM, RGB, Retardation & Apologies

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I apologize for scrambling my previous note to the list server. I
actually sent ascii text, no pictures, etc. and have no idea what went
wrong. If this message is scrambled, I will troubleshoot with our
network police (who have absolute control and change things
whimsically with no notice or accountability).

I only hope optical retardation is not inducing in me the mental kind.

My original question is below--please let me know if this is
scrambled.

I want to observe interference colors using polarized light microscope
and capture the image using a video camera. Using ImageTool, I can
obtain RGB values of the colors at various points of the image. Using
the RGB values only, I want to estimate the retardation. At the
least, from the RGB values I should be able to "calculate" a color on
a Michel-Levy chart to get a retardation. I realize I may not know
which order I am looking at, but I may know other details about the
sample to allow me to predict which order. For instance, based on RGB
values only, I may be able to know the color is red and it would have
associated retardation possibilities of 550nm, 1100nm, ... I would
then "pick" the correct value based on my knowlege of thickness,
typical birefringence values for the material, etc.

Question: can anyone image a conversion from RGB values to retardation
values?

Jim Harper
Amoco





From: cansemf1-at-catoccm1.snads.philips.nl
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 13:20:32 -0100
Subject: Subscribe

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Subscribe





From: Gordon L. Nord Jr. :      gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 98 09:26:13 EST
Subject: re: Qualification-need for software for modeling Xtal structure

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Xiu-lin Gao and Lynne C. Garone,

A useful program for generating crystal forms is Shape. Input the lattice
parameters, space group, forms wanted and distance from the center and the
program generates a crystal for you. Even in vrml. You can get a demo at

http://www.tricon.net/comm/shape/

There are versions for dos, windows 3.1, windows 95 and Mac. BTW the same old
mac version that I ran on System 6.0 and a SE30 still runs on a PowerMac and
MacOS 8.1.

You can get a demo for Atoms as well at the same site. This generates the
crystal structure.

Cheers, Gordon



Gordon L. Nord Jr. Scientist Emeritus, Eastern Energy Team
956 National Center Office: 703-648-6745
U. S. Geological Survey FAX: 703-648-6419
Reston, VA 20192 gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov
USA http://mactem.er.usgs.gov/










From: James Shannon Mulroy :      jmulroy-at-emory.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 10:21:53 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Thanks to all - one more question

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I would like to thank all who answered my question concerning the
separation of resin from glass. Thanks for the tips!
However, I have a new question concerning the same matter. Is there any
method for dissolving the glass from the resin? For instance, are there
any known chemicals/solvents for this? The situation at hand is that
resin stubs are stuck to microscope slides. Thanks for any assistance!!!!

James S. Mulroy
Dept. of Neurology
Emory University







From: kszaruba-at-MMM.COM
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 12:30:51 -0600
Subject: Fluor LM: Nontoxic Bacterial Dye

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A colleague of mine is looking for a means to fluorescently label
bacteria prior to seeding onto a surface for testing. The dye must
not interfere with normal functioning of the bacteria including
adherence and growth. The result would be viewed under confocal or
regular fluor. LM. Does such a label exist?

Acridine Orange was tried a while ago for a slightly different
experiment and found to show too much bleeding under confocal.
Also, UV excitation is out. On the Confocal Listserve there was a
discussion some time ago mentioning dyes from Molecular Probes such as
RH414, the Syto dyes esp. #10, Live/Dead, TMRE, as well as others. I
have no personal experience with any of these. Does one stand out for
this purpose?

Thanks as always,
Karen

--
Karen Zaruba, kszaruba-at-mmm.com
Life Sciences Sector Laboratory,
3M Center Bldg. 270-1S-01
3M Company, St. Paul, MN 55144

"If you can spend a perfectly useless afternoon in a perfectly useless
manner, you have learned how to live." - Lin Yu Tang
[Of course, a perfectly useless afternoon is a rare thing indeed!]
*The opinions above are my own, not necessarily my employer's*




From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.Princeton.EDU
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 13:21:45 -0500
Subject: Saving ZEISS LSM 510 IMAGES AND DATABASES

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Dear all Zeiss LSM510 Users,
Florence Niedergang asked about saving files and database, and
copying them to MO disks. The easiest way to do this without losing any
information or images when moving or coping files and databases is to Set
Options of Saving. To do this go to Options menu in the LSM510 program.
Click on Save page, and select the 3rd choice. This is "At Create Database"
automatically create a subdirectory with the same name and write image files
and database to that directory. This will create a directory in which all
ones LSM files and the database.mdb files will be written. Then when one
wants to move that to any other drive or media, or file server, you simple
copy or move the entire directory. One can directly write to the MO drive
as well, as it is not necessary to write directly to the hard disk. Simple
choose that drive and a directory on it when you first create the new
database. ( It allows you to designate where you want to do this). For
multiple user instrument, users are able to have their own MO disks. I
would not recommend using 230Mo's, as they are too small. I even find that
the 640's are not large enough for some of the work we do.
In regard to exporting images from these, users have a variety of
file formats to choose from, tiff, Photoshop, JPEG, EPS, and GIF, etc.
(Oh, by the way Zeiss, the GIF export currently does not function). I and
my users export these to the users main directory, and after downloading to
another location, delete them. All original databases and their LSM images
are saved for archival, which can be returned to at any time in the future.
To get the image or session information, about how one collected the images,
one would down load a copy of the database file (.mdb) alone.

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal Core Facility
Molecular Biology
Princeton University
jgoodhouse-at-molecular.princeton.edu




From: Lou Ann Miller :      lamiller-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 13:42:27 -0600
Subject: Call for Papers: MIK/MAS -- Central States

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To all MIK/MAS Members , CSMS members and Interested persons:

=======================================
THE MIK / MAS --CSMS Spring 1998 meeting
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Illinois
Urbana , IL May 28-29, 1998
=======================================

NEW DATES:

NOTE CHANGE TO: May 28th & 29th 1998



These 2 societies will be having a joint meeting.

* Thursday May 28th will be a biological topics day. This will include
our guest speaker Dr. Neville Cheville (Book: Cell Pathology) from Iowa
State University.


**Friday May 29th will be a material Science topic day, including a tour
of the Material Research Lab at the University of Illinois

**Thursday Evening will include a private show at our local
planetarium.


Both Days will have mini workshops on :

-- Basics of setting up a Web Page on the Internet
-- HANDS ON -- Digital Equipment usage.
___________________________________________

PRESENTATIONS:

We accept a large span of microscopy topics. Feel free to tell us
what you would like to present.

If you have a presentation you would like to do, please contact me (
see info at bottom)


STUDENT COMPETITION:

Students are encouraged to present papers of work they have done in some
microscopic area.
Each day will have a $50 1st place winner. All student presenters also
get a free lunch.

Student Competition rules can be found at:

www.cvm.uiuc.edu/HomePages/LouAnnMiller/CSMS/student

Feel free to email me, I check my email often,

Lou Ann


***********************************************************
Lou Ann Miller
Center for Microscopy & Imaging
College of Veterinary Medicine
Dept. of Veterinary Biosciences
University of Illinois
Rm 1108 Basic Sciences Bld
2001 S Lincoln Ave.
Urbana, Illinois 61802

Phone: 217-244-1566
email: lamiller-at-uiuc.edu

Center for Microscopy & Imaging Home page:
http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/MicImagLab/MicImagLab.html

Central States Microscopy Society:
http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/Homepages/LouAnnMiller/CSMS/csms.html

Personal Home Pages:
http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu/Homepages/LouAnnMiller/LAM.html




From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 16:20:55 -0500
Subject: Contamination on Semiconductor

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Dear Doug:

I passed your question on to Wesley Nieven at Surface Science Labs and he=

offered the following response. I hope it helps!

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.

=46rom Wesley Nieven:

Contaminants on photoresist can be difficult especially if they are very
thin, e.g. less than 0.5 micron. It is very doubtful at the 0.2 micron
realm that histological or optical microscopy methods will work. There a=
re
several methods available, each giving different degrees/content of
information about contaminant. =


1. The 'simplest' method is FTIR. However, 'simple' is not perhaps the
best choice of words. Depending on contaminant film thickness, FTIR with=

ATR multi-reflection, you may be able to "see" the film. The photoresist=

background will need to be dealt with (a non-trivial matter). FTIR would=

require a substantial lateral size of the contaminant, say 100 micron or
more for this technique to work. The FTIR would not identify a specific
organic per se and would not identify a biological.

2. ESCA or XPS are very good at analyzing very thin films. Depth of
information for XPS is about 100 Angstroms (0.01 microns). Lateral
information area is about 10 microns. It can detect all elements greater=

than He at concentrations about 0.1-1.0% and give quantitative results
(accuracy depends on standards, etc.) ESCA/XPS can also give some chemic=
al
state information, e.g. nitrogen as azide vs nitride, carbon as CFx vs
carbide, etc. This can be extremely useful but chemical state info is no=
t
completely unambiguous. ESCA/XPS requires ultra-high vacuum ( {10e-9 torr=
)
and samples must be compatible. Photoresist should not be a problem, but=

if contaminant has high volatility or is very hydrated (bio-mass) then th=
is
method may not work as is.

3. TOF SIMS (Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy) is a mass sp=
ec
method with extreme surface sensitivity. TOF information comes from top
2-3 monolayers of sample and can easily see films of one monolayer/monoat=
om
thickness. Mass resolution is good (typ. M/deltaM =3D ~10,000) and spati=
al
(lateral) resolution is reasonable (about 0.2 microns) but not
simultaneously. TOF also requires ultra-high vacuum but a cold stage
(offered by one or two of the TOF manufacturers) can work with volatile a=
nd
somewhat hydrated samples. Specific identification 'MAY' be possible wit=
h
TOF. Info from TOF is molecular/elemental mass fragments from surface.
Complex organics can often be identified (with standard) and "reverse
assembly" of molecular mass fragments can sometimes be done to yield exac=
t
parent molecule. TOF has excellent elemental/molecular sensitivity with
some elements detected at ppb range or lower.

Caveats; the FTIR method, although more commonly available, is the least
likely to work especially if the film is very thin and in small spots.
FTIR for this application requires a very skilled analyst (your routine l=
ab
guy is not likely to be successful even if there is enough material to do=

the job) and a high quality machine (FTIR w IR microscope, multi-pass ATR=

cell, etc.)

ESCA/XPS is an expensive technique (instruments usually cost about $0.4
million) and requires experienced operator. Commercial analytical
laboratories are probably the best bet. Cost for this analysis would
probably run from $450-$1500 depending on what you need from the analysis=
=2E
TOF instruments are even more expensive (typ. $0.7million) and require ve=
ry
skilled, experienced analysts. There are not very many of these machines=

around the country. Commercial analytical labs are your only real choice=

here. Analysis would probably run around $750-$1000. =


Contact me directly and I can supply you with additional information. (a=
nd
also a commercial analytical lab as I am the Technical Advisor for one of=

them! {grin} We do this sort of analyses all the time.)

Regards,

Wesley Nieveen, Technical Advisor
Surface Science Laboratories
625-B Clyde Avenue
Mountain View, CA 94043

Phone (650) 962 8767, 800 321 4775
Fax (650) 962 0923
e-mail: wnieveen-at-surface-science.com

} Hello to the Microscopy group!
}
} A friend asked if I might know of a method to detect the =

} identity of small contaminants (about one tenth to three
} tenths of a micron) on the surface of a photoresist coating =

} on silica wafers. They have no good clues as to what it =

} is, though it would help to know if it is organic. I have =

} no experience with materials microscopy, though with a =

} background in biological EM I wondered if OsO4 might be =

} useful, since bound OsO4 could be detected via EM =

} microanalysis. Perhaps there is a fluorescent dye which =

} binds generic organics? If anyone has a suggestion, I would
} be very happy to take notes.
}
} Many thanks, =

}
} Doug =

} ----------------------
} Douglas R. Keene
} Associate Investigator
} Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
} Portland, Oregon 97201
} DRK-at-shcc.org
}
}





From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 17:41:06 -0800
Subject: What do you charge (TEM&SEM)?

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Greetings:

This note is a request for information on what you charge your users for
SEM and TEM time and your opinion in determining if what we charge in
reasonable.

On Wed., Feb. 11, 1998, I will be meeting with the folks who help me set
rates for instrument use in my lab. They have asked me to come with some
ideas about what other similarly equipped labs charge, part of an effort to
establish a reasonableness factor in their calculations.

