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From: suelind-at-amsg.austmus.gov.au (SueLind)
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 12:36:38 +1000
Subject: Re: SEM and beetles

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--IMA.Boundary.638414519
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Hi
I dont know if this technique is the best but it certainly works for us.
Depending on what part of the beetle you want to examine, we stick and glue
with silver dag, an entomological pin (for the small beetles) or a normal
pin (for larger specimens)to an area of the specimen which is not going to
be observed. From here we place the specimen and pin in a stub like vice.
This allows you to gold coat the beetle and place in the SEM chamber with
minimal handling.
Ok yes the pin can be seen under the SEM. The idea is the mount the
specimen in such away that the pin will not obscure in anyway the views
that are wanted. ie if dorsal and front view are wanted then the pin would
be placed in the ventral side at an angle less than 90 degrees sloping
backwards towards the posterior end. This will give a greater angle to work
with when observing the frontal position.

I know this is a brief explanation, however if you want to ask any
questions please ring me on 02 9320 6198

Hope this helps

Sue Lindsay

SEM Lab Australian Museum


I would like to know if there is any new technique about SEM and beetles,
what is the best way to mount the beetle.

Keep care and be of good cheer.

Regards

Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptiste
of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Collorado-Mansfeld

Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
(incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)

Temporally home address:
32 Girrawheen Ave.
Kiama NSW 2533
Australia
e-mail: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
ricardo-at-ans.com.au
(before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
and ricardo-at-login.cz )

http://www.coleoptera.org
phone : 0414 540 465 (Australia)
+61 414 540 465 (International)

Only after the last tree has been cut down,
only after the last river has been poisoned,
only after the last fish has been caught,
only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.


--IMA.Boundary.638414519
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BEGIN:VCARD
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N:Bejsak-Collorado-Mansfeld;Vratislav Richard;Eugene Maria John Baptist
FN:Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptist Bejsak-Collorado-Mansfeld
ORG:Bayshark Research Laboratory
TITLE:director
NOTE;ENCODING=QUOTED-PRINTABLE:Marketing and Coaching=0D=0A=0D=0ATenebrionidae
Orbis and higher taxonomy
TEL;WORK;VOICE:(+61 2) 9319 6380
TEL;CELL;VOICE:(+61 414) 540 465
ADR;WORK:;;29 Edward Street;Darlington, SYDNEY;;NSW 2008;Australie
LABEL;WORK;ENCODING=QUOTED-PRINTABLE:29 Edward Street=0D=0ADarlington, SYDNEY
NSW 2008=0D=0AAustralie
ADR;HOME;ENCODING=QUOTED-PRINTABLE:;;(temporaly address):=0D=0A32 Girrawheen
Ave;KIAMA;;NSW 2533;AUSTRALIA
LABEL;HOME;ENCODING=QUOTED-PRINTABLE:(temporaly address):=0D=0A32 Girrawheen
Ave=0D=0AKIAMA NSW 2533=0D=0AAUSTRAL=
IA
URL:
URL:http://www.coleoptera.org
EMAIL;INTERNET:ricardo-at-login.cz
EMAIL;PREF;INTERNET:vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
EMAIL;INTERNET:ricardo-at-ans.com.au
REV:19981231T063007Z
END:VCARD
--IMA.Boundary.638414519--





From: Stephan Coetzee :      stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 09:28:50 GMT+2
Subject: Re: SEM and beetles

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} Hi
} I dont know if this technique is the best but it certainly works for us.
} Depending on what part of the beetle you want to examine, we stick and glue
} with silver dag, an entomological pin (for the small beetles) or a normal
} pin (for larger specimens)to an area of the specimen which is not going to
} be observed. From here we place the specimen and pin in a stub like vice.
} This allows you to gold coat the beetle and place in the SEM chamber with
} minimal handling.
} Ok yes the pin can be seen under the SEM.

Paint the pin with dag before mounting and if you get your contrast
right the pin dissapear into the bagground!!!

Just a usefull hint.
Mr. S H Coetzee Tell: (011) 716 2419
Electron Microscope Unit Fax: (011) 339 3407
Private bag X3 E-mail: Stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Wits
Johannesburg
2050





From: zizu39-at-bengore.infc.ulst.ac.uk (kenszer)
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 13:40:03 GMT
Subject: > Travel News -Save on AirFares, Holiday Travel tips, 99 fare Outlook

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Removal from lists, please go to http://www.globalremove.com

This Free News service keeps on-line travellers updated on Fare Wars,
Vacation Deals, Airline News, and more. This is a one time message.
Need a quote or more info? Call numbers below.

*** This Issue -- Special Preferred AirFares now available
*** by phone......Holiday Travel Tips.......Airfare Outlook - 1999

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Holiday Travel Tips -

1. Pack lighter than usual - Many carriers have begun enforcing
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2. More flight delays - We're continuing to see a larger than usual
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flying. This began in early 1998 and will definitely increase the
number of delays for the 1998 Holiday season, which will be the
busiest Holiday season in recent years.

3. Call ahead to confirm flight - Be sure to check with the Airline
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Be sure to check with smaller, regional airlines who are aggressively
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} } Travel News keeps on-line consumers update oin AirFares,
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From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-aretha.jax.org
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999 08:09:11 -0500
Subject: Small Company Services Microtomes

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I highly reccomend MOC (Microscopical Optical Consulting) to service your
microtomes. This is a small, independant company in Cottage Valley, NY.
They do all of our's every year - Reichart, Leica, Sorvall, etc. Their #
is 914-268-6450. Good luck!
Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191






From: Rik Brydson :      MTLRMDB-at-LUCS-MAC.NOVELL.LEEDS.AC.UK
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 13:58:41 GMT0BST
Subject: TEM postdoc

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A Research Fellow is required in the Department of Materials,
University of Leeds, for a fixed period of two years, to work on an
electron microscope study of the mechanism of graphitisation in
steels. Applicants should have, or be near completing, a PhD in
Metallurgy, Materials Science or a related discipline. Experience in
transmission electron microscopy would be advantageous.

Salary: Research IA within the range stlg15,735- stlg19,197 p.a. according
to qualifications and relevant experience.

Application forms and further particulars may be obtained from
Professor D V Edmonds, Department of Materials, University of Leeds,
Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. tel: 0113 233 2348, fax: 0113 233 2384.

Job ref: 062-066-004-027.

Closing date: 29 January 1999.

Towards Equal Opportunities

Professor David V Edmonds
Department of Materials
School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering
University of Leeds
Leeds LS2 9JT
United Kingdom

tel: +44 (0)113 233 2341
fax: +44 (0)113 233 2384
email: d.v.edmonds-at-leeds.ac.uk

Departmental web-site address: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/materials






From: Jane M. Woodruff :      jwoodruf-at-polysciences.com
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999 10:41:33 -0500
Subject: subscribe

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Please subscribe

--
Jane M. Woodruff
Polysciences Inc Phone: 215-343-6484
400 Valley Rd. 800-523-2575
Warrington, PA 18976 Fax:215-343-0214
E-mail jwoodruf-at-polysciences.com







From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 10:00:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Project MICRO & quotations

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Project MICRO is MSA's middle school educational outreach program. In his
capacity as MSA webmaster Nestor gave MICRO a wonderful Christmas present;
a major expansion of its web page. The new URL is
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html There is a LOT
of microscopy education info there, including the quotations that
listserver readers contributed last year. Please visit the site, and send
me your comments.

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Steven E. Slap :      ebs-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 99 16:10:25 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM and beetles

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Dear fellow microscopists,

I am a vendor, and we developed and sell "Entomounts", which are
basically specimen mounts with the entomology pins already in them. They
are provided as a convenience, and are so reasonably priced that I don't
care much one way or the other whether we sell a bunch of them or not
{grin} .

Happy New Year!
Steven Slap

********************************
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
The Laboratory Microwave Company
http://www.ebsciences.com
********************************






From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 16:21:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: EM Tech position open

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I have a position open for an EM TECHNICIAN, SENIOR, open. The job
entails negative staining and thin sectioning of clinical specimens for
viral examination. The salary is $26K plus good health benefits. Send
resume to me below, or email for questions.

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: maria lucia ribeiro caldas :      caldasml-at-amcham.com.br
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999 21:25:27 -0200
Subject: SPI-PON 812

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Dear all

Does anyone
have a protocol
for the resin
SPI-PON 812
(Sigma).

Thanks








From: maria lucia ribeiro caldas :      caldasml-at-amcham.com.br
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999 21:29:45 -0200
Subject: Ultramount II

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Dear all

I have an old
100g bottle of
Ultramount II
(Ladd) which is
completely
crystallized. I
would like to
know if there
any solution
for this.

Thanks

Lucy







From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 18:13:13 -0600
Subject: TEM: cryomicroscopy

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We have a researcher who is interested in imaging some molecules (proteins,
primarily) in an aqeuous medium in order to determine if any conformational
changes are occurring. Originally, this work was being done using x-ray
microscopy; however, since there are only a very few such microscopes in
the world, I suggested cryo TEM.

We are now looking for central facilities where high resolution cryo-TEM
work might be done.

Thank you.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################







From: alan stone :      as-at-popmail.mcs.net
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 1999 19:11:08 -0600
Subject: snowflake preparation

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I fear that my copy of Microscopy News (I think that is correct) which had
a procedure for the preparation of snowflakes my have hit the recycling bin
without my knowledge or consent.

Can anyone forward a copy of the procedure to me? I would greatly
appreciate it.

Thanks.

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services
as-at-mcs.com






From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 04 Jan 99 22:41:50 -0500
Subject: SPI-Pon(TM) 812

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Maria Lucia Ribeiro Caldas wrote:
=============================================
Does anyone
have a protocol
for the resin
SPI-PON 812
(Sigma).
==============================================
This product originally came from our firm, SPI Supplies. It is our SPI-Pon
812 epoxy resin, it is one of the components of our "Epon replacement" kit,
and is described on our website given below.

We have not yet put up on our website the "Use Instructions" for this
product, but if you send me your FAX number, I will make sure that a
complete set is FAXed off to you right away. SPI-Pon 812 resin is "plug in"
compatible with all known protocols based on the original Epon 812 protocols
, so you could continue using whatever protocol(s) you have found successful
in the past.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-wfubmc.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 21:55:46 -0600
Subject: Microscopy & Microanalysis '99 Information

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-------------------------------------------------------------------
FOR THOSE PLANNING TO SUBMIT A PAPER TO THE MICROSCOPY AND MICROANALYSIS
MEETING.

This year information about the authors of Papers submitted to the M&M
'99 meeting in Portland, OR should be submitted electronically.
Unfortunately, the URL for submission was inadvertently left out of the
"Call for Papers" booklet. The URL is:

http://resolution.umn.edu:591/MandM/DataEntry.html

The abstract itself still should be mailed to Microscopy & Microanalysis
"99 Meeting Management (as indicated in the Call for Papers).

Additional information about the meeting and a link to the data entry
page are available at:

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/.

If you need a copy of the "Call for Papers" contact M&M '99 meeting
management toll free at 877-672-6271 or toll call at 708-361-6045. Fax
number: 708-361-6166.

We hope to see you at M&M '99







From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 10:31:53 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

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Hello everybody,
I would like to get some information on TEM diffraction pattern
analysis. Specifically;

1) What software is available for analysis of diffraction patterns (both ring
patterns and spot patterns)? What kind of accuracy can be obtained - are we
getting close to the accuracy of X-ray diffractometry yet, or are there
fundamental reasons such as lens aberrations, smaller Bragg angles, and
accuracy of measurement which mean that we'll never get there?

2) What are the typical procedures people use for, say, measuring camera length
or identifying unknown phases using diffraction?

I will make a summary of replies and distribute it to anyone who is interested.

Many thanks in advance, and a Happy New Year to all,

Richard Beanland
GMMT Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ
UK
e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com






From: Pbgrover-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 08:12:16 EST
Subject: re: snowflake preparation

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Alan,

Make a 1% solution of Formvar in methylene chloride (chloroform will work
too). Chill the solution and some glass slides (leave them outside with a
cover to keep the snow off). Dip a toothpick in the Formvar solution and
place drops on a slide, then catch snowflakes on a piece of black velvet or
something similar. With a toothpick wetted with the solution, touch a
snowflake ever so slightly and it will cling so you can transfer it to a drop
on the slide. Cover the slide and let the solvent evaporate (this happens
very quickly). Take the slide inside and the snowflake will melt, leaving the
Formvar replica. (To preserve the most delicate structure, leave the slide
outside longer to let the water sublimate).

This is a great treatment for cabin fever. Happy New Year.

Paul Grover





From: Jim Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mailserv.mta.ca
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 09:10:06 -0400
Subject: SEM and beetles

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I've been using a variation of the "ento pin" for years that
provides a little more flexibility than a rigid pin. Cut a long,
thin triangular piece of thick aluminum foil (like that in a
weighing dish - in a pinch you can use aluminum or copper tape),
bend the base at a 90 degree angle, and stick it to the stub with
carbon paint or your favorite conductive adhesive. Mount the insect
on the point with conductive adhesive and coat. After coating, re-paint
the stub surface and pin with carbon paint to darken the background.
The mount is flexible enough to make fine adjustments to the positioning

of the insect (to get an exactly lateral view, or to hide the pin or
whatever)
and can be bent 90 degrees in any direction to get dorsal, ventral or
other views. This works a lot better than trying to tilt the stage, as
in most
scopes you lose the ability to move in the X or Y direction at high
tilts. Plus
the background remains darker if you don't have to tilt.

Hope this helps

JME

--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca







From: Michael BUCKER :      MBUCKER-at-dgs.state.va.us
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 08:08:27 -0500
Subject: Re: Ultramount II

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Lucy,
I'm not familiar with that specific mounting media but if it is for permanent slides (similar to Cargill melt mounts), then place the container (if glass) on a hot plate and slowly heat it up until the crystals go back into solution. You may need to repeat this if recrystallization occurs between uses. Hope this is helpful.
Mike Bucker
Consolidated Labs of Va
Feed Microscopy Unit

} } } maria lucia ribeiro caldas {caldasml-at-amcham.com.br} 01/04 6:29 PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear all

I have an old
100g bottle of
Ultramount II
(Ladd) which is
completely
crystallized. I
would like to
know if there
any solution
for this.

Thanks

Lucy











From: John Arnott :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 08:48:21 -0500
Subject: Re: Ultramount II

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maria lucia ribeiro caldas wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.}
} Dear all
}
} I have an old
} 100g bottle of
} Ultramount II
} (Ladd) which is
} completely
} crystallized. I
} would like to
} know if there
} any solution
} for this.
}
} Thanks
}
} Lucy

Dear Lucy,

It would depend. If there is some solvent left ther might be a chance to
save it. If you wish to contact me directly and give me a liittle more
detail I can advise you further.
On your other post, SPI-812 is a replacement for the old Epon 812 as is
our LX-112 and similar products sold be other supply houses. SPI-812 I
believe probably is a trademark product from SPI, but I could supply you
with the protocols from our product if you wish.

Thanks,

Dr. Charles Duvic
Chemist
--
LADD RESEARCH
13 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495
TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
web site http://www.ladd.cc





From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 08:06:46 -0600
Subject: ALPS MD-1300 Photographic-Quality Color Printer

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Has anyone had any experience with an ALPS MD-1300 Dye Sublimation printer?

A group in our department just got one for $400 dollars. The ink cartridges
are only $33. The b&w and color images look fantastic.

Any negative comments before I go buy one?!

Thanks,

Robin Griffin
UAB





From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 09:55:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Imaging software

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Is anyone using or has anyone used Improvision's OpenLab software? We have
had it in for a demo and are curious as to how it performs in "real life",
how is the tech support, etc. Any comments (positive or negative) will be
appreciated.

Thanks!

Tamara Howard
CSHL









From: Tom Phillips :      tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 09:07:19 -0600
Subject: human blood smears - safety issues

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I have acquired 2 sets of human blood smears - one stained with Wright's
stain and one with cresyl violet to show reticulocytes. I would like to
incorporate them into my histology class student slide sets. I have
coverslipped the smears but there is still a little stained area outside
some of the coverslipped area. Are there any safety issues with stained
smears or can one assume that any potential viral material would be killed
by the staining step. I am unfamilair with the exact staining procedure
but thought that there is ethanol in the stain. any comments from
knowledge histotechs. Thanks in advance. Tom
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)





From: P. McHardy :      gpma44-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 16:32:17 -0000
Subject: Imaging software

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Date sent: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 09:55:29 -0500 (EST)
} From: Tamara Howard {howard-at-cshl.org}
To: Microscopy Listserver {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
We have been using openlab here for about 1 year now. It is being
used for both time lapse imaging and low light GFP imaging. We are happy
with the software. We have had no real problems. The only problems that we
did run into were generally users (my self included) getting a little confused.
The whole package is very complex and complete, depending on which
modules you have and does require a little time to learn. I did find the
automator, a module for automating repetitive or long protracted tasks, could
become slightly cluttered, again more dependant on how the user was laying
out the tasks.
We did run into a couple of problems, or tasks that made us scratch
our heads. When we phoned their UK tech support line, there was always
someone able to help and they resolved all the problems that we had. When
the line was busy they always phoned back.
These remarks all relate to the earlier version of open lab, Open lab 2
only arrived with us just before christmas so I have not had long to play with it,
but so far it appears to be as good as before.
They also appear to be setting up internet user groups and an improved
web site.

If you need any more info please give me a call.


Peter





Peter McHardy
Technology Services Manager,
Beatson Institute,
Glasgow University,
Garscube Estate,
Bearsden,
Glasgow G61 1BD
Tel 0141 330 4818 Fax 0141 330 4127
http://www.beatson.gla.ac.uk/pmh





From: Laura Garvey :      lkg95001-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 12:12:16 -0500
Subject: dissecting / fixing spermathecae for TEM

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To any insect people out there,

I am trying to embed L. dispar spermathecae for TEM, however I'm having =
a terrible time dissecting / fixing the organs without losing the sperm =
contained within them. Does anyone have any suggestions? ( I have =
tried fixing the organs before dissecting them from the
insect - this has not worked well )

Thanks,

Laura K. Garvey
University of Connecticut
Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology=20
U-131, Beach Hall
Storrs, CT 06269=20







From: David McComb :      davidm-at-chem.gla.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 18:49:49 +0000
Subject: Postdoctoral position

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UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

DEPARTMENTS OF PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY AND CHEMISTRY=20

POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSISTANT =20

RA1A =A315,537 - =A323,651=20


A post-doctoral position is available for up to 24 months to work on an
EPSRC funded project, "The use of XANES and ELNES for the characterisation
of stabilised zirconia". The project is a collaboration between Glasgow
University, The Queen's University, Belfast, MEL Chemicals Ltd and Johnson
Matthey Ltd. The part of the project associated with this post involves
modelling the near edge fine structure present on the edges observed in
x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy.
Experience with first principles band structure calculations is essential
and a background in the theoretical interpretation of spectroscopic
techniques such as ELNES and XANES would be highly desirable, as would a
knowledge of many-body physics. The post will be based in Glasgow but
will involve extended periods at The Queens University working with
Professor Finnis and the Atomic Simulations Group. =20

Further information is available at http://www.ssp.gla.ac.uk/ or from
Professor Alan Craven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of
Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ. (Tel 0141 330 5892, FAX 0141 330 4464,
a.craven-at-physics.gla.ac.uk) to whom applications, including a CV and the
names of two referees, should be sent. Closing date - 12 January 1999.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr Dave McComb
Lecturer in Materials Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
University of Glasgow
Glasgow G12 8QQ
UK

Tel: 0 141 330 4486
Fax: 0 141 330 4888
davidm-at-chem.gla.ac.uk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------=20





From: Wharton Sinkler :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 13:07:14 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
} Hello everybody,
} I would like to get some information on TEM diffraction pattern
} analysis. Specifically;
}
} 1) What software is available for analysis of diffraction patterns (both
ring
} patterns and spot patterns)?

One package is Desktop Microscopist. I have some FORTRAN code (written for
a UNIX platform) which is helpful for indexing spot patterns to a known
structure (If you are interested, you may contact me). I am sure there are
others, too. A place to look would be the Sincris site at

http://www.lmcp.jussieu.fr/sincris/logiciel/

} What kind of accuracy can be obtained - are we
} getting close to the accuracy of X-ray diffractometry yet, or are there
} fundamental reasons such as lens aberrations, smaller Bragg angles, and
} accuracy of measurement which mean that we'll never get there?

Because of lens hysteresis, it's not possible on a standard TEM to calibrate
the camera constant L*(lambda) to an accuracy of greater than about 2
percent. A way to get more accuracy is to use an internal standard. For a
good discussion of the problems, see Hirsch, Howie, Nicholson, Pashley and
Whelan, Electron Microscopy of Thin Crystals, end of chapter 1.

In spite of the camera length inaccuracy, the RELATIVE spacings for two
spots isn't affected. Therefore, it is potentially limited only by
measurement inaccuracies (how precisely can we locate the center of the
spot), and by the relrods (see Hirsch et al).

I believe that a spherical-type distortion of the pattern occurs if you use
the beam convergence (condenser lens) to compensate for poor focus of the
diffraction pattern. I've never read a good discussion of this (anyone know
of one?) Also, ring patterns can be distorted from circular by astigmatism
effects (in any post-specimen lens). These optical factors would also limit
the accuracy of relative d-spacings, though to some extent one may be able
to correct for them.

One place where electrons have a significant advantage over x-rays is with
respect to noise. The interaction of electrons with matter is strong, so in
very short experimental times good statistics can be obtained from miniscule
sample volumse. Electron diffraction therefore has potential for structure
refinements (e.g. recent work by Jansen and Zandbergen, L. D. Marks et al
for surface diffraction). Also, the photographic film or CCD is a 2D
detector (rare in XRD), so you can win big time in reducing noise. This can
be used in studies of amorphous materials, via circumferential averaging of
the patterns. However, strictly speaking, both dynamical and inelastic
effects have to be considered in quantitatively interpreting the data.

}
} 2) What are the typical procedures people use for, say, measuring camera
length
} or identifying unknown phases using diffraction?

Again, you can measure camera length as accurately as you want. Turn the
scope off and on and it may differ by a couple of percent.

}
} I will make a summary of replies and distribute it to anyone who is
interested.

Thanks, I would be interested in hearing.

Wharton
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Tel: (208) 533-7724
FAX: (208) 533-7863

mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov

}
} Many thanks in advance, and a Happy New Year to all,
}
} Richard Beanland
} GMMT Ltd.,
} Caswell,
} Towcester,
} Northants NN12 8EQ
} UK
} e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
}
}
}







From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 15:57:16 EST
Subject: Image Analysis Short Course

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Workshop on Quantitative Image Analysis
May 20-22 and May 24-26, 1999, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North
Carolina, USA
June 14-16, 1999, Danish Technological Institute, Taastrup, Denmark

This highly regarded hands-on course taught by Dr. John Russ and other expert
faculty has been presented annually for more than 15 years. It deals with all
phases of quantitative and computer-assisted imaging from acquisition and
processing through measurement and stereological interpretation. Attendees
receive The Image Processing Handbook plus a CD-ROM containing images,
algorithms (Photoshop-compatible for Mac and Windows) and an extensive
tutorial. The course is appropriate for professionals scientists, technicians
and administrators using these techniques for research. Attendees typically
come from materials science, geology, biological and medical sciences,
pharmaceuticals, food science, industrial quality control, remote sensing, and
other disciplines.

For detailed information and registration contact Cindy Allen, Dept. of
Continuing and Professional Education, N. C. State University, Raleigh, NC
27695-7401, 919-515-8171, fax 919-515-7614, email: cindy_allen-at-ncsu.edu

On-line information is available at http://members.aol.com/IPCourse/






From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 15:12:49 -0600
Subject: TEM, Pt grids

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I need a source for 3mm Pt. grids.

Thanks,
Bruce Brinson
Rice U.






From: hank p adams :      hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 03:37:01 -0600
Subject: Signup software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear listservers,=20
This topic was discussed awhile ago. Hopefully, some new developments =
are now here to solve the problem easily. We are looking for a dedicated =
software package for scheduling, in this case, instrument use =
incorporated into our webpage. We have several microscopes, =
workstations, microtomes, etc. and would like to have calenders or =
something similar for each, so users could sign up in advance using the =
web. It should be possible to assign different levels of privilege to =
each user. Once an entry is made it could only be changed by an =
administrator other than the original user. We like would like to then =
to automatically transfer this information into a billing database, =
either Access or FileMaker Pro based. Is something like what I have =
described commercially available?

Hank Adams
Cell Biology
Integrated Microscopy Core
Baylor College of Medicine
One Baylor Plaza
Houston, Tx 77030






From: Evex :      info-at-evex.com
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 17:03:40 -0500
Subject: Representation in the Pacific Rim

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Evex Analytical is searching for representation of X-ray Microanalysis and Digital Imaging Systems in the Pacific Rim.


For more information please contact Sales Director

Evex Analytical
Sales Director
857 State Road
Princeton, NJ 08540 USA
609-252-9192 T
609-252-9091 F






From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 15:05:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Signup software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I don't have the URL immediately at hand, but you might try the Filemaker
website. They have additional templates besides those shipping with
Filemaker. there are also links to Filemaker consultants who have free
templates or who may be able to advise you regarding feasibility.

Regards,
Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu



On Wed, 6 Jan 1999, hank p adams wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear listservers,
} This topic was discussed awhile ago. Hopefully, some new developments are now here to solve the problem easily. We are looking for a dedicated software package for scheduling, in this case, instrument use incorporated into our webpage. We have several microscopes, workstations, microtomes, etc. and would like to have calenders or something similar for each, so users could sign up in advance using the web. It should be possible to assign different levels of privilege to each user. Once an entry is made it could only be changed by an administrator other than the original user. We like would like to then to automatically transfer this information into a billing database, either Access or FileMaker Pro based. Is something like what I have described commercially available?
}
} Hank Adams
} Cell Biology
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Baylor College of Medicine
} One Baylor Plaza
} Houston, Tx 77030
}
}
}






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 1999 19:28:44 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 wrote:
}
} Hello everybody,
Dear Richard,

} I would like to get some information on TEM diffraction
} pattern
} analysis. Specifically;
}
} 1) What software is available for analysis of diffraction patterns (both ring
} patterns and spot patterns)?

There is an operation in the SPIDER image processing program
which will refine a lattice and determine the background-subtracted
intensities. I have written a procedure which subtracts the circu-
larly symmetric background, which improves the subsequent linear
background subtraction. I have also written a routine (both in
SPIDER and as a stand-alone) to determine the center and radius of
a ring from up to 20 points. I can send you the source code for the
stand-alone version.

} What kind of accuracy can be obtained - are we
} getting close to the accuracy of X-ray diffractometry yet, or are there
} fundamental reasons such as lens aberrations, smaller Bragg angles, and
} accuracy of measurement which mean that we'll never get there?
}
When I selected 20 points from each of 13 rings on a gold
pattern (5 from each quadrant), I got r/d* = 402.79+-0.49 pixels.
The range of values was 401.89 to 403.71. The precision was close
to 0.1%. Furthermore, there seemed to be no pattern of systematic
variation, except that the larger rings, which were less intense and
more diffuse, gave somewhat larger errors.

} 2) What are the typical procedures people use for, say, measuring camera
} length
}
The best procedure, if it can be done, is to evaporate gold,
or another standard, onto the crystal whose lattice constants are to
be measured. This way one gets the lattice points and the standard
on the same negative. I scan my negatives on a Perkin-Elmer micro-
densitometer using a 10 mu x 10 mu window. For lattice constant
measurement, I do not interpolate the file, but for intensity measure-
ments, I reduce by a factor of 5 by averaging a 5 x 5 array for each
pixel in the reduced image. This reduction does not produce errors
in the background-subtracted intensities.

} I will make a summary of replies and distribute it to anyone who is
} interested.
}
Thanx. I am on both listservers, so only those responses to
you directly, rather than to a list, would be required.

} Many thanks in advance, and a Happy New Year to all,
}
And to you.
Yours,
Bill Tivol







From: George Theodossiou :      GEORGE-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 17:43:33 EST-10ESUT
Subject: Trade or Freebies

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Hi all!

We've had abit of a clean up here at RMIT and have some goodies to
give away.
We have:
Two boxes Tungsten filaments, Item no. A050 purchased from AGAR
these were used in an old ETEC.
One H.V. supply for the ETEC, I've been told that when the ETEC was
decommissioned it still worked!!!

Yes! they are old items, but perhaps someone has a creative use for
them.
If you want them you can contact me on the details below. Email has
the best chance of getting me.

G. Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
Email: George-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
ph:+61 3 9925 3394
fax:+61 3 9925 5290






From: Dr Eric E. Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 10:37:54 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: diffraction pattern analysis

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Richard,
One major source of inaccuracy in the measurement
of electron diffraction patterns lies in the rather large
variation of camera length with the specimen height. If
you use a double-tilt stage, the specimen height changes
with tilt (only one tilt axis is eucentric). It is possible
to calibrate the camera length against objective current
when the specimen is in focus, but, as pointed out by
Wharton Sinkler, switching the microscope off and on will
undo your work. The height change with tilt can be
obviated by using a rotation-tilt stage instead, but it can
drive you nuts, especially if the crystal is not at the
centre of the grid.

As was suggested, the best method is to use an internal
standard as this compensates for both camera-length changes
and projector astigmatism. It also enables the operator to
estimate d-spacings on screen in order to decide whether
the crystal is in a sensible orientation, and one can very
quickly tell whether a pattern is rectangular or oblique.



I hope this helps,
Eric
----------------------
Dr Eric E. Lachowski
University of Aberdeen
Department of Chemistry
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 1224 272934
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk








From: Pawel Karaszkiewicz :      zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 13:43:13 +0100
Subject: Odp: snowflake preparation

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Paul,

Do you know what Formvar is?

Pawel Karaszkiewcz
}

} Make a 1% solution of Formvar in methylene chloride






From: Mail Delivery Subsystem :      MAILER-DAEMON
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 07:36:16 -0600
Subject: TEM - cryogen material compatibility

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}
} Hi all.
}
} We are currently setting up a cryo-vitrification unit for TEM sample
} analysis. Research into what is the best
} cryogen to use for vitrification of our sample type gave the answer of
} liquid ethane.
}
} Does anybody have any advice as to what materials to use or to NOT use
} with liquid ethane (for material
} incompatibility reasons - chemically and physically (i.e. extreme
} temperatures))? Is copper okay with
} liquid ethane? I've vaguely read somewhere that some groups use a copper
} coil (in liquid nitrogen) to condense
} their ethane. Any other confirmations?
}
} A small flexible length of tubing will also be needed to join the copper
} (?) tubing to the cylinder regulator
} (so we can move the coil in and out of the liquid N2 easily). Apparently
} natural rubber is NOT good with ethane.
}
} Any other pearls of wisdom out there?
}
} Thanks in advance. I'll summarise my replies.
}
} Terri
}
} -------------------------------------
} Ms Terri Soar, PhD student,
} University of South Australia
} Email: terri-at-drage.com.au {mailto:Terri-at-drage.com.au}
} -------------------------------------
}







From: Sally Shrom :      sally-at-retina.anatomy.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 12:07:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM tech position

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Electron microscopy specialist needed immediately. Prepare ultra thin
sections and photograph them using JEOL1200EX. Darkroom, Adobe
Illustrator/Photoshop. Salary commensurate with experience.

Mail, e-mail, or FAX resume and two letters of recommendation to:

Dr. Peter Sterling
123 Anatomy-Chemistry BLDG
Department of Neuroscience
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6058

FAX# 215-898-9871

E-mail: peter-at-retina.anatomy.upenn.edu






From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 14:05:42 -0400
Subject: RE: Formvar

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I have used Formvar for over 50 years now and never known exactly what it
is. In the back of my mind I seem to recall hearing that it is
polyvinylformal, but I'm not certain that is correct. I have just
consulted two polymer scientists in our department, and neither one of them
knows what it is, nor could they find a chemical formula for it in their
reference books.

If anyone knows what it is, I'd like to know too.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-764-3321







From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 1999 13:13:35 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Philippe-Andr=E9 Buffat wrote:
} =20
} I would be strongly interested in softwares able to handle digital
} diffraction patterns. In particular a soft to flatten the background is
} needed. From my experience, I can see on negatives faint rings or spots=
,
} but under the same condition it is impossible to see them on a computer
} screen without increasing the contrast but then the range between black=
and
} white covers only a small part of densities in the whole pattern and th=
e
} observable area between the white center and the black periphery become=
s
} unacceptably small. The use of color coding of the intensities improves
} only a little bit the visible range. An other soft to determine
} automatically the spot position or the ring position by a refinement me=
thod
} or deconvolution of gaussian/lorentzian (or else) curves would also be
} welcome.

Dear Philippe,
In my old paper (Ultramicroscopy (1982) 9:117-130) I discuss=20
a technique of subtracting circularly-symmetric background, and give=20
a reference to an even older paper by Fraser et al. (Appl. Cryst.=20
(1977) 10:64- ). I have since written a procedure using the opera-
tions in the image-processing program SPIDER (I'm sure the operations
are also part of other programs), and I'd be happy to send you a copy.
Briefly, the procedure refines a lattice, masks out the spots, replaces
them with a local average background, makes a 2-D rotational average
image, and subtracts this from the original pattern. The remaining=20
background is linear enough so that the usual form of background sub-
traction will work. This process cannot be used for ring patterns,
although a modification could work. Not only does this circularly-
symmetric subtraction improve the visibility on a screen, it also
increases the accuracy with which the intensities can be measured.
As one can surmise, SPIDER has an operation to determine
intensities and refine a lattice. It can also find the center and
radius of a ring, and I have a stand-alone version of this. This
program works by one choosing from 3 to 20 points on the ring, using
the first 3 to make an initial guess, then least-squares-fitting the
points (if there are more than 3). I'd be happy to send you the=20
FORTRAN code for the stand-alone ring program.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Gillmeister, Russ :      RGillmeister-at-sdms.usa.xerox.com
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 09:19:51 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Wharton, Nice summary, I would like to add a practical hint to those who
may be new to ED. You can use an extrinsic standard such as a gold film. The
improtant point is maintaining the same conditions for the standard and
sample. To accomplish this the lens currents should be duplicated. An easy
way to accomplish this is to focus the sample with the Z position while
maintaining the lens currents from the standard. When using extrinsic
standards the potential for a Z position mismatch and subsequent change in
the objective lens current is the most likely error in camera length. Russ

-----Original Message-----
} From: Wharton Sinkler [mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 1999 2:07 PM
To: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363; Microscopy Listserver; lemas
Listserver


}
} Hello everybody,
} I would like to get some information on TEM diffraction pattern
} analysis. Specifically;
}
} 1) What software is available for analysis of diffraction patterns (both
ring
} patterns and spot patterns)?

One package is Desktop Microscopist. I have some FORTRAN code (written for
a UNIX platform) which is helpful for indexing spot patterns to a known
structure (If you are interested, you may contact me). I am sure there are
others, too. A place to look would be the Sincris site at

http://www.lmcp.jussieu.fr/sincris/logiciel/

} What kind of accuracy can be obtained - are we
} getting close to the accuracy of X-ray diffractometry yet, or are there
} fundamental reasons such as lens aberrations, smaller Bragg angles, and
} accuracy of measurement which mean that we'll never get there?

Because of lens hysteresis, it's not possible on a standard TEM to calibrate
the camera constant L*(lambda) to an accuracy of greater than about 2
percent. A way to get more accuracy is to use an internal standard. For a
good discussion of the problems, see Hirsch, Howie, Nicholson, Pashley and
Whelan, Electron Microscopy of Thin Crystals, end of chapter 1.

In spite of the camera length inaccuracy, the RELATIVE spacings for two
spots isn't affected. Therefore, it is potentially limited only by
measurement inaccuracies (how precisely can we locate the center of the
spot), and by the relrods (see Hirsch et al).

I believe that a spherical-type distortion of the pattern occurs if you use
the beam convergence (condenser lens) to compensate for poor focus of the
diffraction pattern. I've never read a good discussion of this (anyone know
of one?) Also, ring patterns can be distorted from circular by astigmatism
effects (in any post-specimen lens). These optical factors would also limit
the accuracy of relative d-spacings, though to some extent one may be able
to correct for them.

One place where electrons have a significant advantage over x-rays is with
respect to noise. The interaction of electrons with matter is strong, so in
very short experimental times good statistics can be obtained from miniscule
sample volumse. Electron diffraction therefore has potential for structure
refinements (e.g. recent work by Jansen and Zandbergen, L. D. Marks et al
for surface diffraction). Also, the photographic film or CCD is a 2D
detector (rare in XRD), so you can win big time in reducing noise. This can
be used in studies of amorphous materials, via circumferential averaging of
the patterns. However, strictly speaking, both dynamical and inelastic
effects have to be considered in quantitatively interpreting the data.

}
} 2) What are the typical procedures people use for, say, measuring camera
length
} or identifying unknown phases using diffraction?

Again, you can measure camera length as accurately as you want. Turn the
scope off and on and it may differ by a couple of percent.

}
} I will make a summary of replies and distribute it to anyone who is
interested.

Thanks, I would be interested in hearing.

Wharton
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Tel: (208) 533-7724
FAX: (208) 533-7863

mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov

}
} Many thanks in advance, and a Happy New Year to all,
}
} Richard Beanland
} GMMT Ltd.,
} Caswell,
} Towcester,
} Northants NN12 8EQ
} UK
} e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
}
}
}







From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 1999 13:35:06 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM - cryogen material compatibility

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Terri,

You wrote:
}
} } Does anybody have any advice as to what materials to use or to NOT use
} } with liquid ethane (for material
} } incompatibility reasons - chemically and physically (i.e. extreme
} } temperatures))? Is copper okay with
} } liquid ethane? I've vaguely read somewhere that some groups use a copper
} } coil (in liquid nitrogen) to condense
} } their ethane. Any other confirmations?
} }
Both Cu and Al are compatable with LEt. The best scheme
might be to pass the N2 vapor at ~80 K through the tube to liquify,
but not freeze, the Et. We use an Al cup cooled by LN2, and there
are problems with the Et solidifying.

} } A small flexible length of tubing will also be needed to join the copper
} } (?) tubing to the cylinder regulator
} } (so we can move the coil in and out of the liquid N2 easily). Apparently
} } natural rubber is NOT good with ethane.

Tygon is also not good. Teflon tubing retains its strength
and flexibility at 77 K, so I reccommend it. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 15:34:40 -0400
Subject: RE:Formvar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have done some more research on the matter of the composition of
Formvar. In the book 'Techniques for Electron Microscopy' D. H. Kay, Ed.,
Blackwell Scientific, 1965 I find a statement indicating that Formvar is
Polyvinyl Formal (p. 60)
In the book 'Polymer Chemistry' by M. P. Stevens, Oxford Univ. Press,
1990, p.302, I find that the reaction of vinyl alcohol with butyl aldehyde
produces a polymer called polyvinyl butyral. By analogy, if vinyl alcohol
were reacted with formaldehyde (HCHO) one might assume it would produce
polyvinyl formal. If this is so, AND IT IS ONLY A GUESS, then by analogy
the chemical formula for the repeating unit in the polymer chain might be:


CH2
/ \
-[CH2-CH CH]-
| |
O O
\ /
CH2

I hope this formula survives the process of being transmitted across the
internet. This word processer is not ideal for writing organic chemical
formulas.

Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-764-3321







From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 1999 14:53:02 -0800
Subject: Re: Formvar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wil Bigelow wrote:
}
} I have used Formvar for over 50 years now and never known exactly what it is. In the back of my mind I seem to recall hearing that it is
} polyvinylformal, but I'm not certain that is correct. I have just
} consulted two polymer scientists in our department, and neither one of them knows what it is, nor could they find a chemical formula for it in their reference books.

Will et al:

According to the free sample, yes, I said free sample, I got from
Monsanto, Formvar is a "polymer from polyvinyl alcohol and formaldehyde
as as copolymer with polyvinyl acetate". If that is not enough
information you could call Monsanto in St. Louis. I believe that it was
originally developed to coat copper wire. Note that are several
different types of Formvar. I think the type us EM folks use is 15/95
but I could be wrong.

Geoff
--
***************************************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax -4029 e-mail: mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
***************************************************************





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 06 Jan 99 15:58:17 -0500
Subject: Formvar(R) question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Wilbur C. Bigelow wrote:
===================================================
I have used Formvar for over 50 years now and never known exactly what it is
. In the back of my mind I seem to recall hearing that it is
polyvinylformal, but I'm not certain that is correct. I have just consulted
two polymer scientists in our department, and neither one of them knows what
it is, nor could they find a chemical formula for it in their reference
books.

If anyone knows what it is, I'd like to know too.
=================================================
You are correct, it is generically, polyvinyl formal, and the term "Formvar"
is a trade name, originally registered (if my memory is correct) by Monsanto
Chemical Company in St. Louis.

Disclaimer: SPI is a supplier of Formvar resin for use in electron
microscopy.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 16:36:22 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM - cryogen material compatibility

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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You will find all the information in my book "low Temperature Microscopy
and Analysis" Plenum Press New York 1992

Patrick Echlin
University of CambridheOn Wed, 6 Jan 1999, Mail Delivery


Subsystem wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} }
} } Hi all.
} }
} } We are currently setting up a cryo-vitrification unit for TEM sample
} } analysis. Research into what is the best
} } cryogen to use for vitrification of our sample type gave the answer of
} } liquid ethane.
} }
} } Does anybody have any advice as to what materials to use or to NOT use
} } with liquid ethane (for material
} } incompatibility reasons - chemically and physically (i.e. extreme
} } temperatures))? Is copper okay with
} } liquid ethane? I've vaguely read somewhere that some groups use a copper
} } coil (in liquid nitrogen) to condense
} } their ethane. Any other confirmations?
} }
} } A small flexible length of tubing will also be needed to join the copper
} } (?) tubing to the cylinder regulator
} } (so we can move the coil in and out of the liquid N2 easily). Apparently
} } natural rubber is NOT good with ethane.
} }
} } Any other pearls of wisdom out there?
} }
} } Thanks in advance. I'll summarise my replies.
} }
} } Terri
} }
} } -------------------------------------
} } Ms Terri Soar, PhD student,
} } University of South Australia
} } Email: terri-at-drage.com.au {mailto:Terri-at-drage.com.au}
} } -------------------------------------
} }
}
}
}
}







From: Russ Desnoyer :      desnoyr-at-cesmtp.ccf.org
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 1999 16:37:00 -0600
Subject: TEM - cryogen material compatibility -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Terri,

We use Tygon brand tubing connected to a copper
coil when liquifying gaseous ethane. The tubing
is connected to the ethane tank regulator at one
end and the copper coil at the other. The copper
coil is placed in a beaker in a styrofoam box in a
fume hood. The ethane is turned on and liquid
nitrogen is poured around the coil. As the copper
and ethane start to get cold, the ethane will start
to liquify and collect in the beaker. It should
take approximately 2-3 minutes to start to liquify
and 5-7 minutes to collect 2-300 ml.

You need to be extremely careful with liquid
ethane. Besides the obvious (it's extremely cold
and will produce severe burns rather quickly), it
is volatile if it comes in contact with liquid
nitrogen. So when you have a beaker of liquid
ethane immersed in a box of liquid nitrogen, the
potential for injury cannot be overstated. Hand
(and forearm) as well as eye protection are
essential.

We've been using liquid ethane for years and I
even have photos of the setup in our lab. If you'd
like, I could send you a copy of these. Feel free to
write or call.

Hope this helps....

Russ


Russell W. Desnoyer
Senior Research Technologist
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Department of Molecular Cardiology
9500 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44195
Ph: (216) 444-4673
Fax: (216) 445-6062
E-mail: desnoyr-at-cesmtp.ccf.org







From: George Theodossiou :      GEORGE-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 16:43:43 EST-10ESUT
Subject: Binary Alloys

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all

I need some info on binary alloys. Typically Aluminium, Titanium and
Carbon Nitrides, Borides, etc. These are typically grown as thin
films using cathodic arc deposition.
What I need is some general info:
What research has been done in the past?
What research is currently happening?
Where is the research is likely to go?
What applications do these materials have as thin films and as bulk
samples?

Any info, hints clues greatly appreciated.

George

G. Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
Email: George-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
ph:+61 3 9925 3394
fax:+61 3 9925 5290






From: George Theodossiou :      GEORGE-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 16:47:33 EST-10ESUT
Subject: Ed Sharpe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Ed

Email that I send to you at the address couryhouse-at-aol.com keeps bouncing.
Help me out!!!!

George





From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 06:59:50 -0600 (CDT )
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have come across this several times, and there is no simple solution
that I am aware of. I believe the reason has a lot to do with how the
eye/brain interprets images. We do a good job of excluding noise, and
we can often see patterns when it is very difficult to quantitatively
measure them on a computer. In a sense we do a type of Maximum Entropy
analysis -- we have a prior model of what is in the image and find
features that fit this model, for instance weak spots or rings. (Of
course, this also means that sometimes we find things that are not
there.)

The best method that I am aware of is to combine a rank filter (good
at reducing shot noise), some sort of high-pass filter to remove only
the low frequencies (reducing the background) and pasting togethor
images at different contrast levels to prevent the high intensity
regions from dominating. At least for a picture this often works,
although you have to play a lot with the kernel sizes. Quantitation
is very hard. You have to set up a model (Maximum Entropy, Maximum
Likelihood, Least-Squares) and perform a numerical fit. Sometimes
Least-Squares works; I have never tried Maximum Entropy which should
do better.


Philippe-Andr=E9 Buffat wrote:
} =20
} I would be strongly interested in softwares able to handle digital
} diffraction patterns. In particular a soft to flatten the background is
} needed. From my experience, I can see on negatives faint rings or spots,
} but under the same condition it is impossible to see them on a computer
} screen without increasing the contrast but then the range between black a=
nd
} white covers only a small part of densities in the whole pattern and the
} observable area between the white center and the black periphery becomes
} unacceptably small. The use of color coding of the intensities improves
} only a little bit the visible range. An other soft to determine
} automatically the spot position or the ring position by a refinement meth=
od
} or deconvolution of gaussian/lorentzian (or else) curves would also be
} welcome.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++






From: John Shields :      jpshield-at-arches.uga.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 08:43:30 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: RE: Re: Formvar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Formvar is indeed used to coat copper wire. My wife works for an
overhead transformer manufacturing firm and they buy the stuff by the
barrels for coating the wire (not just copper). It is a different
grade and formulation, otherwise I would've been tempted to never buy
the stuff again after purchasing a 55 gal drum of it...

On Wed, 06 Jan 1999 14:53:02 -0800 Geoff McAuliffe {mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU}
wrote:
.. I got from
} Monsanto, Formvar is a "polymer from polyvinyl alcohol and formaldehyde
} as as copolymer with polyvinyl acetate". If that is not enough
} information you could call Monsanto in St. Louis. I believe that it was
} originally developed to coat copper wire. Note that are several
} different types of Formvar.








From: ROBERT WILLIS :      WILLIS.ROBERT-at-EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 08:51:22 -0600
Subject: SEM: quantifying particle mass distribution uniformity on filter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listservers:

I have some filters with particles of differing size but fixed density
distributed over the surface. I would like to quantify and compare the
"uniformity" of the particle mass distribution on each filter by SEM. My
software estimates the volume of each particle using the min and max
diameters and assuming an oblate spheroid. Is there a statistically
sound recipe for using the observed variation in Vf - where Vf is the
particle volume per field measured over many randomly selected fields -
to quantify the uniformity of the sample's mass distribution and compare
one sample to another? If two samples have different particle loadings,
does one use different field areas on the two samples to get the same
average Vf for both? The recipe should also include some confidence
factor related to the fraction of filter area analyzed.

Thanks for your suggestions.

Bob Willis
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc
Research Triangle Park, NC







From: Wharton Sinkler :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 08:07:44 -0600
Subject: Re: Binary Alloys

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George,

For background and previous research, try "Phase Diagrams of Binary Titanium
Alloys", edited by J. L. Murray. There may also be similar books (published
by ASM) for aluminium and carbon. If not, the phase diagram compilation by
T. B. Massalski would be a place to start, as well as "Journal of Phase
Equilibria" (formerly "Bulletin of Alloy Phase Diagrams" ).

Wharton
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Tel: (208) 533-7724
FAX: (208) 533-7863

mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov

----------
} From: "George Theodossiou" {GEORGE-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Binary Alloys
} Date: Thu, Jan 7, 1999, 10:43 AM
}

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America







From: Steve Barlow :      sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 08:46:13 -0800
Subject: greening stored tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all

One of our researchers has mouse embryos that express gfp-linked material.
These embryos were preserved and maintained in PBS plus freshly made 4% p
formaldehyde and 0.5% Tween 20. Initially, his control samples were pink
in color without fluorescence. After 3 months, his control samples have
started to turn green under fluorescent light. In so far as these are
controls for his gfp expression samples, this fluorescence is not helpful.

Any idea what is causing this change in color? I recommended he should
store his samples long-term in PBS plus 0.5% formaldehyde in PBS. Anyone
have any better suggestions?

Also, those of you who work with gfp.....Could he treat his embryos, say
with ammonium chloride, to try to get rid of his unwanted background
fluorescence? Can he do an equivalent treatment of his controls and
experimentals without damaging the gfp fluorescence he has previously
observed?

thanks in advance

steve


---------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow, Associate Director
EM Facility/Biology Department
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619)594-4523
fax: (619) 594-8759
email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
website: http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility/

Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
promoting remote access to microscopes
Microscopy Society of America http://www.msa.microscopy.com/







From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thursday, January 07, 1999 11:43AM
Subject: Binary Alloys

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You should look up the proceedings from the International Conference on
Metallurgical Coatings and Thin Films for the past several years. The
proceedings are two volumes and the papers are full papers. One volume is
printed in Thin Solid Films and the other in Surface and Coatings
Technology. You can find out more about this year's conference at the
following web site:
http://www.vacuum.org/icmctf/icmctf.html

Incidentally, I am a session chair for the "Microstructural, Microanalytical
and Imaging Characterization" session in the "Coating and Thin Film
Characterization" symposium.

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."



----------
} From: George Theodossiou
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Hi all

I need some info on binary alloys. Typically Aluminium, Titanium and
Carbon Nitrides, Borides, etc. These are typically grown as thin
films using cathodic arc deposition.
What I need is some general info:
What research has been done in the past?
What research is currently happening?
Where is the research is likely to go?
What applications do these materials have as thin films and as bulk
samples?

Any info, hints clues greatly appreciated.

George

G. Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
Email: George-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
ph:+61 3 9925 3394
fax:+61 3 9925 5290






From: jim tross :      giblab-at-pcom.net
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 12:57:46 -0500
Subject: looking for a paper

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


i've been reading principals of heat treatment of steel by krauss and in
the references of chapter 5 reference 4 lists a paper by S.Chattopadhyay
and C.M. Sellars titled
Quantitative measurements of pearlite
spheroidization,Metallography,vol10,1977
pg 89-105

does anyone have this paper?
if you do could you please fax it to me at 716-684-9433

or could you tell me what Metallography is ,is it a magizne?

thankyou
gordon reinig






From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 12:23:02 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM: quantifying particle mass distribution uniformity on

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sounds like you may want to check with John Russ about many of these
issues. I thought he was right there in your backyard. But I will offer a
couple thoughts.

I think you would be better use the same field size for all of your
measurements. Besides, Vf should have the same mean value no matter how
large the field. The larger the field you measure, the less variation in
field-specific measurements between fields. Supposing I find a standard
deviation of 4% for some measurement for a single field (determined by
measureing multiple fields). Then, if I measured a field 5 times as wide or
measured 25 fields and averaged the results, the standard deviation on that
measurement would be sqrt(25) less or 0.8%. Either way, 25 times more area
was analyzed. So, you could make some adjustments to match up your
measurements even if you did use different areas.

Regarding measuring the variation in Vf and compare samples - our work
involves the measuring of void distributions. We are routinely measuring 20
frames per sample and calculating the variation in Af, but that is to have
a measure of confidence in our Af measurements. It gives us some insight
into the nature of our samples. A lower variability normally translates
into a smaller average particle size, but it can also indicate some things
about uniformity of distribution for the smae feature size between samples.

As to the statistical test for determining when the variation is
significantly different between two populations with identical means, I
will leave that to those that are better versed in statistics than I am at
this moment. There must be one out there.

Hoping this helps.
Warren

At 08:51 AM 1/7/99 -0600, you wrote:
} I have some filters with particles of differing size but fixed density
} distributed over the surface. I would like to quantify and compare the
} "uniformity" of the particle mass distribution on each filter by SEM. My
} software estimates the volume of each particle using the min and max
} diameters and assuming an oblate spheroid. Is there a statistically
} sound recipe for using the observed variation in Vf - where Vf is the
} particle volume per field measured over many randomly selected fields -
} to quantify the uniformity of the sample's mass distribution and compare
} one sample to another? If two samples have different particle loadings,
} does one use different field areas on the two samples to get the same
} average Vf for both? The recipe should also include some confidence
} factor related to the fraction of filter area analyzed.
}
} Bob Willis
} ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc
} Research Triangle Park, NC






From: Chris Adams :      cadams-at-lanl.gov
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 11:52:08 -0700
Subject: TEM: Polymer Staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What is eveyones favorite stain for enhancing contrast during polymer TEM?
OS4 or otherwise? The polymer materials are PVC and PVB.

Also, does anyone out there have some advice on a recommended temperature
for ultramicrotomy of the above polymers? We DO have a cryo-ultramicrotome.

Chris







From: Thomas, Larry :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 11:49:10 -0800
Subject: RE: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For some reason, Philippe-Andre Buffat's posting to the listserver =
never showed
up in my mail. I wonder if this is common--getting partial =
conversations.

Seeing faint features on TEM negatives and not on the digitized images =
sounds as
if it has more to do with limitations of the digitization process used =
than it
does with visualization. 8 bits probably just isn't enough integers to =
preserve
the faint image detail and keep the black and white extremes at the =
same time.
If the data is not preserved in the digital images, no amount of fancy =
filtering
is going to recover it. I'd suggest a careful look at what's going on =
in the
digitization process you're using. If your scanner allows spreading =
the film
density data over 12 or 14 bits instead of the usual 8, you may be able =
to
extract the fine detail information by postprocessing high-bit images =
to level
backgrounds, adjust tones, and filter. The unsharp mask filter in =
Photoshop
sometimes does a good job at enhancing faint details that are otherwise =
lost or
blurred in the scanning process.

Larry Thomas
Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Washington State University
Pullman, WA=20

----------
From: L. D. Marks
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 1999 12:59 PM
To: Microscopy List
Subject: Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

=
------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of =
America=20
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to =
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help =
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-----------------------------------------------------------------------.=



I have come across this several times, and there is no simple solution
that I am aware of. I believe the reason has a lot to do with how the
eye/brain interprets images. We do a good job of excluding noise, and
we can often see patterns when it is very difficult to quantitatively
measure them on a computer. In a sense we do a type of Maximum =
Entropy
analysis -- we have a prior model of what is in the image and find
features that fit this model, for instance weak spots or rings. (Of
course, this also means that sometimes we find things that are not
there.)

The best method that I am aware of is to combine a rank filter (good
at reducing shot noise), some sort of high-pass filter to remove only
the low frequencies (reducing the background) and pasting togethor
images at different contrast levels to prevent the high intensity
regions from dominating. At least for a picture this often works,
although you have to play a lot with the kernel sizes. Quantitation
is very hard. You have to set up a model (Maximum Entropy, Maximum
Likelihood, Least-Squares) and perform a numerical fit. Sometimes
Least-Squares works; I have never tried Maximum Entropy which should
do better.


Philippe-Andr=E9 Buffat wrote:
} =20
} I would be strongly interested in softwares able to handle digital
} diffraction patterns. In particular a soft to flatten the background
is
} needed. From my experience, I can see on negatives faint rings or
spots,
} but under the same condition it is impossible to see them on a
computer
} screen without increasing the contrast but then the range between
black and
} white covers only a small part of densities in the whole pattern and
the
} observable area between the white center and the black periphery
becomes
} unacceptably small. The use of color coding of the intensities
improves
} only a little bit the visible range. An other soft to determine
} automatically the spot position or the ring position by a refinement
method
} or deconvolution of gaussian/lorentzian (or else) curves would also =
be
} welcome.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++







From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:06:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: flat embedding of vibratome sections

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Greetings,
I need assistance with flat embedding of rat cerebellum
(IEM-DAB), that is 100 um thick and 1.5 x 0.5 cm dimensions. Basically
we are worried about tissue curling during the dehydration. My first
inclination is argarose embed (before epon), but I would take any expert
advise.
Thank you,

Mike D






From: Vegvari, Paul C. 213 :      PVegvari-at-phelpsd.com
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 13:50:14 -0700
Subject: Electron Diffraction Course

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Hi,
Does anyone know of a short course on electron diffraction (TEM)
sometime in 1999. All information will be appreciated.
Paul





From: Susanne Stemmer :      stemmer-at-uic.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 16:10:44 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral Position

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN INTERFACE PHYSICS


DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO


A postdoctoral position is available in the Interface Physics Group at
the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Research in the Interface
Physics Group focuses on the use atomic resolution imaging and
analytical techniques in electron microscopy, coupled with theoretical
simulations, to determine the structure-property relationships at
internal interfaces on the fundamental atomic scale. Current research
programs involve ceramics, high-Tc superconductors and
optoelectronic/high-power semiconducting materials and devices. The
experimental facilities to perform this research are comprehensive: a
JEOL 2010 Field-Emission STEM/TEM featuring a 1.4=C5 probe size, "drift
free" stage, high-angle annular dark-field detector (Z-contrast), Gatan
Imaging Filter, and Noran EDS; a VG HB501A Field-Emission dedicated
STEM with EDS, EELS and Auger spectrometers; a JEOL 3010 conventional
TEM with digital imaging capabilities and EDS; a JEOL 6320
=46ield-Emission SEM with EDS and Cathodoluminescence; a JEOL JXA733
microprobe; and a Topometrix AFM/STM. In addition to the electron
microscopes, specimen preparation facilities include a Gatan Duo-mill,
=46ischione precision ion-mill, SouthBay plasma cleaner and Leica
Ultramicrotome. The Interface Physics Group has a Silicon Graphics
R10000 Power Indigo workstation with a Molecular Simulations' Cerius 2
package incorporating the CASTEP pseudopotential code. The physics
department has additional workstations and access to the UIC Convex
Exemplar Supercomputer and the National Center for Supercomputing
Applications at UIUC. =20

This position is a joint postdoctoral appointment with Professor
Susanne Stemmer in the Department of Physics at UIC. Research
performed by the successful candidate for this position will involve
the investigation of grain boundaries and defect structures in ionic
and mixed ionic/electronic conducting oxide ceramics. The aim of the
program is to incorporate experimental results into comprehensive
atomic scale models for ionic/electronic transport in these materials.=20
It is anticipated that this position will involve a significant amount
of industrial collaboration.

Candidates should be recent Ph.D. graduates in physics, metallurgy, or
materials science with a background in the relevent materials issues
and an ambition to be part of a developing program pushing at the
frontiers of interface physics. Please send a resume, names, addresses
of three references and a publication list to Professor Nigel D.
Browning at the address below. Prior experience in STEM or TEM is
essential. However, consideration will be based on the candidates
overall potential for success in the field and applicants with prior
experience in related fields are encouraged to apply. Positions are
for one year initially, normally renewed for a second year with
possibilities existing for further years. Salary is commensurate with
experience. UIC is an equal opportunity employer.


Nigel D. Browning,

Department of Physics (M/C 273),

University of Illinois at Chicago,

845 West Taylor Street,

Chicago. IL 60607-7059. USA


e-mail: Browning-at-uic.edu

tel: (312) 413-8164

fax: (312) 996-9016 =20








From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 18:34:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: flat embedding of vibratome sections

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On Thu, 7 Jan 1999, MICHAEL DELANNOY wrote:

} Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:06:29 -0500 (EST)
} From: MICHAEL DELANNOY {delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: flat embedding of vibratome sections
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Greetings,
} I need assistance with flat embedding of rat cerebellum
} (IEM-DAB), that is 100 um thick and 1.5 x 0.5 cm dimensions. Basically
} we are worried about tissue curling during the dehydration. My first
} inclination is argarose embed (before epon), but I would take any expert
} advise.
} Thank you,
}
} Mike D
}
}
We do this all the time. Sections don't curl. We originally tried to
put them into flat molds standing up on their edges, but they would fall
over sometimes. We now cut the pointed end off a BEEM capsule; snap the
cap on the other end and wrap the junction with a sliver of Parafilm to
prevent leaking; put a drop of
resin in the lid (now upside down, with the Beem capsule sticking
upwards); and lift the thick section into the lid with a wooden
applicator stick broken into a flat wedged end with the tip then bent up
into the shape of a hoe then fill the capsule with resin. Do this on a
light box and under a dissecting scope.

If you need to keep straight which side is which, you can trim the tiny
thick section with a razor blade into a funny shape that you will
recognize. We use a trapezoid-like shape/state of Nevada shape:
__
| \
|___\

That way you can keep the side of interest outward, e.g., confocal
scope-selected areas: Miller SE, Levenson RM, Aldridge C, Hester S, Kenan
DJ, Howell DN. 1997. Identification of focal viral infections by
confocal microscopy for subsequent ultrastructural analysis. Ultrastruc.
Pathol. 21:183-193.

Your sections are wider; thus, you will have to embed in a larger mouthed
container if you want sections parallel with the face. But the principle
is the same. If the sections have enough room to "swim" in the resin,
you can gently stretch them out with the applicator stick, i.e., they won't
premanently curl even though they will be flimsy as they float around in the
resin.

Good luck.



Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 16:42:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: flat embedding of vibratome sections

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Mike D-
we routinely embed flat sections
after the immuno proceedures, do any post fixation (OsO4), followed by
dehydration, infiltration with resin, then to embed we place the 100
micron section between two glass slides * one of which has been subbed
with a gelatin material, the other whioch has been subbed with Trenmittel
(we purchase ours from EMS) the trenmittel is something like teflon, it is
a release agent. remove all exess resin from around the section, then
clamp the two slides together (clothes pins or large paper clips)
polymerize as usual, then using a knife blade pry the two glass slides
apart, this takes a little practice.
finally reembed by filling a gelatin capsule with resin, let it thicken a
little, then invert it over thetissue section which remained on the subbed
slide, polymerize overnight. to free the section/block; hold slide over an
alcohol burner flame (use pliers) then after 6-8 seconds snap off the
block with the aid of haemostats or pliers. it really can work quite well.
but practice first it is a little tricky
-Mike


On Thu, 7 Jan 1999, MICHAEL DELANNOY wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Greetings,
} I need assistance with flat embedding of rat cerebellum
} (IEM-DAB), that is 100 um thick and 1.5 x 0.5 cm dimensions. Basically
} we are worried about tissue curling during the dehydration. My first
} inclination is argarose embed (before epon), but I would take any expert
} advise.
} Thank you,
}
} Mike D
}
}
}






From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 20:35:15 EST
Subject: Re: Re: SEM: quantifying particle mass distribution uniformity on filter substrates.

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In a message dated 1/7/99 2:07:07 PM, wesaia-at-iastate.edu wrote:

} Sounds like you may want to check with John Russ about many of these
} issues. I thought he was right there in your backyard. But I will offer a
} couple thoughts.
}
} I think you would be better use the same field size for all of your
} measurements. Besides, Vf should have the same mean value no matter how
} large the field.

Guess I'll throw in my $.02 worth since my name has been taken in vain.... ;-)

Field size does matter, alas. He is trying to measure particle size which
means he needs to ignore those which touch the edge of the image field, and
this creates several problems: a) large particles are more likely to touch the
edge than small ones; b) larger fields will have proportionately fewer edge-
touching particles. It can get complicated but the idea is to determine the
number of edge-touching features and from that and the size distribution of
those measured, adjust the effective area of the image so that the number per
unit area is corrected for edge effects. Contact me directly via email if I
can be of help

John Russ
NCSU, Raleigh





From: David W. Bass :      dwbass-at-appstate.campuscw.net
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 01:50:56 -0500
Subject: LM - good general purpose mountant

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I am new to microscopy - and am trying to figure out what is the best general purpose
mountant. I read that Euparal is good and stable for many years, but I can't find any
except in Australia. I just want to make some basic slides for now, nothing exotic. I
would appreciate any advice from anyone. Thanks.

David W. Bass
Appalachian State University
Boone, North Carolina
dwbass-at-appstate.campuscw.net






From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 12:23:03 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Summary: Diffraction patterns

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Hello All,
I have had 21 replies to my original request for information. Many
thanks to everybody who responded, and apologies to anybody I misrepresent in
this summary!

The state of the art in measurement accuracy was claimed to be close to that
of X-ray diffraction by several people. [Of course, it depends what kind of
X-ray diffraction you're talking about - I don't personally believe it will
ever be possible to get accuracies as good as that of double (triple, etc.)
crystal X-ray diffraction from spot patterns, although CBED/HOLZ line analysis
comes close.] Jouk Jansen mentioned his paper in Acta Cryst of Jan 1998 on
analysis of diffraction patterns.
2% was mentioned as the best day-to-day reproducibility one could hope for
without taking special precautions such as evaporating gold onto your sample to
include a standard pattern on the same negative as the pattern you want to
measure. Lens hysteresis, astigmatism and pincushion/barrel distortion due to
poor focusing may make it even worse.
Eric Lachowski mentioned the huge effect that being away from eucentric
height can have [I came across this myself a little while ago - I was horrified
to find that a 50% change of diffraction pattern spacing was possible, even
though the image size only changed by 5%, when tilting a sample.]
An accuracy of 0.1% in measurement was about the limit, using computer-aided
measurements of digital images. The distortion of diffraction patterns due to
reciprocal lattice spiking was mentioned by quite a few people as potentially
being the limiting factor in measurement.
Most people seem to use evaporated gold as a standard for measuring camera
length.
There seems to be quite a wide variety of measurement methods out there,
ranging from the good old fashioned way (i.e. lupe and graticule) to quite
sophisticated analysis of digitized images.
The software people use seems to fall into two categories; packages used to
measure the position of spots and/or rings, and packages which simulate
diffraction patterns which can be used for comparison with the real thing.
Measurement packages included Gatan's Digital micrograph and NIH-Image. A
few people have put a lot of work into producing packages which automatically
make measurements:
EDP, by Jaap Brink (http://ncmi.bioch.bcm.tmc.edu/~brink), which is free.
MacLispix by Dave Bright (http://www-sims.nist.gov/MLx/doc/home.nclk), also
free but runs only on a power Mac (sob).
Bill Tivol has written plug-ins for the SPIDER image processing package that
subtracts circular backgrounds, measure the centre and radius of a ring, and
obtain background-subtracted intensities for a spot pattern.
Corneliu Sarbu mentioned the free package PATTERN, running on PCs, which can
be used as an aid to interpretation of spot patterns (see Microscopy Today 98-9
(Nov 1998)).
Analysis packages: Carine, Crystal Designer, CRISP, Desktop microscopist and of
course EMS were mentioned as packages which are used to simulate diffraction
patterns for a particular crystal and zone axis. Wharton Sinkler has written a
FORTRAN program to aid indexing of patterns to a known structure
(http://www.lmcp.jussieu.fr/sincris/logiciel/).


Many thanks again to all those who replied.


Richard Beanland
GMMT Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ
UK
e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com






From: Robert Foglia :      fogman-at-microcosm.com
Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 07:47:53 -0500
Subject: Looking for used Zeiss 310 or 410 LSM's

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I am looking for used Zeiss LSM's, either model 310 or 410 that are for
sale. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Robert Foglia






From: Marti, Jordi :      Jordi.Marti-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 06:25:00 -0700
Subject: RE: TEM: Polymer Staining

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Chris :

As far as sectioning, we tend to look for the Tg of the various
components. As long as all of the components in your system have Tg
well above room temperature, then sectioning at room temperature will
result in relatively small deformations. In your case, PVC has a Tg of
about 85 C and room temperature sectioning should be OK. In the case of
PVB ( I assume B = Butadiene ?) the Tg is bellow RT and therefore it
is better to use cryo sectioning for this material. Typically we would
section this at about -100C .

As far as staining, osmium should stain the butadiene , but so will
RuO4. I am not familiar with a stain for PVC, but you could try
etching techniques (e.g. plasma etching). Check Linda Sawyers book on
Polymer microscopy .

I hope this helps.

Jordi Marti
----------------------------------
You wrote:
What is eveyones favorite stain for enhancing contrast during polymer
TEM?
OS4 or otherwise? The polymer materials are PVC and PVB.

Also, does anyone out there have some advice on a recommended
temperature
for ultramicrotomy of the above polymers? We DO have a
cryo-ultramicrotome.

Chris








From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 1/7/99 3:06 PM
Subject: Re: flat embedding of vibratome sections

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Mike,
You shouldn't have much trouble with curling during fixation and
dehydration. The problem comes with getting absolutely flat sections for
polymerization. Your sections are a bit thicker than I used and we were
usually able to cut down the area of interest further but try this procedure. I
think it should work fine. I have used it to embed vibratomed x-sections
of rat brain which had been subjected to pre-embedding ICC reactions. In
this case, since the amount of reaction diminished as you cut further into
the section, it was critical to have absolutely flat material for serial
sectioning.

Try embedding in droplets of resin on a 22x22mm plastic coverslip
(available through most of the EM supply companies). Cover with another
coverslip and weight with metal washers or nuts. The weighting is important as
it really pressed the sections down insuring that they are very flat and
squeezes out extra resin. After 24 hr. polymerization, cut edges of cover
slips and they can then easily be separated. Cut the end off of gelatin
or beam capsules to give a tube. Place the capsules over areas of
interest on the sections, add one small drop of resin and polymerize a number of
hours to secure capsules to the sections. Then fill up the capsules and
finish polymerization.

When ready to section, blocks are easily broken or cut off of the
coverslips. There will be very little extra resin to cut through before
getting into the tissue making sectioning fairly easy once you are properly
lined up.

An alternative method is to embed between teflon-coated glass slides
which are then also weighted. I have found this a bit more cumbersome
than using the plastic coverslips but it may work better for thicker specimen
material.

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Microscopy Center in Agriculture FAX: 765-494-5896
Dept. of Botany & Plant Pathology E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Purdue University
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057


--------------------------------------


Greetings,
I need assistance with flat embedding of rat cerebellum
(IEM-DAB), that is 100 um thick and 1.5 x 0.5 cm dimensions. Basically
we are worried about tissue curling during the dehydration. My first
inclination is argarose embed (before epon), but I would take any expert
advise.
Thank you,

Mike D




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Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:06:29 -0500 (EST)
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From: Amanda Ye :      marsh065-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 99 08:15:32 -0500
Subject: Re: LM - good general purpose mountant

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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David,

Carolina Biological supply has what you are looking for.

K3-86-1910 Euparal Vert. 50 mL $40.00

Carolina Biological Supply Company
2700 York Road
Burlington, NC 27215

Fax (800) 222-7112
Phone (800) 334-5551


Have fun.

Thomas C. Marsh Ph.D.
Department of Pharmacology
University of Minnesota
3-249 Millard Hall
435 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

lab (612) 624-8996
fax (612) 625-8408






From: Liu Zugang :      zugang-at-ideiafix.fis.ua.pt
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 10:16:44 +0000
Subject: Interference microscopy used to evaluate the thin film thickness

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Hi, everybody,
I am looking for where I can buy an interference microscopy, which
can be used to evaluate the thickness of thin film on a glass
substrate by comparing the fringe at the edge of the thin film.
I like to know also that if there is any kind of glass binder
(adhesive material) which can be used inside a vacuum chamber, can
last several hours in vacuum before working and can be used as
air-tight sealing.
Thanks a lot.
Zgliu

Liu Zugang
Departamento de Fisica
Universidade de Aveiro
3810 Aveiro
Portugal
Fax:+351-34-24965
Email:zugang-at-fis.ua.pt





From: George Farrants :      george.farrants-at-calidris-em.se
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 16:57:20 +-100
Subject: Re: Summary: Diffraction patterns

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Dear All,

I would just like to correct one item in Richard's summary:
CRISP and (more relevantly) ELD are programs which extract data
from experimental images and diffraction patterns (rings and spots),
respectively. They are not used to simulate diffraction patterns.

Disclaimer: Calidris sells CRISP and ELD, and we have a vested
interest in making sure that microscopists receive accurate
information about the programs.

I will be happy to send details to anyone who is interested.

Best wishes for the New Year,

George Farrants.



Richard wrote:
} Analysis packages: Carine, Crystal Designer, CRISP, Desktop microscopist and of
} course EMS were mentioned as packages which are used to simulate diffraction
} patterns for a particular crystal and zone axis.






From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Jean=2DFran=E7ois_COULON?=
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 16:50:58 -0000
Subject: SEM

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Hi

Does anyone have an answer to those questions?
Working with a Variable Pressure SEM;
1- What can we see with it on polymers?
2- Where can I find pictures of polymers on a VP-SEM?
3- Is it possible to see spherolites in polymers without any pre-treatment (etching...)
4- Is it possible to see the "Skin effect" on injected parts in polymers and measure its thickness ?

Thanks for your help.
Sophie.






From: Mick Thomas :      mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 11:12:53 -0800
Subject: cleaving rock salt

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Fellow microscopists,

We have tried to cleave rock salt (1cm cube, purchased from a microscopy
supplier) for use as a substrate. We cleaved it with a razor blade, and
had hoped to get a near-atomically smooth surface so we could deposit an
aluminum film on it. However, the cleaved surfaces appear to be far
rougher this, on the order of tens of microns.

Are there any special procedures that we should follow to get a
near-atomically smooth surface?

Thank you all for your suggestions.

Mick Thomas




Mick Thomas
UHV-STEM Laboratory
E-1 Clark Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853

Phone: 607-255-0650
Fax: 607-255-7658
e-mail: mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu





From: Mohan Kalyanaraman :      mohan_kalyanaraman-at-EMail.mobil.com
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 11:24:54 -0500
Subject: Dispersing Agents for agglomerated particles

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} From: "Ursel Bangert" {USCHI-at-fs2.phy.umist.ac.uk}
Organization: Umist
To: MTLRMDB-at-LUCS-MAC.NOVELL.LEEDS.AC.UK


Good Morning All,

I am looking for suggestions on dispersing agglomerated crystals.
Does anyone have a recommendation on what "dispersing agents" are
available for dispersing sub-micron ( {100 nm) crystals?

I have only used ultrasonication of particles in acetone/water so far and
that
works well for micron sized crystals.

Thank you,

Mohan Kalyanaraman

Sr. Staff Material Scientist
Mobil Technology Company
PO Box 480
Paulsboro, NJ 08066
mohan_kalyanaraman-at-email.mobil.com








From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Jean=2DFran=E7ois_COULON?=
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 17:43:21 -0000
Subject: SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

Does anyone have an answer to those questions?
Working with a Variable Pressure SEM;
1- What can we see with it on polymers?
2- Where can I find pictures of polymers on a VP-SEM?
3- Is it possible to see spherolites in polymers without any pre-treatment (etching...)
4- Is it possible to see the "Skin effect" on injected parts in polymers and measure its thickness ?
5- Does anyone work on polymers for quality issues?

Thanks for your help.
Sophie.







From: Robert.C.Reff-at-lawrence.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Jan 1999 09:49:21 -0600
Subject: SEM Prep for Human Chromosomes

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Does anyone have any tips/protocol/adivce for the preparation of human
chromosomes for SEM. I'm just starting the project and I could use anything
to get started... Thanks!

Rob Reff
} From the Lab of:
Professor William J. Perreault
Lawrence University

739 E. College Ave
Appleton WI
54915






From: Robert H. Olley :      R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 17:00:54 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: TEM: Polymer Staining

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On Thu, 7 Jan 1999, Chris Adams wrote:

} What is everyones favorite stain for enhancing contrast during polymer
} TEM? OS04 or otherwise? The polymer materials are PVC and PVB.

} From the literature, ruthenium trioxide seems to be the most popular. We
have used chlorosulphonic acid, but this mainly works for polyolefins, and
I think it would chew up PVB (is that poly vinyl butyral?).

Svoboda,P ++++; RuO3 staining of PCL/SAN blends;
Macromolecules 1994 v27 p1154

is quite a good reference.

} Also, does anyone out there have some advice on a recommended temperature
} for ultramicrotomy of the above polymers? We DO have a cryo-ultramicrotome.

The following article is superb. However, the author is out of reprints,
so it might be better to use some form of library loan, if you don't take
the journal.

*} TI: Reflections on the use of microtomy for materials science specimen
preparation
AU: Plummer_HK
NA: FORD MOTOR CO,RES LAB,MAIL DROP 3028,SRL,DEARBORN,MI,48121
JN: MICROSCOPY AND MICROANALYSIS, 1997, Vol.3, No.3, pp.239-260
IS: 1431-9276
DT: Review

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+







From: ricardo :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 10:34:36 +1100
Subject: Technival 2 - JENA - DDR

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Dear colleagues

I am looking for objectives and oculars or other accessories for microscope
called Technival 2 from old East Germany company JENA..

Any help?

Keep care and be of good cheer.

Regards

Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptiste
of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Collorado-Mansfeld

Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
(incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)

Temporally home address:
32 Girrawheen Ave.
Kiama NSW 2533
Australia
e-mail: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
ricardo-at-ans.com.au
(before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
and ricardo-at-login.cz )

http://www.coleoptera.org
phone : 0414 540 465 (Australia)
+61 414 540 465 (International)

Only after the last tree has been cut down,
only after the last river has been poisoned,
only after the last fish has been caught,
only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.



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TITLE:director
NOTE;ENCODING=3DQUOTED-PRINTABLE:Marketing and =
Coaching=3D0D=3D0A=3D0D=3D0ATenebrionidae Orbis and higher taxonomy
TEL;WORK;VOICE:(+61 2) 9319 6380
TEL;CELL;VOICE:(+61 414) 540 465
ADR;WORK:;;29 Edward Street;Darlington, SYDNEY;;NSW 2008;Australie
LABEL;WORK;ENCODING=3DQUOTED-PRINTABLE:29 Edward =
Street=3D0D=3D0ADarlington, SYDNEY NSW 2008=3D0D=3D0AAustralie
ADR;HOME;ENCODING=3DQUOTED-PRINTABLE:;;(temporaly address):=3D0D=3D0A32 =
Girrawheen Ave;KIAMA;;NSW 2533;AUSTRALIA
LABEL;HOME;ENCODING=3DQUOTED-PRINTABLE:(temporaly address):=3D0D=3D0A32 =
Girrawheen Ave=3D0D=3D0AKIAMA NSW 2533=3D0D=3D0AAUSTRAL=3D
IA
URL:
URL:http://www.coleoptera.org
EMAIL;INTERNET:ricardo-at-login.cz
EMAIL;PREF;INTERNET:vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
EMAIL;INTERNET:ricardo-at-ans.com.au
REV:19990108T233435Z
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From: Chris :      cholp-at-ncweb.com
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 20:56:15 -0500
Subject: STEM

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I am trying to gather information regarding Scanning Transmission =
Electron Microscopy. I currently use an Amray 1645 SEM which has the =
capacity for STEM work, but I have never used it in this mode. Any =
comments or literature citings on this subject would be greatly =
appreciated.