Here is our situation. This is a campus of abut 10K students with maybe 2K
graduate students. We have no professional schools and I run the only EM
lab on campus. We have a 1975 JEOL 100B TEM and a 1987 ISI WB-6 SEM. Both
of these instruments function reasonably well and for the most part meet
the needs of our users. We maintain service contracts on both instruments
using an independent service provider at about $5K for each microscope.

For now we are charging everyone for supplies marked up (25%) to cover
overhead like my time ordering. We charge funded researchers $10/hour
(filament timer on TEM, best estimate for SEM) to use the microscopes. We
do not charge students who are enrolled in a course that uses EM as part of
the course. We don't make much money and so far that has been OK.

Most of our users are students from labs that do not have much grant
support for EM. Some are undergraduates who may receive up to $75/quarter
to support their independent studies courses, including EM if they use it.
I would guess that our annual TEM use is between 250 and 500 hours and SEM
use maybe twice that, some years a lot less.

As I go into this meeting I want to maintain low rates so the lab gets
used, but I don't want to make it look like we give away everything
unreasonably. If I were to calculate rates based on full cost recovery, the
price would be out of reach for most of our users, or maybe not, I'm not
sure. If we set the price too high, I think we would see use of the lab
drop off.

What do you charge for your instruments and lab use? What sort of equipment
do you have? What sort of campus are you on? Do you have different rates
for different users? Are some users subsidized, and if so how? Given the
vintage of our equipment and funding for our students, what would be a
reasonable rate for us?

I know there are facility directories that have some of this information,
but I was interested in some first hand data, even some of the subjective
remarks that don't come through in a simple list.

Thanks, if you can help it will be great.


Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(408) 459-2477
FAX (408) 429-0146
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu






From: Bergsten :      bergsten-at-internexus.net
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 22:45:44 -0500
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Please unsubscribe bergsten-at-internexus.net





From: Gary M. Easton :      gary.easton-at-scannerscorp.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 18:39:21 -0600
Subject: PC based EDS Anaylzer Upgrades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scanners Corporation offers EDS upgrades for any manufactured
system and {bold} NEW {/bold} EDS Analyzers, with either a premium 130ev
detector or standard 140ev detector(both thin window).  We also
offer PC based solutions for SEM Digital Imaging, and of course SEM
service contracts.  For further information, please visit our
website at www.scannerscorp.com or send me an email at
gary.easton-at-scannerscorp.com (the period between my first and last
name is important). Gary M. Easton, Pres. SCANNERS CORPORATION 5320
Enterprise Street Suite C Eldersburg, MD  21784 Phone 
800-466-SCAN(7226) Fax      
410-549-7583






From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:58:16 -0600
Subject: TEM?s recap

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello all,

First let me sincerely thank all (20-30) who responded to my query &
now a summation of the responses:
Most responses centered around the use the precautions one would use
for C-MOS electronics. All indicated improvement but I am not sure any
indicated complete success. The reason I did not pursue this approach is
that unlike semiconductor devices which have nice leads for surface
charges to traverse the device by, the charge on the film by my
observation is trapped in the interior area between the sheets. Until
an air gap develops, there is no way out.
Another common denominator was the relative humidity, winter being
worse. Some suggested wetting the area around anti-stat pads & wetting
film trays. Though I've not had the experience, some told of discharging
from film to film tray. It was also pointed out that peeling sheets
apart rather than sliding the was advantageous & I agree but again not a
complete solution (my experience). In general frictional movement,
synthetic clothing & grooming your hair are on the not good list..
There was one interpretation, perhaps 2 noting that the film is
driest just after coming out of the good TEM vacuum. I think this is a
very valid point. The source of evil.
Their experience was that if they returned the exposed film to the
dissector over night (lower grade vacuum) that an improvement in ESD was
noted. One step further might be to store it in the darkroom (ATM) a
while. Humm may give that a go when anxiety ceases.
Maintaining separation between film sheets with sheets of paper was
also mentioned. Also opposite opinions, that film should be processed
asap.
Before the responses began arriving (really it's true), JD Wise & I
chatted a bit. We came up with a solution which coincidentally is an
application of several suggestions Bare in mind I have the constraints
that I need to process asap, typically 50+ frames, in a 2nd dark room
some distance from the TEM & working late at night I would prefer to
reload the film magazine & leave it with the TEM.

My conclusion is that the charging originates when the film is
removed from the film plates & stacked. From this point if the capacitor
will charge, it probably has.

OUR CURRENT SOLUTION is base on this presumption, is a book out of the
many anti electrostatic bags that lay about. Not envelopes, just
sheets. Each sheet will be separated by an conductive spacer on the
bound side. (one sheet of film thick to prevent wedging. Another option
would be to spiral bind the sheets at the copy shop. The book will go
into a box to keep it in order during transport. May add an antistatic
mat to open the book on or just ground the binding. Once in the dark
room I'll allow the sheets to slide part way out of the book while
loading the film trays. I think the book approach will be more
convenient that loose separators or many envelopes.
It oughta be cheap, easy to make & prevent the build up of charge
while maintaining a tidy package & be relatively easy to handle in the
dark.. Enough FAB ......feed back?

disclaimer: I claim all copywriter, prior art, etc. & license anyone
with a pulse to use this idea free of charge, well ok, the the dead &
undead can use it too. Anyone selling it ought to go home & slap their
daddy (after they send me 10%.)

The jury is still out on my filament question, in it's continuing
evolution the cross is back with a sharp but off axis center bit. I've
instructed our user group to record their best filament image at each
session. Several responses indicated similar experiences but that the
filament kept on trucking. Fickle behavior in the nominal 300 hour range
was common & some were replaced others saw 1000-3000 hours of service.
This problem may not be uncommon to the sharpened rod design. Most
respondents did not have the Hi-res. applications & thus other than a
different picture, their performance was not hindered while they had
sufficient beam current. This may turn out to be a lot of filament
travel, XZY. Eecchhhhh!

FYI the general opinion is that my Kimball filament is in the throughs
of death at an early age. But when it was good, it was real good. Humm
wonder if Kimball will stand behind it? (Kimball if ya want to contact
me...713 285 5485.) Frankly the Denka before it was also short lived
(~200hr) but then the 2000hr Denka before that didn't fail we just
figured it would & swapped it. I went with a the KP not on price but
based on what I considered a very solid recommendation from a JEOL user
with years of KP exp. so I'm going to get another.

only a couple addressed the LaB6 cross. There was agreement that the
cross originates from the crystal orientation (001), not the bulk
geometry. I'll go with that.


Thanks again,
Bruce






From: Mike Reading :      mike_reading-at-email.msn.com
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 1998 15:26:01 -0000
Subject: Abstract Submission

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sir,

I would like to submit the following abstract for an oral presentation. I
believe it represents the introduction of an entirely new form of analytical
microscopy that will soon be available as a commercial product.

Ive pasted the text and also attached a word7 document.

Sincerely

Dr. M Reading


Thermal Analysis For The 21st Century - mTA
M. Reading, D. J. Hourston and M. Song, IPTME, Loughborough University,
Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK. H. M. Pollock and A Hammiche, School of Physics
and Chemistry, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB, UK. T Lever, TAI
Instruments, Leatherhead, Surrey UK, J Lecenby, 18 Hill Street, Essex CB10
1JD, UK.
There are three major problems with our current thermal methods: the first
is a purely practical one, experiments often take too long, especially
thermomechanical measurements, the second is related to sampling. Frequently
the sample is either too small, or too thin or buried within a larger
component from which it is difficult to extract. The third is more
fundamental, the information they provide is not spatially resolved.
Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a technique in which the tip of a probe is
rastered over a surface to build up an image of the surface topography. Our
apparatus is based on a conventional AFM where the tip of the probe has been
replaced by an ultra-miniature resistive heater. The resistance also serves
as means of measuring temperature, thus the tip, when used in conjunction
with a reference probe, serves as a micro Modulated Temperature DSC cell.
The tip is held at a constant average temperature and rastered over the
sample surface in contact mode to build up an image. The data collected are
the topography, as in traditional AFM, plus thermal conductivity, measured
from the average (DC) signal plus thermal diffusivity, as measured from the
response to the modulation (AC signal). Having imaged the sample, any point
in the image can be selected and the probe tip is placed on it. The
temperature of the tip can then be scanned in exactly the same way as
conventional thermal analysis to obtain calorimetric measurements of
transitions. In addition when the tip is placed on a selected point a
carefully controlled force is applied to it. As the temperature increases
the sample often softens and the probe indents further into the sample. This
measurement is closely analogous to a ThermoMechanical Analysis (TMA)
measurement. Both the calorimetric and mechanical property measurements are
made simultaneously at heating rates in excess of 500 Celsius/minute.
These micro-thermal analysis measurements solve all of the problems
outlined in the opening paragraph. It also opens up a new range of
applications for thermal methods in polymer science, catalysis,
pharmaceuticals and composites by providing a powerful new form of
analytical microscopy.







begin 666 MicroTA Abstract.doc
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end







From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sun, 01 Feb 98 15:04:18 -0500
Subject: ID of <300 nm contaminants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Douglas R. Keene asked the following:
=============================================
A friend asked if I might know of a method to detect the identity of small
contaminants (about one tenth to three tenths of a micron) on the surface of
a photoresist coating on silica wafers. They have no good clues as to
what it is, though it would help to know if it is organic. I have no
experience with materials microscopy, though with a background in
biological EM I wondered if OsO4 might be useful, since bound OsO4 could be
detected via EM microanalysis. Perhaps there is a fluorescent dye which
binds generic organics? If anyone has a suggestion, I would be very happy
to take notes.
===============================================
This is never a trivial kind of investigation. We have had this kind of
problem, some times on polymer films or molded plastic parts and a few times
on photoresist over the years. I am talking about features that are well
enough into the submicron range in size that most of the other kinds of
approaches that might come to mind just would not apply.

We have found that plain ordinary thin section TEM has often times provided
either all the information needed to answer the question or else has made
major strides in getting to the point where the question could be answered.
And another advantage relative to the alternatives is that the TEM work,
if managed properly, can be done for a fraction of the cost of the
alternative approaches.

In the case of a polymer film, we first lightly coat with gold (sputtering)
the film surface, then embed. The gold layer acts as a passivation layer to
keep the embedding resin from dissolving or swelling or other wise
interacting with the unknown particles. Usually, on the basis of electron
contrast alone, one can make an educated guess as to whether the observed
features are organic or something else and if the latter, EDS with SAED can
provide even more information.

If on the surface of photoresist, the top surface has to be stripped off.
After gold coating, we use as a stripping agent polyacrylic acid (PAA), and
this is where we must keep our fingers crossed: We need at least some
amount of the photoresist to strip off which sometimes happens and sometimes
does not. Once stripped off, we lightly coat with aluminum that stripped
surface (so the two surfaces are not confused once in section form and in
the TEM), embed only that side, then in water dissolve away the PAA and
embed that side as a secondary step. Now it is in a form to diamond knife
thin section and the discussion would be the same as for the polymer film.

If the nature of the system was such that we could not get the photoresist
to strip off with the PAA, we would then have to thin down in some way, the
silicon wafer, probably first by mechanical milling and then a final step of
plasma etching in a plasma etcher using CF4 gas. Then what is left can be
embedded and thin sectioned.

Hope this information will in some way be of value.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================






From: A. Greene :      ablue-at-deliverator.io.com
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 1998 14:23:51 -0600
Subject: Looking for an old TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

I am looking for an old JEOL 100SX TEM which may or may not be functioning.
My purpose is to use it for parts. Any leads would be appreciated.

Thanks
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alexander Greene
Scientific Instrumentation Services, Inc.
Number 499, Post Office Box 19400
Austin, Texas 78760
Phone: 512/282-5507 FAX 512/280-0702

REASONABLY PRICED ELECTRON MICROSCOPE REPAIR
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^





From: SEMTRADER-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 09:39:15 EST
Subject: Re: PC based EDS Anaylzer Upgrades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have purchased the VIDX X-ray microanalysis system. It is easy to use,
inexpensive, and has overall great value. Latter this year, as money gets
freed we will be adding active imaging and elemental mapping to the system.


Keith Brenna






From: DanCTSC-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 09:56:34 EST
Subject: Position Available within Clinical Studies Group

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Medical Device Research and Development Firm

Medjet Inc., a publicly held research and development firm specializing in the
design and development of ophthalmic surgical devices, has a position
available immediately within its Department of Clinical Studies. Preferred
candidates will have completed a bachelors degree in the biological sciences
with prior experience in all phases of light, scanning and transmission
electron microscopy, photography, and animal handling. The individual will
assist in the coordination, execution, and documentation of all research
activities including clinical studies involving animal and human subjects. Job
functions will include preparing specimens for histological analysis,
operating and maintaining equipment within the histology facilities, and
documenting the results of all analysis.