Thank you for your help,=20

Chris Holp

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{HEAD}

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{/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} I am trying to gather information =
regarding=20
Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy. I currently use an Amray 1645 =
SEM=20
which has the capacity for STEM work, but I have never used it in this =
mode. Any=20
comments or literature citings on this subject would be greatly=20
appreciated. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Thank you for your help, =
{/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Chris =
Holp {/FONT} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

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From: Zhiyu Wang :      zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 22:20:37 -0800
Subject: Resolution of digital SEM image

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Hi, All:

A technical difficulty in my lab is coming on the table: How to increase
resolution of digitized SEM images, especially for low magnification
( {50X). The pixel size of SEM image (50X)in my machine (LEO-435VP) is 4.5
um. In other word, no matter how good image software performs, the
measurement error is at least 4.5 um.
We are going to use SEM as a routine measurement tool under 100X, what is
the disadvantage?
Does any one have excellent idea to solve this problem, in terms of :
Increase number of pixels and save as compressed .jpg to reduce file size?
Stage mapping?
Software solution?
What else?

Thank you for help

Zhiyu Wang









From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 21:49:44 +1100
Subject: RE: cleaving rock salt

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Mick:
Maybe the salt could work, but why not use freshly cleaved
mica, its not sensitive to humidity, dead easy to cleave
and cheaper.
I must declare that ProSciTech (and several other EM
suppliers) stock mica.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****




On Saturday, January 09, 1999 5:13 AM, Mick Thomas
[SMTP:mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu] wrote:
} Fellow microscopists,
}
} We have tried to cleave rock salt (1cm cube, purchased
} from a microscopy
} supplier) for use as a substrate. We cleaved it with a
} razor blade, and
} had hoped to get a near-atomically smooth surface so we
} could deposit an
} aluminum film on it. However, the cleaved surfaces
appear
} to be far
} rougher this, on the order of tens of microns.
}
} Are there any special procedures that we should follow to
} get a
} near-atomically smooth surface?
}
} Thank you all for your suggestions.
}
} Mick Thomas
}
}
}
}
} Mick Thomas
} UHV-STEM Laboratory
} E-1 Clark Hall
} Cornell University
} Ithaca, NY 14853
}
} Phone: 607-255-0650
} Fax: 607-255-7658
} e-mail: mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu






From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 22:48:11 +1100
Subject: RE: STEM

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Chris:
Just a couple of the more obvious differences between SEM
and STEM (as an attachment to a TEM), using secondary mode
-
1. STEM has generally higher kV - greater soft specimen
penetration, charging is worse, but on "hard specimen"
better resolution.
2. Working distance is low in STEM, greater resolution,
poor depths of field.
3. STEM has small sample access and often limited tilt/
rotate facilities. Suitable specimens can give great
images, but with more difficulties.

In STEM mode, which is also possible with some SEMs
(including yours). The important differences are:
The specimen is a section and this is penetrated by the
beam. The detector (photo multiplier) is below the
specimen.
The penetration envelope is not formed because a relative
thin section is used and the beam diameter is the most
important determinant of image resolution.
So when in a conventional SEM resolution in soft
(biological) specimen is limited to say 6nm, you could
resolve, say 2nm in STEM because the resolution is largely
determined by the beam diameter.
Better still, in low contrast specimens contrast can be
increased at will - until electronic noise takes over.
Maybe the best use of STEM is in image analysis of soft
specimens. X-ray scattering from the penetration envelope
in an SEM at around 15kV will result in spatial X-ray
resolution of about 20 micrometer, which is often pretty
near useless. In STEM the spatial X-ray resolution is only
a fraction thereof.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****

On Saturday, January 09, 1999 11:56 AM, Chris
[SMTP:cholp-at-ncweb.com] wrote:
} I am trying to gather information regarding Scanning
} Transmission Electron Microscopy. I currently use an
} Amray 1645 SEM which has the capacity for STEM work, but
} I have never used it in this mode. Any comments or
} literature citings on this subject would be greatly
} appreciated.
}
} Thank you for your help,
}
} Chris Holp
} { { File: ATT00001.html } }





From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 21:57:20 +1100
Subject: RE: Technival 2 - JENA - DDR

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Jena (name also of city), was pre WW2 the Zeiss centre.
Zeiss Jena and Zeiss Oberkochen run as two separate
companies in East and West Germany. Zeiss Oberkochen later
took over the Jena works. Its now known simply as Zeiss.
Zeiss should know about these optics, but I doubt that they
can or would supply these.
Your chances are in the secondhand market.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Saturday, January 09, 1999 9:35 AM, ricardo
[SMTP:ricardo-at-ans.com.au] wrote:
} Dear colleagues
}
} I am looking for objectives and oculars or other
} accessories for microscope
} called Technival 2 from old East Germany company JENA..
}
} Any help?
}
} Keep care and be of good cheer.
}
} Regards
}
} Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptiste
} of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Collorado-Mansfeld
}
} Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
} (incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)
}
} Temporally home address:
} 32 Girrawheen Ave.
} Kiama NSW 2533
} Australia
} e-mail: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
} ricardo-at-ans.com.au
} (before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
} and ricardo-at-login.cz )
}
} http://www.coleoptera.org
} phone : 0414 540 465 (Australia)
} +61 414 540 465 (International)
}
} Only after the last tree has been cut down,
} only after the last river has been poisoned,
} only after the last fish has been caught,
} only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
} CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.
}
}
} { { File: Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptist
} Bejsak-Collorado-Mansfeld.vcf } }





From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 22:13:57 +1100
Subject: RE: Interference microscope

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Liu: I expect that several of the major microscope
manufacturers still make double beam interference
microscopes (Certainly Leitz used to). All of these would
have scary price tags. Perhaps you can find one second-hand
or an alternative method for measuring film thickness.

The properties you seek for sealing air/ glass under vacuum
are those of Apiezon T.
This item is in our online (page M2) and I must declare an
obvious interest.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Friday, January 08, 1999 8:17 PM, Liu Zugang
[SMTP:zugang-at-ideiafix.fis.ua.pt] wrote:
Hi, everybody,
} I am looking for where I can buy an interference
} microscopy, which
} can be used to evaluate the thickness of thin film on a
} glass
} substrate by comparing the fringe at the edge of the thin
} film.
} I like to know also that if there is any kind of glass
} binder
} (adhesive material) which can be used inside a vacuum
} chamber, can
} last several hours in vacuum before working and can be
} used as
} air-tight sealing.
} Thanks a lot.
} Zgliu
}
} Liu Zugang
} Departamento de Fisica
} Universidade de Aveiro
} 3810 Aveiro
} Portugal
} Fax:+351-34-24965
} Email:zugang-at-fis.ua.pt






From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 08:23:38 EST
Subject: Re: Resolution of digital SEM image

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In a message dated 1/9/99 1:47:00 AM, zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net wrote:

} A technical difficulty in my lab is coming on the table: How to increase
} resolution of digitized SEM images, especially for low magnification
} ( {50X). The pixel size of SEM image (50X)in my machine (LEO-435VP) is 4.5
} um. In other word, no matter how good image software performs, the
} measurement error is at least 4.5 um.
} ...
} Does any one have excellent idea to solve this problem, in terms of :
} Increase number of pixels and save as compressed .jpg to reduce file size?
} Stage mapping?
} Software solution?
} What else?
}
If your beam size and actual imaging resolution is sub-micron, then the 4.5
micron limit is arising from the timing of your ADC, in other words how many
samples it takes along each scan line, and from the spacing of the lines. If
you can alter than then you can acquire images with more pixels. But DON'T
compress them with jpeg or any lossy compression scheme or you will lose the
benefits - these methods cause brightness and location shifts for features and
will not get the accuracy you want.

If you can't fiddle the acquisition, your other choice is to acquire a series
of higher magnification images and stitch them together as a mosaic. This
isn't always easy to do, since stage mechanisms aren't very precise and if the
sample isn't flat and horizontal you will have magnification that varies from
side to side and makes fitting impossible.

On the other hand, what is it that you need to measure that can't be sampled
at higher magnification - do you really need One Big Picture?

John Russ





From: Emidio FAZZINI :      emifax-at-hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 1999 09:56:24 -0600
Subject: malachite green in aquaculture

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Hi everybody,

a Happy and prosperous new year to all!
I am a new subscriber and I work at a local branch of the Min. of Health
as a veterinary hygiene inspector in Italy. I am working on a
substitution of malachite green in aquaculture, but I would like to know
more about its nature, use and toxity, how dose it act?
I've recently learned that it's used as a dye in staining certain cell
tissues; surely somebody has posed himself the problem and has even
found some explanation.
Can somebody please give me some information or wher I can get it (ex.
Web Sites)?
Excusing me for having drifted you away from your prevalent work I
anticipate my thanks to those how will answer and a good luck to
evrybody!
regards


emidio fazzini

(...up here from downunder!)


______________________________________________________
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From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 09 Jan 99 14:21:30 -0500
Subject: Use of NaCl substrates

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Jim Darley wrote:
==============================================
Maybe the salt could work, but why not use freshly cleaved
mica, its not sensitive to humidity, dead easy to cleave
and cheaper. I must declare that ProSciTech (and several other EM
suppliers) stock mica.
===============================================
Jim is of course correct in that salt is sensitive to moisture, and it is
that very characteristic that causes freshly cleaved NaCl to be the
substrate of choice for some researchers. When studies of epitaxial effects
are being done, especially at elevated temperatures, it can be problematic
to remove the thin film coating from the substrate, but in the case of NaCl,
it can be readily dissolved in water. And even when mica could be used, in
many instances, NaCl is also used in parallel since the unit cell dimensions
both in size and symmetry are quite a bit different. And they give effects
that can be quite different as well.

The impact of the differences in unit cell geometry and unit cell dimensions
can also result in a significant difference in annealing effects of small
crystals on the surfaces of these substrates. However, from the standpoint
of smoothness, for example, if one was making carbon support films, mica
would be better (if not also easier and cheaper) than NaCl.

An "old" reference from the literature that shows some of this can be found
at Die Makro. Chemie, 113, 246 (1968), "Polyoxymethylene Single Crystals.
II. The Effect of Substrate of Annealing Behavior".

Chuck

Disclaimer: SPI is a supplier of both mica and fine single crystal NaCl as
are also some of the other main suppliers of consumables to the microscopy
and microanalysis market.

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Stephen McCartney :      stmccart-at-vt.edu
Date: Sat, 09 Jan 1999 16:39:00 -0500
Subject: volume of X-ray anlysis at low kV

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Hello: Can anyone comment on the difference in the volume or resolution of
a point EDS analysis at 1kv or even 200V vs. the more standard 10 or 20kV.
If we were to use a FE-SEM at 200V could we expect a significant increase in
resolution of our EDS for a bulk sample compared our convention SEMs. Any
comments are greatly appreciated. Steve


------------------------------
Stephen McCartney
Research Associate
Virginia Tech
Materials Institute
2108 Hahn Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344
USA

TEL: 540-231-9765
FAX: 540-231-8517
------------------------------






From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 1999 22:25:26 +1100
Subject: RE: volume of X-ray analysis at low kV

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Sure Stephen, lower kV equals better spatial X-ray
resolution. But. . . .
But what X-rays would you be able to excite with these low
voltages?
Look at a table of X-ray energies and remember that the
very definition of the X-ray energy lines is the minimum
voltage required to produce those X-rays. Generally 1.8 x
that energy is required to obtain maximum fluorescence.
I expect that you would like to analyse light elements
(biological samples), and these are in most cases
unsatisfactory in SEM because of the poor spatial
resolution. For these TEM or STEM with EDS are the answer.
(Made a posting on STEM yesterday with more info)
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****




}
}
} Hello: Can anyone comment on the difference in the
volume
} or resolution of
} a point EDS analysis at 1kv or even 200V vs. the more
} standard 10 or 20kV.
} If we were to use a FE-SEM at 200V could we expect a
} significant increase in
} resolution of our EDS for a bulk sample compared our
} convention SEMs. Any
} comments are greatly appreciated. Steve
}
}
} ------------------------------
} Stephen McCartney
} Research Associate
} Virginia Tech
} Materials Institute
} 2108 Hahn Hall
} Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344
} USA
}
} TEL: 540-231-9765
} FAX: 540-231-8517
} ------------------------------
}






From: Mark Blackford :      mgb-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 09:52:52 +1100
Subject: RE: Ergonomic EM Operators Chair

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Russ Gillmeister wrote:

} Hi Mark, I must be getting real old as I remember my gransfather used to
} make chairs out of plant material. Large plants I believe. They wood cut the
} larger stems into structural members and glue the parts together into many
} different shapes. I sure these were not as functional or beautiful as the
} bent steel and plastic used today. Maybe you could find one of these
} antiques for your purpose.
} Russ

Hi Russ,

your suggestion has stirred some racial memories in my mind. I have a
vague recollection of seeing such ancient furniture in scratchy black &
white movies (assuming they were not plastic/steel replicas of the
cellulose originals).

I will enquire as to the availability of chairs fashioned from our
forefather's favourite material, and also purhaps from adobe brick, bamboo,
or rock. Cheers,


Mark Blackford
TEM Group
Materials Division, ANSTO
PMB 1,
Menai, N.S.W.
Australia
2234

Phone 61 2 9717 3027
Fax 61 2 9543 7179

Disclaimer:
The views expressed in this E-mail message do not necessarily represent the
official views of ANSTO from which this message was conveyed.







From: Kate Savostyanova :      savost-at-hotmail.com
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 1999 17:22:57 -0600
Subject: 3-D biological tissue architectures reconstruction

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Hi everybody who interested in the problem of 3-D biological tissue
architectures reconstruction. This problem (especially 3-D epithelia
structure) is interesting for me too. So I would greatly appreciate a
copy of your papers.
Also I am inviting you to visit our homepage on same subject. URL is
followed:
http://members.tripod.com/~Gensav/index.htm
Sincerely yours
Gennady A. Savostyanov



Dr. Gennady A. Savostyanov
E-mail: savost-at-ief.spb.su
savost-at-hotmail.com
Sechenov Institute for Evolutional Physiology and Biochemistru
Russian Academy of Science
44 M. Thorez, 194223 St. Petersburg, Russia


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From: Melvyn Dickson :      M.Dickson-at-unsw.edu.au
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 12:40:11 +1100
Subject: Signup software

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}
}
}
Hank Adams wrote ...........
Dear listservers,
We are looking for a dedicated software package for scheduling, in this
case, instrument use incorporated into our webpage. We have several
microscopes, workstations, microtomes, etc. and would like to have
calenders or something similar for each, so users could sign up in advance
using the web. It should be possible to assign different levels of
privilege to each user. Once an entry is made it could only be changed by
an administrator other than the original user. We like would like to then
to automatically transfer this information into a billing database, either
Access or FileMaker Pro based. Is something like what I have described
commercially available



We have just such a system written in house. It has run very smoothly now
for 5 years with constant upgrades. You can buy it if you like it.

Just go to the website in my signature.

The introductory material explains how we work.

Click on
Booking
System,
Access to
Images
and use login {guest} password {guest} to try out the system.

If you are interested get back to me.

Mel Dickson
*****************************************************
Mel Dickson,
Director.
Electron Microscope Unit,
University of New South Wales.
Sydney NSW 2052 Australia

Phone (+612) 9385-6383
Fax (+612) 9385-6400
Website {http://srv.emunit.unsw.edu.au}
*****************************************************





From: David S. Murdock :      dsmurdoc-at-burgoyne.com
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 1999 19:10:21 -0700
Subject: contrast microscope

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Hi: I am beginning a project on glass and I will be using a contract
microscope. Can you explain with diagrams how the phase contrast scope works.
Thank you in advance,
dsm






From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 11:36:25 +0300
Subject: Re: volume of X-ray anlysis at low kV

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High Steve!
As far as I remember, the optimum (in sense of intensity) ratio
between energy of electrons and excitation energy of X-ray line is
from 2 to 3. At that the spatial X-ray resolution is not very high.
It
can be improved by diminishing this ratio. But the intensity of the
line drops very strongly during decreasing of electrons energy to
excitation energy of the line.
But I think there are not so many X-ray lines interesting for you on
EDS spectrum in the range up to 200 eV :-)).
Regards.
Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Co. Ltd., Moscow, Russia.

} Hello: Can anyone comment on the difference in the volume or
resolution of
} a point EDS analysis at 1kv or even 200V vs. the more standard 10 or
20kV.
} If we were to use a FE-SEM at 200V could we expect a significant
increase in
} resolution of our EDS for a bulk sample compared our convention SEMs.
Any
} comments are greatly appreciated. Steve
}
}
} ------------------------------
} Stephen McCartney
} Research Associate
} Virginia Tech
} Materials Institute
} 2108 Hahn Hall
} Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344
} USA
}
} TEL: 540-231-9765
} FAX: 540-231-8517
} ------------------------------
}
}
}







From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 23:28:41 +1100
Subject: RE: Resolution of digital SEM image

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Hi Zhiyu Wang -
Lets hope its me who is confused: I don't care.
If a monitor is 100mm across and is represented by 4um
pixel
(100 divided by 0.004=) 2500 would be required for a single
line. If one pixel was missing I would just forget about
that, although the percentage error would be constant,
regardless of magnification.
What I would worry about is the large variation in
magnification readings, which is possible because of the
SEM's great depths of field and tilt angles.
Calibrated latex spheres have been used for decades in TEM.
Now larger calibrated spheres are available and these can
be routinely and economically applied to SEM and light
microscopy specimen to provide a reliable size comparison.
Disclaimer: ProSciTech supplies latex particles (page "S2"
online) and thus has a vested interest.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Saturday, January 09, 1999 4:21 PM, Zhiyu Wang
[SMTP:zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net] wrote:

} Hi, All:
}
} A technical difficulty in my lab is coming on the table:
} How to increase
} resolution of digitized SEM images, especially for low
} magnification
} ( {50X). The pixel size of SEM image (50X)in my machine
} (LEO-435VP) is 4.5
} um. In other word, no matter how good image software
} performs, the
} measurement error is at least 4.5 um.
} We are going to use SEM as a routine measurement tool
} under 100X, what is
} the disadvantage?
} Does any one have excellent idea to solve this problem,
in
} terms of :
} Increase number of pixels and save as compressed .jpg to
} reduce file size?
} Stage mapping?
} Software solution?
} What else?
}
} Thank you for help
}
} Zhiyu Wang
}
}
}
}






From: rschoonh-at-sph.unc.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 08:35:10 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Re: malachite green in aquaculture

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Would suggest that you take a look at :

Conn's Biological Stains, 9th edition edited by r.d. Lillie, page 248.
under Diaminotriphenylmethanes. It is used as a vital dye so I woul
'assume' that it is not very toxic but there was no mention of toxicity.




-- Begin original message --

} From: Emidio FAZZINI {emifax-at-hotmail.com}
} Date: Sat, 09 Jan 1999 09:56:24 -0600
} Subject: malachite green in aquaculture
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} Hi everybody,
}
} a Happy and prosperous new year to all!
} I am a new subscriber and I work at a local branch of the Min. of Health
} as a veterinary hygiene inspector in Italy. I am working on a
} substitution of malachite green in aquaculture, but I would like to know
} more about its nature, use and toxity, how dose it act?
} I've recently learned that it's used as a dye in staining certain cell
} tissues; surely somebody has posed himself the problem and has even
} found some explanation.
} Can somebody please give me some information or wher I can get it (ex.
} Web Sites)?
} Excusing me for having drifted you away from your prevalent work I
} anticipate my thanks to those how will answer and a good luck to
} evrybody!
} regards
}
}
} emidio fazzini
}
} (...up here from downunder!)
}
}
} ______________________________________________________
} Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
}
}
}
}

-- End original message --
best regards,
Bob
Robert Schoonhoven
Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis
Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering
University of North Carolina
CB#7400
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
Phone
office 919-966-6343
Lab 919-966-6140
Fax 919-966-6123






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 08:40:32 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM

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Dear Sophie,


Depending on the size of the spherulites, you can see them readily with
polarized light microscopy, with no sample preparation. Also, by using a
first order red plate, you can determine the sign of the spherulite.


If you can cross-section the part, you can readily see the skin effect
and measure its thickness, again using light microscopy. While EM
certainly has a place in the polymer lab, there is a tremendous amount
to be learned from light microscopy, with much less sample prep and
investment in equipment. I'd really suggest that you start here first.


Bon chance!


Best regards,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium dedicated to

customized on-site training in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}



At 04:50 PM 1/8/99 -0000, Jean-Fran=E7ois COULON wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Hi

}

} Does anyone have an answer to those questions?

} Working with a Variable Pressure SEM;

} 1- What can we see with it on polymers?

} 2- Where can I find pictures of polymers on a VP-SEM?

} 3- Is it possible to see spherolites in polymers without any
pre-treatment (etching...)

} 4- Is it possible to see the "Skin effect" on injected parts in
polymers and measure its thickness ?

}

} Thanks for your help.

} Sophie.

}

}

}

}







From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 08:41:31 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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{excerpt} Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 08:40:32 -0500

To: From: Barbara Foster { {mme-at-map.com}


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Hi

}

} Does anyone have an answer to those questions?

} Working with a Variable Pressure SEM;

} 1- What can we see with it on polymers?

} 2- Where can I find pictures of polymers on a VP-SEM?

} 3- Is it possible to see spherolites in polymers without any
pre-treatment (etching...)

} 4- Is it possible to see the "Skin effect" on injected parts in
polymers and measure its thickness ?

}

} Thanks for your help.

} Sophie.

}

}

}

{/excerpt} } { { { { { { { {









From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 09:01:23 -0500
Subject: Re: Interference microscopy used to evaluate the thin film

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Dear Liu,


There are a number of different alternatives, but first you need to make
some choices regarding the level of measurement. For very delicate
measurements (1/10th - 1/400th of a wave, or on the order of 10-50 nm),
you will need to use a multiple beam interferometer with a monochromatic
light source. If you just need more standard thicknesses (70 nm or
higher), you can go with a regular dual beam interferometer, using a
white light source or even just a good narrow band filter.


For general purposes, there are several add-on interferometers which can
be used to replace a typical objective (most commonly, the 10x
objective). The one I have used most is a small Michelson which used to
be available through Hacker in this country. (I will fax you an
information sheet).


Regarding multiple-beam/add ons: talk to Nikon. As I remember, in
addition to a Michelson, they also make a Tolanksy. The challenge with
the Tolansky is getting a reference mirror which has a reflectivity
matched to the reflectivity of your sample. I haven't worked with the
Nikon system for some years, but I seem to remember that they had a small
turret, providing you with a choice of several different R values.


Re: larger systems:

Your choices in Europe tend to be much greater than ours in the US. If
you can get your hands on a Reichert Polyvar Met on the used equipment
market, they had a very respectable and easily used interferometer
accessory. Reichert is now part of the Leica family, but I don't know if
they have picked up this neat little attachment. Other, older
microscopes which I have used include the Interphako from Jena (now
Zeiss) and the Pluta, from PZO. The Interphako was amazingly inexpensive
in comparison with its capabilities: in half shade mode it could readily
measure to 10 nm. Finally, Leitz used to make the Linnik, the flagship
of interferometers. I understand that these are no longer available,
but, again, you can probably find one on the used-equipment market.


I am sure that I have missed someone (my apologies), but these comments
should give you a starting point.


One more issue: Thin films are transparent and most of these (exception:
Linnik and Interphako) work in reflected light. By mounting your sample
on a front surfaced mirror, you can overcome this problem.


Hope these comments are helpful.


Best regards,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium dedicated to

customized on-site training in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}



At 10:16 AM 1/8/99 +0000, Liu Zugang wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Hi, everybody,

} I am looking for where I can buy an interference microscopy, which

} can be used to evaluate the thickness of thin film on a glass

} substrate by comparing the fringe at the edge of the thin film.

} I like to know also that if there is any kind of glass binder

} (adhesive material) which can be used inside a vacuum chamber, can

} last several hours in vacuum before working and can be used as

} air-tight sealing.

} Thanks a lot.

} Zgliu

}

} Liu Zugang

} Departamento de Fisica

} Universidade de Aveiro

} 3810 Aveiro

} Portugal

} Fax:+351-34-24965

} Email:zugang-at-fis.ua.pt

}

}

}







From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 09:37:36 -0500
Subject: Re: contrast microscope

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Dear David,


Phase contrast microscopes have two components: a ring which is placed in
the condenser and a special phase-changing plate which is mounted in the
objective. They can be viewed in the back focal plane of the objective
either by removing the eyepiece and looking down the tube into the back
of the objective or replacing the eyepiece with the centering telescope
provided with the phase kit. Make sure that the microscope is set up for
phase first. That is, make sure that the right ring is rotated or moved
into position in the condenser and that you are using the matching phase
objective.

In the back focal plane of the objective (BFPo), you will see the smoky
phase ring from the objective's plate overlaying the bright ring in the
condenser.


First, the principles:

1. a. The basic underlying concept behind phase contrast comes from
Nature's kind provision for a fairly predictable delay in the light
passing through biological and similar structures. These structures
cause the light passing through them to lag by a quarter of a wavelength
behind the light which passes through the surrounding material.

b. The microscope image is formed by the interference between light
passing through the specimen and light passing through the background.
For improved contrast (brighter brights and darker darks), the ideal
situation would be for the light from the specimen to either be
completely in step or to lag by half a wavelength. The intensity of the
light in the image directly proportional to the SQUARE of the amplitude
of the wave which results when the two waves are "added together". This
is a bit difficult to explain without a drawing, but here's the gist:

If the waves are perfectly in step, the resulting,additive wave has an
amplitude twice that of the original components and the light in the
image is 2 squared or 4 times brighter.

If the waves are half a wavelength out of step by half a wavelength,
then they meet peak to trough and cancel each other. That part of the
image will have "zero intensity" and be dark.

All we need to do is design a microscope which controls the light from
specimen and background to meet these conditions.


Now, for the purpose of each:

2. The function of the ring in the condenser is to carefully define what
will be known as the "background light" and place it very specifically in
the smokey area of the phase plate mounted in the objective. The smokey
has a channel cut in it so that the background light has to go through
less glass

3. When a portion of that light interacts with the sample it (a)
scatters, to fill the whole back focal plane of the objective and (b)
undergoes approximately a quarter of a wave shift.

4. When that "specimen light" reaches the phase plate, most of it goes
through the thicker, non smokey part of the phase plate. The phase plate
is designed so that the thicker section adds another quarter of a wave
lag to the specimen light. (quarter wave lag from specimen) + (quarter
wave lag from phase plate) = half wave lag required for destructive
interference and improved contrast.

5. But why is the phase plate smokey? Because the light from the
background is MUCH brighter than the light passing through the specimen.
That is, its amplitude is much greater. For the two waves to
destructively interfer, their amplitudes must match. The manufacturers
coat the cut in the phase plate with neutral density material so that the
background intensity is brought into range with the light coming from the
specimen. You can see the effect in the phase image: the background is
cut to about 15% its original intensity, resulting in a soft, pearly
gray.


Finally: how can you fine-tune a phase contrast image?

Since the underlying principle is based on a difference in refractive
index between the sample and its mounting, one possibility is to change
the mountant. For your glass, for instance, you might find that there are
terrible haloes around the glass particles when they are mounted in air.
Try this test: mount some test samples (all the same refractive index) in
(a) water, ri 1.33 (b) glycerin, ri 1.47 and (c) immersion oil, ri 1.55.
You will see the image get crisper and cleaner as you move toward the
immersion oil, which is a much better match for glass (typically on the
order of ri 1.5152).


Secondly, this whole process is wavelength dependent, yet we never
specified WHICH wavelength. Look in your phase kit for a green filter
(if it is an interference filter, it will appear yellow and mirrored).
Place this filter over the light port. It defines the wavelength for
which your phase kit was built, usually 548 nm.


For more background (plus important diagrams), may we suggest "Optimizing
Light Microscopy for Biological and Clinical Laboratories"? Even though
it is biologically oriented, you will find a great deal of sound, basic
information which will help you in your microscopy. Details are
available on our website:

{ {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education} . Also, a reminder that the
ACS course on Applied Microscopy for Chemists is just around the corner.
Details are also available on the website.


Hope this is helpful.


Best regards,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium dedicated to

customized on-site training in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}






At 07:10 PM 1/10/99 -0700, David S. Murdock wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Hi: I am beginning a project on glass and I will be using a contract

} microscope. Can you explain with diagrams how the phase contrast scope
works.

} Thank you in advance,

} dsm

}

}

}

}







From: Marti, Jordi :      Jordi.Marti-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 09:39:00 -0700
Subject: Reichert Ultracut E Repair

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I have been requested to forward this announcement to this group.

Hank Adams
Cell Biology
Integrated Microscopy Core
Baylor College of Medicine
One Baylor Plaza
Houston, Tx 77030

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mancini [SMTP:mancini-at-bcm.tmc.edu]
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 1999 6:24 PM
To: CONFOCAL-at-LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU


Hello !

The female threads , which hold the cone screw that secures the
specimen holder in our Ultracut E are partially stripped. One option
is for our machine shop to rethread them. This would involve removing
the heater and thermocouple wires that are at the top of the bridge. I
was wandering if any of you had the same problem and how you went
about solving it.

I also checked about replacing the whole bridge, but this option is
quite expensive and there is a question about part availability.

Thanks

Jordi








From: Pauline C. Yu :      splene-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 08:49:06 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Jaz disk archivalness?

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I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital
photography who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro
interview between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the
Jaz only lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to
CD."
Is this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage
life of the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is
planning to supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage,
but if it's not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment.
Does anyone have experience with long term(at least a year) image storage
on Jaz disks?

thanx
Pauline Yu
Microscopist Technician
USDA-ARS-WRRC
- - -- --- ----- -------- ------------- ---------------------






From: pbedard-at-saglac.qc.ca
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 12:00:25 -0500
Subject: SEM use in museum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello all,

I am presently looking at the potential purchase of a basic SEM,
probably variable pressure for a local museum. Are there any one
of you using SEM for public shows? If yes may I have more
information on what is exactly done.

The other alternative (more likely) is presentation of a "microzoo"
similar to Oceanographic institute of Monaco. Small organisms
(plancton, benthos, etc.) are presented via a fully motorized
stereoscopic microscope.
Any personnal experience to share on the subject?
Ciao!
--
L.Paul Bedard, ing. Ph.D.
DocuScience inc.





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 09:01:04 -0800
Subject: Re: volume of X-ray anlysis at low kV

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Dear Stephen,
I have successfully used lower kV electrons to reduce the volume of material
excited for x-ray spectroscopy and a good Monte Carlo x-ray program, such as
David Joy's, will help you to determine the volume excited. At 5 kV I was
able to analyse 0.5 micron layers in a cross-sectioned semi-conductor.
However, you must limit your analyses to those elements whose x-rays are
excited by this energy of electrons, generally the energy of the x-rays is
half or less than the energy of the electrons going in. I don't believe
there is much, if any, resolution advantage to lower electron energy. At
200V, there will be very few x-rays excited that an EDX system can detect.
You wrote:
} Hello: Can anyone comment on the difference in the volume or resolution of
} a point EDS analysis at 1kv or even 200V vs. the more standard 10 or 20kV.
} If we were to use a FE-SEM at 200V could we expect a significant increase in
} resolution of our EDS for a bulk sample compared our convention SEMs. Any
} comments are greatly appreciated. Steve
}
}
} ------------------------------
} Stephen McCartney
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca






From: Randy Nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 11:36:32 -0600
Subject: Re: flat embedding of vibratome sections

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We embed vibratome sections of neural tissue that has been DAB treated
between two pieces of Aclar. If a minimum of resin is placed between
the sheets, the sections won't move much as a weight is applied to
flatten the sections. There are different grades of Aclar, and I had to
go directly to Allied Signal to get the one I prefer. The Aclar peels
easily away from the polymerized resin, leaving one with a "section"
that can be viewed with a LM for subsequent trimming. I super glue it
to a blank beem capsule for thin sectioning.
Best of luck,
Randy
--
Randy Nessler rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Views expressed are my own.
http:\\www.uiowa.edu\~cemrf





From: Mohan Kalyanaraman :      mohan_kalyanaraman-at-EMail.mobil.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 13:28:59 -0500
Subject: Descriptions of crystal morphology

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Good afternoon,

Are there any references to descriptors for various morphology of grown
crystals?
We see several morphologies here, but I feel that I am only coming up with
vegetable analogies - cauliflower, cabbage, etc..

While they sometimes capture the spirit of the picture, they seem
technically inadequate.
Are there technical terms that would be more appropriate to describe
crystal clusters?
Ideally, is there any reference (website etc.) where the terms are defined
along with pictures?

If there is interest, I will post a summary. And thanks to those that
offered leads on dispersing methods

Mohan Kalyanaraman

Sr. Staff Material Scientist
Mobil Technology Company
PO Box 480
Paulsboro, NJ 08066
609-224-3989
609-224-3608 (fax)
mohan_kalyanaraman-at-email.mobil.com







From: Kim Hansen :      kimh-at-neopath.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 10:47:48 -0800
Subject: LM anyone lithograph cell images onto a slide?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings!

I'm looking to see if someone knows anyone that prints cell images on
slides--I need some black and white reference images of cellular
material on a standard slide that can be used to calibrate some
equipment. There are the usual problems with bio material that I really
don't want to have to address since this is going to serve as a
calibration standard. They will be viewed at 4x magnification, so they
don't even need to be especially excellent reproductions. The biggest
key (besides looking like cells) is that the printed image is *thin*
(microns?), as I am trying to accurately determine the thickness of the
coverslip/permount conglomeration that gets mounted on top of it.

Hints are appreciated. TIA

Kim






From: Tracey M. Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 12:53:56 -0600
Subject: General histo query

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--=====================_15079303==_.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Can anyone spit a quick Sudan IV protocol for lipid staining (for en bloc or
embedded tissues-plant) to my email (or the net if anyone else is curious)??
Much obliged!!
Tracey



Tracey Pepper
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa State University
ph: 515-294-3872
fax: 515.294.1337

--=====================_15079303==_.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

{html}
Can anyone spit a quick Sudan IV protocol for lipid staining (for {i} en
bloc {/i} or embedded tissues-plant) to my email (or the net if anyone
else is curious)?? {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} Much
obliged!! {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} Tracey {br}
{br}
{br}
{br}
{div} Tracey Pepper {/div}
{div} Bessey Microscopy Facility {/div}
{div} Iowa State University {/div}
{div} ph:  515-294-3872 {/div}
{div} fax: 515.294.1337 {/div}
{/html}

--=====================_15079303==_.ALT--






From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 12:14:23 -0700
Subject: RE: Resolution of digital SEM image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I basically agree with what John says below, only stitching may be your
only choice, if you really need a large field of view AND a high
resolution.

I suppose, the resolution of 4.5 um comes from the fact, that you
digitize a large field of view into a given number of pixels (for
example, a field of view of about 9 mm digitized into 2Kx2K would give
you such a resolution). The problem is, that going to 4K x 4K resolution
may give you a better resolution but more likely is not. The reason is
this:

For a digital image acquisition (and I believe, the 435 is digital), you
divide your normal x and y sweep into the required number of voltage
levels. The total sweep is normally of the order of a few Volts. If you
divide that by a few thousand pixels, you end up with a few millivolts
per pixel. Any noise of that level will essentially prohibit to keep the
beam stationary to the level you would require. This is normally true
independent of actual magnification as the digitization is done before
the scan amplifier, which translates the x and y sweep into the actual
voltages required to activate the scan coils.

So, to stay with the example above (9 mm field of view): if you need to
digitize that to, let's say 1 um, you would need a resolution of 9000 x
9000 pixels. As I explained above, you probably would not be able to
achive that without image stitching. Also, it would give you an 81 MB
image (at 8 bits per pixel) or 162 MB (at 16 bits per pixel). I'm not
sure you want to deal with that! John is absolutely right regarding
lossy compression: Why spend a lot of money and effort to achieve high
resolution to throw it all away through compression? Lossless
compression may reduce the files by a factor of 2 or so.

We do have software and hardware for image acquisition and processing,
especially but not limited to LEO microscopes, and we migh be able to
help you with some of your challenges. If you need further info, please
contact me through email.

Michael Bode

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: info-at-soft-imaging.com


*******************************************************
Disclaimer:
Soft Imaging System produces and sells image acquisition
and processing systems. We therefore have a vested
interest in some of the items mentioned above.
} *******************************************************
} ----------
} From:
} "DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com[SMTP:"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.
} microscopy.com]
} Sent: Saturday, January 9, 1999 6:23 AM
} To: zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Resolution of digital SEM image
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From: David_Bell-at-Millipore.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 14:56:28 -0500
Subject: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Pauline,

I did not read the article, but perhaps the author was saying that when the
jaz disk fills up, she archives to CD to clear out the jaz disk. This may
be true, because the relative cost of a few CD's is nothing when compared
to a jaz disk (a few dollars vs. over $100US). In this manner, she would
only need to purchase one or two jaz disks. I have been archiving images
on jaz disks for well over a year now and have had no problems with the
file longevity.

Hope this helps,

David A. Bell
Scientist
Electron Microscopy Lab
Millipore Corporation
80 Ashby Road
Bedford, MA 01730
(800) 221-1975x2108






"Pauline C. Yu" {splene-at-pw.usda.gov} on 01/11/99 11:49:06 AM

Please respond to "Pauline C. Yu" {splene-at-pw.usda.gov}

To: Microscopy list {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
cc: (bcc: David Bell/NA/Millipore)


I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital
photography who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro
interview between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the
Jaz only lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to
CD."
Is this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage
life of the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is
planning to supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage,
but if it's not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment.
Does anyone have experience with long term(at least a year) image storage
on Jaz disks?

thanx
Pauline Yu
Microscopist Technician
USDA-ARS-WRRC
- - -- --- ----- -------- ------------- ---------------------













From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/11/99 10:49 AM
Subject: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello Pauline,

I have not used a Jaz drive, but if it is like the Zip (basically a floppy
disk
inside), I would not consider it an "archive" media. On the other hand,
unless
the enviroment was really poor, I would expect a much greater life than you
mentioned. Also, the equipment capable of retreiving the data is limited.
Will
you have a working Jaz drive in 10 years? Another down side to the Jaz is
the
cost of storage compared to a CD-R (650 MB for {$1.50). I would suggest a
CD-R
archive for cost, longevity, and an increased probability that it can be
read a
few years down the road. It remains to be seen if the manufacturers are
correct, but most rate the CD-R for 100 years or more storage.