Headquarters are located in Edison, NJ. Interested applicants should forward a
resume with cover letter to the attention of Daniel Caruso. Candidates will be
considered until the position is filled.

Medjet Inc.
Suite 301
1090 King Georges Post Road
Edison, NJ 08837
Phone: (732) 738-3990
Fax: (732) 738-3984

Medjet Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.





From: paul d. martin :      paul.martin-at-edrd.dnd.ca
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 08:16:22 -0800
Subject: Position Available within Clinical Studies Group

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Please unsubscribe paul.martin-at-edrd.dnd.ca
Paul D. Martin

Dockyard Laboratory Pacific
Esquimalt Defence Research Detachment
Building 199(D)
CFB ESQUIMALT
PO BOX 17000 STN FORCES
VICTORIA BC V9A 7N2
CANADA

(250) 363-2872
Fax. (250) 363-2856

paul.martin-at-edrd.dnd.ca

EDRD located within CFB ESQUIMALT, is a division of the
Defence Research Establishment Atlantic (Halifax)




From: Chris Gilpin :      cgilpin-at-fs1.sem.man.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 16:24:27 -0000
Subject: ESEM symposium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am responsible for organising an ESEM symposium in London, UK in July 1998
as part of Micro 98 under the banner of the RMS.I am soliciting contributed
papers and/or posters for this meeting.
There are a number of invited speakers presenting applications talks and I
need the widest possible representation of users. If you wish to submit an
abstract for consideration please contact either me or the RMS.
Many thanks


Chris

Chris Gilpin
Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Unit
G452 Stopford Building
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PT
phone +44 161 275 5170
fax +44 161 275 5171
http://www.biomed.man.ac.uk/biology/emunit/emhome.html







From: John Sutko :      sutko-at-med.unr.edu
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 09:25:28 -0800 ()
Subject: HP Photo Printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the past, the Epson Stylus Photo has received support as an
inexpensive, near photo-quality printer. Has anyone had experience with
the HP Photo Printer (~$100 more) and been able to compare the black and
white and the color output of these two printers under meaningful
conditions? In particular, is anyone using the HP printer with a Mac and,
if so, how was the printer interfaced? In addition, any experiences with
the negative/slide scanner (~$500) available from HP are also of interest.
Thanks for any comments.

john


John Sutko
Dept. Pharmacology/318
Univ. Nevada, Reno
Reno, NV 89557

tel: (702) 784-4121
fax: (702) 784-1620
email sutko-at-med.unr.edu





From: S. CICERO :      scicero-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 11:34:52 -0700 (MST)
Subject: TEM of myelin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am a student at NMSU and am studying developmental myelination
on the TEM. Recently I've noticed that the myelin rings around the axons
don not appear to show clearly defined intraperiod lines (only part of a
line is visible and does not extend completely around...). Could this be
due to fixation or dehydration/embedding? Are there any specialized
protocols for myelin or protocols that limit the loss of lipids? I am
using a standard biological protocol (dialdehydic fix, cacodylate buffers,
post-fix osmium, dehydration-30,50,70,80,90,95,100-pproplyene oxide,
embedding:araldite:EMbed (50/50), section, stain:uranyl acetae, lead
citrate)

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thank You!

Samantha Cicero





From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 14:36:38 -0500
Subject: packaging of samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Microscopists,

Do any of you have experience with analyzing residual packaging
materials on small parts (i.e. electronic components, precision
mechanical parts, samples submitted for F/A, etc.)? I'm primarily
interested in success stories in which people have analyzed the
components, found contaminants relating to packaging such as low-density
polyethylene plastic, and then made a change to a non-contaminating
packaging.

Thanks,

Harold J. Crossman
Senior Scientist
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
(978) 750-1717
crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-acpub.duke.edu
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 16:59:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Shared Facilities for STEM/TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Among other things, I run an EM service facility; I have 4 TEMs, 5
microtomes-3 with cryo attachments, and ancillary stuff. We don't do
analytical analyses, but I can put you in touch with someone who does.
We do biological TEM, thin sectioning, ultrathin cryosectioning for
immunolabeling, negative staining, etc. Feel free to contact me if I can
help you. See below.

On Tue, 13 Jan 1998, Anthony Domenicucci wrote:

} Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:12:41 -0500
} From: Anthony Domenicucci {domenicu-at-US.ibm.com}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Shared Facilities for STEM/TEM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am gathering information on Microscopy Facilities which rent time to
} industry. I am interested in facilities which have the following capabilities
} - e.g. High resolution TEM and STEM, EELS and Image Filtering, High Angle
} Annular Dark Field. I would appreciate any help gathering this info.
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735





From: John Shane :      jshane-at-mcri.org
Date: 02 Feb 98 16:13:31 +0000
Subject: Refractive index liquids - help

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charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable



From: John Shane :      jshane-at-mcri.org
Date: 02 Feb 98 16:13:31 +0000
Subject: Refractive index liquids - help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I am looking for a non-volatile, slightly viscous liquid with a refractiv=
e index greater than 1.80. Are there are some new materials available w=
ith these chracteristics?

Your help is appreciated.

John Shane
McCrone Research Institute




From: G. de Silveira :      gds1002-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:03:15 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Refractive index liquids - help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ursa.cus.cam.ac.uk with smtp (Exim 1.853 #1)
id 0xzUtX-00046L-00; Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:03:15 +0000

unsubscribe

-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Glynis de Silveira
University of Cambridge
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy E-m:gds1002-at-cam.ac.uk
Pembroke Street, UK Tel:+44(0)1223 334434
CB2 3QZ Fax:+44(0)1223 334567





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-acpub.duke.edu
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 17:52:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: high vacuum evaporator parts needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have an old (30++ yrs) Kinney that's going to salvage soon. The only
number I can find on it is SC3CT. I do not have time to take it apart
for you, but if you can use it and want to arrange to have it shipped,
it's yours. Where are you?


On Tue, 20 Jan 1998, David L Johnson wrote:

} Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 08:23:59 -0600
} From: David L Johnson {jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: high vacuum evaporator parts needed
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Community--
} We have a Kinney High Vacuum Evaporator (Model SC-2), and I'm trying to
} locate an OFEC Hi Vacuum Globe Valve, size 1" (sweat type, straight
} through). This is for the Backing circuit--the seat is OK, but the
} brass bellows on the valve has given up. I contacted Kinney (now part of
} Tuthill Corp) and they know nothing....
} jptmvl-at-mailbox.syr.edu
} thanx
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735





From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.Princeton.EDU
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:53:27 -0500
Subject: Dye for living bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

On Fri, 30 Jan 1998 kszaruba-at-MMM.COM wrote:

} A colleague of mine is looking for a means to fluorescently label
} bacteria prior to seeding onto a surface for testing. The dye must
} not interfere with normal functioning of the bacteria including
} adherence and growth. The result would be viewed under confocal or
} regular fluor. LM. Does such a label exist?

I would suggest that you try the PkH2 dye from Sigma. We use this
in mammalian cells, and are able to keep the cells alive for several weeks
after labeling. The dye really screams. Of course, one would expect some
decrease of intensity as cells proliferate, but this will be dependent on
the number of doublings. One can always re-label cells as the proliferate.
The dye is fixable as long as you do not use detergents or any extracting
reagents, such as acetone and alcohols. It intercalates into lipid bilayers
and fluoresces strongly with 488 excitation.

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal Core Facility
Molecular Biology
Princeton University
jgoodhouse-at-molecular.princeton.edu






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 08:42:36 -0600
Subject: Digital Imaging: need high resolution color system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are looking for a high resolution color digital camera system as follows:

- hi res color digital camera (like the Leaf camera or better)
- computer interfaced to the camera (prefer Macintosh but might consider
Silicon Graphics)
- lots of RAM in computer
- CD writer (like APS Jaz/CDR combo)
- large monitor, graphics tablet
- image analysis package
- ability to use camera on variety of light microscopes (Olympus, Leica, Nikon)
- ability to use camera on copy stand

I invite vendors or satisfied users to send or phone me with comments & quotes.
Please include $$ amounts.
Of course, we need the info by Thursday of this week at the latest.

Many, many thanks.





####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################






From: Bob Thompson :      rjt-at-buffnet.net
Date: Mon, 02 Feb 1998 22:24:02 +0000
Subject: Re: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Please unsubscribe rjt-at-buffnet.net




From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 08:27:31 +-100
Subject: AW: TEM of myelin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------ =_NextPart_000_01BD307D.9354DEE0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Salzburg, 3rd Febr. 1998, local time: 08.35 a. m.

Dear Samantha,
maybe my first reply was not sent correctly because of a electrical =
circuit/net crash down in our hospital. Therefore once more again:
maybe your problem is one of "sectioning plane". What about the =
thickness of your ultrathins?; Do you have, and if yes, did you use and =
prove ultrastructural appearance by means of a goniometer stage?

Hopefully it helps a bit,
have a joyful day,
best regards

Dr. Wolfgang MUSS
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")


----------
Von: S. CICERO[SMTP:scicero-at-NMSU.Edu]
Gesendet: Montag, 02. Februar 1998 12:34
An: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: TEM of myelin

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20


I am a student at NMSU and am studying developmental myelination
on the TEM. Recently I've noticed that the myelin rings around the =
axons
don not appear to show clearly defined intraperiod lines (only part of =
a=20
line is visible and does not extend completely around...). Could this be
due to fixation or dehydration/embedding? Are there any specialized
protocols for myelin or protocols that limit the loss of lipids? I am
using a standard biological protocol (dialdehydic fix, cacodylate =
buffers,
post-fix osmium, dehydration-30,50,70,80,90,95,100-pproplyene oxide,
embedding:araldite:EMbed (50/50), section, stain:uranyl acetae, lead
citrate)

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thank You!

Samantha Cicero =20



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------ =_NextPart_000_01BD307D.9354DEE0--





From: jeharper-at-amoco.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 08:13:44 -0600
Subject: PLM, RGB, Retardation & Apologies

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I apologize for scrambling my previous note to the list server. I
actually sent ascii text, no pictures, etc. and have no idea what went
wrong. If this message is scrambled, I will troubleshoot with our
network police (who have absolute control and change things
whimsically with no notice or accountability).

I only hope optical retardation is not inducing in me the mental kind.

My original question is below--please let me know if this is
scrambled.

I want to observe interference colors using polarized light microscope
and capture the image using a video camera. Using ImageTool, I can
obtain RGB values of the colors at various points of the image. Using
the RGB values only, I want to estimate the retardation. At the
least, from the RGB values I should be able to "calculate" a color on
a Michel-Levy chart to get a retardation. I realize I may not know
which order I am looking at, but I may know other details about the
sample to allow me to predict which order. For instance, based on RGB
values only, I may be able to know the color is red and it would have
associated retardation possibilities of 550nm, 1100nm, ... I would
then "pick" the correct value based on my knowlege of thickness,
typical birefringence values for the material, etc.

Question: can anyone image a conversion from RGB values to retardation
values?

Jim Harper
Amoco






From: CANTINO-at-ORACLE.PNB.UCONN.EDU (MARIE CANTINO)
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 09:19:40 -0400
Subject: Re: TEM of myelin

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Samantha,

My impression is that this is an artifact which is usually due to geometry
rather than to fixation; if the myelin layers are not oriented precisely
perpendicular to the plane of section, they will appear to be smeared in
transmission. Since it is highly unlikely that this requirement will be
met everywhere around an entire axon, you will see some areas which appear
sharp and others which appear blurry. If you have a tilting stage, you may
be able to test whether this is the case by tilting the sample and looking
to see whether some fuzzy parts become sharp (this will depend on the angle
of tilt of the plane of the myelin relative to the tilt axis of the sample
holder).

Marie


}
} I am a student at NMSU and am studying developmental myelination
} on the TEM. Recently I've noticed that the myelin rings around the axons
} don not appear to show clearly defined intraperiod lines (only part of a
} line is visible and does not extend completely around...). Could this be
} due to fixation or dehydration/embedding? Are there any specialized
} protocols for myelin or protocols that limit the loss of lipids? I am
} using a standard biological protocol (dialdehydic fix, cacodylate buffers,
} post-fix osmium, dehydration-30,50,70,80,90,95,100-pproplyene oxide,
} embedding:araldite:EMbed (50/50), section, stain:uranyl acetae, lead
} citrate)
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions?
}
} Thank You!
}
} Samantha Cicero

Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology, U-131
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269
Ph: 860-486-3588
Fax: 860-486-1936







From: Cheri Owen :      cowen-at-cmb.biosci.wayne.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 11:24:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM of myelin

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Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII


--- On Mon, 02 Feb 1998 17:21:11 -0500 Glenda Richardson {grichardson-at-crs.loc.gov} wrote:

For some reason, reading this reminded me of you, cuz.

Luvya
G

-----------------End of Original Message-----------------

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Name: Winston W Wiggins, Supervisor Vox:704/355-1267
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P.O. Box 32861
Charlotte, NC 28232-2861 USA Date: 2/3/98
E-mail: wwiggins-at-carolinas.org Time: 10:29:18 AM
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In the past, I have worked on getting a good fixation where I
could visualize major and minor dense lines in the myelin. One
post-fixation protocol that we came up with worked pretty well. It is at
the Osmium post fix stage.

1% Osmium
1.5% Potassium Ferricyanide
0.1M Buffer (in your case, cacodylate)

Fix the same amount of time you normally would with standard Osmium.

Good luck,

Cheri Owen
Neuroscience Imaging Core
Emergency Medicine
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI 48201





From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 08:26:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Need image analysis course

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Hello to all fellow microscopists,

We have set up a new light microscopy digital imaging station. Now we
need to learn what to do with it!

Does anyone have feed back on good image analysis workshops that give a
solid foundation in image analysis for the money? Or bad experiences?
Or does anyone think it is better to just read the manual and muddle
through?

Robert Underwood
Morphology Core
Univ. of Washington





From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 12:52:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM of myelin

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Samantha,
If you haven't gotten this bit of advice yet, go to potassium
ferrocyanide reduced osmium, there is a refernce where it is used
specifically for myelin preservation, (if you need that reference
get back to me) it should do the trick.

Mike D
JHMI Microscopy Facility


On Mon, 2 Feb 1998, S. CICERO wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I am a student at NMSU and am studying developmental myelination
} on the TEM. Recently I've noticed that the myelin rings around the axons
} don not appear to show clearly defined intraperiod lines (only part of a
} line is visible and does not extend completely around...). Could this be
} due to fixation or dehydration/embedding? Are there any specialized
} protocols for myelin or protocols that limit the loss of lipids? I am
} using a standard biological protocol (dialdehydic fix, cacodylate buffers,
} post-fix osmium, dehydration-30,50,70,80,90,95,100-pproplyene oxide,
} embedding:araldite:EMbed (50/50), section, stain:uranyl acetae, lead
} citrate)
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions?
}
} Thank You!
}
} Samantha Cicero
}
}





From: Dennis Goode :      GOODE-at-zool.umd.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 13:01:02 +0500EST
Subject: Re: TEM of myelin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} ... In the TEM. Recently I've noticed that the myelin rings around
the axons
} do not appear to show clearly defined intraperiod lines (only part of a
} line is visible and does not extend completely around...). Could this be
} due to fixation or dehydration/embedding? Are there any specialized

Samantha:

If the line doesn't appear to extend completely around the myelin
sheath, the most likely explanation is a slight tilt from
perpendicular orientation in the section. Only textbook photos are
always perpendicular or parallel to the plane of section. Try a tilt
stage, and you may find that you can see the intraperiod line appear
at one tilt angle and disappear at others. Because an axon and
accompanying myelin are not perfect cylindars, one side may not be
exactly parallel to the other side of the sheath. and thus both are
not perpendicular to any one plane of section and only a partial
intraperiod line will be seen.

If you still never see the expected layers, then I would start to
look for other causes, such as fixation or chemical exposures of the
animals before fixation.

-Dennis





Dr. M. Dennis Goode Phone (301) 405-6917
Department of Zoology Fax (301) 314-9358
University of Maryland e-mail goode-at-zool.umd.edu
College Park MD 20742
*************************************************************
"If the Lord Almighty had consulted me before embarking upon the
creation, I should have recommended something simpler."
-Alphonso X of Castile, 15th Century




From: feng-at-iris.lamel.bo.cnr.it (Wu Feng)
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 19:25:46 +0100
Subject: subscribe the newsgroup

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Dear Sir/Madam:
I would like to subscribe the newsgroup to increase my knowledge in
the field of microscopy.

Thanks inadvance.

Best wishes.

Sincerely yours,
Feng Wu
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| 40129 Bologna tel: +39 51 6399185 |
| Italy fax: +39 51 6399216 |
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From: Richard Fonda :      fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 15:12:14 +1500
Subject: EM lab renovation

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Dear list members,

I am looking for suggestions on features we should consider for an EM lab
renovation. We are currently in the design process for renovating a
building which will house two TEMS, 2 SEMs, an AES, and a darkroom. With
this opportunity to design the EM labs, we want to take all reasonable
precautions and make the necessary improvements to optimize these areas.
This includes necessities for EM operation as well as conveniences.

While this currently unoccupied building readily passes vibrational and
magnetic field tests, I am trying to minimize the impact of the labs,
offices, and electrical/ventilation systems which will surround the EM
labs. Alderson's book (suggested on the list a while back) was a great
help for the initial design stages. What suggestions do you have either
for the design of the laboratories or for the related equipment? While my
primary interest is for the TEM labs, I would welcome any suggestions for
the other EM rooms or dark room as well.

One major concern I have is with mechanical vibration isolation. We would
like to limit a priori the effects of the surrounding labs and services.
Any suggestions which would limit the effects of mechanical vibrations at
the TEMs, or reduce the level of ambient vibrations, would be particularly
helpful.

Richard Fonda

_____________________________________________________________
Richard W. Fonda Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 767-2622 Code 6324
(202) 767-2623 fax Washington DC 20375
_____________________________________________________________






From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 3 Feb 1998 11:22:46 -0800
Subject: Microwave, SEM

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Topic: Microwaving for SEM
We have been experimenting with the microwave for TEM, and want to use it =
also for SEM samples, which of course are larger. We do both Glut, Os, =
and conductive staining techniques.

Questions
Does anyone have experience with microwaving for SEM samples?
How large of samples do you use?
What protocols do you use? and times in the microwave?
Wattage and type of microwave?
Do you use iced samples or any special conditions for SEM samples?
Any thoughts on results as compared to standard preps?

Thanks for any info. We are setting up experiments and need some =
starting point for SEM samples.

Thanks in advance for any input.
Judy M.




Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 12:12:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Moving into modern times

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for {microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com} ; Tue, 3 Feb 1998 12:12:28 -0800 (PST)

Listers,

I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
& stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
computers?
I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
that true?

Thanks in advance for all your fine help.


Still preferring to make photographs,


Paula = )

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu






From: up-at-uplinkpro.com
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 15:30:39 -0500
Subject: Can't Find Your Web Site

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To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

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From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 15:55:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: EM lab renovation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Richard,
}
} One major concern I have is with mechanical vibration isolation. We would
} like to limit a priori the effects of the surrounding labs and services.
} Any suggestions which would limit the effects of mechanical vibrations at
} the TEMs, or reduce the level of ambient vibrations, would be particularly
} helpful.
}
You are right to be concerned. One difficulty is that there is no
one prescription for minimizing mechanical vibrations. If the building and
ground is very rigid, it will transmit vibrations due to traffic and wind,
so you must isolate the equipment with, e.g., a pneumatic platform, but if
the building and ground are not rigid, and do not transmit vibrations read-
ily, you might need to anchor the equipment so that, e.g., air conditioning
vibrations do not affect the EMs. Furthermore, the frequency spectrum of
the vibrations is important. Our HVEM responds greatly to 20 Hz vibrations,
but not to ~22 Hz vibrations. Sometimes a spring-mass-spring type of moun-
ting--as we use for our vacuum pumps--will lower transmission of vibrations,
and it can be tuned to damp specific frequencies. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 16:08:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

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Dear Paula,

} Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
} comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images

If the capacity is large enough to hold the image, then, yes.
The important thing is the information--the string of 0's and 1's--not
the form it's written in (assuming your equipment can read that form).
Thus, the only necessary criterion is the capacity. There are also
considerations of convenience, i.e., can one read in the info in a
reasonably short time or is the info compatable with other interested
parties' equipment. The Zip drive does well on both counts.

} and will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
} computers?

If and only if the images were decent in the first place. The
digital info will be read without added noise [of course all computers
are perfect, aren't they? Oh, right, the early pentiums. ;-)]. Zip
disks should certainly hold the info without significant loss, so they
will pass this test.

} I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
} that true?
}
Yes.
}
} Still preferring to make photographs,
}
They still record much more info than any available digital system.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov (Cynthia J. Zeissler)
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 16:34:23 -0500
Subject: All: Image Pro Plus and Visual Basic

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We are considering Image Pro Plus (IPP) from Media Cybernetics for
automating image acquisition and analysis. Does anyone know if Image Pro
commands can be driven from Visual Basic, such as through an Active X or
similar control? The promotional literature I have seen so far for IPP
only mentions VB in terms of within-program macro scripting. (No luck
contacting Media Cybernetics or its local vendor yet). We are thinking of
using Visual Basic to be the core of a comprehensive microscope automation,
image acquisition, and image analysis program. Any other ideas or tips
would be very appreciated. Thank you.

Cynthia J. Zeissler
Physical Scientist
National Institute of Standards and Technology
cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov
301-975-3910






From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 15:49:45 -0600
Subject: TEM-EDS: What is a reasonable background?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We've just had our EDS detector crystal replaced and I am now getting
complaints that the copper peak that is present whenever we collect
spectra (including hole counts) is too large. We've placed the repaired
detector at the same position as before and are using a Pt top-hat
aperture. My questions:
1) What is the source of the Cu peak when we collect a hole count?
2) How can I minimize the presence of the Cu peak?
3) How big of a Cu peak, is too big of a Cu peak?

Thanks in advance,

Robin Griffin (rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu)
UAB




From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 1998 13:57:06 -0800
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Paula Sicurello wrote:

} ...,
}
} I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
} & stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
} something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
} campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
} comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
} will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
} computers?
} I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
} that true?
}
} ...

One virtue of optical drives (... over zip or jaz drives ...) is file
integrity and longevity ... that is, if you want to consider "archival"
abilities, then stay with optical. In this regard, you probably want to only
consider one possibility, that being a CD writer ... the prices are way down
and the media is less than $10/600Mb ... you get archival quality optical and a
CD compatible across all platforms. The only disadvantage to access times for
writing and reading files ... CDs will not compete with magnetic media in this
regard.

... hope this helps :o)
cheerios, shAf
--
{\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility at the University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu or mshaf-at-oregon.uoregon.edu






From: Fred Pearson :      eoptics-at-mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 17:00:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: FFT programs for PC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are using an Agfa Duoscan (1000 dpi) for digitizing HRTEM images.

At the moment we are saving the images to disk, transfering the tif files
via Apple File Exchange to the Mac, then using Digital Micrograph to give
us an FFT, for printing/exporting etc.

Question:

Is there software available, (freeware or...) that would allow us to
perform the "FFT" on the "PC" that we are using to digitize the HRTEM?

Thanks in advance

Fred Pearson
Electron Optics Coordinator

********************************************************
Fred Pearson
Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research
McMaster University
1280 Main St. West
Hamilton, Ontario
Canada L8S 4M1

********************************************************






From: Wolfgang Muss :      W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 23:16:43 +-100
Subject: Q: TEM: Resin LX112, info?

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------ =_NextPart_000_01BD30F9.CB33C700
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Salzburg, 3rd of Febr., 1998, local time 10.55 p.m.

Dear listmembers,
I am confronted with a type of resin, called "LX 112", which obviousely =
is not available via a European EM supplier or at least very unusual to =
use in Europe=20
(if this is false, please correct me).
Concerning questions for the POP-OFF-technique (previous postings) I =
learned of the use of that resin "LX 112". It seems to me either to be a =
substitute for EPON or a Spurr's like resin.

I know from Abstracts in the MSA-Proceedings that MASCORRO J.A. and =
KIRBY G.S. described Novel EPOXY/Anhydride Alternatives.....(EMBED 812 & =
LX112), MSA Proc. 47th Ann.Meeting, 1989, p.1000/1001, & MSA Proc. 49th =
Ann Meeting, 1991, 292/293, &.....EM-VIEWS (Texas A&M Univ., Issue #8, =
1993, p. 23-24)

Unfortunately, no supplier address, physical properties, etc. were =
mentioned (maybe it is an invention of J. A. MASCORRO himself?).

If anyone out there could provide me with the address data of a =
supplying company, even in the USA, and some comments on working with it =
(for instance, experience with hardener, catalyst and or accelerator, =
embedding quality, physical properties like the type of polymerization, =
etc) it would be a great help for me (and Eva KELLER: enjoy the day, =
greetings!).