Woody

______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital
photography who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro
interview between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the
Jaz only lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to
CD."
Is this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage
life of the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is
planning to supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage,
but if it's not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment.
Does anyone have experience with long term(at least a year) image storage
on Jaz disks?

thanx
Pauline Yu
Microscopist Technician
USDA-ARS-WRRC
- - -- --- ----- -------- ------------- ---------------------





From: Gang Ning, Ph.D. :      gning-at-mcw.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 14:46:52 -0600
Subject: Hitachi S-520 SEM For Sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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for {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Mon, 11 Jan 1999 14:48:35 -0600 (CST)
Message-ID: {369A633B.6E10F13A-at-mcw.edu}


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Hi, dear all -

I have been required to forward this ad to this group:

Hitachi S-520 SEM For Sale

Make: Hitachi Model: S-520 Price: $20K

Hitachi SEM Model S-520 for sale. In good condition and recently
used. Specs include 6nm resolution, 20~200,000xmag. specimen goniometer

stage with 0~40mm continuous movement in X & Y, -20~+90 deg. tilting
angle, 5~35mm z-movement, 102mm dia. x 6mm H/15mm dia. x 10mm H specimen

max size, 2 Afterglow type, 150x135mm CRTs, 1 non-afterglow type120x90mm

photographing CRT, and Polaroid camera attachment. This system also
includes a TracorNorthern TN-5500 MicroTrace Series X-ray Analyzer
System with 1Mb RAM, Microscan Digital Beam Controller and all related
system software.

Contact Brett at 414-456-8504, e-mail to schroedb-at-mcw.edu.

Gang Ning, Ph.D.

EM Facility
Department of Microbiology
Medical College of Wisconsin

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n: Ning;Gang
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title: Ph.D.
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--------------7C749C0833D7A3AD8BB1CF73--






From: Larry Allard :      l2a-at-ornl.gov
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 16:59:40 -0500
Subject: RE: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Woody and all:

Just a couple of additional cents...

I forget the source, but a few months ago I recall a discussion on the web
of CD longevity. It had been the conventional wisdom that CDs had a shelf
life on the order of 30 years. But people were discovering that CDs 5
years old or so were becoming defective through delamination or other
processes, just with age and not necessarily with handling, so there was
some skepticism about the 30yr shelf life figure.

Like all media types, there is no question that after 10 years or so you
might expect that the ability to read specific disks or cards or whatever
would be difficult due to dramatic changes in technology (who has 8-track
tapes any longer?) and the natural migration to new technologies that
causes older technology to disappear. So any discussion of shelf life for
electronic storage is probably a moot point (unlike film, which could be
good almost indefinitely with proper handling). I fully expect to have to,
sooner or later, transfer all of my archived data over to some new type of
storage. Just the way life is...

Larry




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

423-574-4981
423-574-4913 Fax
l2a-at-ornl.gov







From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 16:53:04 -0500
Subject: Re: STEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Jim & Chris,

Jim J Darley wrote:
}
} In STEM mode, which is also possible with some SEMs
} (including yours). The important differences are:
} The specimen is a section and this is penetrated by the
} beam. The detector (photo multiplier) is below the
} specimen.

One can also put a parallel EELS detector under the specimen
and collect position-tagged spectra. This gives a very high-resolu-
tion compositional image.

} Better still, in low contrast specimens contrast can be
} increased at will - until electronic noise takes over.
} Maybe the best use of STEM is in image analysis of soft
} specimens.

Looking at the low-loss region of an EELS spectrum can dif-
ferentiate among lipid, protein and nucleic acid, as reported a few
years ago by Rich Leapman at MSA. This could be ideal for cryo-
specimens or other unstained biological specimens.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 1999 20:53:17 EST
Subject: Seeking Lisa Hartnell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow Listserver Members:

I am trying to locate Ms. Lisa Hartnell. We were colleagues a few years ago
at RMC. After departing from RMC, Lisa worked for a while in Paul Webster's
lab at Yale.

If anyone knows of Lisa's whereabouts or has an e-mail address for her, please
contact me off-list. Or feel free to forward this message to her.

Thanks for your help!

Bob
****************************************
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti, Ph.D.
President
Microimaging Technologies, Inc.
Tucson, Arizona USA
Tel. / Fax (520) 546-4986
rchiovetti-at-aol.com
Manufacturers' Representatives
Systems Integrators
Analog & Digital Imaging Systems
Research Microscopy Products
*****************************************





From: Colin Reid :      creid-at-tcd.ie
Date: Monday, January 11, 1999 10:31 PM
Subject: SEM use in museum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Paul,

It might be useful to contact the Royal Microscopical Society. I know that
in the past they have displayed material on open access on a SEM with
restricted access to controls. I haven't personally seen it, but read
about it in the "RMS Proceedings". I think a manual SEM was used with
covers over certain controls. A similar effect could be achieved using a
simple PC control interface.

Best wishes,

Colin


Colin Reid,
Electron Microscope Unit,
Trinity College Dublin,
Dublin 2,
Ireland.
Tel: 353-1-6081820
Fax: 353-1-6770438
email: creid-at-tcd.ie
-----Original Message-----
} From: "pbedard-at-saglac.qc.ca"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
{"pbedard-at-saglac.qc.ca"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Hello all,

I am presently looking at the potential purchase of a basic SEM,
probably variable pressure for a local museum. Are there any one
of you using SEM for public shows? If yes may I have more
information on what is exactly done.

The other alternative (more likely) is presentation of a "microzoo"
similar to Oceanographic institute of Monaco. Small organisms
(plancton, benthos, etc.) are presented via a fully motorized
stereoscopic microscope.
Any personnal experience to share on the subject?
Ciao!
--
L.Paul Bedard, ing. Ph.D.
DocuScience inc.








From: Colin Reid :      creid-at-tcd.ie
Date: Tuesday, January 12, 1999 3:14 AM
Subject: RE: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree with Larry. If you want to "Archive" images there is only one
stable medium - Conventional Film.

Jaz & Zip disks are fine for temporary storage of images. I have been
using Jaz disks for a few years without any failures, but due to cost
transfer data to CD-R's. The Jaz is only used for rapid access to the
images. As pointed out the Jaz/Zip technology will probably be superseded
soon ( 1GB drives are gone already ! ) and in a few years it will be
difficult to read data if your drive fails. This was a major factor
along with cost ) 5 years ago when we decided on a CD-R storage system,
over Magneto-Optical which was the current favourite then.

CD-R's are not in themselves a good long-term archive medium. We have
experienced a number of failures of CD-R's given to customers over the five
years. These failures are usually attributed to environmental factors since
the CD-R's are extremely sensitive to bad handling. Our archive has not
experienced any failures in this time and the CD-R's are carefully stored in
drawers. We always recommend that customers take their own copy so that a
second copy exists. Any images lost over the five years were due to hard
disk failures prior to storage. CD-R's are so cheap now that it is
probably worth writing two disks at a time and storing them separately. At
least five years on all the archive can still be read on any computer.

I suppose DVD ( 5.2 GB ) will be the next way to go as soon as industry
settle on a universal standard ?

Colin



Colin Reid,
Electron Microscope Unit,
Trinity College Dublin,
Dublin 2,
Ireland.
Tel: 353-1-6081820
Fax: 353-1-6770438
email: creid-at-tcd.ie
-----Original Message-----
} From: Larry Allard {l2a-at-ornl.gov}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}






From: Jesus Ricote :      jricote-at-aviion.univ-lemans.fr
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 09:04:56 +0100
Subject: Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I confirm that my address is right. Please add it to the mailing list.

Thank you.
---------------------------------------------------
Dr. J. Ricote
Laboratoire du Physique et l'Etat Condens=E9 (LPEC)
Facult=E9 des Sciences
Universit=E9 du Maine-Le Mans
Avenue Olivier Messiaen
BP 535
72085 Le Mans cedex
FRANCE

Phone: 33 (0) 24383268
FAX: 33 (0) 243833518
e-mail: j.ricote-at-univ-lemans.fr
----------------------------------------------------






From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.org
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:00:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



The 5-year life of CDs is for older technology CDs. Current
CDs are nominally rated at 70-200 years, depending on the
manufacturer. Magnetic media, regardless of how it is
packaged (floppy, winchester, Zip, Jaz, SyQuest, whatever),
all fall prey to the same problems that all magnetic media
fall to -- archival for a decade or two, less than that
under "real world" use.

For a good discussion of the CD longevity debate, see
http://www.cd-info.com/CDIC/Industry/news/media-chronology.html.

For a good discussion of how these "100 year" lifetime
determinations are made, see

http://www.cd-info.com/CDIC/Technology/CD-R/Media/Kodak.html.

I think that one has to remember that the environmental
conditions are exquisitely important when discussing
longevity. There *is no* single number that one can
look to unless one knows how the media is stored and used.

For an example of how this plays for photographic media,
look at
http://www.kodak.com/cluster/global/en/consumer/education/imageStability.shtml

While the above is for photographic prints, not CDs or magnetic
media, the importance of environmental issues are analogous.

billo


On Mon, 11 Jan 1999, Larry Allard wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Woody and all:
}
} Just a couple of additional cents...
}
} I forget the source, but a few months ago I recall a discussion on the web
} of CD longevity. It had been the conventional wisdom that CDs had a shelf
} life on the order of 30 years. But people were discovering that CDs 5
} years old or so were becoming defective through delamination or other
} processes, just with age and not necessarily with handling, so there was
} some skepticism about the 30yr shelf life figure.
}
} Like all media types, there is no question that after 10 years or so you
} might expect that the ability to read specific disks or cards or whatever
} would be difficult due to dramatic changes in technology (who has 8-track
} tapes any longer?) and the natural migration to new technologies that
} causes older technology to disappear. So any discussion of shelf life for
} electronic storage is probably a moot point (unlike film, which could be
} good almost indefinitely with proper handling). I fully expect to have to,
} sooner or later, transfer all of my archived data over to some new type of
} storage. Just the way life is...
}
} Larry
}
}
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} }
} } Hello Pauline,
} }
} } I have not used a Jaz drive, but if it is like the Zip (basically a floppy
} } disk
} } inside), I would not consider it an "archive" media. On the other hand,
} } unless
} } the enviroment was really poor, I would expect a much greater life than you
} } mentioned. Also, the equipment capable of retreiving the data is limited.
} } Will
} } you have a working Jaz drive in 10 years? Another down side to the Jaz is
} } the
} } cost of storage compared to a CD-R (650 MB for {$1.50). I would suggest a
} } CD-R
} } archive for cost, longevity, and an increased probability that it can be
} } read a
} } few years down the road. It remains to be seen if the manufacturers are
} } correct, but most rate the CD-R for 100 years or more storage.
} }
} } Woody
} }
} } ______________________________ Reply Separator
} } _________________________________
} } Subject: Jaz disk archivalness?
} } Author: "Pauline C. Yu" [SMTP:splene-at-pw.usda.gov] at CORP
} } Date: 1/11/99 10:49 AM
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital
} } photography who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro
} } interview between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the
} } Jaz only lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to
} } CD."
} } Is this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage
} } life of the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is
} } planning to supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage,
} } but if it's not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment.
} } Does anyone have experience with long term(at least a year) image storage
} } on Jaz disks?
} }
} } thanx
} } Pauline Yu
} } Microscopist Technician
} } USDA-ARS-WRRC
} } - - -- --- ----- -------- ------------- ---------------------
}
}
} Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
} Senior Research Staff Member
} High Temperature Materials Laboratory
} Oak Ridge National Laboratory
} 1 Bethel Valley Road
} Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
} PO Box 2008
} Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064
}
} 423-574-4981
} 423-574-4913 Fax
} l2a-at-ornl.gov
}
}
}






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:28:16 -0500
Subject: Re: LM anyone lithograph cell images onto a slide?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Kim,


Check with the following:

Applied Image, Rochester NY, 716-482-0300


They do all sorts of materials printed on glass. We routinely use their
image analysis calibration slide and stage micrometers as part of our
on-site workshops.


Caveat: MME has no commercial interest in this product.


All the best,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium providing

customized on-site workshops in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}


At 10:47 AM 1/11/99 -0800, Kim Hansen wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Greetings!

}

} I'm looking to see if someone knows anyone that prints cell images on

} slides--I need some black and white reference images of cellular

} material on a standard slide that can be used to calibrate some

} equipment. There are the usual problems with bio material that I
really

} don't want to have to address since this is going to serve as a

} calibration standard. They will be viewed at 4x magnification, so they

} don't even need to be especially excellent reproductions. The biggest

} key (besides looking like cells) is that the printed image is *thin*

} (microns?), as I am trying to accurately determine the thickness of
the

} coverslip/permount conglomeration that gets mounted on top of it.

}

} Hints are appreciated. TIA

}

} Kim

}

}

}

}







From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:33:15 -0500
Subject: Re: Descriptions of crystal morphology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Mohan,


Suggest you see the Particle Atlas, available from McCrone, now in a very
convenient CD Rom format which is quick and easy to search. Try
contacting

Dina Mattes at McCrone Associates, Westmont, IL 800-622-8122.


There are also good descriptions of all sorts of crystal families and
habits the old reference, Chamot (pronounced Cha-mo) and Mason's Handbook
of Chemical Microscopy. I think McCrone Assoc. has also brought this
back into print. It's a great reference because it shows you how to
control crystal growth of various types under the microscope. Drs.
Chamot and Mason reigned over the chemical microscopy facility at Cornell
U. for nearly 100 years.... Their book contains lots of good "benchtop
wisdom".


Hope this is helpful,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium providing

customized on-site workshops in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}



At 01:28 PM 1/11/99 -0500, Mohan Kalyanaraman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Good afternoon,

}

} Are there any references to descriptors for various morphology of
grown

} crystals?

} We see several morphologies here, but I feel that I am only coming up
with

} vegetable analogies - cauliflower, cabbage, etc..

}

} While they sometimes capture the spirit of the picture, they seem

} technically inadequate.

} Are there technical terms that would be more appropriate to describe

} crystal clusters?

} Ideally, is there any reference (website etc.) where the terms are
defined

} along with pictures?

}

} If there is interest, I will post a summary. And thanks to those that

} offered leads on dispersing methods

}

} Mohan Kalyanaraman

}

} Sr. Staff Material Scientist

} Mobil Technology Company

} PO Box 480

} Paulsboro, NJ 08066

} 609-224-3989

} 609-224-3608 (fax)

} mohan_kalyanaraman-at-email.mobil.com

}

}

}

}

}







From: Mick Thomas :      mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:40:48 -0800
Subject: salt cleavage: summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow microscopists,

Many thanks to all who responded to my question. Below is a summary of the
responses to cleaving rock salt:

1) Irradiate the salt (with a Co60 source, for example) to set up point
defects in the crystal, making it easier to cleave.

2) Ensure you are using a high quality salt crystal.

3) Use a sharp, brand new razor blade for each cleave.

3) After cleaving, take a piece of lens cleaning paper, place it on a
smooth surface, and put a little
water on it. Using tweezers, pick up the salt and rub it in a circular
motion in the puddle of water.

4) Consider using alternate substrates, depending on their suitability to
the particular experiment on hand. Suggestions included mica, Barium
sulfate, and Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG).

5) Be realistic in your expectations; even a very well cleaved salt
crystal will have some cleavage steps.

Thanks again, these suggestions have been very helpful to me.

Mick Thomas

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------


Mick Thomas
UHV-STEM Laboratory
E-1 Clark Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853

Phone: 607-255-0650
Fax: 607-255-7658
e-mail: mgt3-at-msc.cornell.edu





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:46:33 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM use in museum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Paul,


There was a wonderful microscopy exhibits at both the American Museum of
Natural History (NY) and at the Smithsonian in the early-mid 80's. Cecil
Fox, then with Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, helped organize both.
The Smithsonian exhibit not only had a major display of old and new
equipment but a working SEM. I have lost track of Dr. Fox ... last I
heard he was still in the Silver Spring area. I have left a message for
him and will send you info when available.


The other alternative is to talk to our illustrious listmaster, Nestor.
He has a tremendous amount of experience with telemicroscopy which should
be easily transferable to this type of situation.


Hope this is helpful,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

{color} {param} 0000,8080,0000 {/param} Microscopy/Microscopy Education
..Educating microscopists for greater productivity.


{/color} 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

{bigger} {bigger} MME {/bigger} {/bigger} is America's first national
consortium providing

customized on-site workshops in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis {bigger} .

{/bigger}

At 12:00 PM 1/11/99 -0500, pbedard-at-saglac.qc.ca"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Hello all,

}

} I am presently looking at the potential purchase of a basic SEM,

} probably variable pressure for a local museum. Are there any one

} of you using SEM for public shows? If yes may I have more

} information on what is exactly done.

}

} The other alternative (more likely) is presentation of a "microzoo"

} similar to Oceanographic institute of Monaco. Small organisms

} (plancton, benthos, etc.) are presented via a fully motorized

} stereoscopic microscope.

} Any personnal experience to share on the subject?

} Ciao!

} --

} L.Paul Bedard, ing. Ph.D.

} DocuScience inc.

}

}

}







From: oshel-at-terracom.net (Philip Oshel)
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 08:19:03 -0600
Subject: Re: General histo query

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Quoted from "Staining Procedures", 3rd ed. Biological Stain Commission pg 212:
Sudan IV
to show: suberized walls, cuticle, fat or oil globules

fix: either none or any botanical fixative
embedding: paraffin or freehand

Preparation of staining and mounting solutions:
Make a saturated solution of Sudan IV in 95% EtOH
Add an equal volume of glycerin and filter
if stain precipitates out on the sections, dilute further as necessary with
a mixture of equal parts glycerine and EtOH
Keep in a dropper bottle

Staining schedule:
1) Bring sections into 30% EtOH
2) Mount sections on a slide in a few drops of the staining and mounting
solution
3) Seal edges of coverslip with "vas-par"*

Results:
Cuticle, cutinized and suberized walls, and fat globules--orange.

*equal parts melted paraffin and vasaline; apply with a metal rod about
1/8th inch in diameter, bent into an L shape with a 6" handle and a 1" leg:
warm applicator over a burner/hot plate, etc., then melt and pick up a few
drops of vas-par and apply to coverslip edges. pg 239

Reference:
Rawlins, T.E. 1933. "Phytopathological and Botanical Research Methods."
John Wiley & Sons, NY.

(Pardon me while I go wipe off my keyboard.)

Phil

} Can anyone spit a quick Sudan IV protocol for lipid staining (for en bloc or
} embedded tissues-plant) to my email (or the net if anyone else is curious)??
} Much obliged!!
} Tracey
}
}
}
} Tracey Pepper
} Bessey Microscopy Facility
} Iowa State University
} ph: 515-294-3872
} fax: 515.294.1337

****be famous! send in a tech tip or question***
Philip Oshel
Technical Editor, Microscopy Today
PO Box 620068
Middleton, WI 53562
(608) 833-2885
oshel-at-terracom.net








From: Larry Allard :      l2a-at-ornl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 09:37:41 -0500
Subject: RE: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bill:

Thanks for the informative links. I was not aware of the extensive
"debate" that has gone on regarding CD lifetime expectancy.

It is interesting that models suggest a lifetime of CD-R of 217 years. I
think it is safe to assert that no one presently alive will be around to
test this hypothesis. And if they were, it is probably safer to assert
that there would be no device still in existance that could read such an
ancient recording...

Larry








The 5-year life of CDs is for older technology CDs. Current
} CDs are nominally rated at 70-200 years, depending on the
} manufacturer. Magnetic media, regardless of how it is
} packaged (floppy, winchester, Zip, Jaz, SyQuest, whatever),
} all fall prey to the same problems that all magnetic media
} fall to -- archival for a decade or two, less than that
} under "real world" use.
}
} For a good discussion of the CD longevity debate, see
} http://www.cd-info.com/CDIC/Industry/news/media-chronology.html.
}
} For a good discussion of how these "100 year" lifetime
} determinations are made, see
}
} http://www.cd-info.com/CDIC/Technology/CD-R/Media/Kodak.html.
}
} I think that one has to remember that the environmental
} conditions are exquisitely important when discussing
} longevity. There *is no* single number that one can
} look to unless one knows how the media is stored and used.
}
} For an example of how this plays for photographic media,
} look at
} http://www.kodak.com/cluster/global/en/consumer/education/imageStability.shtml
}
} While the above is for photographic prints, not CDs or magnetic
} media, the importance of environmental issues are analogous.
}
} billo
}
}
} On Mon, 11 Jan 1999, Larry Allard wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Woody and all:
} }
} } Just a couple of additional cents...
} }
} } I forget the source, but a few months ago I recall a discussion on the web
} } of CD longevity. It had been the conventional wisdom that CDs had a shelf
} } life on the order of 30 years. But people were discovering that CDs 5
} } years old or so were becoming defective through delamination or other
} } processes, just with age and not necessarily with handling, so there was
} } some skepticism about the 30yr shelf life figure.
} }
} } Like all media types, there is no question that after 10 years or so you
} } might expect that the ability to read specific disks or cards or whatever
} } would be difficult due to dramatic changes in technology (who has 8-track
} } tapes any longer?) and the natural migration to new technologies that
} } causes older technology to disappear. So any discussion of shelf life for
} } electronic storage is probably a moot point (unlike film, which could be
} } good almost indefinitely with proper handling). I fully expect to have to,
} } sooner or later, transfer all of my archived data over to some new type of
} } storage. Just the way life is...
} }
} } Larry
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } Hello Pauline,
} } }
} } } I have not used a Jaz drive, but if it is like the Zip (basically a floppy
} } } disk
} } } inside), I would not consider it an "archive" media. On the other hand,
} } } unless
} } } the enviroment was really poor, I would expect a much greater life than you
} } } mentioned. Also, the equipment capable of retreiving the data is limited.
} } } Will
} } } you have a working Jaz drive in 10 years? Another down side to the Jaz is
} } } the
} } } cost of storage compared to a CD-R (650 MB for {$1.50). I would suggest a
} } } CD-R
} } } archive for cost, longevity, and an increased probability that it can be
} } } read a
} } } few years down the road. It remains to be seen if the manufacturers are
} } } correct, but most rate the CD-R for 100 years or more storage.
} } }
} } } Woody
} } }
} } } ______________________________ Reply Separator
} } } _________________________________
} } } Subject: Jaz disk archivalness?
} } } Author: "Pauline C. Yu" [SMTP:splene-at-pw.usda.gov] at CORP
} } } Date: 1/11/99 10:49 AM
} } }
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital
} } } photography who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro
} } } interview between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the
} } } Jaz only lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to
} } } CD."
} } } Is this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage
} } } life of the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is
} } } planning to supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage,
} } } but if it's not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment.
} } } Does anyone have experience with long term(at least a year) image storage
} } } on Jaz disks?
} } }
} } } thanx
} } } Pauline Yu
} } } Microscopist Technician
} } } USDA-ARS-WRRC
} } } - - -- --- ----- -------- ------------- ---------------------
} }
} }
} } Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
} } Senior Research Staff Member
} } High Temperature Materials Laboratory
} } Oak Ridge National Laboratory
} } 1 Bethel Valley Road
} } Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
} } PO Box 2008
} } Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064
} }
} } 423-574-4981
} } 423-574-4913 Fax
} } l2a-at-ornl.gov
} }
} }
} }


Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

423-574-4981
423-574-4913 Fax
l2a-at-ornl.gov







From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 01:31:44 +1100
Subject: RE: Resolution of digital SEM image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry Zhiyu Wang, I still have trouble with that concept. A
single pixel in a line of 2500 pixel represents an error
any microscopist could ignore. The pixel size may be 4.5um
- on the charge coupled device; on the specimen, depending
on how small the area examined (higher power less field)
that pixel may represent rather more. What matters is the
observed (enlarged) image and here, if the image width is
100mm, that single pixel represents 100 over 2500= 0.04mm
or an 0.04% error. If only part of the image is used, like
with a photographic negative the error does not change
dramatically. One would not calculate a magnification by
ignoring that only half of the enlarged image is used.

If you worry about magnification use a build in
calibration, like latex spheres as earlier suggested.
With care an SEM may be accurate to 5%, though some people
have claimed 1%. In either case those pixel will not be
your problem - the way I see it.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****

On Tuesday, January 12, 1999 5:37 PM, Zhiyu Wang
[SMTP:zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net] wrote:
} Hi, Jim:
}
} Thank you for responding my message. Your calculation is
} right, but the
} question is that we do not want to ignore the smallest
} unit on large scale
} of measurement. Say 1/2500 is a small number in
} persentage, but its
} absolute value is 4 um, my sample is not covered by
total
} 2500 pixels,
} only part of them instead. If I measure multipal
samples,
} the error should
} be +/- 4 um, ie. 8 um, close to 0.01 mm. This is too
} rough for quality
} control of machinary (in semoconductor industry)
}
} Basiclly I do not believe SEM is a good machine for
} dimension measurement
} as many factors involve on imaging system. Therefore,
its
} high electron
} optical resolution and high depth of view attract me and
} my boss to do
} something different. I am collect information around the
} world. I
} appreciate your help and we can share some interest idea
} later.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Zhiyu Wang
} ----------
} } From: Jim J Darley {jim-at-proscitech.com.au}
} } To: 'Zhiyu Wang' {zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net} ;
} 'Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com'
} {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} } Subject: RE: Resolution of digital SEM image
} } Date: Monday, January 11, 1999 4:28 AM
} }
} }
} }
---------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} } Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} }
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.ht
} } ml
} } ---------------------}
} }
} } Hi Zhiyu Wang -
} } Lets hope its me who is confused: I don't care.
} } If a monitor is 100mm across and is represented by 4um
} } pixel
} } (100 divided by 0.004=) 2500 would be required for a
} } single
} } line. If one pixel was missing I would just forget
about
} }
} } that, although the percentage error would be constant,
} } regardless of magnification.
} } What I would worry about is the large variation in
} } magnification readings, which is possible because of
the
} }
} } SEM's great depths of field and tilt angles.
} } Calibrated latex spheres have been used for decades in
} } TEM.
} } Now larger calibrated spheres are available and these
} } can
} } be routinely and economically applied to SEM and light
} } microscopy specimen to provide a reliable size
} } comparison.
} } Disclaimer: ProSciTech supplies latex particles (page
} } "S2"
} } online) and thus has a vested interest.
} } Cheers
} } Jim Darley
} } ProSciTech
} } Microscopy
} } PLUS
} } PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
} } Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
} } Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
} } ********************** www.proscitech.com.au
} } *****
} }
} }
} }
} } On Saturday, January 09, 1999 4:21 PM, Zhiyu Wang
} } [SMTP:zhiyuw-at-worldnet.att.net] wrote:
} }
} } } Hi, All:
} } }
} } } A technical difficulty in my lab is coming on the
} } } table:
} } } How to increase
} } } resolution of digitized SEM images, especially for
} } } low
} } } magnification
} } } ( {50X). The pixel size of SEM image (50X)in my
} } } machine
} } } (LEO-435VP) is 4.5
} } } um. In other word, no matter how good image
} } } software
} } } performs, the
} } } measurement error is at least 4.5 um.
} } } We are going to use SEM as a routine measurement tool
} } } under 100X, what is
} } } the disadvantage?
} } } Does any one have excellent idea to solve this
} } } problem,
} } in
} } } terms of :
} } } Increase number of pixels and save as compressed
.jpg
} } } to
} } } reduce file size?
} } } Stage mapping?
} } } Software solution?
} } } What else?
} } }
} } } Thank you for help
} } }
} } } Zhiyu Wang
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }





From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.org
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 10:55:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Tue, 12 Jan 1999, Larry Allard wrote:

} Bill:
}
} Thanks for the informative links. I was not aware of the extensive
} "debate" that has gone on regarding CD lifetime expectancy.
}
} It is interesting that models suggest a lifetime of CD-R of 217 years. I
} think it is safe to assert that no one presently alive will be around to
} test this hypothesis. And if they were, it is probably safer to assert
} that there would be no device still in existance that could read such an
} ancient recording...
}
} Larry
}


I'm not sure how good these models are, though. It's a little like
mutagenesis tests on bacteria. Yeah, it's a measure of carcinogenicity,
but it's a loose one. I'm much happier using these tests as a relative
scale rather than an absolute one.


billo






From: Satyarth Suri :      suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 10:46:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello:
I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
in terms of what the problem may be?

thanks - if you want you can respond directly to suri.3-at-osu.edu

-satyarth





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 99 11:51:31 -0500
Subject: Iomega JAZ drive longevity

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Pauline Yu wrote:
============================================
I read an interview with a photojournalist who does all digital photography
who saves her work on a Jaz drive "in the field"(PhotoMetro interview
between ADColeman&Maggie Hallahan). She commented that "...the Jaz only
lasts a few months and after that I have to archive everything to CD." Is
this true? It's rather alarming as Iomega claims that the storage life of
the cartridges(under *ideal* conditions) is 10 years. Someone is planning to
supply our microscopy lab with a Jaz drive for image storage, but if it's
not archival, I don't think it's worth the investment. Does anyone have
experience with long term(at least a year) image storage on Jaz disks?
==============================================
When the 1 GIG Iomega drives came out some months ago, I thought then they
were the greatest thing since sliced bread. I have used one on my home
desktop repeatedly without problems. And ditto for some number of the
office desktops (except for one).

But another one that I dedicated for use with my laptop for when I travel
has been another story. During the warranty period, when I could get through
on the Iomega lines, they did keep replacing the entire drive, which
apparently did not survive the bouncing around during travel. The drive
itself was packed in my checked luggage but well packed. But the survival
rate was about three months. After the warranty period was up, they stopped
replacing them.

In any case, my experience seemed to be consistent with that of the
photojournalist: If you carry them around, you have problems. But so far
as I can tell, after very heavy use of the 1 GIG JAZ drives, if they are
permanently installed, we have not had any particular problems. In talking
with their customer service people, apparently, something goes wrong with
the drive if carried around and when that happens, it does do damage to the
replaceable disc when you next try to use it.

Chuck

Disclaimer: In this instance, I have no financial interest in this product,
just a satisfied user who wished Iomega had more customer service lines.

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 13:00:59 -0500
Subject: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Satyarth:

An excellent paper on the subject is:

"In Situ Hydride Formation in Zirconium and Titanium during Ion Milling"
Graham J.C. Carpenter et al, JMSA Vol.1 No. 4 pp 175-184 1995.

=46rom the paper you will see that a key factor in eliminating hydride
formation is having a clean sample free from hydrocarbon contamination. =

This contamination could be remnants from the dimpling process or other
pre-thinning steps or it could be caused by the back streaming of diffusi=
on
pump oil in your ion mill. As titanium has a high chemical affinity for
hydrogen, you may want to look over your preparation steps and try to
eliminate any areas of possible contamination. If you are still having a=

problem, a quick cleaning of both the specimen and the specimen holder in=
a
Plasma Cleaner should take care of it.

If you have an interest, I can send you a copy of the above referenced
paper. I also have papers on plasma cleaning which may be of interest.

NOTE: South Bay Technology does manufacture the PC150 Plasma Cleaner and
therefore I have a vested interest in promoting its use.

Best regards-

David =

Writing at 9:38:23 AM on 1/12/99
=

*************************************************************************=
**
************************

David Henriks TEL: =

800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499=

San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com=


*************************************************************************=
**
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by Satyarth Suri
}
Hello:
I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
in terms of what the problem may be?

thanks - if you want you can respond directly to suri.3-at-osu.edu

-satyarth

{






From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 13:34:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Jaz disk archivalness?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pauline,
We have had a horrible time with the Jaz drives (hooked to an
SGI archiving confocal images). Apparently when they get near full
capacity they screw up. I've sent three unreadable disks to an
image retrieval company, with no luck. The told me that when the
disk is near full and you try to add another file it will put
data back at the begining of the disk, erasing file allocation tables,
basically making the disk unreadable. We have several defective
disks and I have been forced to the zip drive.

Mike D






From: quex-at-mauromedia.com (Michael Draper)
Date: Sat, 15 Feb 1997 12:41:01 -0600
Subject: Tem Carbon Coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


1/12/99

Hello,
My lab is currently looking for a used carbon coater for our TEM lab.
Our Emitech has
passed away and is in England trying to be repaired, but it looks grim.
I also have a
Denton coater that will not pump down. So I am looking into other
options.

If your are selling such a machine or might know someone who is, please
write back or
drop a line to our website

http://www.analyticagroup.com
Mailto:marketing-at-analyticagroup.com

Thanks,
MD






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 16:34:16 -0500
Subject: TEM for plant material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I need some advice as to the best protocol for fixing fresh plant leaves
for routine TEM. My only experience has been with animal tissue.
Thanks,
MG Engle






From: Tom Reese :      treese-at-mbl.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 17:29:39 -0400
Subject: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We just got a G3 Mac and an Epson digital projector-I have seen some really
nice digital slide shows and am excited by the increase in quality and
decrease in effort making slides. I expect, however, to spend some effort
finding out the best way to put together a slide show, and am wondering
what advice or experience might be out there. I would like to show ~10MB
images without any computer stuff showing at the same time, but could
consider compression (eg., jpeg) if there is no loss of quality. Wondering
whether to get into a slide presentation program or just make a stack and
open them sequentially (I have 190+ MB of memory). There is also a neat IR
pointer that seems to bounce off the screen and feed into software in the
projector that allows you to move the cursor around and click/double click
with the IR pointer. Too bad they didn't include a laser pointer in this
device!....Many thanks for any help or advice!...Tom Reese







From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 12 Jan 99 16:34:58 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu}
X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.4 (Mac)
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MIME-Version: 1.0
Reply-To: Bernard Kestel {kestel-at-anl.gov}
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="====56485753495051555654===1"



From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 12 Jan 99 16:34:58 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
Pure titanium has been jet electropolished here at Argonne National =
Laboratory for over 10 years. A South Bay 550-B single jet instrument is =
used because it has in-situ viewing of the specimen during the process to =
speed up the determination of proper electropolishing conditions.

Electrolyte: 30 ml. perchloric acid
295 ml. methanol
175 ml. butyl cellosolve

Conditions: -20 degrees C.
70 volts, 35 mA, (one side of 3 mm disc)

Note: After polishing about half way thru the specimen,=

it is cleaned, dried, and a dot of =
Microshield stop-
off lacquer is placed on the polished "side =
one" dimple.
The inverted specimen is then remounted on =
the polish-
ing instrument and thinned to perforation =
using the =
sensitive optical termination system. It =
should be =
possible to make several foils per day in =
this manner.

Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il, 60439

E-mail: bkestel-at-anl.gov
South Bay Technology wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

{/PRE}
{FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Pure titanium has =
been jet electropolished here at Argonne =
National Laboratory for over 10 years. =
A South Bay 550-B single jet instrument is =
used because it has in-situ viewing of the =
specimen during the process to speed up =
the determination of proper electropolishing =
conditions. {BR}
{BR}
Electrolyte: =
30 ml. perchloric acid {BR}
=
295 ml. methanol {BR}
=
175 ml. butyl cellosolve {BR}
{BR}
=
Conditions: -20 degrees C. {BR}
=
70 volts, =
35 mA, (one side of 3 mm disc) {BR}
{BR}
=
Note: After polishing about =
half way thru the specimen, {BR}
=
it is cleaned, dried, =
and a dot of Microshield stop- {BR}
=
off lacquer is placed =
on the polished "side one" dimple. {BR}
=
The inverted =
specimen is then remounted on the polish- {BR}
=
ing instrument =
and thinned to perforation using the {BR}
=
sensitive optical =
termination system. It should be {BR}
=
possible to make =
several foils per day in this manner. {BR}
{BR}
=
Bernard Kestel {BR}
Materials =
Science Division {BR}
Argonne National =
Laboratory {BR}
Argonne, Il, 60439 {BR}
{BR}
=
E-mail: bkestel-at-anl.gov {BR}
South =
Bay Technology wrote: {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#=
000000"} {BR}
>-----------------------------------------------------------------------=
- {BR}
>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America {BR}
I also have papers on plasma cleaning which =
may be of interest. {BR}
> {BR}
>NOTE: South =
Bay Technology does manufacture the PC150 =
Plasma Cleaner and {BR}
>therefore I have =
a vested interest in promoting its use. {BR}
> {BR}
>Best =
regards- {BR}
> {BR}
>David =
{BR}
>Writing at 9:38:23 =
AM on 1/12/99 {BR}
> =
{BR}
>***************************************************************** {BR}
>********** {BR}
>************************ {BR}
> {BR}
>David =
Henriks =
TEL: {BR}
>800-728-2233 (toll =
free in the USA) {BR}
>South Bay Technology, =
Inc. +1-949-492-2600 {BR}
>1120 =
Via Callejon =
FAX: +1-949-492-1499 {BR}
>San Clemente, =
CA 92673 USA e-mail: {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} henriks-at-southbaytech.com {/U} {=
/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
> {BR}
>***************************************************************** {BR}
>********** {BR}
>************************ {BR}
> {BR}
> =
>>>>> Please visit us =
at {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} http://www.=
southbaytech.com {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} <<<<< {BR}
> {BR}
>Manufacturers =
of precision sample preparation equipment =
and supplies for {BR}
>metallography, crystallography =
and electron microscopy. {BR}
> {BR}
>Message =
text written by Satyarth Suri {BR}
>> {BR}
>Hello: {BR}
>I =
am currently working on mechanical behavior =
/ microstructure {BR}
>correlations in single =
colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently {BR}
>preparing =
the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, =
1mA), but {BR}
>have run into the problem =
of a very uneven alpha phase morphology, {BR}
>the =
alpha phase has island formation - we are =
using a cold stage {BR}
>to minimize the =
hydride formation at the interface. I am =
using {BR}
>3 micron/6micron diamond paste =
during the dimpling process - the {BR}
>foil =
itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms =
of the dislocation {BR}
>content. Could =
anyone in the microscopy land have some =
suggestions {BR}
>in terms of what the problem =
may be? {BR}
> {BR}
>thanks - if you want =
you can respond directly to {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" =
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} suri.3-at-osu.edu {/U} {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"=
Geneva" =
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
> {BR}
>-satyarth {BR}
> {BR}
>< {BR}
> {BR}
> {BR}
> {BR}
>RFC822 =
header {BR}
>----------------------------------- {BR}
> {BR}
> =
Received: from dns2.anl.gov (dns2.anl.gov =
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From: Ciprian Almonte :      calmonte+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 17:47:10 -0500
Subject: batch file conversion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Guys,
I'm looking for a shareware program for the mac that will allow me to batch
process 12 bit images to 8 bit images.
Thanks,

--Ciprian
________________________________________________________________
Ciprian A. Almonte Phone: (412) 648-9796
Center for Biologic Imaging FAX: (412) 648-8330
University of Pittsburgh URL:http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA mailto:calmonte-at-pitt.edu
________________________________________________________________





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 18:33:12 -0500
Subject: Opticalt Microscopy Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Just a reminder: - Not just for Chemists!

American Chemican Society "Applied Optical Microscopy for Chemists"
March 4-5-7 in Beautiful Orlando, Florida
Three days of total immersion, hands-on experience with all phases of
optical microscopy, including one whole day of Polarized Light (both
qualitative and quantitative)
Strongly supported with the latest in equipment from the major
manufacturers for HANDS-ON labs
Special Saturday evening session on video imaging and image analysis

For further details, including registration information, visit the MME
website: {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Barbara Foster,
Course Coordinator

Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.
125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}






From: Ranan Gulhan Aktas :      ranaoz-at-turk.net
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 01:49:48 +0200
Subject: Hello from Turkey!

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------6C36AB32CC464C8C85112D45
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-9
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear all microscopists;

I am a young electron microscopist who is trying to organise an EM lab
in Turkey.

I had a chance to study with a wonderful electron microscopist
and also a great teacher, Dr. Robert J.Kayton(the president of PNEMS) in
Portland, OR for 1 year. I learned the technical aspects of electron
microscopy from him. I have never had much more enjoyable experience
than that. Now, I am back and have been asked to organise an EM lab.

All I have in this lab is an old TEM(Carl Zeiss EM 9) and an old
ultramicrotome. As you see, I need so many things. I really want to
rebuilt a nice EM lab and to apply my experience I have learned in U.S.
It will be very hard for me since it is not easy to find financial
support for that in my country.

Would you like to help me? I would like to ask you to send me
any equipments, appliances, dark room stuffs, books etc. which you don't
use anymore in your EM lab. I will prepare a chart for being able to
thank all of you on the front door of my lab and write the names of
persons, companies, facilities etc. which help me. I also would like
to bring small presents from Turkey for you,
dear helpfull electron microscopists, when I come to the
Microscopy&Microanalysis'1999,in Portland,OR.

I will greatly appreciate any kind of help.

Thanks in advance,

Ranan Gulhan AKTAS, M. D.
Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine
Pathology Department
22030 Edirne, TURKEY
Tel: +90 284 235 44 68
Fax: +90 284 235 76 52
e-mail: ranaoz-at-turk.net



--------------6C36AB32CC464C8C85112D45
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name="ranaoz.vcf"
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Content-Description: Card for Ranan Gulhan Aktas
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begin:vcard
n:AKTAS;Ranan Gulhan
tel;fax:+90-284 235 76 52
tel;home:+90 284 235 44 68
tel;work:Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine
x-mozilla-html:FALSE
adr:;;;;;;
version:2.1
email;internet:ranaoz-at-turk.net
fn:Ranan Gulhan AKTAS, M. D.
end:vcard

--------------6C36AB32CC464C8C85112D45--






From: Thomas, Larry :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 15:54:36 -0800
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Satyrith-

Unless you have a compelling reason to use ion milling for this preparation, I
recommend using jet electropolishing, possibly with just a final touch-up in the
ion mill. Although both electropolishing and ion milling commonly produce
sample preparation artifacts, the artifacts from ion-milling reactive metals
such as Ti and Zr are not well understood and can be harder to eliminate.
Despite Carpenter et. als work (see D. Henriks posting) implicating hydrocarbon
contamination as a source of hydriding during ion milling, my personal
experience ion milling Zr samples in 'oil-free' systems indicates that water
vapor is the main culprit in the hydridng. Surface irregularities on ion milled
Zr/Ti samples (surface terracing, for example) usually have other causes,
possibly related to air leaks in the ion mill or oxygen in the feed gas.
Another source of irregular surfaces on ion milled samples is embedded polishing
compound. Cubic boron nitride (CBN) sometimes gives better results in dimpling
metals than diamond, and even the diamond polishing compounds from different
suppliers can give different results. Conversely, brief ion milling of
electropolished samples--especially at low incidence angles and very low kV--can
improve the surface finish and mill away irregularities caused by second-phase
particles. Often the 'trick' to eliminating milling artifacts is minimizing
time spent in the ion mill.

Larry Thomas
Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Washington State University
Pullman, WA


----------
From: South Bay Technology
Sent: Tuesday, January 12, 1999 6:00 PM
To: Satyarth Suri; Microscopy ListServer
Subject: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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Dear Satyarth:

An excellent paper on the subject is:

"In Situ Hydride Formation in Zirconium and Titanium during Ion Milling"
Graham J.C. Carpenter et al, JMSA Vol.1 No. 4 pp 175-184 1995.

From the paper you will see that a key factor in eliminating hydride
formation is having a clean sample free from hydrocarbon contamination.
This contamination could be remnants from the dimpling process or other
pre-thinning steps or it could be caused by the back streaming of
diffusion
pump oil in your ion mill. As titanium has a high chemical affinity for
hydrogen, you may want to look over your preparation steps and try to
eliminate any areas of possible contamination. If you are still having
a
problem, a quick cleaning of both the specimen and the specimen holder
in a
Plasma Cleaner should take care of it.

If you have an interest, I can send you a copy of the above referenced
paper. I also have papers on plasma cleaning which may be of interest.

NOTE: South Bay Technology does manufacture the PC150 Plasma Cleaner and
therefore I have a vested interest in promoting its use.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 9:38:23 AM on 1/12/99


***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks TEL:
800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX:
+1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail:
henriks-at-southbaytech.com


***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by Satyarth Suri
}
Hello:
I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
in terms of what the problem may be?

thanks - if you want you can respond directly to suri.3-at-osu.edu

-satyarth

{







From: steve barlow :      sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 16:10:45 -0800
Subject: outreach programs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all

I am compiling for the MSA Education Committee a listing of laboratories
involved in outreach and/or remote access programs with local schools or
just across campus. Please contact me with information about your
respective programs. This list will be mounted on the MSA webpage.

I will be compiling lists for scanning electron microscopes, light
microscopes(standard and confocal), scanning probes, confocal, and
transmission microscopes. I'ld like to know what school levels your
program is tartgeted to, what instruments you are using, a web site if you
have one, and your email so I can follow up on the information.


Please contact me directly at
sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
(NOT THE LISTSERVER LIST) and I will see the information is compiled and
posted.

thanks in advance

steve




---------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow, Associate Director
EM Facility/Biology Department
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619)594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
website: http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility/







From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 19:07:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Iomega JAZ drive longevity

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I agree with Chuck. When I took Dr. McKenzie's Digital Microscopy
course, he informed us that these things couldn't be banged around.
We've had a 1 GB (permanently installed) for over a year and a 2 GB
"portable" drive (that never gets moved) for almost a year, and have
never had any trouble with either.

I don't know about over filling disks. My fattest one still has 170 MB
left and is perfectly fine. For really important files/pictures, I keep 2
backups on separate disks. We have about 20 of these things. We also
use Zips as a more portable medium. Go iomega.

No commercial interest; just a satisfied customer.

Sara



Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735







From: Ping DeHai :      ping-at-tamamori.nrim.go.jp
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 09:13:08 +0900
Subject: FW: electropolishing Mg

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----- forward W. T. Reynolds's message -----

} Dear All,
}
} Is anyone aware of an electropolishing solution for Mg alloys that (i)
} thins very slowly, and (ii) works at room temperature?
}
} thanks.
}
Sincerely yours

D. H. Ping

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
D. H. Ping, Dr
Materials Physics Division
National Research Institute for Metals (NRIM)
1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047, Japan
Phone: +81-298-59-2717 FAX:+81-298-59-2701
E-mail: Ping-at-tamamori.nrim.go.jp WWW: http://inaba.nrim.go.jp/apfim/
Home phone: +81-298-59-0918






From: Marisa Ahmad :      mahmad-at-semiconductor.com
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 20:08:33 -0500
Subject: endpoint detection for RIE's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi everyone!

Can anyone out there tell me a bit about endpoint detection systems for
Reactive Ion Etchers? What different types there are, how they work, what
situations they are optimal for, and {shudder} approximate price ranges? I
was told to write up a summary within the week regarding the possibility of
either attaching one to our existing RIE (PlasmaTherm Batchtop) or getting
another. (Wow! They actually came to me and offered to buy stuff, instead
of me having to beg!!! Either I'm doing stuff really right, or really
wrong!)

Much thanks in advance,

Marisa Ahmad
R&D Specialist
mahmad-at-semiconductor.com

"It's not how hard you fall, it's how high you bounce."






From: Larry Allard :      l2a-at-ornl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 21:16:39 -0500
Subject: Re: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tom:

Much as I hate to say it, Microsoft PowerPoint does a pretty good job with
digital slide presentation. You definitely do *not* want to simply make a
stack of slides and open them independently...it will seem clumsy and will
be distracting. PowerPoint opens slides instantly, and you can do a lot of
tricks to presumably enhance the production (although sometimes the tricks
are somewhat distracting themselves). The best thing is to have a PowerBook
with XGA (1024 x 768) resolution, and a projector with the same XGA
resolution, to get the best projection results. We have been using digital
projection almost exclusively for over a year now with this setup, and it
works extremely well. The best thing is that you can be making slides just
about up to the minute of your talk...a great capability for those of us
who tend to procrastinate just a teeny bit... ;-).



Larry






} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

423-574-4981
423-574-4913 Fax
l2a-at-ornl.gov







From: Ciprian Almonte :      calmonte+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 23:27:45 -0500
Subject: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Tom, Firstable congratulation on you new G3, awesome machine. I
recommend Graphic converter for slide show. It's pretty easy to set up and
it allow you to fade down the images. If you need help seeting it up let
me know.
}
} We just got a G3 Mac and an Epson digital projector-I have seen some really
} nice digital slide shows and am excited by the increase in quality and
} decrease in effort making slides. I expect, however, to spend some effort
} finding out the best way to put together a slide show, and am wondering
} what advice or experience might be out there. I would like to show ~10MB
} images without any computer stuff showing at the same time, but could
} consider compression (eg., jpeg) if there is no loss of quality. Wondering
} whether to get into a slide presentation program or just make a stack and
} open them sequentially (I have 190+ MB of memory). There is also a neat IR
} pointer that seems to bounce off the screen and feed into software in the
} projector that allows you to move the cursor around and click/double click
} with the IR pointer. Too bad they didn't include a laser pointer in this
} device!....Many thanks for any help or advice!...Tom Reese



--Ciprian

_____________________________________________________________
Ciprian A. Almonte Phone: (412) 648-9796
University of Pittsburgh FAX: (412) 648-8330
Center for Biologic Imaging http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA mailto:calmonte-at-pitt.edu
_____________________________________________________________





From: Colin Reid :      creid-at-tcd.ie
Date: Wednesday, January 13, 1999 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: Iomega JAZ drive longevity

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The problem with overfilling Jaz disks sounds like more of a software
problem than a problem with the Jaz. I have filled a number of Jaz disks
to capacity and simply get a message telling me it's too full. This has
worked with both PC's and Unix systems.

Colin


Colin Reid,
Electron Microscope Unit,
Trinity College Dublin,
Dublin 2,
Ireland.
Tel: 353-1-6081820
Fax: 353-1-6770438
email: creid-at-tcd.ie
-----Original Message-----
} From: Sara Miller {saram-at-duke.edu}
To: Garber, Charles A. {cgarber-at-2spi.com}
Cc: MICROSCOPY BB {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}






From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-fy.chalmers.se
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 10:56:24 +0100
Subject: Re: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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At 10.46 -0500 99-01-12, Satyarth Suri wrote:
}
} Hello:
} I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
} correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
} preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
} have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
} the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
} to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
} 3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
} foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
} content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
} in terms of what the problem may be?

Why can't you electropolish the specimens? For my PhD work we prepared a
lot of (commercial purity alpha) Ti specimens using electropolishing with
minimal hydride formation. This has been continued by another PhD student
who also did work on Ti at the University of Birmingham (England).

We used a non-acid electrolyte developed by B.J. Kestel of Argonne National
Lab. He recommends using it in a South Bay Technology single jet
electropolisher but we made it work with a Struers Twin jet Tenupol, I
guess you could probably make it work with a variety of other jet
electropolishing devices. I can give further details of our procedure if
anyone wants.

Hope this helps

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ian MacLaren
PLEASE NOTE NEW CONTACT DETAILS:
Department of Experimental Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-412 96 G=F6teborg
Sweden
Tel: +46 31 772 36 33
=46AX: +46 31 772 32 24
email: maclaren-at-fy.chalmers.se
or: ianmaclaren-at-hotmail.com
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++







From: jim tross :      giblab-at-pcom.net
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 08:22:15 -0500
Subject: polishing of zinc coated material

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I am polishing a low carbon steel that is coated with zinc.
The situation i'm experiencing is when i try to etch the base material
with 2%nital for grain size determination i seam to get some effect
from
the zinc in that the area near the surface does not etch.
Is it because of polishing practice dragging that zinc onto the surface?

or is there another mechanism involved?


thank you

Gordon Reinig






From: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk (HASWELL Malcolm)
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 14:21:50 GMT
Subject: Re: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tom

even if you do use something like 'Powerpoint' for the final slide
presentation, it might be worth seeing if you can get hold a program such as
'Thumbsplus'. It's shareware for the PC but I don't know if it's available
for the Mac. I have found 'Thumbsplus' is much quicker for simple image
management and filing images because of it's use of thumbnail images and it
can even produce a basic slide show.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
Tom:

Much as I hate to say it, Microsoft PowerPoint does a pretty good job with
digital slide presentation. You definitely do *not* want to simply make a
stack of slides and open them independently...it will seem clumsy and will
be distracting. PowerPoint opens slides instantly, and you can do a lot of
tricks to presumably enhance the production (although sometimes the tricks
are somewhat distracting themselves). The best thing is to have a PowerBook
with XGA (1024 x 768) resolution, and a projector with the same XGA
resolution, to get the best projection results. We have been using digital
projection almost exclusively for over a year now with this setup, and it
works extremely well. The best thing is that you can be making slides just
about up to the minute of your talk...a great capability for those of us who
tend to procrastinate just a teeny bit... ;-).


Larry
}
} We just got a G3 Mac and an Epson digital projector-I have seen some really
nice digital slide shows and am excited by the
} increase in quality and decrease in effort making slides. I expect,
however, to spend some effort finding out the best way to
} put together a slide show, and am wondering what advice or experience might
be out there. I would like to show ~10MB
} images without any computer stuff showing at the same time, but could
consider compression (eg., jpeg) if there is no loss of
} quality. Wondering whether to get into a slide presentation program or
just make a stack and open them sequentially (I have 190+
} MB of memory). There is also a neat IR pointer that seems to bounce off
the screen and feed into software in the projector that
} allows you to move the cursor around and click/double click with the IR
pointer. Too bad they didn't include a laser pointer in this
} device!....Many thanks for any help or advice!...Tom Reese

Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

423-574-4981
423-574-4913 Fax
l2a-at-ornl.gov






From: emitech :      em-at-emitech.demon.co.uk
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 10:55:36 +0000
Subject: Re: Tem Carbon Coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In message {3306033D.951200C9-at-mauromedia.com} , Michael Draper
{quex-at-mauromedia.com} writes
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 13 Jan 99 10:11:49 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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"Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov} ,
Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 13 Jan 99 10:11:49 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
Re: Electropolishing of Ti alloys
=
Due to interest in this subject, I will list some additional =
electrolytes I have used on Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing).

Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL -60 degrees C
Ti-811 87% methanol 70 to 90 volts
Ti-6Al-4V 25-35 mA.

Ti-13 Sn 130 ml HCL -50 degrees C
670 ml methanol 150 volts
100 ml butyl 60 mA.

Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric acid -50 degrees C
Ti-20 Zr 590 ml methanol 50 volts
Ti-14 Al 350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA

Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric acid -15 t0 -20 C
(rolled) 460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% 180 volts
280 ml butyl alcohol 40 mA.
100 ml butyl cellosolve
=
Ti 5.3 g. lithium chloride -40 degrees C.
nanocrystals, 11.16 g. magnesium 150 volts
compacted chloride 30 mA
500 ml. methanol
100 ml. butyl cellosolve
(Note: the two salts above must be added to the combined solvents one =
"powder" at a time, while stirring. The two dry salts react violently if =
mixed together. This electrolyte has nearly as wide an application as =
perchloric acid mixtures and is known as B K-2).
I suspect that B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. It was =
developed to eliminate hydrides in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages given =
would need to be reduced about 20% for a twin jet system due to lower =
electrical resistance of that configuration. My work was done on a South =
Bay vertical single jet unit.
I have no vested interest in the above equipment, but have enjoyed =
the ease with which good polishing conditions can be obtained and =
reproduced since 1975 or so. Good luck!
=
Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail: {bkestel-at-anl.gov}
Thomas, Larry wrote:
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From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 08:34:12 -0800
Subject: Re: Filling Jaz discs

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To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com


Following the discussion about filling Jaz discs:

We collect images from a Bio-Rad MRC 600 confocal to Jaz disc on an IBM
computer and transfer to a Jaz drive on a Mac G3 for making projections
and plates with NIH Image and Photoshop. We used to transfer by ethernet
but it was too slow and taking a disc out of one drive and putting into
another drive is by far the quickest approach. Using the Mac G3 to work on
the images allows another researcher to collect their images on the
confocal and doesn't hold them up while data is being transfered.

We once lost 1GB of data because the user filled up the Jaz disc
completely. Now we wouldn't lose that data because as I understand it:
When you transfer to a Mac, there is a Mac header put onto the disc. If the
disc is full, this header overwrites the PC directory tree. The IBM doesn't
recognise the disc and the Mac thinks it is empty. The solution (thanks to
Eric Jervis) is to put the Jaz disc back into the IBM. Look for hidden
files, delete them, and use Norton Utilities to rebuild the tree directory.
We have a rule now which is "Try to leave 10% free on a disc," then this
problem never arises.

We use Jaz and Zips regularly as temporary storage and for quick transfers
between computers but we always archive to CD.
Elaine


Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Biosciences Electron Microscopy Facility
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca







From: Brian Tryon :      tryon-at-auhs.edu
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 07:29:22 -0500
Subject: Re:batch file conversion

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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hey Ciprian,

I'm not aware of a shareware tool, however, commercially IPLab
(http://www.iplab.com/) can do it, and I believe so can ImportAccess
(http://www.desacc.com/). Good luck.

Brian C. Tryon
MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine
Ann Preston Hall, Box 551
3300 Henry Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19129
USA

Voice mail: (215) 620-0077
E-mail: tryon-at-auhs.edu
URL: http://www.erols.com/btryon/intro.html
Pager: (215) 842-PAGE, #16272

-----------------------------------------
"Quantifying is a committing task." - Cruz-Orive, 1994.

"For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public
relations, for Nature cannot be fooled." - Richard Feynman
--------------------------------------------------------------





From: Brian Tryon :      tryon-at-auhs.edu
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 07:04:22 -0500
Subject: Re:Iomega JAZ drive longevity

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

I travel quite a bit with my Jaz, and have not had the same experience
mentioned earlier with drive problems. For what it's worth, when traveling
I carry 2 carry-ons, one for my laptop, the other (a cool bag from
Kensington) carries any drives, media, and accessories. I rarely pack my
drives in checked luggage (my paranoia). One reason I carry on all drives
(besides brutish bag-manglers, boy, do I have stories) is because I believe
this avoids some of the temperature fluctuations that you might experience
with checked bags. I've been to some cold regions and noticed luggage items
quite cold when upacked. Typically, I'm working on something just prior to
catching a flight so going from warm to cold couldn't help drive
performance. Likewise, I typically take some dessicant and moisture-proof
bags with me, quickly wrap the drive in, throw in a bag of dessicant and I
believe this helps avoid condensation on the drive and when I get to my
destination, I can get right to work without worry of letting the drive
reach room temp or needing a papertowel to drive off the casing.

So, I've had Jaz drives (I currently have 3) since they came out, never a
problem with the drive. I do routinely check the disk with disk utility
programs, and have occasionally (once every 2 months with routine weekend
checks of mission critical data) found some errors but nothing that could
not be repaired.

I do store image data (triplicates) on Jaz and CD-ROM, but my main archival
tool is CD-ROM, I've had excellent performance from a Pinnacle drive and
Toast software and would strongly recommend to others to try CD-ROM
storage. Again, I "burn" duplicates of all data stored on Jaz, one copy
goes in the safe, the other is kept within easy reach, and the Jaz is used
for day to day data working. When not being used, all Jaz are stored in
their containers and filed in a clean unit. Most of the computers on my
network get a weekend quick cleaning to keep dust and garbage from
interrupting the work flow. Hope it helps,




Brian C. Tryon
MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine
Ann Preston Hall, Box 551
3300 Henry Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19129
USA

Voice mail: (215) 620-0077
E-mail: tryon-at-auhs.edu
URL: http://www.erols.com/btryon/intro.html
Pager: (215) 842-PAGE, #16272

-----------------------------------------
"Quantifying is a committing task." - Cruz-Orive, 1994.

"For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public
relations, for Nature cannot be fooled." - Richard Feynman
--------------------------------------------------------------





From: GARONEL-at-polaroid.com (LYNNE C GARONE)
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 12:14:48 -0500
Subject: Looking for Info. on old Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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My colleague here at Polaroid has recently purchased an old
microscope. He is interested in finding out as much information about
it as possible. The markings on the microscope are the following:
Waldemar Straufs
Berlin, S.W. 68
N0. 3692
Note that the S and F is written in a strange script and may not be
translated correctly.
It is a black stand microscope with "brass accents" and a brass
optical tube. It has a condenser which slides out, a polarizing
stage, a mirror for capturing the light, a pivot arm in the stand.
There are three objectives on the nose piece with the following
markings: J. Thamm A.G. Berlin N.W. 6, one is an oil immersion. It
came with three eye pieces as well.
Pls. let us know if you have any information on this microscope.
You can contact my colleague directly,
Russ Gaudiana
Gaudiar-at-Polaroid.com





From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 10:58:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Sectioning steel

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Hey there boarders,

We have a graduate student who is looking at concrete & the
weathering of the steel rebar inside of it. He needs to section the steel
rebar. We have never worked with steel, we are kinda biological oriented.
So I'm asking for help.
What's the best way for him to get thin sections of steel? Any &
all suggestions gratefully accepted, I will pass them on to him.


Steeling myself for your replies,


Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: Stephen R Poe :      Stephen.R.Poe-at-usda.gov
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 14:45:48 -0500
Subject: TEM - New Diamond knife for sale or trade

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am one of those people who moved from the bench to management (in USDA), and
just can't seem to give up my roots (mycology/plant pathology) so keep plugging
along with my self-funded research. I have been using glass knives for LM
sections, and as part of a recent trade picked up a new EdgeCraft Standard
Ultrathin 2.7mm diamond knife. Turns out that I am pretty happy with my glass
knife sections, and would be better off with something else or some money
instead of the diamond knife. The knife sells for about $2000, but I would be
open to offers of about half that, or trades (or trade + cash) involving a
better sterio microscope(s) - I am pretty happy with my B&L SZ5, but keep
dreaming of a Wild - other areas of interest are older Leitz microscopes (170
mm Ortholux, Dialux, etc.), as well as objectives and components. If you want
more information on the diamond knife (model, angle, etc.) - I can provide
that. My objective is to find a home for something that I don't need, and in
the process keep up the support for my own work.

Stephen Poe





From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 13 Jan 99 15:47:30 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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Bernard Kestel {kestel-at-anl.gov} ,
"Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov} ,
Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 13 Jan 99 15:47:30 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
1/13/99 3:47 PM

Bernard Kestel wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =
=
} electrolytes I have used on Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing).
}
} Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL -60 degrees C
} Ti-811 87% methanol 70 to 90 volts
} Ti-6Al-4V 25-35 mA.
}
} Ti-13 Sn 130 ml HCL -50 degrees C
} 670 ml methanol 150 volts
} 100 ml butyl 60 mA.
}
} Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric acid -50 degrees C
} Ti-20 Zr 590 ml methanol 50 volts
} Ti-14 Al 350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA
}
} Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric acid -15 t0 -20 C
} (rolled) 460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% 180 volts
} 280 ml butyl alcohol 40 mA.
} 100 ml butyl cellosolve
} Ti 5.3 g. =
lithium =
} chloride -40 degrees C.
} nanocrystals, 11.16 g. magnesium 150 volts
} compacted chloride 30 mA
} 500 ml. methanol
} 100 ml. butyl cellosolve
} (Note: the two salts above must be added to the combined solvents =
one =
} "powder" at a time, while stirring. The two dry salts react violently if =
mixed =
} together. This electrolyte has nearly as wide an application as =
perchloric acid =
} mixtures and is known as B K-2).
} I suspect that B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. It was =
} developed to eliminate hydrides in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages =
given would =
} need to be reduced about 20% for a twin jet system due to lower =
electrical =
} resistance of that configuration. My work was done on a South Bay =
vertical single jet unit.
} I have no vested interest in the above equipment, but have enjoyed =
the =
} ease with which good polishing conditions can be obtained and reproduced =
since =
} 1975 or so. Good luck!
} Bernard Kestel
} Materials Science Division
} Argonne National Laboratory
} Argonne, Il., 60439
}
} E-mail: {bkestel-at-anl.gov}
} Thomas, Larry wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Satyrith-
} }
} } Unless you have a compelling reason to use ion milling for this =
preparation, I
} } recommend using jet electropolishing, possibly with just a final touch-=
up =
} in the
} } ion mill. Although both electropolishing and ion milling commonly =
produce
} } sample preparation artifacts, the artifacts from ion-milling reactive =
metals
} } such as Ti and Zr are not well understood and can be harder to eliminate.=

} } Despite Carpenter et. als work (see D. Henriks posting) implicating =
hydrocarbon
} } contamination as a source of hydriding during ion milling, my personal
} } experience ion milling Zr samples in 'oil-free' systems indicates that =
water
} } vapor is the main culprit in the hydridng. Surface irregularities on =
ion =
} milled
} } Zr/Ti samples (surface terracing, for example) usually have other causes,=

} } possibly related to air leaks in the ion mill or oxygen in the feed gas.
} } Another source of irregular surfaces on ion milled samples is embedded =
} polishing
} } compound. Cubic boron nitride (CBN) sometimes gives better results in =
dimpling
} } metals than diamond, and even the diamond polishing compounds from =
different
} } suppliers can give different results. Conversely, brief ion milling of
} } electropolished samples--especially at low incidence angles and very low =
} kV--can
} } improve the surface finish and mill away irregularities caused by second-=
phase
} } particles. Often the 'trick' to eliminating milling artifacts is =
minimizing
} } time spent in the ion mill.
} }
} } Larry Thomas
} } Mechanical and Materials Engineering
} } Washington State University
} } Pullman, WA
} }
} }
} } ----------
} } From: South Bay Technology
} } Sent: Tuesday, January 12, 1999 6:00 PM
} } To: Satyarth Suri; Microscopy ListServer
} } Subject: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------=

} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =
} To =
} Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.=
html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.=

} }
} }
} } Dear Satyarth:
} }
} } An excellent paper on the subject is:
} }
} } "In Situ Hydride Formation in Zirconium and Titanium during Ion Milling"=

} } Graham J.C. Carpenter et al, JMSA Vol.1 No. 4 pp 175-184 1995.
} }
} } From the paper you will see that a key factor in eliminating hydride
} } formation is having a clean sample free from hydrocarbon contamination. =
} } This contamination could be remnants from the dimpling process or other
} } pre-thinning steps or it could be caused by the back streaming of
} } diffusion
} } pump oil in your ion mill. As titanium has a high chemical affinity =
for
} } hydrogen, you may want to look over your preparation steps and try to
} } eliminate any areas of possible contamination. If you are still having
} } a
} } problem, a quick cleaning of both the specimen and the specimen holder
} } in a
} } Plasma Cleaner should take care of it.
} }
} } If you have an interest, I can send you a copy of the above referenced
} } paper. I also have papers on plasma cleaning which may be of interest.
} }
} } NOTE: South Bay Technology does manufacture the PC150 Plasma Cleaner =
and
} } therefore I have a vested interest in promoting its use.
} }
} } Best regards-
} }
} } David } Writing at 9:38:23 AM on 1/12/99
} } } =
} } ***************************************************************
} **
} } **********
} } ************************
} }
} } David Henriks TEL: =
} } 800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
} } South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
} } 1120 Via Callejon FAX:
} } +1-949-492-1499
} } San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail:
} } henriks-at-southbaytech.com
} }
} } =
} } ***************************************************************
} **
} } **********
} } ************************
} }
} } } } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {
} }
} } Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies =
for
} } metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.
} }
} } Message text written by Satyarth Suri
} } }
} } Hello:
} } I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
} } correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
} } preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
} } have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
} } the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
} } to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
} } 3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
} } foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
} } content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
} } in terms of what the problem may be?
} }
} } thanks - if you want you can respond directly to suri.3-at-osu.edu
} }
} } -satyarth
} }
} } {
} }
} }
} }
} }
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} } Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 15:54:36 -0800
} } From: "Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov}
} } Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
} } To: Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu} ,
} } Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
} } "'South Bay Technology'" {Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM}
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} Date: 13 Jan 99 10:11:49 -0500
} From: Bernard Kestel {kestel-at-anl.gov}
} Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
} To: "'South Bay Technology'" {Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM} ,
} "Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov} ,
} Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
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{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE WIDTH=3D"132"}
RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
1/13/99 3:47 PM

{/PRE}
{FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D2 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
Bernard Kestel wrote: {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>-----------------------------------------------------------------------=
- {BR}
>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America {BR}
Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM =
foil preparation {BR}
> Re: Electropolishing =
of Ti alloys {BR}
> Due to interest =
in this subject, I will list some additional =
{BR}
>electrolytes I have used on =
Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing). {BR}
> {BR}
> =
Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL =
-60 degrees C {BR}
> Ti-811 =
87% methanol =
70 to 90 volts {BR}
> Ti-6Al-4V =
25-35 =
mA. {BR}
> {BR}
> Ti-13 Sn =
130 ml HCL -50 degrees =
C {BR}
> =
670 ml methanol 150 volts {BR}
> =
100 ml butyl =
60 mA. {BR}
> {BR}
> =
Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric =
acid -50 degrees C {BR}
> Ti-20 =
Zr 590 ml methanol =
50 volts {BR}
> Ti-14 Al =
350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA {BR}
> {BR}
> =
Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric =
acid -15 t0 -20 C {BR}
> (rolled) =
460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% =
180 volts {BR}
> =
280 ml butyl alcohol =
40 mA. {BR}
> =
100 ml butyl cellosolve {BR}
> =
Ti =
5.3 g. lithium {BR}
>chloride =
-40 degrees C. {BR}
> nanocrystals, =
11.16 g. magnesium 150 =
volts {BR}
> compacted =
chloride 30 mA {BR}
> =
500 ml. methanol {BR}
> =
100 ml. butyl =
cellosolve {BR}
> (Note: the two salts =
above must be added to the combined solvents =
one {BR}
>"powder" at a time, =
while stirring. The two dry salts react =
violently if mixed {BR}
>together. This =
electrolyte has nearly as wide an application =
as perchloric acid {BR}
>mixtures and is =
known as B K-2). {BR}
> I suspect that =
B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. =
It was {BR}
>developed to eliminate hydrides =
in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages given =
would {BR}
>need to be reduced about 20% =
for a twin jet system due to lower electrical =
{BR}
>resistance of that configuration. =
My work was done on a South Bay vertical =
single jet unit. {BR}
> I have no vested =
interest in the above equipment, but have =
enjoyed the {BR}
>ease with which good =
polishing conditions can be obtained and =
reproduced since {BR}
>1975 or so. Good =
luck! {BR}
> Bernard Kestel {BR}
> =
Materials Science Division {BR}
> =
Argonne National Laboratory {BR}
> =
Argonne, Il., 60439 {BR}
> {BR}
> =
E-mail: < {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} =
bkestel-at-anl.gov {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} > {BR}
>Thomas, Larry =
wrote: {BR}
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------=
----- {BR}
>>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America >To {BR}
>Subscribe/Unsubscribe =
-- Send Email to {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {=
U} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>>On-Line Help =
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} http://www.msa.=
microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------=
----. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>>Satyrith- {BR}
>> {BR}
>>Unless =
you have a compelling reason to use ion =
milling for this preparation, I {BR}
>>recommend =
using jet electropolishing, possibly with =
just a final touch-up {BR}
>in the {BR}
>>ion =
mill. Although both electropolishing and =
ion milling commonly produce {BR}
>>sample =
preparation artifacts, the artifacts from =
ion-milling reactive metals {BR}
>>such =
as Ti and Zr are not well understood and =
can be harder to eliminate. {BR}
>>Despite =
Carpenter et. als work (see D. Henriks posting) =
implicating hydrocarbon {BR}
>>contamination =
as a source of hydriding during ion milling, =
my personal {BR}
>>experience ion milling =
Zr samples in 'oil-free' systems indicates =
that water {BR}
>>vapor is the main culprit =
in the hydridng. Surface irregularities =
on ion {BR}
>milled {BR}
>>Zr/Ti samples =
(surface terracing, for example) usually =
have other causes, {BR}
>>possibly related =
to air leaks in the ion mill or oxygen in =
the feed gas. {BR}
>>Another source of =
irregular surfaces on ion milled samples =
is embedded {BR}
>polishing {BR}
>>compound. =
Cubic boron nitride (CBN) sometimes gives =
better results in dimpling {BR}
>>metals =
than diamond, and even the diamond polishing =
compounds from different {BR}
>>suppliers =
can give different results. Conversely, =
brief ion milling of {BR}
>>electropolished =
samples--especially at low incidence angles =
and very low {BR}
>kV--can {BR}
>>improve =
the surface finish and mill away irregularities =
caused by second-phase {BR}
>>particles. =
Often the 'trick' to eliminating milling =
artifacts is minimizing {BR}
>>time spent =
in the ion mill. {BR}
>> {BR}
>>Larry =
Thomas {BR}
>>Mechanical and Materials =
Engineering {BR}
>>Washington State University {BR}
>>Pullman, =
WA {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>> ---------- {BR}
>> From: =
South Bay Technology {BR}
>> Sent: Tuesday, =
January 12, 1999 6:00 PM {BR}
>> To: =
Satyarth Suri; Microscopy ListServer {BR}
>> Subject: =
Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation {BR}
>> {BR}
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------=
------ {BR}
>> The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America > To {BR}
>Subscribe/Unsubscribe =
-- Send Email to {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {=
U} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>> On-Line Help =
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} http://www.msa.=
microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>> Dear =
Satyarth: {BR}
>> {BR}
>> An excellent =
paper on the subject is: {BR}
>> {BR}
>> "In =
Situ Hydride Formation in Zirconium and =
Titanium during Ion Milling" {BR}
>> Graham =
J.C. Carpenter et al, JMSA Vol.1 No. 4 pp =
175-184 1995. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> From =
the paper you will see that a key factor =
in eliminating hydride {BR}
>> formation =
is having a clean sample free from hydrocarbon =
contamination. {BR}
>> This contamination =
could be remnants from the dimpling process =
or other {BR}
>> pre-thinning steps or =
it could be caused by the back streaming =
of {BR}
>>diffusion {BR}
>> pump oil =
in your ion mill. As titanium has a high =
chemical affinity for {BR}
>> hydrogen, =
you may want to look over your preparation =
steps and try to {BR}
>> eliminate any =
areas of possible contamination. If you =
are still having {BR}
>>a {BR}
>> problem, =
a quick cleaning of both the specimen and =
the specimen holder {BR}
>>in a {BR}
>> Plasma =
Cleaner should take care of it. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> If =
you have an interest, I can send you a copy =
of the above referenced {BR}
>> paper. =
I also have papers on plasma cleaning which =
may be of interest. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> NOTE: =
South Bay Technology does manufacture the =
PC150 Plasma Cleaner and {BR}
>> therefore =
I have a vested interest in promoting its =
use. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> Best regards- {BR}
>> {BR}
>> David =
> Writing =
at 9:38:23 AM on 1/12/99 {BR}
>> =
> {BR}
>>*************************************************************** {BR} =

>** {BR}
>>********** {BR}
>> ************************ {BR}
>> {BR}
>> David =
Henriks =
TEL: {BR}
>> 800-728-2233 =
(toll free in the USA) {BR}
>> South =
Bay Technology, Inc. =
+1-949-492-2600 {BR}
>> 1120 Via =
Callejon =
FAX: {BR}
>>+1-949-492-1499 {BR}
>> San =
Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: {BR}
>> {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} henriks-at-southbaytech.com {/U} {=
/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>>*************************************************************** {BR} =

>** {BR}
>>********** {BR}
>> ************************ {BR}
>> {BR}
>> =
>>>>> Please visit us =
at {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} http://www.=
southbaytech.com {/U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} <<<<< {BR}
>> {BR}
>> Manufacturers =
of precision sample preparation equipment =
and supplies for {BR}
>> metallography, =
crystallography and electron microscopy. {BR}
>> {BR}
>> Message =
text written by Satyarth Suri {BR}
>> > {BR}
>> Hello: {BR}
>> I =
am currently working on mechanical behavior =
/ microstructure {BR}
>> correlations =
in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I =
am currently {BR}
>> preparing the foils =
using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), =
but {BR}
>> have run into the problem =
of a very uneven alpha phase morphology, {BR}
>> the =
alpha phase has island formation - we are =
using a cold stage {BR}
>> to minimize =
the hydride formation at the interface. =
I am using {BR}
>> 3 micron/6micron diamond =
paste during the dimpling process - the {BR}
>> foil =
itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms =
of the dislocation {BR}
>> content. =
Could anyone in the microscopy land have =
some suggestions {BR}
>> in terms of =
what the problem may be? {BR}
>> {BR}
>> thanks =
- if you want you can respond directly to =
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} suri.3-at-osu.edu {/=
U} {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>> {BR}
>> -satyarth {BR}
>> {BR}
>> < {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
>> {BR}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 13 Jan 99 15:47:30 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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From: Gary Liechty :      garyliechty-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 1999 16:18:18 -0800
Subject: Re: Sectioning steel

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Thu, 14 Jan 1999 00:14:51 +0000
Message-ID: {369D37CA.56F575DD-at-worldnet.att.net}


Dear Paula,

The success of thin sections will depend on the blade type and size which will
then be dictated on the type of saw you have. Slow speed diamond saws have a
blade capacity of 5" Diameter which can limit the sample size to be cut and
take a long time to cut.. High speed saws can accomodate larger blades and
perform cuts much faster (5 minutes or less) with the same accuracy as a slow
speed saw. Feed pressure can affect the blade during the cut on either saw.
If the blade is too thin, too much feed pressure will cause the blade to
wander form the original cut line affecting the thickness of the section.
This can be remedied by using a large flange or more rigid, thicker blade.

CBN is the only choice for cutting steels on a low speed saw without
destroying the blade or sample, but can also be used on a high speed saw.
Aluminum Oxide blades cut the most effieciently on a high speed saw and cost
much less. DO NOT attempt cutting with diamond blades, they will only become
loaded with steel and this will prohibit the sample from being cut. Even
frequent dressing will not enhance the performance. Aluminum Oxide blades are
better suited for steels and Allied HighTech has a wide selection of blades
for any saw you may have.

I know of two labs at LBL that have a high speed saw and can get you this
information should you require it. In additon, if you have any application
questions, please feel free to contact me at 800-675-1118 to further discuss
your interest.

Good Luck,

Gary Liechty




Paula Sicurello wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
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}
} Hey there boarders,
}
} We have a graduate student who is looking at concrete & the
} weathering of the steel rebar inside of it. He needs to section the steel
} rebar. We have never worked with steel, we are kinda biological oriented.
} So I'm asking for help.
} What's the best way for him to get thin sections of steel? Any &
} all suggestions gratefully accepted, I will pass them on to him.
}
} Steeling myself for your replies,
}
} Paula :-)
}
} Paula Sicurello
} UC Berkeley
} Electron Microscope Lab
} psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
} phone: 510-642-2085
} fax: 510-643-6207
} http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML



--
Gary Liechty
Product Application Specialist

Allied
High Tech Products, Inc.
2376 E. Pacifica Place
Rancho Dominguez, CA 90220
800-675-1118
310-635-2466
310-762-6808 Fax

Equipment and Consumable Products for Materialographic, SEM and TEM Sample
Prepration

http://www.alliedhightech.com







From: Eric LEROY :      leroy-at-glvt-cnrs.fr
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 09:50:59 +0100
Subject: Re:batch file conversion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try Graphic converter, it's a shareware that can read and translate almost
every format. It can be able to solve your problem. You can find it on
every info-mac mirror.