Thanking you in advance
very best regards

Wolfgang


__________________________________

Dr. Wolfgang MUSS
Department of Pathology, LKA
EM-Laboratory
Muellner Hauptstrasse 48
A-5020 SALZBURG
AUSTRIA/Europe

phone: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 4720 Ext
fax: ++43++ 662 + 4482 + 882 Ext.
e-mail: W.Muss-at-lkasbg.gv.at (note: "l" right to "-at-" is a small "L")
_______________________________________________________________

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From: Lourdes Salamanca-Riba :      riba-at-eng.umd.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 17:24:17 -0500
Subject: TEM/SEM position available for facility assistant

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Microscopy and Microanalysis Center at the University of Maryland at =
College Park is searching for an assistant to help maintain two TEMs, =
one electron microprobe and an environmental SEM. The MMC is a campus =
facility that provides service to faculty, students, and outside users. =
The facility is also used for teaching and research. The qualified =
candidate should have experience in the maintenance of electron =
microscopes and their use. Background on electronics and vacuum =
technology is required. The starting salary is $30,000 to $35,000 =
depending on experience. =20

Interested candidates should send resume and list of three references =
to:=20
Lourdes Salamanca-Riba at either
riba-at-eng.umd.edu,=20
Fax No. (301) 314-9467, or=20
Materials and Nuclear Engineering Department
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-2115


The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity affirmative action =
employer.

=00




From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 17:04:49 EST
Subject: Re: Need image analysis course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In a message dated 2/3/98 5:31:38 PM, you wrote:

}
} Does anyone have feed back on good image analysis workshops that give a
} solid foundation in image analysis for the money? Or bad experiences?
} Or does anyone think it is better to just read the manual and muddle
} through?

Obviously my reply is suspect since I teach the course, but over the last 15
years we've had more than 1000 students attend the three-day workshops on
quantitative image analysis that we teach at N. C. State University every May,
and most of them tell us they feel the course has been worthwhile, and prove
it by sending their colleagues. Info is available on-line at
http://members.aol.com/IPCourse

John Russ




From: Warren Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 1998 16:42:56 -0600
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Paula,

First, what kind of optical drive do you have? We have an HP magneto-optical
which will store about 650 MB on each side of a disk (1300 MB total). But it
too is the only one we have found in the area, and it is going bad. It will
not reliably accept cartridges. Once it takes a cartridge, it appears to be
fine. It would be great if you might be able to help us out in a pinch.

Now as to your question,
ZIP drives cost $15 or less per 100 MB cartridge. That it is a little
expensive and small. The good point is that they are becoming fairly common.
Thus it may be a good media for passing around. We have one, but don't use
it much yet. The internal IDE or SCSI variety will give much better
performance than the external parallel variety. They also now have a
combination model to work with SCSI or parallel. It auto-senses.

I might suggest a CD writer. The platters are fairly cheap - less that $3
per 600 MB disk. The writers are coming down in price and are available for
under $500. The main benefit is just about everybody and their brother (or
sister) have one readily available. We are using one from HP and it seems to
be working fine for us.

Hope this helps some.

At 12:12 PM 2/3/98 -0800, you wrote:
} Listers,
}
} I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
} & stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
} something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
} campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
} comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
} will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
} computers?
} I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
} that true?
}
} Thanks in advance for all your fine help.
}
}
} Still preferring to make photographs,
}
}
} Paula = )
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011
Phone: 515-294-8187 FAX: 515-294-8216

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications





From: psic
Date: Tuesday, February 03, 1998 12:12PM
Subject: Moving into modern times

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Zips are a good choice, the drives and disks are relatively inexpensive.
You can install them on both Mac and PC platforms easily. You can also get
some cheap software that allows you to read the Mac formatted drives on
PC's. I use Conversions Plus, I buy PC disks, and quick format them in Mac
format (takes 8 seconds). This has solved my long filename compatibility
problems across the two platforms.

With respect to storage, garbage in garbage out. If you have good digital
images, they will retain their quality, it is not a function of the storage
media that you use. Copying a digital image many times does not degrade the
quality of the image.

The number of images on a disk is dependent on the file size of the images
and the bit resolution. I good rule of thumb for a grey level image with 8
bit level is that an image in the 1 Mbyte size range will give you a
reasonably good image in the 4 x 5 inch size at a resolution of 300 dpi.
you can put about 90 such images on the ZIP disk.

However, things get bigger with high resolution and number of color
channels. If you collect a 10 or 12 bit image, it will still have to be
stored with a16 bit format; the file size will be twice the size of the 8
bit image (8 bits of depth gives you the 256 gray levels). If your image is
color and you choose RGB mode (i.e. 3 color channels) then you will need to
multiply the size by 3. If you double the image resolution, e.g. change
300 to 600, you will need to multiply the file size by a factor of 4.

Example: a 1Mb file at 8 bit, grey scale, and 300 dpi would be
24Mb (1 x 2 x 3 x 4) for a color(x3), 12 bit (x2), 600 dpi (x4) image.

I hope this helps.

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."


----------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.

Listers,

I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
& stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
computers?
I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
that true?

Thanks in advance for all your fine help.


Still preferring to make photographs,


Paula = )

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu







From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 4 Feb 1998 09:06:14 +0100
Subject: Re: FFT programs for PC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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"microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.co" {microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP-QM 4.1.0



From: Birgit Neubohn :      neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 09:43:55 +0100
Subject: help with collodium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Reply to: RE} FFT programs for PC

Hi Fred,

we recently bought an Image Processing toolkit with plug-ins for Photoshop. It
runs under Mac as well as Windows and has, among a lot of other things, FFT.
The package is from Reindeer Games. I haven't tested it very severely but it
did give me good power spectra. Unfortunately the documentation is rather
limited and I can't find their full address.

Hope this helps anyway.

Nick Schryvers

--------------------------------------


We are using an Agfa Duoscan (1000 dpi) for digitizing HRTEM images.

At the moment we are saving the images to disk, transfering the tif files
via Apple File Exchange to the Mac, then using Digital Micrograph to give
us an FFT, for printing/exporting etc.

Question:

Is there software available, (freeware or...) that would allow us to
perform the "FFT" on the "PC" that we are using to digitize the HRTEM?

Thanks in advance

Fred Pearson
Electron Optics Coordinator

********************************************************
Fred Pearson
Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research
McMaster University
1280 Main St. West
Hamilton, Ontario
Canada L8S 4M1

********************************************************



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Dear microscopist,

some weeks ago I asked for adresses for purchasing collodium. Thanks to all
who answered me!
Now I got pyroxilin (= collodium) 2% in amylacetate.
When I put one drop onto water, it spreads incredibly. So the resulting
film is much to thin and tears immediately when I get the grid into the EM.
Is the 2% solution to weak?
Is there another method to produce a thicker film?

I am trying the collodium support for I get enormous binding of the
*primary* antibodies to the formvar sometimes. I find it often, that
primary antibodies bind to formvar, but not to that extend that I saw with
two antibodies from eggyolk and rabbit. Any suggestions how to overcome
this?

Thanks a lot in advance

Birgit


Dr. Birgit Neubohn
Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK)
Corrensstr. 3
D-06466 Gatersleben-Deutschland

Tel.: (+49) 039482 5447
Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de







From: Crossman, Harold :      crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 06:26:36 -0500
Subject: RE: EM lab renovation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Richard,


Several years ago, we were in a similar situation. The company
renovated a vacant building so all us R&D folk could play in the same
place. Of course it passed inspection - there was nothing in it. After
moving, we found that we ran into numerous problems with EM fields for a
variety of reasons. We eventually found the sources and had the
problems corrected, but with quite a bit of unnecessary expense and down
time.

If I had to do it again, I'd bring in the vibration and field experts
during the design stage.

If you'd like to, contact me at the address below and I can give you a
reference.


Harold J. Crossman
Senior Scientist
OSRAM SYLVANIA INC.
Lighting Research Center
71 Cherry Hill Dr.
Beverly, MA 01915
(978) 750-1717
crossman-at-osi.sylvania.com
}




From: Goran Drazic :      goran.drazic-at-ijs.si
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 14:31:43 +0001
Subject: Re: FFT programs for PC

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At 17:00 3. 2. 1998 -0500, Fred Pearson wrote:

} Is there software available, (freeware or...) that would allow us to
} perform the "FFT" on the "PC" that we are using to digitize the HRTEM?


Try simple and fast program (I belive it is freeware) ProFFT (pro stands for
Project and not Professional). Pics should be in *.bmp format. The program
can be found at:

ftp://ftp.cdrom.com/.5/asme/WIN_ENG/PROFFT.ZIP
or
ftp.wustl.edu/systems/ibmpc/umich.edu/windows/graphics/bmp/profft.zip
or
ftp.iij.ad.jp/win3/desktop/profft.zip
or ...

Limitations: (from readme.txt):
The pictures to be transformed has to have the following characteristics:
They must be square and their width and height has to be in a power of 2
(16, 32, 64, ..., 2^n). They must be in the DIB (Device Independent Bitmap)
format specified for Windows 3.X and OS/2. In addition they must have
8 bitplanes (that is a maximum of 256 colours/grayscales) and must have
a grayscale palette. The palette is presumed to have colour 0 as black all the
way up to 255 as white (so that 127 equals 50% gray).



Regards,

Goran
http://www2.ijs.si/~goran/






From: PESTO 224 STOLZENBERG :      Pesto-at-erols.com
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 08:53:42 +0000
Subject: Aperture holder for EM400

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To all,
A client of ours is urgently in need of a condenser aperture holder
for the Philips EM 400, early model. We only need the insert, not the
whole assembly with the bellow.We would appreciate any help. Please
call George at KAM CONSULTING at 718-729-1997or E-Mail him at:
dimitri-at-interport.net
or E-Mail me directly or call 215-699-6160
Thank you, Peter A. Stolzenberg, PESTO INC.




From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 09:41:02 EST
Subject: Re: help with collodium

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Hello Birgit,

For doing immunoelectron microscopy I would suggest that if at all possible
you completely eliminate the collodion and formvar films.

Also, the kind of metal that is used in the grid seems to somehow affect non-
specific binding as well.

If it is a question of supporting your sections during the immunolabeling, I
would suggest you use a fairly high mesh (300 or 400 mesh) gold grid,
preferably with a hexagonal mesh pattern, with no supporting film. Just put
the sections on the grids, dry them, and begin the immunolabeling procedure.

If this is not possible, and you absolutely must use a supporting film, you
can try increasing the salt concentration in your buffer washing steps. If
you are using phosphate buffered saline or any other recipe with NaCl in it,
it is probably around 150 mM (0.9%). Try boosting the NaCl to 5X normal.
This would make it 750 mM, or 4.5% by weight.

If you use the high salt buffer, remember to incubate the grids in a couple of
changes of regular strength (150 mM) saline before you go to the next step, to
get the salt back into the range of physiologic strength! High Salt
concentrations will often get rid of non-specific binding.

I hope this is of some assistance. Let us know how it works.

Best regards,
Bob
*********************************
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti
E. Licht Company / USA / 1-800-865-4248
rchiovetti-at-aol.com

*********************************
Leica (Wild, Leitz, Bausch&Lomb, Cambridge, AO, Reichert-Jung) / Technical
Instrument Company / American Volpi / Fostek / Stocker and Yale / AEI North
America / OptiQuip / Dolan-Jenner / Osram / G.E. / Philips / Ushio / Boeckler
Instruments / Heidenhain / Narishige / Colorado Video / Visual Environments of
California, Inc. / Kinetic Systems / Pacific Precision Laboratories, Inc. /
Pryor Scientific / Compumotor / Sutter Instrument Co. / Advanced Database
Systems / Cohu / Javeline Electronics / Optronics / Diagnostic Instruments,
Inc. / Dage MTI / Hitachi / Panasonic / Polaroid / Kodak / Mitsubishi / Sony




From: Heeschen, Bill (WA) :      WAHEESCHEN-at-dow.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 09:41:24 -0500
Subject: Re: Need image analysis course

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Folks:

Regarding John Russ' reply: I am a graduate of the NCSU course and
readily recommend it to anyone who is looking for a solid foundation in
digital imaging. I hope my response is not as "suspect" as John's -the
only "kickback" I get from the course is the knowledge!

Cheers

Bill Heeschen
The Dow Chemical Company




From: Tseng Ming Chou :      tchou-at-menger.eecs.stevens-tech.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 10:10:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: FFT programs for PC

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There is a software called Scion Image. It's a software based on NIH Image
( a Mac based freeware from NIH). You can download it from the web site(
http://www.scioncorp.com) or call 301-695-7870 for help.