\\_//
-(-at- -at-)-
-------------------------oOO--(_)--Ooo-------------------------

Eric LEROY Dr.
Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares
UPR 209 - CNRS
Groupe des Laboratoires de Thiais
2-8, rue Henri Dunant
94320 THIAIS cedex

Tel : (33) (0)1 49 78 12 09
Fax : (33) (0)1 49 78 12 03
email : leroy-at-glvt-cnrs.fr

---------------------------------Oooo.-------------------------
.oooO ( )
( ) ) /
\ ( (_/
\_)






From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 08:29:29 -0600
Subject: SuperSEM software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A few years ago I got hold of a beta version of a SEM Macintosh simulation
program, SuperSEM. It was a Macintosh program that was developed with
Supercard software. It was misplaced during the process of upgrading my
computers. Does anyone know if it exists?

Thanks in advance,
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 08:59:17 -0600
Subject: Re: Jaz disk archivalness? and MOs

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Colin raises a good point of media being orphaned that we feel the pinch of
already. Our HP 1300T MO drive (~650 MB each side) failed on us a while
back. It will no longer accept the cartridges - it keeps kicking them out.
We had already offloaded much of the data to CD but we have a few
cartridges that I would still like to retrieve. However, we appear to be
the only ones on campus that ever purchased the HP drive.

Is there anyone out there with a working HP MO drive (gathering dust or
not) that could help us retrieve the last few cartidges?

At 07:10 AM 1/12/99 +0000, you wrote:
{snip}
} As pointed out the Jaz/Zip technology will probably be superseded
} soon ( 1GB drives are gone already ! ) and in a few years it will be
} difficult to read data if your drive fails. This was a major factor
} along with cost ) 5 years ago when we decided on a CD-R storage system,
} over Magneto-Optical which was the current favourite then.
{snip}
} Colin Reid,
} Electron Microscope Unit,
} Trinity College Dublin,

----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications






From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 08:52:32 -0600
Subject: Re: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please remember that 3/4ths of your 10 MB image won't be doing you any good
during the slide show. If your projector supports true 24-bit color (as
opposed to 16-bit or 8-bit) and 1024x768 pixels, you will only be
displaying 2.25 MB of image. You might as well match your image size to the
projector as you make up your presentation. It would help file size and the
speed of transition between slides, but these fast computers are handling
that pretty well.

I concur with the others. Most imaging programs have a slide show
capability built in. They may not have all the fancy transitional effects,
but they should do the show. Even my shareware LViewPro on the PC had that.

At 05:29 PM 1/12/99 -0400, you wrote:
}
} We just got a G3 Mac and an Epson digital projector-I have seen some really
} nice digital slide shows and am excited by the increase in quality and
} decrease in effort making slides. I expect, however, to spend some effort
} finding out the best way to put together a slide show, and am wondering
} what advice or experience might be out there. I would like to show ~10MB
} images without any computer stuff showing at the same time, but could
} consider compression (eg., jpeg) if there is no loss of quality. Wondering
} whether to get into a slide presentation program or just make a stack and
} open them sequentially (I have 190+ MB of memory). There is also a neat IR
} pointer that seems to bounce off the screen and feed into software in the
} projector that allows you to move the cursor around and click/double click
} with the IR pointer. Too bad they didn't include a laser pointer in this
} device!....Many thanks for any help or advice!...Tom Reese
}
----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications






From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 14 Jan 99 10:01:08 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
Re: Electropolishing of Ti alloys
=
Due to interest in this subject, I will list some additional =
electrolytes I have used on Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing).

Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL -60 degrees C
Ti-811 87% methanol 70 to 90 volts
Ti-6Al-4V 25-35 mA.

Ti-13 Sn 130 ml HCL -50 degrees C
670 ml methanol 150 volts
100 ml butyl 60 mA.

Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric acid -50 degrees C
Ti-20 Zr 590 ml methanol 50 volts
Ti-14 Al 350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA

Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric acid -15 t0 -20 C
(rolled) 460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% 180 volts
280 ml butyl alcohol 40 mA.
100 ml butyl cellosolve
=
Ti 5.3 g. lithium chloride -40 degrees C.
nanocrystals, 11.16 g. magnesium 150 volts
compacted chloride 30 mA
500 ml. methanol
100 ml. butyl cellosolve
(Note: the two salts above must be added to the combined solvents one =
"powder" at a time, while stirring. The two dry salts react violently if =
mixed together. This electrolyte has nearly as wide an application as =
perchloric acid mixtures and is known as B K-2).
I suspect that B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. It was =
developed to eliminate hydrides in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages given =
would need to be reduced about 20% for a twin jet system due to lower =
electrical resistance of that configuration. My work was done on a South =
Bay vertical single jet unit.
I have no vested interest in the above equipment, but have enjoyed =
the ease with which good polishing conditions can be obtained and =
reproduced since 1975 or so. Good luck!
=
Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail: {bkestel-at-anl.gov}
Thomas, Larry wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 14 Jan 99 09:59:42 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
"Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov} ,
Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 14 Jan 99 09:59:42 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
Re: Electropolishing of Ti alloys
=
Due to interest in this subject, I will list some additional =
electrolytes I have used on Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing).

Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL -60 degrees C
Ti-811 87% methanol 70 to 90 volts
Ti-6Al-4V 25-35 mA.

Ti-13 Sn 130 ml HCL -50 degrees C
670 ml methanol 150 volts
100 ml butyl 60 mA.

Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric acid -50 degrees C
Ti-20 Zr 590 ml methanol 50 volts
Ti-14 Al 350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA

Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric acid -15 t0 -20 C
(rolled) 460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% 180 volts
280 ml butyl alcohol 40 mA.
100 ml butyl cellosolve
=
Ti 5.3 g. lithium chloride -40 degrees C.
nanocrystals, 11.16 g. magnesium 150 volts
compacted chloride 30 mA
500 ml. methanol
100 ml. butyl cellosolve
(Note: the two salts above must be added to the combined solvents one =
"powder" at a time, while stirring. The two dry salts react violently if =
mixed together. This electrolyte has nearly as wide an application as =
perchloric acid mixtures and is known as B K-2).
I suspect that B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. It was =
developed to eliminate hydrides in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages given =
would need to be reduced about 20% for a twin jet system due to lower =
electrical resistance of that configuration. My work was done on a South =
Bay vertical single jet unit.
I have no vested interest in the above equipment, but have enjoyed =
the ease with which good polishing conditions can be obtained and =
reproduced since 1975 or so. Good luck!
=
Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail: {bkestel-at-anl.gov}
Thomas, Larry wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =






From: J.F.Bailey :      JFB-at-novell.uidaho.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 08:42:03 PST
Subject: Specimen Holder for EDX

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14 Jan 99 08:47:23 -0800 (PST)
Received: from SpoolDir by OAK (Mercury 1.43); 14 Jan 99 08:46:51 -0800 (PST)


I am looking for a used, but functional, EDX specimen holder for a
JEOL 1200 EX TEM. If anyone has one for sell, please contact me at:
jfb-at-uidaho.edu
(208)885-6656

Thank you.

Franklin Bailey
Holm Research Center
University of Idaho
Moscow, ID 83844-2204





From: David E. Luzzi :      luzzi-at-sol1.lrsm.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 12:15:59 -0500
Subject: USA EM video in Europe

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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I have in-situ results currently stored on VHS tape that I need to present
in Europe.

Any recipes available?

Thanks.
David E. Luzzi
Professor
Department of Materials Science
University of Pennsylvania
3231 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272

215-898-8366
215-573-2128 - fax
luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu {mailto:luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu}


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From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 09:11:29 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Cold stage for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy New Year to you all

A pair of postdocs in Plant Pathology came in to the facility to ask about
a cold stage for a light microscope, which no one at this university seems
to have. They want to look at cryostat sections of wood, and need
digital images for image analysis, and the sections must remain frozen. I
have here a light microscope fitted with a digital camera hooked to the
Mac with NIH Image. I have liquid nitrogen, styrofoam, and a machine
shop. I also have high humidity. Can anyone tell me how to kludge
together a cold enough stage that we can get images of these
frozen sections while preventing frost? I have some general ideas, but
I'd appreciate any specific plans or ideas.

The idea is to look at the number of vacuoles filled with gas vs the
number filled with water. Up to now they have had images taken with an
SEM with a cold stage in Canada, and would prefer to do them locally, at
lower mag, and cheaper.

Thanks in advance for any advice!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************






From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 13:54:01 -0600
Subject: Final aperture contamination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A colleage from an industrial SEM lab contacted me about a problem with
contamination on the final aperture on an variable pressure SEM. This SEM
was recently purchased by one of their branch plants to examine
semiconductor products. Although it is a variable pressure SEM, they have
only operated it in the high vac mode like a standard SEM.

The problem they are experiencing is that the final aperture presumably
gets so dirty they have to change the aperture every two weeks.
Unfortunately the manufacturer has not been able to shed any light on this
situation.

If the vacuum system is alright, I suggested that the problem might be with
the samples. Supposedly the branch lab operators are following the same
sample prep protocol established in the local SEM lab.

Any other ideas out there?

Thanks in advance,
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 13:59:09 -0600
Subject: Re: USA EM video in Europe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Products like Dazzle can digitize the video over to MPG files which should
be transportable. We bought a unit for about $200 and are still coming up
to speed with it. If you have a CD-R, you should be able to cut the movies
onto a CD which they could read over there.

Disclaimer: We have no interest in Dazzle other than its the unit we
bought. There are many other products on the market which can also
accomplish the task.

Warren S.

At 12:15 PM 1/14/99 -0500, you wrote:
} I have in-situ results currently stored on VHS tape that I need to present
} in Europe.
}
} Any recipes available?
}
} Thanks.
} David E. Luzzi
} Professor
} Department of Materials Science
} University of Pennsylvania






From: PESTOEM-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 15:44:05 EST
Subject: Film Adapters for 1A

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To all
We have a client trying to convert from glass plates to sheet film.
Can anyone help us to obtain film adapters for the Siemens 1A camera?
Thank you. Peter Stolzenberg





From: r.bhatnagar-at-UAlberta.CA ( Rakesh Bhatnagar)
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 15:58:25 -0600
Subject: Drosphila Embryos

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Hi there,

I'm just posting to ask if anyone has developed a fixation protocol
for Drosophila embryos suitable for use in TEM studies. Is it necessary to
remove the chorion and vitelline membranes as in light microscopy
procedures. Also, I'm wondering if the use of methanol is strictly taboo,
or can it be tolerated if the exposure time is short?

Thanks,
Don







From: Ekstrom, Harry :      Harry.Ekstrom-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Thursday, January 14, 1999 12:54PM
Subject: Final aperture contamination

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} From: Lou Ross
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------




From: Margaret Casey :      CaseyM-at-state.mi.us
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 16:02:26 -0500
Subject: TEM:virus isolation from foods for negative staining

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Dear Fellow Listers,

Does anyone have a good protocol or reference for virus isolation =
from food other than shellfish? We are trying to isolate and concentrate =
Norwalk virus from some foods implicated in a poisoning outbreak in =
Detroit. The foods in question are salami, garbanzo beans and some kind of =
cheese (I think provolone). We need to concentrate to at least 1 million =
particles/ml in order to use our prep for negative staining and TEM =
observation. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Sincerely,
Peggy Casey
Michigan Dept. of Community Health
Lansing, Mich.
phone: 517-335-8102
e-mail: caseym-at-state.mi.us






From: Tim P. LaFave Jr. :      lafatim-at-charlie.cns.iit.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 22:27:30 -0600 (CST)
Subject: M6 adhesive for X-sectioning.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have been told to search for "M6", an adhesive which was used in the
somewhat distant past for bonding samples for cross-sectioning. ..I
cannnot find a company which has even heard of this. Any suggestions as
to where I can find it?

__ _-==-=_,-.
/--`' \_-at---at-.-- {
Tim (TJ) LaFave Jr. `--'\ \ {___/.
Department of Physics \ \\ " /
University of North Carolina, Charlotte } =\\_/` {
Charlotte, NC 28223 ____ /= | \_|/
_' `\ _/=== \___/
(704)547-3392 [x4] `___/ //\./=/~\====\
(704)509-6622 [Hm] \ // / | ===:
http://www.iit.edu/~lafatim | ._/_,__|_ ==: __
\/ \\ \\`--| / \\
---------- +*+ ---------- | _ \\: /==:-\
`.__' `-____/ |--|==:
Such that the future be theirs \ \ ===\ :==:`-'
to shape and direct. _} \ ===\ /==/
-----------------------------------------------------------------






From: Ginger R Baker :      lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 22:46:04 -0600
Subject: rat kidney tubules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Hello,
}
} A colleague is interested in examining rat kidney tubules at the TEM
level.
} The tubules are approximately 40 um in length. Unfortunately, once they
} are placed in fixative in a 1 ml centrifuge tube, the tubules are no
longer
} visible which creates processing problems. We are going to try placing
} the tubules in agar as a way of transporting the tubules through the
} processing procedure so as not to lose them in transit.
}
} Also, the few cells (not tubules) we did see appeared to be washed out.
We
} used the following solutions:
}
} 2% glutaraldehyde in sodium cacodylate buffer
} 2% osmium tetroxide
} alcohol
} propylene oxide
} polybed
}
} Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Thank you,
}
} Ginger Baker
} EM Lab Manager
} Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
} lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
} 918-561-8232







From: wa5ekh-at-juno.com (day j day)
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 00:08:25 -0600
Subject: Stereology, Hole Sizing, and Digitizing Pen and Boards-from

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Through the years I have approached, evaluated and re-evaluated "hole
sizing" from SEM micrographs for various technologies: biology, electron
optics, polymers, chemistry and microelectronics. The paramount
objectives are always the same:
1) spatial resolution(of digitizing hardware and software)
2) repeatability
3) SEM background contrast (gray scales) differentiation
4) Maximizing Automation
5) Minimizing user judgement (auto-thresholding, etc.)
6) Manual extraction of artifacts
7) Stereological considerations
to mention a few. Also such techniques were attempted to improve the
above such as: Image projection, edge detection, pre- and post- image
or frame(or pixel) averaging and processing.
Well once again this re-evaluation in light of current advances
in hard and soft digital technologies is required. I thought I would see
if commercial and non-commercial members of this forum would share any
current technological information with me.
Hopefully after the first 5 or 10 responses, to avoid driving
subscribers crazy , you could respond directly to my email. I will
gather and redistribute this data in any fashion requested at a later
date to avoid congesting the mailservor. Thank you for your interest.
Jeff Day/ 'JD'
DBA Texas Industrial
Mesquite, Texas
Email: WA5EKH-at-juno.com

___________________________________________________________________
You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]





From: Jurgen Paetz :      JPaetz-at-mhs17.tns.co.za
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 08:05:09 +0200
Subject: Unsubscribe

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Unsubscribe





From: Stephan Coetzee :      stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 09:08:25 GMT+2
Subject: Re: M6 adhesive for X-sectioning.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
}
} I have been told to search for "M6", an adhesive which was used in the
} somewhat distant past for bonding samples for cross-sectioning. ..I
} cannnot find a company which has even heard of this. Any suggestions as
} to where I can find it?

Great stuff! Does work well. M6 is a short abbreviation for M-Bond
610 which was originally desighned for strain gages. Can be
purchased from "MM" Micro Measurement Division at Raleigh North
Carolina USA.
Phone: (919) 365 3800
Fax: (919) 365 3945

Standard disclaimer.


Mr. S H Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
Private bag X3
Wits
Johannesburg
2050
Tell: +27 11 716 2419
Fax : +27 11 339 3407
E-mail stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 99 02:55:03 -0500
Subject: M-Bond 610

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Tim (TJ) LaFave Jr. wrote:
=================================================
I have been told to search for "M6", an adhesive which was used in the
somewhat distant past for bonding samples for cross-sectioning. ..I cannnot
find a company which has even heard of this. Any suggestions as to where I
can find it?
==================================================
Could it be that you are looking for M-Bond(TM) 610? It is all described on
our website below, if that is what you had in mind. Maybe there was a
predecessor called M6 but in any case, M-Bond 610 is perhaps what you had in
mind? The product is manufactured by a division of Vishay Technology.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 08:09:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: USA EM video in Europe

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On Thu, 14 Jan 1999, David E. Luzzi wrote:

} I have in-situ results currently stored on VHS tape that I need to present
} in Europe.
}
} Any recipes available?
}
} Thanks.
} David E. Luzzi
} Professor
} Department of Materials Science
} University of Pennsylvania
} 3231 Walnut Street
} Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272
}
} 215-898-8366
} 215-573-2128 - fax
} luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu {mailto:luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu}
}
}
Hi David,

Here in Europe we use different standards in different countries,
however, we also have multi-standard machines that will play the
3 commonest standards (NTSC, PAL and SECAM). I suggest that before you go
to too much trouble check if your hosts can play NTSC. VHS is the
commonest format here anyway.
Regards,
Ron
===========================================================================
Mr. Ron Doole e-mail ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
Department of Materials, phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
University of Oxford, fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
Parks Road.
Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
============================================================================






From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 05:10:15 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM:virus isolation from foods for negative staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I did my first bifringant crystals with Polaroid light to night. My
experiment
in marginal at best. The swift is not too swift and my polarizing setup was
a Grey photo polarize and the resolver was a broken pair of brown
sun glasses. Probably the worst choice I could have come up with.

But it was a hoot.

I am trying a little slower drying solution and hope for larger salt
crystals.

Happy new year

Gordon






From: Bob Phillips :      microservis-at-dial.pipex.com
Date: Thursday, January 14, 1999 11:12
Subject: Film Adapters for 1A

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Hello Peter,

I have gone through my stock of Siemens spares, and have found 23 cut film
inserts to fit the Elmiskop 1a plate holders. They are second-hand, but
appear to be in very good condition. If you are interested please Email me
directly.

Regards,

Bob
**********************************************
Bob Phillips,
MicroServiS Electron Microscopy Services,
11 Grafton Close,
St. Ives,
Huntingdon,
Cambs.
PE17 6DL
United Kingdom.
Email: microservis-at-dial.pipex.com
******************************************
-----Original Message-----
} From: "PESTOEM-at-aol.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
{"PESTOEM-at-aol.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
Cc: uelzen-at-erols.com {uelzen-at-erols.com}







From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 08:49:31 -0500
Subject: LM: Uranium Glass Block Source

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O.k., all you good microscopists, I'm looking for a source for either a Uranium Glass
Block or a suitable replacement for visualizing/teaching the light path on a light
microscope. The block is placed in the microscope stage and the illumination path way
can be viewed inside the block - particularly as the condensor is focused and as either
the stage aperature or field aperature are varied.

I know this can be visualize with a dilute milk solution but I really would prefer
something a little more stable (and non-perishable).

Thanks!



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."





From: Focus99 :      focus99-at-embl-heidelberg.de
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 15:26:56 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1999: Register now and send your abstracts!

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Register now for the "Focus on Microscopy" conference at the EMBL in
Heidelberg, Germany!

The important deadlines are:

Early Registration fee until: February 15th, 1999
Abstract due date: February 21st, 1999


============================================================

Conference Announcement:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

Confocal microscopy, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution techniques are
increasingly applied in the study of three-dimensional structures such as
are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
Three-dimensional analysis and representation are crucial tasks in
subsequent data assessment. These conferences offer a most efficient meeting
point for developers and users working in these rapidly evolving fields and
play an important role in the dissemination of information about new
developments. Special attention will be given to the dramatic developments
in live cell imaging and manipulation, such as the role of the green
fluorescent protein.
Further information:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy


Local Organizing Committee:
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Heidelberg
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen

Under the auspices of The International 3D Microscopy Society:
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University


Mailing address:
Focus on Microscopy 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Meyerhofstrasse 1
69117 Heidelberg
P.O. Box 102209
69012 Heidelberg
Germany

Tel. 06221-387354
Fax 06221-387306
E-Mail: focus99-at-embl-heidelberg.de

============================================================================
====

This e-mail was produced by Ernst H.K. Stelzer
EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany






From: mary mckee :      mckee-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 09:53:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: rat kidney tubules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If you pulse-spiin the tubules in an Eppendorf centrifuge and then
osmicate (I would use 1% OSO4 in 0.1M sodium cacodylate, 30 min to 1 hr,
room temp), then spin again, you should be able to see them. At that
point you can embed them in a small drop of 2% agarose and continue the
processing. Good luck.

On Thu, 14 Jan 1999, Ginger R Baker wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} } Hello,
} }
} } A colleague is interested in examining rat kidney tubules at the TEM
} level.
} } The tubules are approximately 40 um in length. Unfortunately, once they
} } are placed in fixative in a 1 ml centrifuge tube, the tubules are no
} longer
} } visible which creates processing problems. We are going to try placing
} } the tubules in agar as a way of transporting the tubules through the
} } processing procedure so as not to lose them in transit.
} }
} } Also, the few cells (not tubules) we did see appeared to be washed out.
} We
} } used the following solutions:
} }
} } 2% glutaraldehyde in sodium cacodylate buffer
} } 2% osmium tetroxide
} } alcohol
} } propylene oxide
} } polybed
} }
} } Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
} }
} } Thank you,
} }
} } Ginger Baker
} } EM Lab Manager
} } Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
} } lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
} } 918-561-8232
}
}
}
}






From: Salvatore Frasca :      sfrasca-at-canr1.cag.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 10:07:39 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM-- Obtaining used sectioning equipment...

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TEM-

I am a new faculty member in a small department of veterinary
pathology. I am interested in obtaining the equipment necessary to
produce good quality ultrathin sections for TEM examination at our
University's central EM facility. I am particularly interested in
ultratomes (1 or 2), vacuum oven, embedding molds, and other
necessities. Equipment from laboratories that are down-sizing
would be considered ideal. Please respond directly to my e-mail
address: sfrasca-at-canr1.cag.uconn.edu

Thank you for your consideration.

Sal Frasca Jr.





From: Tom Phillips :      tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 1994 09:27:20 -0500
Subject: Time: 9:45 AM

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--============_-1295708639==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Richard: Here is a summary I had saved of a previous uranyl glass thread.
Hope it helps. Tom



--------------------------------------



Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.
1631 Monrovia Ave.
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Tel: 714-642-9980
Fax: 714-645-6800
Contact person: Bill Larsen (you can tell him I sent you). Sold as a
6.5x6.5" sheet (you can specify 1 mm height), so you may want to form a
"consortium" to have Newport pre-cut a sheet to slide size (nominal extra
cost, but your lab only needs one or two slides). If there is a lot of
interest, my company may start selling single slides.

As for references and the Shading Correction equation: please see my
article in the 11/94 issue of Journal of NIH Research 6(11): 80 (usual
Internet disclaimer: yes, that is an ad from my company on the facing
page). Also look at Jericevic et al (1989) Methods in Cell Biology
30:47-83.

MutliSpeck beads: The Molecular Probes pre-mounted slide kits should be
ideal for DAPI and Fluorescein. I believe they were optimized for
Rhodamine, but should still work ok for Texas Red. If your problem is with
mounting, Mol. Probes now sells the beads in solution, so you can
'sprinkle' some on your specimens. If you have a different problem with the
current MultiSpeck's, Mol. Probes may be able to work something out for
you.

Sorry, but I usually buy my reference material from Mol. Probes and don't
keep close track of other slide manufacturers.

Sincerely,

Dr. George McNamara
Universal Imaging Corporation
George_M-at-Image1.com



} Dear confocalers,

} I read through the archives for information on uranyl glass test slides,
} but couldn't figure out if there is a definitive answer to the question,
} Does anyone still manufacture uranyl glass, and where could I get some?

} Thanks,
} Chi-Bin Chien
} chien-at-jeeves.ucsd.edu

Chi-Bin Chien,

You can obtain micro slide sized pieces of uranyl glass from:

Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.
1631 Monrovia Avenue
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
(714) 645 - 1500
(714) 645 - 6800 [FAX]

They have this glass (glass #3750) in large stock pieces, so it must be cut
down to the size of a micro slide. The will grind it down to whatever
thickness you
desire, as well. We ordered two micro slide sized peices in July of 1993.
The cost was $86.

Good luck!

Cheers,
Bill Bug


*************************
* Bill Bug *
* Dept. of Biology *
* Swarthmore College *
*************************} O.k., all you good microscopists, I'm
looking for a source for either a Uranium Glass
} Block or a suitable replacement for visualizing/teaching the light path on
} a light
} microscope. The block is placed in the microscope stage and the
} illumination path way
} can be viewed inside the block - particularly as the condensor is focused
} and as either
} the stage aperature or field aperature are varied.
}
} I know this can be visualize with a dilute milk solution but I
} really would prefer
} something a little more stable (and non-perishable).
}
} Thanks!
}
}
}
} Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} 352 Pearson Hall
} Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
} Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
} E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
}
} "RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)
--============_-1295708639==_ma============
Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"

Richard: Here is a summary I had saved of a previous uranyl glass
thread. Hope it helps. Tom




--------------------------------------


} From: Not Specified { {Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu} Attn: George M

Return-Path: Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu To:
Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (M)

Organization: University of California, SF Division of Molecular
Cytometry Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST



OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date: 2/3/95

Dear Microscopists,

Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where it might be obtained?
I have been told that it is no longer manufactured commercially. It
might be an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy control. Are
there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence standards
besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very convenient,
but they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein, and
Texas Red specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards
Co. no longer makes pre-mounted standards.

I have been managing the UCSF core flow and image cytometry facility
("Lab for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I had no real QC for our 2
occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I need to establish QC
protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized fluorescence (one
scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular Cytogenetics
Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal
references) seem to be available.

Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
very much. Kris Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu



To: Microscopy-at-AAEM.amc.anl.gov

} From: George M { {George_M-at-image1.com}

Reply to: RE} Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.

Hi Kris,

Uranium glass slides can be purchased from:


Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.

1631 Monrovia Ave.

Costa Mesa, CA 92627

Tel: 714-642-9980

Fax: 714-645-6800

Contact person: Bill Larsen (you can tell him I sent you). Sold as a
6.5x6.5" sheet (you can specify 1 mm height), so you may want to form a
"consortium" to have Newport pre-cut a sheet to slide size (nominal
extra cost, but your lab only needs one or two slides). If there is a
lot of interest, my company may start selling single slides.


As for references and the Shading Correction equation: please see my
article in the 11/94 issue of Journal of NIH Research 6(11): 80 (usual
Internet disclaimer: yes, that is an ad from my company on the facing
page). Also look at Jericevic et al (1989) Methods in Cell Biology
30:47-83.


MutliSpeck beads: The Molecular Probes pre-mounted slide kits should be
ideal for DAPI and Fluorescein. I believe they were optimized for
Rhodamine, but should still work ok for Texas Red. If your problem is
with mounting, Mol. Probes now sells the beads in solution, so you can
'sprinkle' some on your specimens. If you have a different problem with
the current MultiSpeck's, Mol. Probes may be able to work something out
for you.


Sorry, but I usually buy my reference material from Mol. Probes and
don't keep close track of other slide manufacturers.


Sincerely,


Dr. George McNamara

Universal Imaging Corporation

George_M-at-Image1.com




} From: "Bill Bug (Bill Bug)" { {bbug1-at-CC.SWARTHMORE.EDU

} Subject: Re: uranyl glass


} Dear confocalers,


} I read through the archives for information on uranyl glass test
slides, but couldn't figure out if there is a definitive answer to the
question, Does anyone still manufacture uranyl glass, and where could I
get some?


} Thanks,

} Chi-Bin Chien

} chien-at-jeeves.ucsd.edu


Chi-Bin Chien,


You can obtain micro slide sized pieces of uranyl glass from:


Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.

1631 Monrovia Avenue

Costa Mesa, CA 92627

(714) 645 - 1500

(714) 645 - 6800 [FAX]


They have this glass (glass #3750) in large stock pieces, so it must be
cut down to the size of a micro slide. The will grind it down to
whatever thickness you

desire, as well. We ordered two micro slide sized peices in July of
1993. The cost was $86.


Good luck!


Cheers,

Bill Bug



*************************

* Bill Bug *

* Dept. of Biology *

* Swarthmore College *

*************************} O.k., all you good microscopists, I'm
looking for a source for either a Uranium Glass

} Block or a suitable replacement for visualizing/teaching the light
path on a light

} microscope. The block is placed in the microscope stage and the
illumination path way

} can be viewed inside the block - particularly as the condensor is
focused and as either

} the stage aperature or field aperature are varied.

}

} I know this can be visualize with a dilute milk solution but I
really would prefer

} something a little more stable (and non-perishable).

}

} Thanks!

}

}

}

} Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.

} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor

} 352 Pearson Hall

} Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056

} Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243

} E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

}

} "RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility


3 Tucker Hall

Division of Biological Sciences

University of Missouri

Columbia, MO 65211

(573)-882-4712 (voice)

(573)-882-0123 (fax)

--============_-1295708639==_ma============--





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 10:36:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM:virus isolation from foods for negative staining

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On Thu, 14 Jan 1999, Margaret Casey wrote:

} Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 16:02:26 -0500
} From: Margaret Casey {CaseyM-at-state.mi.us}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM:virus isolation from foods for negative staining
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Fellow Listers,
}
} Does anyone have a good protocol or reference for virus isolation from food other than shellfish? We are trying to isolate and concentrate Norwalk virus from some foods implicated in a poisoning outbreak in Detroit. The foods in question are salami, garbanzo beans and some kind of cheese (I think provolone). We need to concentrate to at least 1 million particles/ml in order to use our prep for negative staining and TEM observation. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
}
} Sincerely,
} Peggy Casey
} Michigan Dept. of Community Health
} Lansing, Mich.
} phone: 517-335-8102
} e-mail: caseym-at-state.mi.us
}
The best way to detect these kinds of viruses in dilute concentrations is
PCR. In this case, viral numbers are likely to be very low, and getting
enough to see by negative staining, unless you aggregate them with
antiserum, may be difficult. If you want to proceed anyway, see
concentration methods in Hayat and Miller, Negative Staining, McGraw-Hill.


Under separate cover, I will send you the name of an expert who
does PCR on Norwalk. She is on the faculty at UNC and the CDC.

SM

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: Neilly,Joseph :      joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 10:00:04 -0600
Subject: Re: Cold stage for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tina,

How fast can you work and how long will the sections stay frozen? We l=
ooked
at frozen samples on a light microscope by covering the scope in a glov=
e bag
(~$15 from scientific supply houses) and doing all our work inside the =
bag.
We started by flooding the bag with dry nitrogen for a couple of hours =
to
drive out all humidity. We were able to freeze our samples in the bag,=

transfer them to the stage and back to the LN2 when we thought they wer=
e
starting to melt. You might be able to transfer the frozen sections in=
to the
bag and keep them frozen with some LN2 and quickly transfer them to the=
stage
of the microscope. This is a very kludgy setup, but it worked for us a=
nd was
dirt cheap.

Joe Neilly
Abbott Laboratories
D-45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-3537
voice: (847)-938-5024
fax: (847)-938-5027
e-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com
=





From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 17:15:44 +0100 (MET)
Subject: EM912 diffraction astigmatism problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear fellow microscopists,

since a couple of weeks I have to face a problem with our LEO EM912 which I
could not solve up to now: I can't correct for the astigmatism in
diffraction mode any more. If I use the "Image Stig xy" buttons they
influence the appearence but the possible range of this potentiometers is
not large enough for the correction. In addition the zero-beam moves very
slowly across the screen (approx. 0.5mm/min on the final screen). I did a
thorough alignment of all the settings of the microscope and the problem
persists. We had service here and were told that it is probably some dirt
particle in a part of the column which we can't clean. The only possibility
would be to try to "burn" the particle in low-mag mode with high
illumination aperture and "playing" with the illumination tilt in
diffraction mode or the illumination shift in spot mode. And in fact, this
helps for a short time, but the problem reappears latest after half an our
again.

We have no problems with astigmatism in the image mode.

Does anybody out there has an idea what we could do, check, exchange ... to
help solving the problem?

Greetings,

Petra

--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpcu.lu/~wahlbrin






From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 10:45:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: SuperSEM software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Lou -
}
} A few years ago I got hold of a beta version of a SEM Macintosh simulation
} program, SuperSEM. It was a Macintosh program that was developed with
} Supercard software. It was misplaced during the process of upgrading my
} computers. Does anyone know if it exists?

Might you be thinking of Brian Griffen's "Virtual SEM"? It's a great
simulation, and you'll find it listed in the CD-ROM section of the
bibliography on Project MICRO's web page (URL below).

Caroline
}


Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 15 Jan 99 13:10:02 -0500
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation

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Reply to: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
Re: Electropolishing of Ti alloys
Due to interest in this subject, I will list some additional =
electrolytes I have used on Ti alloys. (3mm, jet polishing).

Ti-8 w/% Al 13% HCL -60 degrees C
Ti-811 87% methanol 70 to 90 volts
Ti-6Al-4V 25-35 mA.

Ti-13 Sn 130 ml HCL -50 degrees C
670 ml methanol 150 volts
100 ml butyl 60 mA.

Ti-3V 60 ml perchloric acid -50 degrees C
Ti-20 Zr 590 ml methanol 50 volts
Ti-14 Al 350 ml butyl cellosolve 10-15 mA

Ti-8 Al 60 ml perchloric acid -15 t0 -20 C
(rolled) 460 ml ethyl alcohol, 95% 180 volts
280 ml butyl alcohol 40 mA.
100 ml butyl cellosolve
Ti 5.3 g. =
lithium chloride -40 degrees C.
nanocrystals, 11.16 g. magnesium 150 volts
compacted chloride 30 mA
500 ml. methanol
100 ml. butyl cellosolve
(Note: the two salts above must be added to the combined solvents one =
"powder" at a time, while stirring. The two dry salts react violently if =
mixed together. This electrolyte has nearly as wide an application as =
perchloric acid mixtures and is known as B K-2).
I suspect that B K-2 will cause the least hydride problem. It was =
developed to eliminate hydrides in vanadium TEM foils. The voltages given =
would need to be reduced about 20% for a twin jet system due to lower =
electrical resistance of that configuration. My work was done on a South =
Bay vertical single jet unit.
I have no vested interest in the above equipment, but have enjoyed =
the ease with which good polishing conditions can be obtained and =
reproduced since 1975 or so. Good luck!
Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail: {bkestel-at-anl.gov}
Thomas, Larry wrote:
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}
}
} Dear Satyarth:
}
} An excellent paper on the subject is:
}
} "In Situ Hydride Formation in Zirconium and Titanium during Ion Milling"
} Graham J.C. Carpenter et al, JMSA Vol.1 No. 4 pp 175-184 1995.
}
} From the paper you will see that a key factor in eliminating hydride
} formation is having a clean sample free from hydrocarbon contamination. } =
This contamination could be remnants from the dimpling process or other
} pre-thinning steps or it could be caused by the back streaming of
} diffusion
} pump oil in your ion mill. As titanium has a high chemical affinity for
} hydrogen, you may want to look over your preparation steps and try to
} eliminate any areas of possible contamination. If you are still having
} a
} problem, a quick cleaning of both the specimen and the specimen holder
} in a
} Plasma Cleaner should take care of it.
}
} If you have an interest, I can send you a copy of the above referenced
} paper. I also have papers on plasma cleaning which may be of interest.
}
} NOTE: South Bay Technology does manufacture the PC150 Plasma Cleaner and
} therefore I have a vested interest in promoting its use.
}
} Best regards-
}
} David } Writing at 9:38:23 AM on 1/12/99
} } } ******************************=
***********************************
} **********
} ************************
}
} David Henriks TEL: } 800-=
728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
} South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
} 1120 Via Callejon FAX:
} +1-949-492-1499
} San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail:
} henriks-at-southbaytech.com
}
} } *****************************************************************
} **********
} ************************
}
} } } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {
}
} Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
} metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.
}
} Message text written by Satyarth Suri
} }
} Hello:
} I am currently working on mechanical behavior / microstructure
} correlations in single colony near apha Ti Alloys. I am currently
} preparing the foils using a dual ion mill (6kV, 12deg, 1mA), but
} have run into the problem of a very uneven alpha phase morphology,
} the alpha phase has island formation - we are using a cold stage
} to minimize the hydride formation at the interface. I am using
} 3 micron/6micron diamond paste during the dimpling process - the
} foil itself otherwise is fairly clean in terms of the dislocation
} content. Could anyone in the microscopy land have some suggestions
} in terms of what the problem may be?
}
} thanks - if you want you can respond directly to suri.3-at-osu.edu
}
} -satyarth
}
} {
}
}
}
}
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} Date: Tue, 12 Jan 1999 15:54:36 -0800
} From: "Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov}
} Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
} To: Satyarth Suri {suri-at-mse.eng.ohio-state.edu} ,
} Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
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Date: 14 Jan 99 09:59:42 -0500
From: Bernard Kestel {kestel-at-anl.gov}
Subject: RE: Ti Alloys - TEM foil preparation
To: "'South Bay Technology'" {Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM} ,
"Thomas, Larry" {Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov} ,
Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
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From: Ming Chen :      mingchen-at-gpu.srv.ualberta.ca
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 12:46:33 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: TEM for plant material

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Hi Mary,

I have done a lot of fixation for plant material for more than 25 yrs. I
think 2% paraformaldehyde-2.5% glutaraldehyde fixative in 0.2 M
cacodylate or phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) is the best.

Good luck.

Ming

On Tue, 12 Jan 1999, Mary Gail Engle wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I need some advice as to the best protocol for fixing fresh plant leaves
} for routine TEM. My only experience has been with animal tissue.
} Thanks,
} MG Engle
}
}
}


***********************************************
* Ming H. Chen, PhD *
* Medicine/Dentistry Electron Microscopy Unit *
* #1074B Dentistry Pharmacy Building *
* University Of Alberta. *
* Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2N8 *
* *
* Visit My Page At: *
* http://www.ualberta.ca/~mingchen *
***********************************************









From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 14:46:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Final aperture contamination

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Lou Ross wrote:
}
}
}
} A colleage from an industrial SEM lab contacted me about a problem with
} contamination on the final aperture on an variable pressure SEM. This SEM
} was recently purchased by one of their branch plants to examine
} semiconductor products. Although it is a variable pressure SEM, they have
} only operated it in the high vac mode like a standard SEM.
}
} The problem they are experiencing is that the final aperture presumably
} gets so dirty they have to change the aperture every two weeks.
} Unfortunately the manufacturer has not been able to shed any light on this
} situation.
}
} If the vacuum system is alright, I suggested that the problem might be with
} the samples. Supposedly the branch lab operators are following the same
} sample prep protocol established in the local SEM lab.
}
} Any other ideas out there?
}
} Thanks in advance,
} Lou Ross
} Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
} Room 101
} Department of Geological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} (573) 882-4777
} (573) 882=5458 fax
} www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html


Dear Lou Ross,

Based on your message concerning the contaminated aperture, my feeling
is that the problem probably rests somewhere other than the aperture
itself.
But since there is the slightest possibility that there might be a
problem with the aperture perhaps we can assist you. Ladd produces the
vast majority of apertures/microholes used in the United States and the
aperture you have may very will be a Ladd aperture.
To make sure there is no residual contamination on an aperture we have a
post production protocol that is designed to eliminate any contamination
that results during production. In fact we have some
apertures/microholes used in fluid and gas control that are required to
be absolutely contamination free. We have a protocol to ensure that.
It is also important that an aperture be shipped or stored in a glass or
non-contaminating vial and that the aperture surface should not touch
tissue or even lint free cloth.
We would be glad to examine the aperture to see if the contamination was
a result of packaging, handling or the production process.
Please contact us if you if you wish us to do that.