Best regards,

On Tue, 3 Feb 1998, Fred Pearson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We are using an Agfa Duoscan (1000 dpi) for digitizing HRTEM images.
}
} At the moment we are saving the images to disk, transfering the tif files
} via Apple File Exchange to the Mac, then using Digital Micrograph to give
} us an FFT, for printing/exporting etc.
}
} Question:
}
} Is there software available, (freeware or...) that would allow us to
} perform the "FFT" on the "PC" that we are using to digitize the HRTEM?
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Fred Pearson
} Electron Optics Coordinator
}
} ********************************************************
} Fred Pearson
} Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research
} McMaster University
} 1280 Main St. West
} Hamilton, Ontario
} Canada L8S 4M1
}
} ********************************************************
}
}

Tseng-Ming Chou (Alex)
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030
e-mail: tchou-at-attila.stevens-tech.edu
tchou-at-menger.eecs.stevens-tech.edu
The Microstructure Group of Stevens





From: Joiner Cartwright, Jr. :      joiner-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 09:56:52 -0600
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

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One idea is to get both a Zip Drive and a CD read/writer. Store your images
on the Zip disks and when you get six to eight filled up, transfer the
files to a CD. Then recycle the Zips. The Zip drive is more agile when
working with individual files. Writing to the CD is best done in a few (6
to 8 if you are copying from 6 to 8 Zip disks) sessions. Using the Zip
disks allows you to make changes before archiving the final file(s). Often
a lab or department with several computers used in image handling will have
Zip Drives on each computer, and a single CD writer that is external &
portable. This arrangement will give you the write/read/change/write again
flexibility of the Zips and the efficient & permanence of the CDs. And you
won't have to buy truck loads of Zip disks......just a car load of CDs.


Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Pathology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas U.S.A.




From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 11:01:27 -0500
Subject: Re: help with collodium

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Birgit:

2% should be o.k., but collodine solutions have this wonderful
property in that you can stack the layers. I usually use 4%, I
gently place one drop on the watre surface, as you've noted as the
drop spreads you note that it reaches maximum spread and then
'bounces" back a little, right when it bounces back I add one more
drop to the middle. The second drop spreads on top of the first
giving a thicker film. You can use the color index (just like
sectioning) to tell you approximately how thick the film is and just
keep adding drops of the 2% until you get a color/thickness you like.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu


"File Not Found. Should I fake it? (Y/N)"




From: James.Passmore-at-grace.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 98 11:45:43 -0500
Subject: FFT, Image Processing course

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A couple of related notes on recent postings . . .

The first posting:
} } Does anyone have feed back on good image analysis workshops that give a
} } solid foundation in image analysis for the money? Or bad experiences?
} } Or does anyone think it is better to just read the manual and muddle
} } through?
}
} Obviously my reply is suspect since I teach the course, but over the last 15
} years we've had more than 1000 students attend the three-day workshops on
} quantitative image analysis that we teach at N. C. State University every May,
} and most of them tell us they feel the course has been worthwhile, and prove
} it by sending their colleagues. Info is available on-line at
} http://members.aol.com/IPCourse
}
} John Russ


And the second posting:
} we recently bought an Image Processing toolkit with plug-ins for Photoshop. It
} runs under Mac as well as Windows and has, among a lot of other things, FFT.
} The package is from Reindeer Games. I haven't tested it very severely but it
} did give me good power spectra. Unfortunately the documentation is rather
} limited and I can't find their full address.

It turns out the the Image Processing Toolkit is a companion to John
Russ's book
"The Image Processing Handbook." They can be purchased, or received
when attending the image analysis course at NC State. I've attended
the course and feel it was well worth the money. Definitely better
than "muddling through"!

The toolkit actually has pretty decent documentation in the form of
"tutorials" in pdf (Adobe Acrobat, a reader for which can be downloaded
free--from www.adobe.com I believe) format on the CD. I'm sure info on
the toolkit can be found at the web address Dr. Russ gave above.

Disclaimer--I have no affiliation with Russ, NC State, or Reindeer
Games Software. I'm just a satisifed customer!


Jim Passmore
Analytical Chemist
Cryovac North America





From: Bill Neill :      110155.1253-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 12:33:51 -0500
Subject: Re: Image storage on CD ROMs

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There is a lot of overhead (ie wasted capacity) involved in storing files=

to CDROM. For one at a time storage of images, the overhead will use a lo=
t
more disk than the image.
Best thing is to batch the images on to Zip or hard drive, wait till you
got a lot, hopefully at a logical break in the stream of images, then
archive them to CDROM.
Some labs I know buffer images on the SEM hard drive, push the images in
batches up a network to a departmental server, then recycle the SEM stora=
ge
space. The deparmental server has a CDROM writer on it, when a suitable
block of images (generally a full CDROMs worth), is collected, a CD is
written, and the server space recycled.

Bill Neill




From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 10:11:24 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: response about photoresist contamination

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Thank you to those who responded to my question about
methods to detect contaminants on the surface of
photoresist. As I mentioned in my message, I am a
biological microscopist. I gained alot of respect for
those of you doing materials microscopy...you even know a
language that I have never heard before! The responses are
listed below, for anyone interested.

My original message to the microscopy list server
(microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com):

Hello to the Microscopy group!

A friend asked if I might know of a method to detect the
identity of small contaminants (about one tenth to three
tenths of a micron) on the surface of a photoresist coating
on silica wafers. They have no good clues as to what it
is, though it would help to know if it is organic. I have
no experience with materials microscopy, though with a
background in biological EM I wondered if OsO4 might be
useful, since bound OsO4 could be detected via EM
microanalysis. Perhaps there is a fluorescent dye which
binds generic organics? If anyone has a suggestion, I
would be very happy to take notes.

Many thanks,

Doug
---------------------- Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
Portland, Oregon 97201 DRK-at-shcc.org



Dear Doug:

I passed your question on to Wesley Nieven at Surface
Science Labs and he offered the following response. I hope
it helps!

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.

} From Wesley Nieven:

There are several methods one could use. They are highly
dependent on analyst skill and experience. There is some
degree of dependence on equipment capability, e.g. a cheap,
'routine' FTIR instrument would not do the job. Other
methods that can "see" films/contaminants this small will
not give info you can use, e.g. AFM would likely see the
contaminant but would not provide any chemical or ID
information (only topography).

Contaminants on photoresist can be difficult especially if
they are very thin, e.g. less than 0.5 micron. It is very
doubtful at the 0.2 micron realm that histological or
optical microscopy methods will work. There are several
methods available, each giving different degrees/content
of information about contaminant.

1. The 'simplest' method is FTIR. However, 'simple' is not
perhaps the best choice of words. Depending on contaminant
film thickness, FTIR with ATR multi-reflection, you may be
able to "see" the film. The photoresist background will
need to be dealt with (a non-trivial matter). FTIR would
require a substantial lateral size of the contaminant, say
100 micron or more for this technique to work. The FTIR
would not identify a specific organic per se and would not
identify a biological.

2. ESCA or XPS are very good at analyzing very thin films.
Depth of information for XPS is about 100 Angstroms (0.01
microns). Lateral information area is about 10 microns.
It can detect all elements greater than He at
concentrations about 0.1-1.0% and give quantitative
results (accuracy depends on standards, etc.) ESCA/XPS can
also give some chemical state information, e.g. nitrogen as
azide vs nitride, carbon as CFx vs carbide, etc. This can
be extremely useful but chemical state info is not
completely unambiguous. ESCA/XPS requires ultra-high
vacuum ( {10e-9 torr) and samples must be compatible.
Photoresist should not be a problem, but if contaminant has
high volatility or is very hydrated (bio-mass) then this
method may not work as is.

3. TOF SIMS (Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass
Spectroscopy) is a mass spec method with extreme surface
sensitivity. TOF information comes from top 2-3 monolayers
of sample and can easily see films of one
monolayer/monoatom thickness. Mass resolution is good
(typ. M/deltaM = ~10,000) and spatial (lateral) resolution
is reasonable (about 0.2 microns) but not simultaneously.
TOF also requires ultra-high vacuum but a cold stage
(offered by one or two of the TOF manufacturers) can work
with volatile and somewhat hydrated samples. Specific
identification 'MAY' be possible with TOF. Info from TOF
is molecular/elemental mass fragments from surface. Complex
organics can often be identified (with standard) and
"reverse assembly" of molecular mass fragments can
sometimes be done to yield exact parent molecule. TOF has
excellent elemental/molecular sensitivity with some
elements detected at ppb range or lower.

Caveats; the FTIR method, although more commonly available,
is the least likely to work especially if the film is very
thin and in small spots. FTIR for this application requires
a very skilled analyst (your routine lab guy is not likely
to be successful even if there is enough material to do the
job) and a high quality machine (FTIR w IR microscope,
multi-pass ATR cell, etc.)

ESCA/XPS is an expensive technique (instruments usually
cost about $0.4 million) and requires experienced operator.
Commercial analytical laboratories are probably the best
bet. Cost for this analysis would probably run from
$450-$1500 depending on what you need from the analysis.
TOF instruments are even more expensive (typ. $0.7million)
and require very skilled, experienced analysts. There are
not very many of these machines around the country.
Commercial analytical labs are your only real choice here.

Analysis would probably run around $750-$1000.

Contact me directly and I can supply you with additional
information. (and also a commercial analytical lab as I am
the Technical Advisor for one of them! {grin} We do this
sort of analyses all the time.)

Regards,

Wesley Nieveen, Technical Advisor
Surface Science Laboratories
625-B Clyde Avenue
Mountain View, CA 94043

Phone (650) 962 8767, 800 321 4775
Fax (650) 962 0923
e-mail: wnieveen-at-surface-science.com
-------------------------
You can try FTIR using diamond anvil cell microscopy/FTIR
technique.
--------------------------
Perhaps you should find someone with some surface
analytical equipment - x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
(will give elemental and chemical state information,
analysis depth ~5 nm, area 50 um - 1 cm across depending
on instrumentation), secondary ion mass spectrometry
(especially time-of-flight SIMS) (will give fingerprint
mass spectra, especially useful if you have your unknown
and some candidates under suspicion and good for
differentiating between different organics of similar
structure, analysis diameter say .1 um upwards, analysing
outer monolayer of contaminant, could etch through
to guestimate thickness, could create maps to see if
coverage uniform. Probably better in this case as carbon
and oxygen spectra in XPS can be a pain to analyse.
Another possibility, though the size/thickness of your
contamination might be a problem here, could be Raman
spectroscopy (very akin to infrared spectroscopy) if you
can find one locally with microanalysis possibilities.
Again (as with anything, really) if you have any candidate
contaminants to compare the unknown to, it makes life
easier.

Of course, none of this is useful if you either don't have
access to the equipment or money to pay for time.

Silicon wafer samples are great for surface analytical
machines (much the same as for microscopes I guess) - nice
and flat, can easily be cut to size

Best of luck,

Keith

--
Dr. Keith R. Hallam University of Bristol, Interface
Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121,
St. Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS, England Telephone: +
44 (0)117 925 5666 | E-mail:
k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk Facsimile: + 44 (0)117 925 5646

| URL: http://zeus.bris.ac.uk/~phkrh/


Hi Doug,

We routinely use EDS either in a Hitachi S-4700 FE-SEM or
an ADEM Lab6 SEM to detect trace contaminates on Photo
Resist. Typically, the eV energy of the element that may
be present times 1.5 will give you the desired beam energy
to use. I would suggest starting at lower KeV and move
upward. We also use a backscatter detector to image
instead of the secondary detector due to charging.

Bye for now!

Rodney Hopper
Reliability Engineer
Analytical Services
Burr-Brown Corp
(Microelectronic/Semiconductor Manufacturer)

(520) 746-7808
hopper_rod-at-burr-brown.com


Hi,

Deposits on photoresist are a big problem in the micro
circuit industry, finding out what they are may be equal in
status!

Lets talk you through a SEM protocol.

1. Photoresist is made up of very light elements which
will help in the SEM as other materials will almost
certainly be heavier and be better imaged by the system,
this will enable you to see detail down to tenths of a
micron with no problems.

2. Your analytical problems are much greater. To
display a reasonably good range of light elements in an EDX
system we need at least 10kV. The problem is that for
carbon we are punching the beam in at least 1.3 microns (by
the Monte Carlo calculation) so to be certain that the only
information comes from the deposit is really impossible,
its too small. Do not let your contact be fooled into
believing that if we place a small probe onto a solid
sample we only obtain information from the point the probe
strikes - not true!

3. If you do manage to stain the material with TEM
type stains all you will get is a higher signal due to the
metal being more emissive than an organic deposit, will
this prove anything as the analytical problems remain the
same?

Lets see what the MSA wizards come up with?

Good luck

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, Oxford, UK
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
Portland, Oregon 97201
DRK-at-shcc.org





From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 13:11:13 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM-EDS: What is a reasonable background?

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Robin,

It is a little hard to imagine a scenario where the new crystal
itself could be causing the copper counts (either directly or indirectly).
Mind you, in the field of EDS systems, there are many wierd and wonderful
things that can happen!

You say that you have put the detector back in original position.
Do you mean in the axial direction? Is it possible, for example, that the
snout has been bent slightly, so it is now at a different height? If so,
then the collimator may be looking at a different view of the sample holder.
It is also possible that the collimator has been installed incorrectly (or
was perhaps incorrectly installed before and is now correct!) Perhaps even
a different, less effective collimator was installed during the repair.

The hole count arises because of unfocussed radiation (both
electrons and x-rays) which reaches the sample area, within view of the
detector collimator. Anything which is hit by this radiation will generate
characteristic x-rays. This would occur, for example, if your samples are
mounted on copper grids or support rings. If parts of your sample holder
are made of bronze (which is very common) then you may see copper
originating from here. Another possible source might be an objective
aperture blade which, though retracted, can still be hit by stray radiation.
Do you still get the copper x-rays with the sample holder removed from the
microscope? If so, then something else is being irradiated in the 'scope.
Usually the objective polepieces are coated with carbon dag, or perhaps have
a beryllium liner, so you dont see any characteristic x-rays from them, but
even if they are bare, you would expect to see not copper but iron, perhaps
with come cobalt (depending upon the alloy used in the polepieces).

Are you using a low-background sample holder for your x-ray work?
This would have a beryllium insert to hold the sample, keeping the bronze
parts further from the sample itself.

The purpose of the top hat aperture is to trap as many as possible
of the x-rays and scattered electrons that arise from the edge of the
beam-defining part of the aperture.

Different microscopes have widely different hole count
characteristics, and as you didn't mention which model you are using it is
not possible to give a hard number for what the hole count should be. In
our instruments (which are VG's, known for their extremely low hole counts)
the hole count would be around 0.1% of the count obtained from a reasonably
thin area of the sample.

Good Luck,

Tony Garratt-Reed




Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
MIT Room 13-1027
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
United States of America

Ph: 617-253-4622
Fax: 617-258-6478





From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 13:32:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM-EDS: What is a reasonable background?

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Dear Robin,
}
} We've just had our EDS detector crystal replaced and I am now getting
} complaints that the copper peak that is present whenever we collect
} spectra (including hole counts) is too large. We've placed the repaired
} detector at the same position as before and are using a Pt top-hat
} aperture. My questions:
} 1) What is the source of the Cu peak when we collect a hole count?

My guess is that either electrons or brehmsstrahlung x-rays from
above the specimen are illuminating the (presumably copper) grid. When
you replaced the detector did you also change the aperture? If not, then
there should be no changes in illumination from before, so I can't account
for any change in Cu peak.

} 2) How can I minimize the presence of the Cu peak?

Shielding both above the specimen to reduce stray electrons and
x-rays and below the specimen to eliminate electrons backscattered from
the objective pole piece will help. See my short communication in J.
Elect. Microsc. Tech. 13:274-276 (1989) for how we did it.

} 3) How big of a Cu peak, is too big of a Cu peak?
}
If Cu is an element of interest, or if the Cu peaks overlap an
element of interest, e.g. Os, Zn, any size is too big. If not, then
if the Cu peaks cause significant dead time in the detector or significant
continuum background, they're too big. You can measure the latter with
"hole" counts where the "hole" is 1) a true hole and 2) a part of the
specimen which contains the matrix (plastic, ice, glucose, etc. for bio-
logical specimens, whatever surrounds the area of interest for materials
specimens) but not the element of interest. 1) gives a measure of the
stray radiation in the column, and 2) gives a measure of the stray radi-
ation produced by the specimen. You can minimize 1), but you have to
change the nature of the specimen to minimize 2). Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Mongeon Line (NTC) :      Mongeon-at-ntc.noranda.com (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 16:28:42 -0600
Subject: Microtome- Wood cell-OM and SEM

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We just received our new microtome unit. (Leica RM 2165)
We wanted to prepare thin slice for optical and SEM observation.
Suggestion on embedding media and staining procedure will be very
appreciate.
We have tried the disposable "WC" blade from Leica on section of 1" and we
were able to get a good slice but I never relly look at this type of samples
before. What is the best way to look at it: glue for glass slide and
objectives for optical microscope.
Thank's in advance.
Line Mongeon ( Line is the french ways to right Lynn)
Technologist premier.
e-mail address: Mongeon-at-NTC.Noranda.com






From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 16:39:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: help with collodium

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Brigit,
Try a smaller petri for spreading or two drops, interfernce
colors will help with judging thickness. Personally I make my own from the
parlodion sticks. Good luck.

Mike D
JHMI Microscopy Facility

On Wed, 4 Feb 1998, Birgit Neubohn wrote:

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} Dear microscopist,
}
} some weeks ago I asked for adresses for purchasing collodium. Thanks to all
} who answered me!
} Now I got pyroxilin (= collodium) 2% in amylacetate.
} When I put one drop onto water, it spreads incredibly. So the resulting
} film is much to thin and tears immediately when I get the grid into the EM.
} Is the 2% solution to weak?
} Is there another method to produce a thicker film?
}
} I am trying the collodium support for I get enormous binding of the
} *primary* antibodies to the formvar sometimes. I find it often, that
} primary antibodies bind to formvar, but not to that extend that I saw with
} two antibodies from eggyolk and rabbit. Any suggestions how to overcome
} this?
}
} Thanks a lot in advance
}
} Birgit
}
}
} Dr. Birgit Neubohn
} Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK)
} Corrensstr. 3
} D-06466 Gatersleben-Deutschland
}
} Tel.: (+49) 039482 5447
} Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
} e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
}
}
}
}





From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 14:55:33 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If you are considering ZIP discs / drives (which are great) also consider
JAZZ discs / drives, which are essentially the same, but hold much more
data, and images take up data storage space. Also you may wish to look
into a CD recorder unit, which is also a great way to store digital
images.
Although no digital image can compare to the resolution of film, not yet
anyway.
best of luck
-Mike

On Tue, 3 Feb 1998, Paula Sicurello wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Listers,
}
} I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
} & stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
} something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
} campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
} comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
} will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
} computers?
} I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
} that true?
}
} Thanks in advance for all your fine help.
}
}
} Still preferring to make photographs,
}
}
} Paula = )
}
} Paula Sicurello
} UC Berkeley
} Electron Microscope Lab
} psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
}
}
}





From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 15:09:09 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: EM lab renovation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Richard-
one way of isolating equipment (in AFM and other scanning probe
microscopies) which may or may not work for your situation is to suspend
the equipment from the ceiling, designing the damping system into the
suspension system...?
-Mike

On Tue, 3 Feb 1998, Richard Fonda wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear list members,
}
} I am looking for suggestions on features we should consider for an EM lab
} renovation. We are currently in the design process for renovating a
} building which will house two TEMS, 2 SEMs, an AES, and a darkroom. With
} this opportunity to design the EM labs, we want to take all reasonable
} precautions and make the necessary improvements to optimize these areas.
} This includes necessities for EM operation as well as conveniences.
}
} While this currently unoccupied building readily passes vibrational and
} magnetic field tests, I am trying to minimize the impact of the labs,
} offices, and electrical/ventilation systems which will surround the EM
} labs. Alderson's book (suggested on the list a while back) was a great
} help for the initial design stages. What suggestions do you have either
} for the design of the laboratories or for the related equipment? While my
} primary interest is for the TEM labs, I would welcome any suggestions for
} the other EM rooms or dark room as well.
}
} One major concern I have is with mechanical vibration isolation. We would
} like to limit a priori the effects of the surrounding labs and services.
} Any suggestions which would limit the effects of mechanical vibrations at
} the TEMs, or reduce the level of ambient vibrations, would be particularly
} helpful.
}
} Richard Fonda
}
} _____________________________________________________________
} Richard W. Fonda Naval Research Laboratory
} (202) 767-2622 Code 6324
} (202) 767-2623 fax Washington DC 20375
} _____________________________________________________________
}
}
}





From: Hank Adams :      hadams-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 15:36:23 +0000
Subject: Re: help with collodium

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Regarding Image Analysis Course

There are actually two image analysis courses offered at NC State, one by =
John Russ and one by John Mackenzie.
I have taken both the courses and both are good but for different =
purposes.

John Russ' courses deals mostly with image measurement and what one needs =
to do to make that possible.
John MacKenzie's course is an excellent basic course in what digital =
imaging is all about, how to make and print good looking photographs, =
scanning images, how one needs to set up to do digital imaging, etc.

For a basic digital imaging course, John Mackenzie's course is more tuned =
in to making good looking images and the digital basics.
John Russ' is really more advanced dealing with doing image measurement, =
manually and by computer.

Just my thoughts for what they are worth.
Judy M.

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us


__________________________________________________________________________=
_____

Folks:

Regarding John Russ' reply: I am a graduate of the NCSU course and
readily recommend it to anyone who is looking for a solid foundation in
digital imaging. I hope my response is not as "suspect" as John's -the
only "kickback" I get from the course is the knowledge!

Cheers

Bill Heeschen
The Dow Chemical Company

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Birgit, we routinely use 2% collodion films cast on distilled water.
You didn't mention carbon coating your films after they were placed
on grids. This is necessary to dissipate the energy from the beam.
I try not to use films if it can be avoided. However, with
troublesome plant or bacterial samples it is often needed.
Hank Adams
Electron Microscopy Lab
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces,NM 88003
phone: 505-6463600
fax: 505-6465665




From: Tracy Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 16:41:44 -0600
Subject: re: image storage stuff

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I know this may be "species specific" but we use a magneto-optical (MO)
drive system with our JEOL 5800LV SEM for image storage. The disks are
260MB-acres of space for bitmap or tif image storage. I don't know if MO
drives are not as readily available as rewritable CD's but thought I'd
mention them.

Tracey Pepper
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa state University




From: lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu (Lucille A. Giannuzzi)
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 21:23:09 -0500
Subject: variable pressure SEM demo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Nick,

Look in the tutorial section of the disk and you will find a good
instruction and tutorial on the plug-ins. There are also the same images
that they use in the manual so that you can try things out yourself. They
are Adobe ".pdf" files and there is a reader on the CD. You should also
consider getting John Russ' companion book, "The Image Processing Handbook".
The URL for the website is
http://members.aol.com/ImagProcTK/index.htm

John has info on a short course at
http://vims.ncsu.edu/matsci/IPCFacul.html

and his email address is
john_russ-at-ncsu.edu

He has answered questions for me in the past and he has addressed questions
on the listserver as well.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."


-Scott Walck




----------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.

Reply to: RE} FFT programs for PC

Hi Fred,

we recently bought an Image Processing toolkit with plug-ins for Photoshop.
It
runs under Mac as well as Windows and has, among a lot of other things, FFT.
The package is from Reindeer Games. I haven't tested it very severely but it
did give me good power spectra. Unfortunately the documentation is rather
limited and I can't find their full address.

Hope this helps anyway.

Nick Schryvers

--------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


We are using an Agfa Duoscan (1000 dpi) for digitizing HRTEM images.

At the moment we are saving the images to disk, transfering the tif files
via Apple File Exchange to the Mac, then using Digital Micrograph to give
us an FFT, for printing/exporting etc.

Question:

Is there software available, (freeware or...) that would allow us to
perform the "FFT" on the "PC" that we are using to digitize the HRTEM?

Thanks in advance

Fred Pearson
Electron Optics Coordinator

********************************************************
Fred Pearson
Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research
McMaster University
1280 Main St. West
Hamilton, Ontario
Canada L8S 4M1

********************************************************



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(EST)

There will be a demo of the Hitachi variable pressure SEM in conjunction
with the joint FL AVS and Florida Society for Microscopy meeting at the
University of Central Florida in Orlando February 23-25, 1998.

For more information or to set up a demo appointment please contact me
directly. You my bring you own samples to the demo.

*************************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Dept. of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Eng.