John Arnott
Chairman

--
LADD RESEARCH
13 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495
TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
web site http://www.ladd.cc





From: Steve Fields :      steve-fields-at-omrf.ouhsc.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 14:52:07 -0600
Subject: Request for cryostat user comments

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Hello,

My institution needs to purchase a new cryostat in the next several months.
I would appreciate any comments from cryostat users about their satisfation/
dissatisfaction with particular makes and models of relatively new cryostats.

We do not anticipate particularly heavy usage of this equipment, but the tissues
that will need to be sectioned range from soft tissues such as brain and heart
all the way to mouse and rat bone. Some investigators would like to collect
sections in excess of 30 microns for confocal microscopy projects, and others
would like to serial section whole organs from transgenic mice. Are disposable
knives sufficient for this range of usage?

Also, cryostat vendors are welcome to email me directly. Surprisingly, it has
been like pulling teeth to get some companies to talk to a ready and willing
customer.

Thanks for your help,

Dr. Steve Fields
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
825 N.E. 13th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73104

405-271-7665 (Office)
405-271-3153 (Fax)







From: CMontana4-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 17:28:18 EST
Subject: Re: Final aperture contamination

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Good Morning, Lou!
There are several reasons why the final aperture may be getting dirty on a
variable pressure SEM, and why this may be more noticeable on semiconductor
samples. Several causes contribute to contamination within SEM chambers. If
this system has been used for any other analysis other than semiconductor, at
low vac modes, residues from prior analysis may be lining the chamber walls -
these are difficult to remove even by baking the chamber out. Additionally,
this system probably has oil-cooled pumps - the deleterious effect of
backstreaming oils into chamber which "gums" onto the final aperture is well
established, but can be diminished with a strategically located dry N2 purge
port in the sample exchange chamber. Mounting media is also of concern - since
most conductive paints outgas, these vapors can also contaminate the F.A.
quickly, especially if the material is not exceedingly well dried. Simple
cleanliness may also be the culprit - by handling a metal sample fixture with
bare hands, oils and sweats are deposited on the fixture. These deposits love
to attach to the F.A. (and cold tip of EDS detectors too!) As most
semiconductor analysis requires fairly high magnification, and often lower
KeV, these problems are exacerbated. I've delt with these and many other
problems concerning the optimal performance of SEM's with semiconductor
materials, and would be pleased to look over his system for performance
improvements. Let me know if I may be of assistance!

Lisa Montanaro - Consultant
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
ph: (703) 257-7157
fax:(703) 365-2427
e-mail: cmontana4-at-aol.com



In a message dated 1/14/99 8:41:46 PM Mid-Atlantic Standard Time,
RossLM-at-missouri.edu writes:

{ {
A colleage from an industrial SEM lab contacted me about a problem with
contamination on the final aperture on an variable pressure SEM. This SEM
was recently purchased by one of their branch plants to examine
semiconductor products. Although it is a variable pressure SEM, they have
only operated it in the high vac mode like a standard SEM.

The problem they are experiencing is that the final aperture presumably
gets so dirty they have to change the aperture every two weeks.
Unfortunately the manufacturer has not been able to shed any light on this
situation.

If the vacuum system is alright, I suggested that the problem might be with
the samples. Supposedly the branch lab operators are following the same
sample prep protocol established in the local SEM lab.

Any other ideas out there?

Thanks in advance,
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html
} }





From: Nick Strausfeld :      flybrain-at-neurobio.arizona.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 15:45:57 -0800
Subject: Unsubscribe

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From: Weilie ZHOU :      wzhou-at-uno.edu
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 18:29:15 -0600
Subject: Help!

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Hi everyone,

I am asking for help. We bought a JSM 5410 SEM (3.5 nm at 30kv 8mm working
distance) and JEOL 2010 microscopes (without FEG) here. Both microscopes
has almost finished installation. For JEOL 2010 I checked our quotation
written by JEOL that they should provide working pressure of 6x10-6 Pa or
better at specimen as read by the ion pump. But now we got best vacuum is
1.5x10-5 Pa. Is there anyone who has JEOL 2010 TEM and can tell me your
best working value ASAP? Thank you very much in advance.

As for JSM 5410, is there anybody who has JSM 5000 series SEM and can send
me your resoultion shooting photos by JEOL engineer (resolution 3.5nm) to
let me have a look. I will pay the Fedex fee and send you back by Fedex
express. Thank you very much.

Sincerely yours,

Weilie Zhou (Ph.D)

************************************************
Advanced Materials Research Institute
University of New Orleans
Science Building 2021
New Orleans, LA 70148
Tel:(504) 280-5570
Fax:(504) 280-3185
************************************************







From: Ronald Vane :      RVaneXEI-at-concentric.net
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 17:23:55 -0800
Subject: Fw: Final aperture contamination

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Dear Lou and all,

I have given the following advice to several users of variable pressure
SEMs who have dirty microscopes and contamination, and they all said it
cured the problem.

Don't leave it in high Vacuum mode all the time. Some variable pressure SEMs
are very dirty due to backstreaming at high vacuum. They are designed for
low vacuum not high vacuum. By placing the system into low vacuum mode, the
chamber is placed into viscous flow vacuum dynamics which stops
backstreaming and purges out contaminants. Try leaving it in low vacuum
mode overnight for a month and check the results.

Let me know if this helps.

Ronald Vane
XEI Scientific


Disclaimer: XEI is in the anti-contamination business.
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Lou Ross {RossLM-at-missouri.edu}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Thursday, January 14, 1999 1:48 PM
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } A colleage from an industrial SEM lab contacted me about a problem with
} } contamination on the final aperture on an variable pressure SEM. This SEM
} } was recently purchased by one of their branch plants to examine
} } semiconductor products. Although it is a variable pressure SEM, they have
} } only operated it in the high vac mode like a standard SEM.
} }
} } The problem they are experiencing is that the final aperture presumably
} } gets so dirty they have to change the aperture every two weeks.
} } Unfortunately the manufacturer has not been able to shed any light on this
} } situation.
} }
} } If the vacuum system is alright, I suggested that the problem might be
with
} } the samples. Supposedly the branch lab operators are following the same
} } sample prep protocol established in the local SEM lab.
} }
} } Any other ideas out there?
} }
} } Thanks in advance,
} } Lou Ross
} } Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
} } Room 101
} } Department of Geological Sciences
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211
} } (573) 882-4777
} } (573) 882=5458 fax
} } www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html
} }
} }
}






From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 15 Jan 99 18:31:01 -0800
Subject: EM:Water Purification

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Happy New Year all,

A question for the New Year: what are EM laboratories using for pure water =
these days? Is it possible to use deionized water, or even the distilled =
water from Rite Aid or Arrowhead? In the past I had a still which was fed =
from a deionized water supply. We had no problems at all with this.

If the preferred purification process turns out to be deionized water, =
which quality is best - Type 1 (HPLC etc.) or will lower quality suffice? =
Also has anyone had problems with resin in the water?

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm






From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 1999 20:41:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Cold stage for LM

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microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com, tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
MMDF-Warning: Parse error in original version of preceding line at rfdata.net


Another quick cheap fix is dress warm and do the work in a walk in freezer.
The glove bag would work well to keep your breath from freezing on the
scope.

When I was working at Ag Engineering we had and etymology and vet
student that spent the summer in a walk in cooler monitor tick behavior
from freezing to 55 degrees F.

Gordon

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Owner PRAG-L PRactical AGriculture List www.couger.com/prag-l
Stillwater, OK 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00


} From: Neilly,Joseph {joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com}

How fast can you work and how long will the sections stay frozen? We looked
at frozen samples on a light microscope by covering the scope in a glove bag
(~$15 from scientific supply houses) and doing all our work inside the bag.
We started by flooding the bag with dry nitrogen for a couple of hours to
drive out all humidity. We were able to freeze our samples in the bag,
transfer them to the stage and back to the LN2 when we thought they were
starting to melt. You might be able to transfer the frozen sections into
the
bag and keep them frozen with some LN2 and quickly transfer them to the
stage
of the microscope. This is a very kludgy setup, but it worked for us and
was
dirt cheap.

Joe Neilly
Abbott Laboratories
D-45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-3537
voice: (847)-938-5024
fax: (847)-938-5027
e-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com







From: dmrelion-at-world.std.com (donald j marshall)
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 10:31:00 -0500
Subject: Re: Cold stage for LM

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} From Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com Thu Jan 14 14:44:05 1999
}
} Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 09:11:29 -1000 (HST)
} From: Tina Carvalho {tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu}
} To: Microscopy Listserver {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Subject: Cold stage for LM
}
} Happy New Year to you all
}
} .......... I have liquid nitrogen, styrofoam, and a machine
} shop. I also have high humidity. Can anyone tell me how to kludge
} together a cold enough stage that we can get images of these
} frozen sections while preventing frost? I have some general ideas, but
} I'd appreciate any specific plans or ideas..............
}
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
}

Tina, We have done some work with a cold stage for cathodoluminescence (CL)
studies of minerals, ceramics, etc. A simple vacuum chamber (mechanical pump
- pressures of 30 to 100 millitorr) is used for the CL work and the chamber
sits on the stage of the light microscope. For cold stage work we use a
simple system consisting of a chillable plate that is cooled in liquid
nitrogen outside the chamber and then inserted and pumped down. Temperatures
low enough to dramatically change the CL behaviour are achieved for about 10
- 12 minutes and there is minimum condensation. The vacuum helps to provide
thermal insulation for the chillable plate and also minimizes the amount of
water vapor that can condense. The plate itself is designed to minimize
thermal transfer to the other parts of the vacuum chamber.

Don Marshall

(Claimer: RELION is in the business of CL instrumentation for light
microscopes and chillable sample plates are one of the items we offer.)


Donald J. Marshall
Relion Industries
P.O. Box 12
Bedford, MA 01730
Ph: 781-275-4695
FAX: 781-271-0252
email dmrelion-at-world.std.com

"A weed is a flower out of place."

(Please note: Do not send email with attachments to this address. Instead, send it to donbarlen-at-aol.com. Thank you.)





From: Louie Kerr :      lkerr-at-mbl.edu
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 11:22:49 -0500
Subject: Summer Biology Microscopy Technician Position

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SUMMER MICROSCOPY TECHNICIAN
POSITION AVAILABLE

A three month (June, July, and August) position is open for a microscopy
oriented technician at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA.
We would like to attract someone with some knowledge of biological
preparative techniques and experience in laser scanning confocal
microscopy, TEM, SEM, and/or LM.

The technician will assist in the Central Microscopy Facility. The
technician's duties will be to check out incoming investigators in the
usage of our equipment and then to supervise its continuing usage and to
perform contract work for investigators. This may include fixation,
embedding, sectioning, scope use, darkroom work, etc. The technician will
also provide routine maintenance.

This is a short term and scientifically rewarding position. Salary will be
in the $7 to $10/hour range. Housing may be available to rent through MBL.

For more information, including a more detailed position description,
please contact Louis Kerr at: MBL, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543.
Telephone, 508-289-7273; or at Email: lkerr-at-mbl.edu.
Please apply to: Human Resources, MBL, 7 MBL Street,
Woods Hole, MA 02543. or resume-at-mbl.edu.

An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer/ Non-smoking workplace.

Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu







From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 16:53:06 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Summer Biology Microscopy Technician Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} SUMMER MICROSCOPY TECHNICIAN POSITION AVAILABLE
}
} A three month (June, July, and August) position is open for a microscopy
} oriented technician at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA....

} ...This is a short term and scientifically rewarding position. Salary will be
} in the $7 to $10/hour range. Housing may be available to rent through MBL...
}
} ...For more information, including a more detailed position description,
} please contact Louis Kerr at: MBL, 7 MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543.
} Telephone, 508-289-7273; or at Email: lkerr-at-mbl.edu.
} Please apply to: Human Resources, MBL, 7 MBL Street,
} Woods Hole, MA 02543. or resume-at-mbl.edu.

I once had a senior student (at UC Berkeley) who took this job. He was
recruited into a top MD/PhD program and met his wife, all in a summer of
hard work at MBL. Apply, folks!



Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Brian Tryon :      tryon-at-auhs.edu
Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 08:11:31 -0400
Subject: Archiving microscopy images question

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Hi Folks,

Perhaps a little off-topic, but for those of you who archive microscopy
images to recordable CD-ROM, does anyone know of a strategy for placing a
"software lock" on the CD-ROM which would require a "key" to access, view,
or copy the CD-ROM contents? I'd rather not compress or encrypt images and
use a password to access but to have a security option initiated upon
mounting of the CD-ROM.

Thanks very much for any info,

Brian C. Tryon
MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine
Ann Preston Hall, Box 551
3300 Henry Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19129
USA

Voice mail: (215) 620-0077
E-mail: tryon-at-auhs.edu
URL: http://www.erols.com/btryon/intro.html
Pager: (215) 842-PAGE, #16272

-----------------------------------------
"Quantifying is a committing task." - Cruz-Orive, 1994.

"For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public
relations, for Nature cannot be fooled." - Richard Feynman
--------------------------------------------------------------





From: Diane E. Orado :      diorado-at-stc.net
Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 17:02:22 -0500
Subject: HELP

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I am a school counselor at the elementary level. Our leadership team is
spending some of our grant money on microscopes for a Science lab which
we are developing. I would like to know basic information on purchasing
microscopes for the elementary student. We hope to purchase five-six
scopes depending on the price. Can you help with this information?
Please e-mail me at diorado-at-stc.net Thanks! Diane





From: George Theodossiou :      GEORGE-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 16:13:35 EST-10ESUT
Subject: Wants

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Tina:
I am afraid I will not provide detailed plans, just a
couple of hints. I expect that the easiest way would be to
built a suitable, insulated enclosure with a minimal
opening for the objective lens. On top of that small
opening a resistance heater loop may be required. Somewhere
you would have an inlet for dry industrial nitrogen gas and
with a small sealed chamber and the only opening near the
lens, no air and therefore no moisture can enter.
Gas flow could be quite low - if the outlet hole is not too
large. Gasflow would need to be activated well before
freezing. Temperature control and nitrogen flow are other
problems, but avoiding frost tends to be the greatest
challenge.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



Hi all

Here is a 'WISH' list of bits that we want for our labs, if anyone
has these bits that they want to giveaway, trade, sell, we look
forward to hearing from you.

Spares for a Gatan model 600 ion beam thinner

Spares for JEOL 35-CF
Spares for JEOL 100-CX

EDXS for a JEOL 35-CF with with electronics. It doesn't have to have
excellent energy resolution.
EELS for a JEOL 2010 or JEOL 100-CX
Four quadrant Back Scatter detector (UHV Compatible)

An oven
Any specimen preparation gear for physical and biological specimens
Microtome and accessories

Enlargers working or broken
Timers for enlargers
Print dryer

Printers - B&W and color

Dessicators (vacuum)

Chemical storage cupboard

I know some of these are extravagant, but I have to ask.
The Gods just might smile upon me today.

Thank you
George
G. Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
Email: George-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
ph:+61 3 9925 3394
fax:+61 3 9925 5290






From: Luc Harmsen :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 12:17:12 +0200
Subject: Backstreaming and cold fingers.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all
Best wishes for the new year to all.
We have a small problem that needs fixing and would like to get a few =
other ideas on the matter before the user spends money on fixing it.
The user has an ISI SEM which has the typical back streaming problems. =
This oil is contaminating the ED detector window and therefore causing =
absorption of the light x-rays.
Other than cleaning the window regularly, which carries the danger of =
blowing the window and detector, we were looking at methods to stop this =
contamination. We are fitting a foreline trap to the Rotary pump, but =
experience shows that you still get oil back streaming. We could try a =
Ln2 cold finger but this is a hassle to keep toped up and can only be =
fitted above the diff pump which makes engineering a problem.
A SEM clean gas leak system would also help but they are very short on =
cash. ( surprise surprise) They also need to work at high mag and so =
whilst the SEM is in use the SEM clean system could not be effective.=20
The only other idea we have is to fit a peltier cold finger to the SEM =
chamber in the hope of attracting most of the oil to the cold finger =
and thus not contaminating the detector. This we though could be =
controlled to have a fairly low temp whilst the SEM is in use and =
frequent sample changes are required, then turn up the power for when =
the SEM is not in use to be more efficient.

Has any one fitted a peltier to their EM before ? What experiences have =
you had with them and what size and power would work.=20
All ideas welcome.=20
Thanks
=20
Luc Harmsen=09
Anaspec, South Africa
International technical support on microscopy.
Tel: +27 (0) 11 476 3455
Fax:+27 (0) 11 476 7290
anaspec-at-icon.co.za

=00





From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 12:11:28 +0000
Subject: Br in epoxy resin

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Hello fellow listservers,
I've recently discovered a problem with a batch of a particular
type of cold setting epoxy resin. I have been using this batch of
resin on an infrequent basis for about 2 years (and is probably
about 4 years old). When I analysed some of the cured resin by
microanalysis last week appreciable bromine (Br) was detected as well
as the usual chlorine content (Br} Cl). The 'introduction' of the Br
is a recent thing because I also analysed some resin (from the same
batch) prepared approximately one year ago. The analysis of this
showed no Br with Cl the only detectable element present (with the Be
window of the EDS detector in place that is). Is it possible
therefore for the resin to in some way deteriorate with time and for
Br compounds to form? If so, what are the chemical reactions going on
here. I'm very certain that the Br is not a contaminant. Also, I
should point out that if this is a chemical degradation of the resin
then the physical characteristics of the cured resin are normal. I
would appreciate any thoughts on the matter. Regards

Martin Roe
Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
Aberdeen
AB15 8QH
Scotland
United Kingdom





From: Deborah Hills-Haney :      ddhills-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 07:49:35 -0600
Subject: full eye protection?

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Greetings All,
}
} I have been reading this list for well over a year and am confident
that this is the place to come if one has a question regarding
microscopy...so here goes.
}
} The Chemical Hygiene Officer of the company I work for has decided
that all laboratory personnel must wear full eye protection when in a
lab.
} This presents a problem to me, because of my near sightedness, I
prefer to look through the optical/IR microscope without glasses and
this results in a side splash safety hazard. Does anyone have any
suggestions on how to fully protect myself from side impact and
satisfy the safety requirements and view my microscopy images? Thank
you all in advance and if anyone wants a summary of responses, I will be
more than happy to oblige.
}
}
}
}
} Deborah Hills-Haney
} Research Analytical Services/NMR Lab
} International Flavors and Fragrances R&D
} 1515 US Highway 36
} Union Beach, NJ 07735
}
} Phone: (732) 335-2663
} Fax: (732) 335-2591

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com







From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 18:01:52 +0000
Subject: Re: Br in epoxy resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Hello fellow listservers,
} I've recently discovered a problem with a batch of a particular
} type of cold setting epoxy resin. I have been using this batch of
} resin on an infrequent basis for about 2 years (and is probably
} about 4 years old). When I analysed some of the cured resin by
} microanalysis last week appreciable bromine (Br) was detected as well
} as the usual chlorine content (Br} Cl). The 'introduction' of the Br
} is a recent thing because I also analysed some resin (from the same
} batch) prepared approximately one year ago. The analysis of this
} showed no Br with Cl the only detectable element present (with the Be
} window of the EDS detector in place that is). Is it possible
} therefore for the resin to in some way deteriorate with time and for
} Br compounds to form? If so, what are the chemical reactions going on
} here. I'm very certain that the Br is not a contaminant. Also, I
} should point out that if this is a chemical degradation of the resin
} then the physical characteristics of the cured resin appear to be normal. I
} would appreciate any thoughts on the matter. Regards
}
} Martin Roe
} Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
} Aberdeen
} AB15 8QH
} Scotland
} United Kingdom
}
}
}





From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 09:30:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: HELP

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} I am a school counselor at the elementary level. Our leadership team is
} spending some of our grant money on microscopes for a Science lab which
} we are developing. I would like to know basic information on purchasing
} microscopes for the elementary student. We hope to purchase five-six
} scopes depending on the price. Can you help with this information?
} Please e-mail me at diorado-at-stc.net Thanks! Diane

I'm happy to help; that's what Project MICRO is all about. You'll find
detailed general purchase and evaluation advice on the MICRO web page (URL
below), plus a list of possible sources. For elementary science, I
strongly favor monocular "dissecting" scopes; you can get good ones for
under $80. Plus perhaps one conventional 3-objective (4, 10, 40x) compound
scope, for $120. Where are you located? I may be able to get you some
advice from a local MSA member.



Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Gerhard Frank :      frank-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 19:35:10 +0100
Subject: Re: Br in epoxy resin

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Martin J. Roe wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello fellow listservers,
} I've recently discovered a problem with a batch of a particular
} type of cold setting epoxy resin. I have been using this batch of
} resin on an infrequent basis for about 2 years (and is probably
} about 4 years old). When I analysed some of the cured resin by
} microanalysis last week appreciable bromine (Br) was detected as well
} as the usual chlorine content (Br} Cl). The 'introduction' of the Br
} is a recent thing because I also analysed some resin (from the same
} batch) prepared approximately one year ago. The analysis of this
} showed no Br with Cl the only detectable element present (with the Be
} window of the EDS detector in place that is). Is it possible
} therefore for the resin to in some way deteriorate with time and for
} Br compounds to form? If so, what are the chemical reactions going on
} here. I'm very certain that the Br is not a contaminant. Also, I
} should point out that if this is a chemical degradation of the resin
} then the physical characteristics of the cured resin are normal. I
} would appreciate any thoughts on the matter. Regards
}
} Martin Roe
} Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
} Aberdeen
} AB15 8QH
} Scotland
} United Kingdom

Martin,
One possibility that comes to mind is the storage cabinet of the resin:
if you store bromine in the same cabinet and the resin is packed in a
polymer flask, I can think of some diffusion out of the bromine into the
resin bottle.

An other possibiliy is that there is a solvent used with a part of the
resin, which contains Br. If the resin is growing older, there may be
decomposition/degradation of the solvent, leaving a non volatile Br
conaining component behind. Check each single component of the resin.

Hope this helps
--
Gerhard Frank
UNIVERSITAET ERLANGEN-NUERNBERG Phone: +49 9131 85 28606
Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaften VII Fax: +49 9131 85 28602
Cauerstr. 6, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany frank-at-ww.uni.erlangen.de





From: corwinl-at-pt.cyanamid.com
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 14:35 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: full eye protection?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I ordinarily wear bifocals with an astigmatism correction. My company
has bought me distance-only safety glasses, which I use irregularly
but satisfactorily in place of my bifocals at the LM. The main
advantage is the lack of the bifocal line.

If you can't bear the glasses, you might propose writing a "job hazard
analysis" in which you analyze the hazards involved in your specific
operation and propose specific solutions other than safety glasses,
e.g., a splash shield between you and other workers, use of safety
glasses for certain operations but not for viewing, after you have
assured that risk of splash etc. during viewing is minimal.

Leonard Corwin
Research Chemist
Fort Dodge Animal Health
Princeton, NJ 08543-0400





From: Jon Charlesworth :      charlesworth.jon-at-mayo.edu
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 15:22:01 -0500
Subject: Used EM equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Our laboratory is in the process of 'remodelling' and have found several
items which we would be able to part with at this time. These items
include:
1. A Polaron Critical Point Dryer
2. An Arkay CD-80 cabinet dryer
3. A Gatan model 673 mark 2 wide angle TV system with a Data Translation
3851 A/D converter board
4. A Gatan model 622 fiber optically coupled TV system

This equipment was 100% functional the last time it was used. If you are
interested in any of this equipment please contact me off line.

Jon Charlesworth, Coordinator
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Mayo Clinic
1426 Guggenheim Building
Rochester, MN 55905
ph: (507) 284-3148
fax: (507) 284-9349
email: charlesworth.jon-at-mayo.edu







From: J.Bruyntjes-at-voeding.tno.nl
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 06:57:38 -0600
Subject: EYES

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-----Original Message-----
} From: Luc Harmsen {anaspec-at-icon.co.za}
To: 'MSA listserver' {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Hi there

Is anyone familliar with specific fixation- and/or staining techniques for
rat and/or chicken eyes. Someone on our laboratory wants to to do some
research on eyes. He wants to stain specific membranes like Bowmann and
Desmett membrane.

Thanks in advance

Joost Bruyntjes
TNO Zeist
Holland







From: mcalabrese-at-rsc.rockwell.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 06:59:23 -0600
Subject: program to convert weight % to Atomic %

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi, I am looking for a program to convert weight % to Atomic % and vise
versa preferably on a Power Mac.. An old program we have works on pre '90
Mac's but not on the newer ones. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks- Mike







From: Wharton Sinkler :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 08:22:38 -0600
Subject: Leafscan 45 part

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear List,

I am looking for a 8cm by 10cm (TEM film format) film holder for a Leafscan
45 negative scanner.

I've been told that the company which makes the Leafscan was bought out.
Does anyone know by whom, or who might now deal in parts?

Thanks,
Wharton
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Tel: (208) 533-7724
FAX: (208) 533-7863

mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov





From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 09:23:45 -0600
Subject: Do we need a Live-cell 3D Microscopy Course?

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Hello all,

Hope that there is room on this list for a bit of pre-millenial philosophy.

Before I saw John White's prototype laser scanner in 1986, I had spent my
time trying to improve instrumentation for high-resolution SEM and TEM.
Though capable of "seeing molecules" and even labelling them, these
instruments and have one tremendous disadvantage for the biologist: because
they form their images using quanta that carry (much) more than 5 electron
volts of energy, the act of imaging destroys molecules. Consequently, these
instruments can only be used to image dead cells.

So, even when the confocal microscope was seen primarily as a method of
making 3D images of biological structures that had been fixed and stained,
my own focus was on using it to image living specimens.

Early confocal microscopes were so inefficient in their use of the light
from the specimen that one could only image a "living" specimen at high
magnification for a very sort time (one frame?) before it was well on the
way to death. However, the wide-field/deconvolution contingent under Agard
and Sedat showed that 3D imaging of living cells was possible, so we tried
harder.

Even though instrumental improvements have now reduced the amount of damage
produced per image by about 100x, and even though "the hidden agenda" of
the Second edition of the Confocal Handbook was to give researchers the
tools needed to view living specimens optimally, it seemed (seems?) to me
that the large preponderance of confocal images is still made on dead cells.

There were several important reasons:

* Not clear which biological questions could be best approached in this way.
* Hard to keep cells alive on microscope stage.
* Results tedious to obtain and outcome uncertain.
* Unclear which dyes were most suitable for live-cell operation in terms of
cytotoxicity and bleaching
* The choice of operational parameters was complicated by interactions
between them. If pixel and raster-size, NA, sampling time and, laser power
all have to be optimized to produce the best signal-to-noise and
signal-to-damage ratios.
* Single=photon or multi-photon.
* Finally, there seemed to be a geography problem. While individual groups
were making great strides, their isolation kept the practical knowledge
that they gained by trial and error from reaching many of those who had
good biological problems but lacked "a place to start from".

This Email Listserve was a response to the isolation and, I believe, it has
been a major factor in the development of the field. Thanks Bob and now
Steve!!

However, sometimes one needs a more personal type of interaction than is
yet possible over email. In an attempt to fill this perceived gap, 5 years
ago I decided to organize a 10-day course devoted to the 3D microscopy of
living cells. Although the course would also cover advanced 2D techniques,
the bulk of the time would be devoted to hands-on, laboratory sessions with
no more than 3-4 students to a 3D Workstation. To focus attention, students
were encouraged to design and carry out a 3D Live-cell Microscopy project
during 5 evening sessions in the 3D part of the course and them present the
results on the last morning.

Since that time, the course has served over 80 students from 18 countries,
and will be offered again this year June 16 -27 (with a 3D Image Processing
Workshop from June 29 - July 1. More info at
http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html).

My question is this:

Now that the field has progressed and so many groups are actively
publishing in the field (and helping out on the Email Net!), is there still
need for such a course?

Although organizing 15 faculty members to come to beautiful Vancouver
isn't so difficult, it costs the manufacturers an estimated $200,000 to
send the equipment and personnel for the 11, 3D Workstations and you know
who pays for that in the end!!

In addition, the controversy about who can, and cannot, do 2-photon
excitation and under what conditions becomes ever more strident. Besides
making organizing more onerous, this is particularly sad because it is
clear that the main advantage that 2-photon imaging has over other methods
is in
imaging live cells, where conventional anti-bleach agents cannot be used,
and where objects thicker than 20 micrometers must sometimes be viewed.

Last year, this controversy was almost certainly a factor in the last minute
non-appearance of a multi-photon instrument (we did have 2 others) and this
year it may lead to the total absence of one our major sponsors from earlier
years (we will have at least 9 others).

I ask whether we have outlived our usefulness because I want to know. And I
don't any more knowledgeable group to ask.

Although the student evaluations have been predominantly very positive,
and the course itself has definitely improved as we found out what worked
best, the trend in student numbers has not been encouraging: the first year
we had over 50 applications for 28 places, the second about 35 applications
and last year we had only 24 students after 4 dropped out at the last
moment. Applications this year are about the same as last year but the
March 1 deadline is still far away so this doesn't mean much.

I ask for your thoughts in planning beyond this year, because, given the
"informal" nature of the founding of the course, there is no "institutional
support" and tuition and expenses are handled through my personal account.
So far, we are solvent but I personally can't afford to make good losses,
should they occur.

And just to make sure there is no misunderstanding: I am not talking about
this year's course (1999). I am asking for the future.

Best Regards,

Jim Pawley





From: mike_boykin-at-pop.mindspring.com (Mike Boykin)
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 10:30:26 -0500
Subject: US TEM Cryo Techniques Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Emory University Neurology Microscopy Laboratory, the University of
Georgia Botany Department EM Laboratory, and Leica Microsystems, Inc.

Present a Cryo Techniques and Immunogold Workshop.

April 18-23, 1999 at the Campus of Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Objectives

1. To provide researchers the opportunity to learn the theory and practice
of cryo techniques for biological sample preparation and immunogold labeling.

2. To permit participants to process their own samples using these
techniques under expert guidance.

Techniques to be covered:

1. High pressure freezing
2. Cryo substitution,
3. Cryo ultramicrotomy
4. Immunogold labeling.


Workshop Faculty

Dr. Wim Voorhout
University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Dr. Jan Leunissen
Aurion Immunogold Reagents and Accessories, The Netherlands

Dr. Steven Hersch
Emory University, Department of Neurology

Ms. Beth Richardson
University of Georgia, Department of Botany

Fees

High Pressure Freezing $175.00
Cryosubstitution $175.00
Cryo ultramicrotomy $175.00
Immunogold labeling $175.00
All $550.00

Contact

Ms. Hong Yi
Department of Neurology
Emory University
404-727-8692
hyi-at-emory.edu

Mike Boykin
Leica Microsystems, Inc.
800-248-0665 X5092
Mike_Boykin-at-Mindspring.com







From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-aretha.jax.org
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 13:02:38 -0500
Subject: Re:EYES

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scitex America owned Leaf and its products. The address for Scitex was:
One O'Hare Center
6250 River Rd.
Rosemont, IL 60018
(847) 692-6000

The film holders were negative carriers made by Beseler for the Beseler 45M
series and CB7 enlargers. Why not contact Beseler either directly or
through a dealer to get a carrier for, say, 35 mm film. Then you can have
your shop cut the appropriate opening in the carrier for your film.

Below is the text of a message I received from Joe Peng at Scitex:
--------------------------------------------------------


Dear Joost,

Are you doing these eyes for TEM or LM? We do mice eyes for TEM (in
plastic) and have gotten some really beautiful shots of Desmett's membrane.
We have a whole fixation and embedding protocol worked out. The membranes
are perfect. If this is for TEM, let me know and I'll send you our
fixation and embedding protocol.

Regards!!

Lesley
Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191






From: Ricky L Vaughn :      RLVAUGHN-at-MAIL.UNMC.EDU
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 15:36:29 -0600
Subject: Iowa State Contact

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Who would be a contact person at Iowa State Univ. for biological TEM ?
Possibly involving Immuno EM. Thanks.

Rick L. Vaughn





From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 17:32:01 -0600
Subject: Re: Iowa State Contact

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I think Tracy and Jean would be a good start. There are some other TEM labs
on campus and in the Vet College and Labs. They should be able to tell you
about them, too. IThat's about as much as I know since I am over on the
Engineering/Materials side of campus.

Name: PEPPER TRACEY M
Phone(w): 515-294-3872
Phone(w): 515-769-2471
Fax: 515-294-3932
Email(w): tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Office: Address: 001 BESSEY
City/State: AMES, IA 50011-1020

Name: OLSEN JEAN ANN
Phone(w): 515-294-1009
Phone(w): 515-233-2696
Fax: 515-294-1401
Email(w): jaolsen-at-iastate.edu
Department: VETERINARY MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Office: Address: VMRI BLDG 2
City/State: AMES, IA 50011-1240

At 03:36 PM 1/19/99 -0600, you wrote:
}
} Who would be a contact person at Iowa State Univ. for biological TEM ?
} Possibly involving Immuno EM. Thanks.
}
} Rick L. Vaughn
}





From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 19 Jan 99 16:22:02 -0800
Subject: Evaporator

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

Does anyone out there have a vacuum evaporator that is taking up space? I =
have lots of space but no evaporator. =

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm






From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 11:27:58 +1100
Subject: TEM EDXA standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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with Novell_GroupWise; Wed, 20 Jan 1999 11:28:14 +1100
Message-Id: {s6a5bdce.092-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 5.2


We are just setting up TEM EDXA in a multidisciplinary unit, and need to =
acquire standards covering a wide range of applications. Any recommendatio=
ns, pitfalls etc? (Philips 430 TEM up to 300kV, Oxford ISIS ultra-thin =
window detector).=20
thanks
Sally


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator
Australian National University EM Unit
Research School of Biological Sciences
Box 475
ACT 2601, Canberra, Australia
FAX 06 (0)2 6279 8525






From: Travis Baroni :      tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 10:37:42 +0800 (WST)
Subject: Histogram Equalisation

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This message is in MIME format. The first part should be readable text,
while the remaining parts are likely unreadable without MIME-aware tools.
Send mail to mime-at-docserver.cac.washington.edu for more info.

--1602357120-23563501-916796844=:14600
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
Content-ID: {Pine.LNX.3.96.990120094735.14600C-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au}


Hi all,

I have a series of se images of a serial sectioned material which I would
like to display as a volume rendered image. I have aligned the images,
using an nih-image macro, however the brightness and contrast differs
between them. As I understand it I need to perform histgram equalisation
to correct for these differences.

I've noticed photoshop allows the user to load a transfer function using
the "curves" dialog box, but it doesn't give the desired result.

Is this because the function which you specify is not the cumulative
transfer function based on the reference histogram area??

Is there anyone who has done this before? I am using nih-image and
photoshop for these tasks. As for the reconstruction, well any suggestions
there would be apreciated also.

Thanks


----------------------------
Travis Baroni (PhD Student) |
tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au |
The University of Western |
Australia, Nedlands, WA. |
6907. |
----------------------------


--1602357120-23563501-916796844=:14600--





From: CBo3885576-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 22:53:24 EST
Subject: RE: SEM use in Museum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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As Curriculum & Technology Specialist for the Alliance for Education, I take a
Personal Scanning Electron Microscope (manufactured by RJ Lee, Pittsburgh, PA)
to schools and museums. It is easily operated by anyone who can use a joystick
and a mouse. I generally have students work in teams. Since our major funder
is the Air Force, I refer to the responsibilities in flying terms, such as
pilot and copilot.

We coordinate with the teacher to select specimens appropriate to their
curriculum. Since we are using 17 inch monitors, it's not a particularly
flashy activity for a large group. With large screens and appropriate sound
systems, it could be. The main thing, though, is to choose a system that can
be operated hands-on by young people.

For more information, you can call me at (937) 222-2934 between 9 and 5 EST.

Carlton Bowers





From: Travis Baroni :      tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 13:29:23 +0800 (WST)
Subject: Histogram Equalisation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I have a series of se images of a serial sectioned material which I would
like to display as a volume rendered image. I have aligned the images,
using an nih-image macro, however the brightness and contrast differs
between them. As I understand it I need to perform histgram equalisation
to correct for these differences.

I've noticed photoshop allows the user to load a transfer function using
the "curves" dialog box, but it doesn't give the desired result.

Is this because the function which you specify is not the cumulative
transfer function based on the reference histogram area??

Is there anyone who has done this before? I am using nih-image and
photoshop for these tasks. As for the reconstruction, well any suggestions
there would be apreciated also.

Thanks


Travis Baroni



----------------------------
Travis Baroni (PhD Student) |
tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au |
The University of Western |
Australia, Nedlands, WA. |
6907. |
----------------------------







From: J.Bruyntjes-at-voeding.tno.nl
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 09:16:12 +0100
Subject: EYES

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi there

Is anyone famillair with good fixation and staining techniques for rat and
chicken eyes. Is Davidson's fluid THE best fixative?
Someone in our lab wants to stain slides in order to examin Desmett's and
Bowman's membrane. Is it possible, to stain these kind of membranes?

Thanks in advance

Joost Bruyntjes
TNO Zeist
The Netherlands





From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 08:24:43 +0000 (BST)
Subject: Re: program to convert weight % to Atomic %

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Conversion of weight% to atomic %

Try using the excellent piece of Software "Electron Flight Simulator"
version 3.1-E. It is marketed by D, Chernoff of Small Woprld somewhere
in the US. I am running it on a PC and I am not sure its works on a Mac.
Contact David Joy at {djoy-at-utk.edu} as he has written much of the
software and will give you an adress for Chernoff.

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
University of Cambridge
UK


On Tue, 19 Jan 1999, by
way of Nestor J. Zaluzec wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Hi, I am looking for a program to convert weight % to Atomic % and vise
} versa preferably on a Power Mac.. An old program we have works on pre '90
} Mac's but not on the newer ones. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks- Mike
}
}
}
}






From: Dr. Ranan Gulhan Aktas :      ranaoz-at-turk.net
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 10:23:03 +0200
Subject: Re-embedding methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all;

Is anyone familiar with the re-embedding methods of paraffin embedded
tissues in resin? I was asked to re-embed human lung tumor specimens
into resin and reclassify them on electron microscope level. I will
appreciate if you could send me your
reembedding protocol.

Thanks in advance,

Regards,

Ranan

Ranan Gulhan AKTAS, M. D.
Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine
Pathology Department
Edirne 22030
TURKEY

Tel: +90 284 235 44 68
Fax: +90 284 235 76 52
e-mail: ranaoz-at-turk.net








From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 08:28:17 +0000 (BST)
Subject: Re: Evaporator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Paul:=20
I have two rather old evaporators which still get 10-6 torr. I will give=20
then to you but you must pay the shipping costs !

Patrick E=A3chlin
Multi-Imaging Centre
University of Cambridge
UK

On 19 Jan 1999, Paul
Webster wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} =20
} =20
} Hi,
} =20
} Does anyone out there have a vacuum evaporator that is taking up space? =
I have lots of space but no evaporator. =20
} Paul Webster, Ph.D
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles, CA 90057
} phone:213 273 8026
} fax: 213 413 6739
} e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
} http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm
} =20
} =20
} =20






From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Philippe=2DAndr=E9?= Buffat :      philippe.buffat-at-epfl.ch
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 13:06:26 +0100
Subject: Re: Br in epoxy resin

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Martin Roe discovered some Br in epoxies and asked for the source. I gave
him an answer off line. However I see some other answers and I think that I
should add my two cents for everybody:

I have a good friend who worked a long time as microscopist for CIBA before
it came Novartis=8A

He told me about 5 years ago that bromine is voluntarily added (for some
reasons=8A) in certain types of epoxies. So it is not a contamination, nor a
new thing! So he (or his supplier) has probably just changed his epoxy
source.