Director, Cirent/UCF Materials Characterization Facility
President, Florida Society for Microscopy

University of Central Florida phone (407) 823-5770
PO Box 162450 fax (407) 823-0208
4000 Central Florida Blvd. email lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu
Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
*************************************************************************






From: feng-at-iris.lamel.bo.cnr.it (Wu Feng)
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 11:13:57 +0100
Subject: Re: Welcome To Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thank you for your email.
Wu Feng

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
| Feng Wu |
| CNR - Istituto LAMEL E-mail: feng-at-iris.lamel.bo.cnr.it |
| Via Gobetti 101 |
| 40129 Bologna tel: +39 51 6399185 |
| Italy fax: +39 51 6399216 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------




From: Richard Fonda
Date: 04 February 1998 18:12
Subject: EM lab renovation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Richard

most e.m. units are at ground floor or basement level so consider the risk
of flooding. This may be natural flooding (when the drains block with leaves
in autumn/fall), the lab above may often flood or someone leaves the tap on
in the darkroom. Precautions may range from a pair of wellies and sandbags
to sills and sealable doors (I've seen something like that in a London
University). But at the very least it should be possible to isolate the
electrics to microscope and lab in an emergency.

Flooding is less likely than vibration and magnetic fields but it does
happen and can be disastrous.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK
----------

Dear list members,

I am looking for suggestions on features we should consider for an EM lab
renovation. We are currently in the design process for renovating a
building which will house two TEMS, 2 SEMs, an AES, and a darkroom. With
this opportunity to design the EM labs, we want to take all reasonable
precautions and make the necessary improvements to optimize these areas.
This includes necessities for EM operation as well as conveniences.

While this currently unoccupied building readily passes vibrational and
magnetic field tests, I am trying to minimize the impact of the labs,
offices, and electrical/ventilation systems which will surround the EM
labs. Alderson's book (suggested on the list a while back) was a great
help for the initial design stages. What suggestions do you have either
for the design of the laboratories or for the related equipment? While my
primary interest is for the TEM labs, I would welcome any suggestions for
the other EM rooms or dark room as well.

One major concern I have is with mechanical vibration isolation. We would
like to limit a priori the effects of the surrounding labs and services.
Any suggestions which would limit the effects of mechanical vibrations at
the TEMs, or reduce the level of ambient vibrations, would be particularly
helpful.

Richard Fonda

_____________________________________________________________
Richard W. Fonda Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 767-2622 Code 6324
(202) 767-2623 fax Washington DC 20375





From: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 2/4/98 10:00 AM
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

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The idea to copy a "batch" of zip disks to CD-R is very good. Do
beware that some sources cannot feed data fast enough to a CD-R
(especially =} 2x) and will cause a "buffer under run" at the CD-R.
This will make a frisbe rather than a data disk. A SCSI Zip may be
fast enough, but it should not be assumed that it will work (I have
not tied). A solution is to assemble the intended DC-R contents on
a HDD 650 Meg partition. A fast SCSI HDD is best, but I have had
only one buffer under run failure using my P166 with a EIDE/WD3.2
HDD.

Woody White
McDermott Technology, Inc.
http://www.mtiresearch.com

Home:
woody.white-at-worldnet.att.net
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722
(Sorry about the $%#* cookies and browser openings that randomally
hit - but it is free!)




______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


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One idea is to get both a Zip Drive and a CD read/writer. Store your images
on the Zip disks and when you get six to eight filled up, transfer the
files to a CD. Then recycle the Zips. The Zip drive is more agile when
working with individual files. Writing to the CD is best done in a few (6
to 8 if you are copying from 6 to 8 Zip disks) sessions. Using the Zip
disks allows you to make changes before archiving the final file(s). Often
a lab or department with several computers used in image handling will have
Zip Drives on each computer, and a single CD writer that is external &
portable. This arrangement will give you the write/read/change/write again
flexibility of the Zips and the efficient & permanence of the CDs. And you
won't have to buy truck loads of Zip disks......just a car load of CDs.


Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Pathology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas U.S.A.




From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 09:07:26 -0500
Subject: More on casting collodine...

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To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com

I should have mentioned the following in my post yesterday:

When casting Collodine on water it is important that you use a
large enough container so that the solution can spread to its full
extent and not be limited by 'running into' the sides of the
container. When it hits the side(s) of the contianer the film will
pileup in that area resulting in an uneven film thickness.

Any circular dish seems to work, but I prefer using 10 -12" pyrex
baking dishes purchased from local home stores (i.e. K-mart, Wallmart,
etc.). They are very cost effective ($3-9 US), and have nice thick
walls which stand up nicely to general lab abuse.

Good casting again!


Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"CONGRESS.SYS Corrupted: Re-boot Washington D.C. (Y/N)?"




From: Scott Holt :      102467.2752-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 09:32:29 -0500
Subject: Image Analysis Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

BUEHLER also offers an Image Analysis course two times a year.
The first of these has already concluded, but space is available
for our summer course. BUEHLER is a manufacturer of Image
Analysis Systems, but, although we do use BUEHLER products
to conduct the class, this course is not focused on sales. It is a
technical description of the methods and mechanisms of Image
Analysis for Materials Science.

The following is a description of our class as printed in our course
schedule:

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF IMAGE ANALYSIS
Instructor: M. Hoffmann
Quantitative analysis of specimens is invaluable for the development
and maintenance of a quality product. Principles of Image Analysis
is an introductory course teaching the basic theory and practice of image
analysis. The course provides hands-on experience and will cover
many common measurements such as nodularity, area percentage
of constituents, coating thickness, and ASTM E112 grain size. No
experience in image analysis is required, but an understanding of
microstructural evaluation, specimen preparation, and computer literacy
is assumed. 2.2 CEUs
Jan. 20-22 Irvine, CA Aug. 17-19 Lake Bluff, IL

A wide selection of other materials related courses are available.
Please see this list on our Web Site (http://www.buehlerltd.com)
or call for a course schedule.

For more details on course availability and prices, please contact
Sandy Kaucic at (800)323-9330, Ext. 4679.

Regards,
Scott D. Holt
BUEHLER, LTD
PO Box 1
41 Waukegan Rd.
Lake Bluff, IL 60044 USA
(847)295-6500, Ext. 4546
http://www.buehlerltd.com




From: cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov (Cynthia J. Zeissler)
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 09:49:01 -0500
Subject: Image Processing, Visual Basic, and TWAIN

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'd like to know which image processors can be called from Visual Basic
that also accept TWAIN drivers?

Cynthia J. Zeissler
Physical Scientist
National Institute of Standards and Technology
cynthia.zeissler-at-nist.gov
301-975-3910






From: Kathi Alexander :      akx-at-ornl.gov
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 10:03:59 -0400
Subject: Microscopy & Microanalysis '98

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

All-

******* ABSTRACT DEADLINE EXTENSION !!! ********

The abstract deadline has been extended to Friday February 13th for the
Microscopy and Microanalysis '98 meeting to be held in Atlanta GA from July
12-16th, 1998. Please do not delay. Get your abstracts in as soon as
possible. Check out the website at :

******* ABSTRACT DEADLINE EXTENSION !!! ********

http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html

for more details on planned symposia as well as abstract submission.

Kathi

Kathleen B. Alexander
Metals and Ceramics Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
P.O. Box 2008 MS-6376
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376
PH (423) 574-0631
FAX (423) 574-0641







From: rgarcia-at-nova.wright.edu
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 11:21:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Image Analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopists,

I have a student that is trying to deterimine the grain size of a
metal that has twins. He is using the line intercept method and is
wondering how he should treat the twin bondaries. It isn't always clear
what is a twin and what may be a grain. Does anyone know how to correct
for this or how twins are treated in this type of analysis. Thanks.

Roberto Garcia
EMF Manager
Wright State University





From: bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu (JIM ROMANOW)
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 11:38:49 -0400
Subject: Re: Moving into modern times

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If you become interested in CDs:
Rewritable (CD-RW) is the latest form of CD storage. Look for the newer
CD-RW drives with "packet writing" capability. You will still need a
compatable disk drive and software. For extensive information check out the
web sights for some of the 'brand' name CD-RW devices. You can find these
names in recent computer products sales flyers etc.



Original message was:

} I know a lot of you are real smart when it comes to computer images
} & stuff. I have an optical disc drive on my SEM and would like to go to
} something that most people have (we have the only optical disc drive on
} campus). Folks here have suggested Zip Drives. Now, I'm an idiot when it
} comes to computer stuff, is a Zip drive good enough for storing images and
} will people get decent images back when they put them on their lab
} computers?
} I've heard that Zip drives and the discs are fairly inexpensive, is
} that true?

} Thanks in advance for all your fine help.

}
} Still preferring to make photographs,


} Paula = )

} Paula Sicurello
} UC Berkeley
} Electron Microscope Lab
} psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-131
Storrs, CT 06269
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax






From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 11:51:09 -0500
Subject: Short UBC Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,

Just to remind those of you still in shock after the SuperBowl, the
deadline for applications to the UBC "Live Cell" course is at the end of
this month. Enrollment is limited but there is still room.

Basic information about the course is to be found below. Many more details
including the complete course brochure, this year's tentative Program
Outline, some 3D results from last year's course and AN APPLICATION FORM
(!) can be found at:

http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html

If you cannot get to the WWW, please respond to me at

{jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu}

Hope to see many of you in beautiful Vancouver next June.

=46ax your applications to me at 1-608-265-5315 or mail to the addresses bel=
ow.

Cheers,

Jim Pawley


*******************************************************


Announcing the Third Annual

10-Day Short Course on
3D Microscopy of Living Cells

June 17 - 28, 1998

and

Second, Post-course Workshop on

3D Image Processing
June 30 - July 2


in association with the
UBC BioSciences Microscopy Facility
and the
Department of Computer Science


University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Organized by Prof. James Pawley
University of Wisconsin-Madison

=46aculty

* Jon Art University of Illinois
* Pin Ching Cheng State U. of New York, Buffalo
* Rachel Errington University of Nijmegen
* Elaine Humphrey University of British Columbia
* Jim Pawley University of Wisconsin-Madison
* Ernst Stelzer EMBL, Heidelberg
* Michael Weis Agriculture Canada
* Nick White Oxford University
* Dan Focht Bioptechs, PA
* Ted Inou=E9 Universal Imaging, PA
* Larry Keenan Cell Robotics, NM
* Paul Millard Molecular Probes, OR
* Sigrid Myrdal Multidimensional Imaging, WA
* Paul Negulescu Aurora Biosciences, CA
* Hans Van der Voort Scientific Volume Imaging, NL

TUITION

Course tuition is $1,950 US and includes lunches. On receipt of 50%
deposit, all students will receive preliminary group assignments and a
copy of the textbook, Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy, (Plenum,
1995). The tuition fee includes single tickets for the Opening Reception,
the Manufacturer's Reception and the Beach Party, the textbook and all
handouts. Accommodations and meals other than lunch are not included in
the tuition fee.


APPLICATIONS

Applicants will complete a questionnaire to assess knowledge level and
field of interest. Enrollment will be limited to about 24 participants.
Selection will be made on the basis of background and perceived need.
Those without previous LM experience will be provided with basic texts on
request to read before the course begins.
Application forms can be down-loaded from the WWW site at

http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html

or obtained from:

Prof. James Pawley, Rm. 1235,
1500 Johnson Dr., Madison, WI, USA 53706.
Phone: 1-608-263-3147, Fax 1-608-265-5315,
Email: jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu

Application deadlines:

Application forms must be received by March 1, 1998!

Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, and a deposit of 50%
must be received by April 15, 1998 to reserve your position. In general,
refunds of the deposit will only be possible if your position can be filled
from the Waiting List. The remainder of the fees are due before
registration.

DATES:

Applications must be received by Mar. 1/98
deposit due Apr. 15/98
Registration 8:00 - 7:00 pm Wednesday, June 17/98
Last class will end with lunch Sun., June 28/98

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3D Image Processing Workshop

June 30 - July 2, 1998

The course is designed for biologists who need to make measurements on 3D
microscopical data sets and then display the results in an effective
manner. The course will be taught in a computer laboratory belonging to
the Computer Sciences Department at the University of British Columbia
which contains 27 SGI Indy workstaions and much of the other equipment
needed for the measurement and display of 3D digital image data. Software
from a variety of vendors serving the 3D microscopy market will be
described, demonstrated and available for use.

Course Organizers

* Nick White Oxford University
* Hans Van der Voort Scientific Volume Imaging, NL

=46aculty
* Pin Ching Cheng State U. of New York, Buffalo
* Rachel Errington University of Nijmegen
* Alain Fournier Computer Science, UBC
* Sigrid Myrdal Seattle, WA

Tuition (including lunch) $700 (US)


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Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 1235, Engineering Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
"A scientist is not one who can an