We used some compound sample made of A alloysl bits in epoxy to show to our
students how dangerous it can be to work only at low kV in EDS. You have a
nice superposition of Al Ka and Br L lines. If the uncertainty on
sulfur/molybdenum is quite well known, that on Al/Br confuses quite a lot
of people because Br is often unexpected!

Yours

Philippe Buffat

__________________________________________________________________
Philippe Buffat
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Centre Interdepartemental de Microscopie Electronique
Address: EPFL-CIME, Batiment MX-C, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Phone: +41(21)693 29 83 Fax: +41(21)693 44 01 (Central European Time)
E-mail: philippe.buffat-at-epfl.ch, WWW URL http://cimewww.epfl.ch/
______________________________ Eudora F2.1 ___________________________







From: Jim Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mailserv.mta.ca
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 08:37:44 -0400
Subject: Re: program to convert weight % to Atomic %

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Why not use a spreadsheet?

JME

by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec wrote:

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} Hi, I am looking for a program to convert weight % to Atomic % and vise
} versa preferably on a Power Mac.. An old program we have works on pre '90
} Mac's but not on the newer ones. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks- Mike



--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca







From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 07:39:43 EST
Subject: Re: Histogram Equalisation

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In a message dated 1/19/99 10:19:06 PM, tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au writes:

} As I understand it I need to perform histgram equalisation
} to correct for these differences.

In your case what you should really do is apply a transfer function that is
the cumulative histogram of ALL of the images in the stack to each image, not
equalize them individually.

John Russ





From: Rik Brydson :      MTLRMDB-at-LUCS-MAC.NOVELL.LEEDS.AC.UK
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 07:40:31 -0600
Subject: POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOW

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UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS
School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOW


Applications are invited for this post funded by the EPSRC (Waste
Minimisation Managed
Programme) to join an active research group working with Dr. Mark A. Keane
(Department of
Chemical Engineering) and Dr. Rik Brydson (Department of Materials) on the
development of
supported metal catalysts for the "environmentally friendly" treatment of
chlorinated aromatics
(see, for example Appl. Catal. B: Environmental 18 (1998) 241-250). The
project is a
fundamental study of catalytic hydrodechlorination and will involve the
preparation, testing
and characterisation of a range of catalyst systems with an emphasis on
developing an
understanding of reaction kinetics and mechanism. The successful applicant
should have a
PhD in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering or Materials with a strong background=
in
Heterogeneous Catalysis: some experience in catalyst characterisation is a
decided advantage.
The post is available from 1 April 1999, or as soon as possible thereafter,
for a period of three
years

Salary Range: RA1A3 =A3 15,462-=A317,226

Informal Enquiries may be made to Dr. Mark A. Keane , Tel: +44 113 233
2428, E-mail:
chemaak-at-leeds.ac.uk

Interested candidates should apply in writing with a detailed CV and the
names of two referees
to Dr. Mark A. Keane, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of
Leeds, Leeds LS2
9JT, UK

Closing Date: 1 March 1999
__________________________________________________________
Dr. Rik Brydson,
University Research Fellow,
Electron Optical Unit,
Department of Materials,
School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering
University of Leeds,
Leeds LS2 9JT,
U.K.

Tel: 44 + (0)113 233 2369
=46ax: 44 + (0)113 242 2531
Web: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/materials

______________________________

**************************
Join email discussion list for all aspects of
Electron Microscopy and Analytical Spectroscopy (LEMAS)

send message "join lemas firstname lastname"
to mailbase-at-mailbase.ac.uk
**************************







From: Jonathan P. McGovern :      semrus-at-telusplanet.net
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 08:00:46 -0600
Subject: Batch file conversion

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There is a good shareware product named GraphicWorkshop Pro from
Alchemy Mindworks in Ontario, Canada. It is a very good batch converter for
Windows XXX.XXX based operating systems.  They have a friendly web
site to down load a copy:www.midworkshop.com. We of course have no
financial interest in this product.  Consider the Canadian dollar and
our American friends can get it for about 65% of cost which I think is
$40.00 if you register it.  And we all register shareware, don't we?
Jon McGovern J. P. McGovern and Associates jon-at-microscopy.net







From: Riitta Miettinen :      rimietti-at-jalus.uku.fi
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 16:09:21 WET-2WET
Subject: post-doc positions-Finland

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2 Postdoctoral positions

available immediately in Department of Neuroscience and Neurology,
University of Kuopio.

We are seeking suitably qualified persons to join a progressive
multidisciplinary group investigating Alzheimer=92s disease. The
experimental projects will investigate the efficacy of estrogen
replacement therapy in preventing structural and functional impairment
in different animal models of Alzheimer=92s disease.

We are looking for applicants who have experience in at least one of
the following specialities:

Histopathology/histochemistry, electron microscopy, autoradiography.

Salary and date of commencement are negotiable.

For further information please contact:

Research Director
Paavo Riekkinen, Jr. M.D., PhD.
Dept. Neuroscience and Neurology
Univ. Kuopio
FIN-70211 Kuopio
Finland
Tel. 358-17-162016
Fax. 358-17-162048
E-mail: paavojr.riekkinen-at-uku.fi

Riitta Miettinen, Ph.D.
Dept. Neuroscience and Neurology
Univ. Kuopio
P.O.Box 1627
FIN-70211 Kuopio
FINLAND
E-mail: Riitta.Miettinen-at-uku.fi
Tel. 358-17-162761
Fax: 358-17-162048





From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 08:37:14 -0600
Subject: Re: Histogram Equalisation

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I join John Russ in saying that you do NOT want to apply histogram
equalization to each image individually, although I am not quite sure that
what he suggested is quite what you want.

I suppose that there may be some differences in exposure between the images
for whatever reason. The challenge will be to get the same features to the
same level of gray. That is, if you have some light features on a dark
background, you always want those light features to be at the same light
gray level and the background to be at the same darker gray level.
Histogram equalization is definitely NOT the tool you want to use since it
will move gray levels depending on their population in the image. It
normally increases contrast between some pixels and decreases it between
others and hardly gives you a uniform transfer function for all images.

I am not very familiar with Photoshop. I thought the tool you would look
for was called something like "levels". I think you would want to primarily
use the gamma adjustment to bring two reference features (e.g., light
features and dark background) to the same gray levels in all images, then
maybe use some tweaking of brightness and contrast to finish the match (per
John Mackenzie's recipe). I will leave it to you to figure out which tool
to use (histogram or a pixel cursor or ...) to determine when the images
are matched. In my own work I do not need a quantitative match, but only a
qualitative, visually apparent match. Therefore, I just eyeball a match
between one reference image and all the others as I adjust them.

WES

At 10:37 AM 1/20/99 +0800, you wrote:
}
} Hi all,
}
} I have a series of se images of a serial sectioned material which I would
} like to display as a volume rendered image. I have aligned the images,
} using an nih-image macro, however the brightness and contrast differs
} between them. As I understand it I need to perform histgram equalisation
} to correct for these differences.
}
} I've noticed photoshop allows the user to load a transfer function using
} the "curves" dialog box, but it doesn't give the desired result.
}
} Is this because the function which you specify is not the cumulative
} transfer function based on the reference histogram area??
}
} Is there anyone who has done this before? I am using nih-image and
} photoshop for these tasks. As for the reconstruction, well any suggestions
} there would be apreciated also.
}
} Thanks
} ----------------------------
} Travis Baroni (PhD Student) |
} tbaroni-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au |
} The University of Western |
} Australia, Nedlands, WA. |
} 6907. |
} ----------------------------

----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications






From: Gang Ning :      gning-at-mcw.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 09:21:59 -0600
Subject: Lubricate Ultracut

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Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi, Dear all -

I have an AO Reichert Ultracut and a LKB knifemaker. They have been in a
storage for a while and need to be cleaned and lubricated. Does anyone
has such experience in lubricating them and can give me some suggestions
about what kind of lubricator(s) that I should use and how to do that?

Thank you in advance.

Gang Ning
EM Facility
Medical College of Wisconsin



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--------------846215E1EFF5EB2068C50004--






From: Patricia Hales :      hales-at-med.mcgill.ca
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 11:53:11 -0500
Subject: Reichert-Jung OMu2 parts

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Hallo to all!

We have two old Reichert-Jung OMu2 microtomes which are in good working
order with one exception - we are in need of a "female" allen key part
which is used to tighten the block into the chuck. Does anyone have any
they no longer need? Or know where to get one? Or has found a substitute
which is easily available?

Thanks in advance,

Pat Hales
McGill University
Dept. of Anatomy & Cell Biology
hales-at-med.mcgill.ca






From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 10:22:53 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: EYES

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Hi Joost-
you could refer to an article published in Cornea 12(3): 255-260, 1993
(Rock et al.,)
we used a modified Karnovsky's 2.5% glut, 2.0% paraform, in a 300-momol,
in cacodylate bfr., post fixed in OsO4, dehydrated, embedded in epon.

then using a Mallory's Azure II, methylene-blue followed by a basic
fuchsin counter stain protocol we developed a fat and effective method for
identifying and differentiating various regions of the cornea. Descemet's
membrane stains blue, Bowman's layer stains pink, the collagen of the
stroma striated pink & blue, scar tissue blue, and keratocytes blue.
staining differences in the various regions are presumably attributed to
the proteoglycan content and/or the various collagen types

hope this helps
-Mike Rock

On Wed, 20 Jan 1999 J.Bruyntjes-at-voeding.tno.nl-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com wrote:

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}
} Hi there
}
} Is anyone famillair with good fixation and staining techniques for rat and
} chicken eyes. Is Davidson's fluid THE best fixative?
} Someone in our lab wants to stain slides in order to examin Desmett's and
} Bowman's membrane. Is it possible, to stain these kind of membranes?
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Joost Bruyntjes
} TNO Zeist
} The Netherlands
}
}






From: McLean, Dorrance :      dmclea-at-sandia.gov
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 12:02:09 -0700
Subject: Analytical Standards for SS

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Dear All,
I need to obtain some TEM analytical standards for stainless steel (for
example, a standard containing just Ni, Cr, and Fe, in a well characterized
composition). I was hoping for something along the lines of Cr ~ 28%, Ni
~22% and Fe ~ 50%. It would be great if I could find a sample that was TEM
"ready", so that I don't have to make a new sample. If anyone knows of a
source for such a sample, I would be grateful for a reference.
Thanks in advance,
Dorrance





From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 11:11:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Nikon Epifluorescence wanted

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Does anyone have epifluorescence attachments for a Nikon Optiphot that
they wish to sell? I'm looking for a complete epi set-up.

Thanks,
Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu

The box said "Requires Windows98 or better.", so I bought a Macintosh.








From: Larry :      mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 11:53:44 -0800
Subject: cryostat user comments

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We have a Microm HM 500 0 sold by Zeiss. It has been very reliable for
three years and gives excellent sections with minimal adjustment. The only
caveat is the refrigeration system. A compressor was replaced under
warranty and recently we experienced a leak of refrigerant. Local
refrigeration people can do the work (Zeiss is not licensed to do it). I
might add that refrigeration problems are common in this building due to
various factors.
Larry D. Ackerman
Lily & Yuh Nung Jan Laboratories
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
UCSF, Box 0725, Rm U226
533 Parnassus Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94143

(415) 476-8751 FAX (415) 476-5774
mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu





From: Sally Burns :      burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 16:09:47 -0500
Subject: TEM polycarbonate filters and tissue culture

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I will be receiving a sample consisting of a culture grown on a
polycarbonate membrane (Transwell permeable). I need to know any pitfalls
working with the membrane!
Is this membrane compatible with acetone dehydration? Is it compatible with
a Spurrs resin? Does anyone have experience in this area?

Thanks -
Sally Burns

Sally Burns
Center for Electron Optics
B5 Pesticide Research Center
(517) 355-5004

burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu






From: tom moninger :      moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 16:06:48 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: TEM polycarbonate filters and tissue culture

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I have processed many filter membranes for TEM and SEM. I follow standard
procedures with the following changes;

-dehydrate in EtOH, not acetone (eats the polycarbonate)
-embed in Epon 812 or equivalent (I use Ted Pella's Eponate 12)
-times can be shortened conciderably (Fix 20 min, wash and
dehydrate steps 5 min, resin changes around 30 min.)
-do a couple more resin changes than normal

I carry out the entire process (including embedment) in a 24 well plate
and cut the filters out with a jeweler's saw after polymerization.

Thomas Moninger moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
University of Iowa Central Microscopy Research Facility
http://www.uiowa.edu/~cemrf
Views expressed are mine.

On Wed, 20 Jan 1999, Sally Burns wrote:

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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I will be receiving a sample consisting of a culture grown on a
} polycarbonate membrane (Transwell permeable). I need to know any pitfalls
} working with the membrane!
} Is this membrane compatible with acetone dehydration? Is it compatible with
} a Spurrs resin? Does anyone have experience in this area?
}
} Thanks -
} Sally Burns
}
} Sally Burns
} Center for Electron Optics
} B5 Pesticide Research Center
} (517) 355-5004
}
} burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
}
}






From: Bruce Cunningham :      cunningham1-at-llnl.gov
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 18:26:48 -0600
Subject: Small particle filtration for LEO 438

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We have recently acquired a LEO 438 and have need, for safety reasons, to
provide
small particle (1 micron) filtration at the inlet side of both the roughing
and turbo
pumps. I believe we can use conventional filters in-line on the roughing
pump, but
probably cannot afford to restrict flow at the turbo pump inlet. Does
anyone have advice
or ideas on how we might provide small particle filtration, perhaps via a
commercial or
custom built free-flow filtering device placed just under the perforated
screen at the floor
of the chamber. Servicing is a consideration. Also, any advice on
filtering the roughing
pump would also be much appreciated.

Thank you very much for your consideration.

Bruce Cunningham
High Explosives Application Facility (HEAF)
Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

--------------------------------------
Bruce Cunningham
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
P.O. Box 808, L-282
Livermore, CA 94550
cunningham1-at-llnl.gov
TEL: 510-423-0135
FAX: 510-424-3281







From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 16:48:10 -0800 (PST)
Subject: ACLAR Manufacturer?

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Hey Boarders,

I am looking for the company that makes ACLAR. I need to contact
them. I don't need vendors I need the manufacturer of this wonder
substance. So if anybody out there knows who it is, please let me know.


Tired of changing my fingerprints with borken slides,


Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: Gary Radice :      gradice-at-richmond.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 15:17:31 -0500
Subject: Re: is it practical to make color pictures from gray ones

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Gloria wrote:

} With a good camera for initial camera, the results can be better than any
} mid range color camera!! Definitely worth it.

What filter sets would people recommend? And for light microscopy I assume
the filters are usually placed out of the focal plane, maybe somewhere near
the field diaphram?

Gary Radice 804-289-8107
Department of Biology 804-289-8233 (FAX)
University of Richmond gradice-at-richmond.edu
Richmond VA 23173







From: Jean Raleigh :      Jean.Raleigh-at-nuigalway.ie
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 11:16:57 +0000
Subject: SEM processing containers

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HI
I am attempting to examine embrylogical samples of a marine bivalve
using SEM. But any containers I have used during the processing
proceedure have proved indequate. I need containers which will hold
samples down to a size of 30um. I have used filters placed in processing
capsules but they are very awkward, and the sample has more often than
not been lost during the proceedure.
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Jean Raleigh,
Marine Zoology Dept.,
Natioal University Galway
Ireland





From: ricardo :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 22:15:17 +1100
Subject: COMPUTER VIRUS NOW INFECTING HUMANS!

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COMPUTER VIRUS NOW INFECTING HUMANS!
Trojan Horse Supervirus Could Be Worse Than AIDS, Warn Docs --
And TWICE As Deadly!
by Kevin Creed/Weekly World News

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----


CHICAGO, ILL. -- Concerned scientists say the dreaded "Trojan Horse"
computer virus has made the jump to humans -- and the brain-eating bug may
soon be sweeping through America, claiming even more human lives than the
AIDS epidemic!
An unidentified 38-year-old man known only as Patient Zero has been
diagnosed with the virus that had been heretofore found only in PCs.


"We've been dreading this day," said noted virologist Dr. Frederick
Attingale who made the terrifying diagnosis. "We knew it was only a matter
of time. That's how these things work.
"At some point, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome -- AIDS -- made the jump
from monkeys to man. Now, in a similar way, the Trojan Horse virus has
worked its way into the human population. Both viral transmissions were
bound to happen sooner or later."

Dr. Attingale will not name the Chicago-area hospital where Patient Zero is
being held. But the prognosis is not good.
"People whose PCs have been infected know the virus eats away the hard disks
and 'nervous systems' before anyone is aware that their computers have been
infected.

"I'm afraid the same thing is happening in this man's body."

The patient, a junior executive with a large investment firm, is suffering
from nerve spasms, hearing and vision loss and severe deterioration of the
parts of the brain that govern memory, reasoning, math and language. His
brain and nerves are being literally eaten away.

"There's no known cure and the illness continues to worsen," Dr. Attingale
said. "He can barely communicate with us now."

The alarming situation came to light early last month when the patient went
to his family physician complaining of headaches and memory lapses.

The doctor, suspecting a virus, referred him to Dr. Attingale.


For more information on this deadly virus, including how it enters the body
and interviews with other doctors, pick up the current edition of Weekly
World News (1/26/99), at your local supermarket or newsstand! Or better yet,
why not subscribe and have it mailed to your home or office!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----







From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 08:50:34 -0500
Subject: Re: ACLAR Manufacturer?

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I have no experience with the Ultracut but I am aware that the surface
between the cutting head and the main structure of the LKB Knifemaker (LKB
7801A) must NOT be lubricated. The metals are supposed to provide the
correct level of friction to allow glass to be clamped at the correct
pressure. So perhaps my message is don't lubricate anything until you are
certain.

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
----------
} From: Gang Ning
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.co


Aclar is made by and can be purchased in bulk from :

Pro Plastics Inc
1190 Sylvan Street
P.O. Box 1489
Linden NJ 07036

201-925-5555

Area code may have changed
At 04:48 PM 01/20/1999 -0800, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America







From: Gary Radice :      gradice-at-richmond.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 15:17:31 -0500
Subject: Re: is it practical to make color pictures from gray ones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gloria wrote:

} With a good camera for initial camera, the results can be better than any
} mid range color camera!! Definitely worth it.

What filter sets would people recommend? And for light microscopy I assume
the filters are usually placed out of the focal plane, maybe somewhere near
the field diaphram?

Gary Radice 804-289-8107
Department of Biology 804-289-8233 (FAX)
University of Richmond gradice-at-richmond.edu
Richmond VA 23173







From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 21 Jan 99 09:09:47 -0500
Subject: ESEM-FEG

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I would appreciate hearing from anyone with an ESEM-FEG. Please respond
to me personally as I would like to talk to you re: this instrument.

Thanks, Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Microscopy Center in Agriculture FAX: 765-494-5896
Dept. of Botany & Plant Pathology E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Purdue University
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057






From: NJWS-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 09:38:42 EST
Subject: Re: Lubricate LKB 7800

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by imo29.mx.aol.com (IMOv18.1) id DMMGa01223;
Thu, 21 Jan 1999 09:38:42 -0500 (EST)
Message-ID: {cb9380fd.36a73bf2-at-aol.com}


Not only should the knifemaker not be lubricated but all sliding surfaces
between the clamping head and pedestal should be periodically cleaned with
acetone or alcohol. Any lubrication will attract dirt which will affect the
gravity drop of the pins onto the glass,it will also cause the clamping head
to move up when pressure is applied to make the break. Many times poor knives
can be eliminated by this simple cleaning procedure. It will necessitate
removing the clamping head from the pedestal
Good luck,
Norm Woodside
former LKB product specialist





From: EVERETT RAMER :      Everett.Ramer-at-fetc.doe.gov
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 10:10:28 -0500
Subject: Br in epoxy resin -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Out of curiosity I mentioned this to a chemist colleague. He indicated that
bromine is sometimes added to resins as a flame retardant. In some
cases antimony is also added to boost the effect of the bromine.
Everett Ramer
Federal Energy Technology Center

} } } "Martin J. Roe" {mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk} 01/18/99 07:11am } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
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Hello fellow listservers,
I've recently discovered a problem with a batch of a particular
type of cold setting epoxy resin. I have been using this batch of
resin on an infrequent basis for about 2 years (and is probably
about 4 years old). When I analysed some of the cured resin by
microanalysis last week appreciable bromine (Br) was detected as well
as the usual chlorine content (Br} Cl). The 'introduction' of the Br
is a recent thing because I also analysed some resin (from the same
batch) prepared approximately one year ago. The analysis of this
showed no Br with Cl the only detectable element present (with the Be
window of the EDS detector in place that is). Is it possible
therefore for the resin to in some way deteriorate with time and for
Br compounds to form? If so, what are the chemical reactions going on
here. I'm very certain that the Br is not a contaminant. Also, I
should point out that if this is a chemical degradation of the resin
then the physical characteristics of the cured resin are normal. I
would appreciate any thoughts on the matter. Regards

Martin Roe
Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
Aberdeen
AB15 8QH
Scotland
United Kingdom







From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 10:48:24 -0500
Subject: KEVEX 7700

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_000C_01BE452B.91E58140
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I have a question about the KEVEX 7700 XRF system. We have been trying =
for some time to get the output of the unit into a PC through the =
printer port. Apparently it can be done and we would like to know if =
anyone out there has tried this and what sort of parameters and software =
have they used to connect to the 7700 unit. Any help would be greatly =
appreciated. Currently all we get from the printer output to the PC via =
a hyperterminal link is just garbeld. Thanks in advance.

______________________
Roberto Garcia
Senior Analyst, Metallography
North Carolina State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com

------=_NextPart_000_000C_01BE452B.91E58140
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charset="iso-8859-1"
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{HTML} {HEAD}
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http-equiv=3DContent-Type}
{STYLE} {/STYLE}

{META content=3D'"MSHTML 5.00.0910.1309"' name=3DGENERATOR} {/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D2} I have a question about the KEVEX 7700 XRF system. =
We have=20
been trying for some time to get the output of the unit into a PC =
through the=20
printer port. Apparently it can be done and we would like to know if =
anyone out=20
there has tried this and what sort of parameters and software have they =
used to=20
connect to the 7700 unit. Any help would be greatly appreciated. =
Currently all=20
we get from the printer output to the PC via a hyperterminal link is =
just=20
garbeld. Thanks in advance. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D2} ______________________ {BR} Roberto Garcia {BR} Senior =
Analyst,=20
Metallography {BR} North Carolina State University {BR} Analytical =
Instrumentation=20
Facility {BR} Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC {BR} Raleigh, NC 27695-7531 {BR} {A=20
href=3D"mailto:rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com"} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com {/A} {/FONT} {=
/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_000C_01BE452B.91E58140--






From: David McKemy :      ddmckemy-at-med.unr.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 08:31:21 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Re: ACLAR Manufacturer?

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Dear Paula,

You can get ACLAR from Allied Signal, Inc. Westwood Road. Pottsville, PA.
17901. The phone number that we have appears to no longer be the correct
one but I am sure you can find the number using information.

Good Luck.

---------------------------------------
David McKemy
Dept. of Pharmacology/318
University of Nevada School of Medicine
Howard Bldg. Rm.#214
Reno, Nevada 89557
Phone: (775) 784-4537
Fax: (775) 784-1620
Email: ddmckemy-at-med.unr.edu

On Wed, 20 Jan 1999, Paula Sicurello wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hey Boarders,
}
} I am looking for the company that makes ACLAR. I need to contact
} them. I don't need vendors I need the manufacturer of this wonder
} substance. So if anybody out there knows who it is, please let me know.
}
}
} Tired of changing my fingerprints with borken slides,
}
}
} Paula :-)
}
} Paula Sicurello
} UC Berkeley
} Electron Microscope Lab
} psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
} phone: 510-642-2085
} fax: 510-643-6207
} http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML
}
}
}






From: Louie Kerr :      lkerr-at-mbl.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 12:01:27 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM processing containers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Jean,

I routinely refer to two articles regarding this type of SEM prep.

Preparation of Microbiological Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy,
L.P. Watson, A.E. Mckee, and B.R. Merrell. Scanning Electron
Microscopy/1980/II, pages 45-56.

Specimen Preparation Techniques for Aquatic Organisms, T.K. Maugel, D.B.
Bonar, W.J. Creegan and E.B. Small. Scanning Electron Microscopy/1980/II,
pages 57-77.

Hope this helps,
Louie

At 11:16 AM +0000 1/21/99, Jean Raleigh wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu







From: Tim P. LaFave Jr. :      lafatim-at-charlie.cns.iit.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 11:20:23 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Optical Amplifier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Soon I may need to study an optical fiber with a periodic refractive index
(doped). Since I am just beginning TEM studies, I am hoping that someone
may be able to suggest the typical method of observing optical fibers with
a TEM (these optical fibers are typically 100-125 microns in diameter). I
suspect that thinning the fibers lengthwise may be a possible means,
however, I would like to see a reference where optical fibers have been
studied...or perhaps similar geometries like biological hair samples
(though optical fibers are generally much thinner).

cross-sectional thinning (circular samples) is useless since we need to
study period structures along the length of the fiber.

Thanks

__ _-==-=_,-.
/--`' \_-at---at-.-- {
Tim (TJ) LaFave Jr. `--'\ \ {___/.
Department of Physics \ \\ " /
University of North Carolina, Charlotte } =\\_/` {
Charlotte, NC 28223 ____ /= | \_|/
_' `\ _/=== \___/
(704)547-3392 [x4] `___/ //\./=/~\====\
(704)509-6622 [Hm] \ // / | ===:
http://www.iit.edu/~lafatim | ._/_,__|_ ==: __
\/ \\ \\`--| / \\
---------- +*+ ---------- | _ \\: /==:-\
`.__' `-____/ |--|==:
Such that the future be theirs \ \ ===\ :==:`-'
to shape and direct. _} \ ===\ /==/
-----------------------------------------------------------------






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 14:00:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Lubricate LKB 7800

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OK, so we should not lube the knifemaker at the clamping head, but what
should we do with ours that squeeks so bad it makes your teeth hurt? Our
LKB 7800 has some serious squeeking when you increase the upward pressure
for the break (and release it). Can we lube the arm that causes the
pressing up motion (the one on the front of the machine)? It's driving us
all crazier than we already are. So any suggestions will be greatly
appreciated.

I was thinking of taking the cover off the knifebreaker and see if I could
find any lubrication points, is that a bad thing to do?

Squeeking loudly in Berkeley,


Paula :-)


} Not only should the knifemaker not be lubricated but all sliding surfaces
} between the clamping head and pedestal should be periodically cleaned with
} acetone or alcohol. Any lubrication will attract dirt which will affect the
} gravity drop of the pins onto the glass,it will also cause the clamping head
} to move up when pressure is applied to make the break. Many times poor knives
} can be eliminated by this simple cleaning procedure. It will necessitate
} removing the clamping head from the pedestal
} Good luck,
} Norm Woodside
} former LKB product specialist

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: Maoxu Qian :      mxq-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 14:22:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: >high T glue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi, All,

Does anyone knows where can I get high temperature conductive glue for TEM
sample preparation? I need to glue a ceramic sample to Cu grid and
Ion-mill it then heat treat to 1000 C in air before TEM observation.
Thank you in advance.

Maoxu Qian

****************************
* Maoxu Qian, Ph.D. *
* Dept of MSE, box 352120 *
* University of Washington *
* Seattle, WA 98195 *
* mxq-at-u.washington.edu *
* (206)616-3973(phone) *
* (206)543-3100(fax) *
****************************







From: Claypool :      pclypool-at-sgi.net
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 17:52:48 -0500
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe

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fn:Paul (Ted) Claypool
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--------------180495243C352E9EA0670C81--






From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 11:55:43 -0600
Subject: Re: KEVEX 7700

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would think that it would be a simple enough issue. I have done similar
things in the past. In fact you are probably pretty close to the solution.

It sounds like you probably have a mismatch in the baud rate between the two
computers - it would give you garbage. The PC side is fairly easy to change
for
experimentation while the Kevex side is harder to change. I don't think the
old
DEC serial cards supported more than 19,200 baud. We had some old printers
that
required the rate set down to 2400. You could check your printer or Kevex
manuals to see if there is any info in there. Otherwise, you could just keep
setting the baud rate down on the PC side and reprinting until something
sensible comes through.

The specs on the port are usually 8-bit, no parity, 1 stop bit. That should be
the same as the default PC setting. Most DEC stuff was setup to use XON/XOFF
software handshaking as oppsed to DTR or other hardware handshaking.

Good luck, and please let me know how it works.

WS

At 10:48 AM 1/21/99 -0500, you wrote:
}
} I have a question about the KEVEX 7700 XRF system. We have been trying for
} some time to get the output of the unit into a PC through the printer port.
} Apparently it can be done and we would like to know if anyone out there has
} tried this and what sort of parameters and software have they used to
connect
} to the 7700 unit. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Currently all we
get
} from the printer output to the PC via a hyperterminal link is just garbeld.
} Thanks in advance.
}
} ______________________
} Roberto Garcia
} Senior Analyst, Metallography
} North Carolina State University
} Analytical Instrumentation Facility
} Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
} Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
} {mailto:rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com








From: Sonny :      pprayoon-at-du8.mat.stevens-tech.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 18:51:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: PC-PDF file

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello, everyone
Is there anyone that has "PC-PDF" JCPDS-ICDD PDF-2 DATABASE files of RuO4
and RuO2 or knows from where we can get these files? We have a very old
PC-PDF file that has not been upgraded for several years. I would
appreciate any information from anyone.

With best regards,
Pipat Prayoonthong
Graduate student
Materials Science & Engineering Department.
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, NJ 07030







From: Claypool :      pclypool-at-sgi.net
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 20:04:29 -0500
Subject: New Email

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Greetings Everyone,
At one time or another, i have recieved an email from you and am just
letting you know my email addy has changed from pclypool-at-sgi.net to
claypool-at-serve.com

This email might concern the SX-50 Users group, contacts dealing with a
Task8verC Microprobe, or you might just be a personal friend (or all the
above hehe).

Thanx again
Paul (Ted) Claypool

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url:http://www.rjlg.com
org:RJ Lee Group;Environmental / Analytical
version:2.1
email;internet:pclypool-at-sgi.net
title:Engineer Scientist
adr;quoted-printable:;;350 Hochberg Road=0D=0A;Monroeville ;Pennsylvania;15146;USA
fn:Paul (Ted) Claypool
end:vcard

--------------0625152F5E7A2CB151E1C380--






From: VLADIS-at-MAINE.MAINE.EDU
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 99 19:05:17 EST
Subject: Re: Re-embedding methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Ranan,

The following procedure may sound a little obvious, but I imagine
you may be facing a rather limited access to all those books and
journals, and I would feel really happy if this could help.
I do wish you all the best in your EM lab-raising mission!

First, you will have to select smaller, "EM-size", portions of your
paraffin-embedded specimens, cut them out and thoroughly deparaffinate.
I would recommend at least 2 hours in xylene with frequent changes of
xylene and some agitation; you should be able to see when it's all gone.
Then several changes of 100% (anhydrous) ethanol, at least 1-1.5 h
total time, and then gradually down the ethanol concentrations, like
95-85-70-50, 30 min or more at each step.
Rinse 3x5 min in your choice of phosphate or cacodylate buffer, and
then osmicate for 1-2 h, 1% OsO4 in the same buffer. Then dehydrate
and embed for EM as you normally would.

Needless to say, even with the best original fixation the material
will look pityful, but most of those diagnostically significant
cell-to-cell junctions, filaments, etc. must still be there.

Best of luck!
Sincerely,
Vlad.

Vladislav V. Speransky
Postdoctoral Research Associate
School of Marine Sciences
University of Maine
5722 Deering Hall
Orono ME 04469-5722
Ph: 207 581 2998
FAX: 207 581 2969
Email: vladis-at-maine.maine.edu





From: Missy Josephson :      ejosephs-at-neuron.uchc.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 22:01:03 -0600
Subject: Aclar

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I have a slip that was attached to a roll of ACLAR giving specifications
and the following company name and address:
Engineered Plastics
Specialty Plastic Films
Pottsville, PA 17901

I have no knowledge of whether this company still exists. I would guess the
roll of ACLAR was 5 years old or more.

Missy Josephson


Eleanor Josephson, DVM, PhD
University of Connecticut Health Center
Department of Anatomy MC-3405
263 Farmington Ave.
Farmington, CT 06030-3405
Ph.(860)679-2463
Fax (860)679-1274
ejosephs-at-neuron.uchc.edu







From: :      Terry&Linda-at-gnet-hk.com
Date: Wed, 20 Jan 1999 19:01:49 -0800
Subject: Pay us a visit. #3B54

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55FC

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From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 03:54:48 -0500
Subject: EM912 diffraction astigmatism problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Petra,

I have not seen a reply to your posting so try this.

Astigmatism in an image of a modern TEM is always down to cleanlyness. I=
f
you have a gross change in astigmatism, if everything is working correctl=
y,
it has to be dirt. Lets look at typical symptoms for dirt in a system:-

1. An increase in astigmatism levels due to the charge on the dirt
affecting the beam.

2. Beam movement, gradual in one direction as the charge grows then
rapid in the return direction as the problem is discharged. When the
charge reaches a level sufficient to touch earthed components within the
system it discharges, the problem starts all over again.

3. The problem will vary depending upon the number of electrons
hitting the area that is charging and their energy. The greater the numb=
er
of electrons you place in the charging area the faster it will charge. T=
he
higher the kV the more chance you have of the beam penetrating the
contamination and finding an earth; less or no charge. The mode of
operation in which you are working will also change the charge rate. In
the normal imaging mode the setting of the diffraction lens does not plac=
e
the beam near the problem area of your coulmn - no noticable astigmatism
change in this mode. In the diffraction mode the diffraction lens focal
length is dramatically changed hence electrons in larger numbers strike t=
he
problem area and we see what happens; trouble.

There is only one solution as the problem will get worse - strip the
column. I am sorry for the engineer because this is a rare move on a
modern machine BUT IT MUST BE DONE!

How to make friends with service engineers this is not, but it is THE onl=
y
solution!

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: Randi Olsen :      randio-at-fagmed.uit.no
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 10:02:39 +0100
Subject: Re: Re-embedding methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Ranan.

Here is the method used by the pathology people around here.

- Remove tissue of interest from parafin embedded specimen, cut in 1-2 mm
cubes.
- Leave the specimens in fresh 1% OsO4 in XYLENE for 1,5 - 2 hrs.
- Wash in xylene 2 times 10 min
- One part resin(we use Epon-Araldite) + two parts xylene for 1 hr.
- 1 part resin + 1 part xylene for 1 hr.
- Resin for 30 min to 1 hour without a lid on the glass

All this steps on a carousel.

Embedd as usual, but keep the specimens in the resin over night before
polymerization.

Good luck!

Best regards
Randi Olsen

Randi Olsen
Department of Electron Microscopy
Faculty of Medicine
University of Tromso
MH-Breivika
N-9037 TROMSO
NORWAY

tel: +47 77 64 53 15
fax: +47 77 64 46 50
email: randio-at-fagmed.uit.no













From: Anne Heller :      heller-at-Uni-Hohenheim.DE
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 10:48:26 +0100
Subject: Re: SEM processing containers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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HI
I am attempting to examine embrylogical samples of a marine bivalve
using SEM. But any containers I have used during the processing
proceedure have proved indequate. I need containers which will hold
samples down to a size of 30um. I have used filters placed in processing
capsules but they are very awkward, and the sample has more often than
not been lost during the proceedure.
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Jean Raleigh,
Marine Zoology Dept.,
Natioal University Galway
Ireland

For the SEM preparations of spores and other small samples we
put nets made of metal or nylon, meshs 20 =B5m, in our holder for CPD.
For very small things, e.g. bacteria, zoospores, we introduce the
samples with syringe and needle into LUMitainers. Lumitainers are
little balls D=3D2,5-3,5 mm made of a kind of cellulose. They are
useful for both SEM and TEM. In Germany you can buy them by Plano W.
Planet GmbH, Marburgerstr. 90, 35043 Marburg, Fax 06425-51173. They
are not cheap! I do not know where to get it abroad?
Good luck!
Anne Heller
_____________________
Dr. Anne Heller
Institut fuer Botanik (210)
Universitaet Hohenheim
Garbenstr.30
D-70593 Stuttgart
Tel.0049-711-459-2180
Fax 0049-711-459-3355





From: Jan Coetzee - Microscopy & Micro-analysis UP :      janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 13:50:22 +0200
Subject: Re: SEM processing containers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Containers for processing small SEM samples:

Try folding small (10 x 10 mm) envelopes from lens tissue. Close
with a small staple. These envelopes are permeable enough for
processing. They work very well for pollen and erythrocyte
samples.

Some types of lens tissue have rather large pores - I have seen
holes up to 30 microns in some makes of tissue - check yours
before using.


} I am attempting to examine embrylogical samples of a marine bivalve
} using SEM. But any containers I have used during the processing
} proceedure have proved indequate. I need containers which will hold
} samples down to a size of 30um. I have used filters placed in processing
} capsules but they are very awkward, and the sample has more often than not
} been lost during the proceedure. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
} Jean Raleigh, Marine Zoology Dept., Natioal University Galway Ireland





Prof Jan Coetzee
Head: Lab for Microscopy and Microanalysis Tel:+27-12-420-2075
University of Pretoria Fax:+27-12-362-5150
Pretoria 0002, South Africa
http://www.up.ac.za/science/electron/emunit1.htm





From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 16:20:44 +0000
Subject: Hi Randi

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Hi Randi

I was interested in the use of osmium in xylene that you described. Does the tissue blacken as
in a water-solution or does it simply become yellowish/brown? I am curious because the latter is
what happens in the absence of water during freeze-substitution using e.g. 1% in acetone at -80
*C, although the colour change probably happens when warming up from low temperature.

Keith Ryan
late of Plymouth Marine Lab., UK



PS - See, Daniele? I am still around!!







From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 10:52:06 -0600
Subject: 442nm OBJ.

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Hello.
I am looking for a company that is willing to build optical u-scope
objectives with wavelength specific AR coatings.
All leads will be greatly appreciated.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.







From: Tim Bruchman :      timbruc-at-azstarnet.com
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 09:49:00 -0700
Subject: Unsubscribe

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Unsubscribe






From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 14:30:01 -0500
Subject: TEM Specimen Preparation Short Courses

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The Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC) at the
University of Central Florida will be sponsoring two TEM specimen
preparation short courses in conjunction with the FL AVS/FSM conference and
vendor participation.


AMPAC's UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility is offering two
short courses in March.

"Tripod Polisher" will be offered March 12 and 13
instructor: Ron Anderson, IBM
co-sponsored by UCF and South Bay Technology

"Focused Ion Beam Specimen Preparation" will be offered March 18 and 19.
Instructors: Fred Stevie, Lucent Technologies and Lucille Giannuzzi, UCF
co-sponsored by FEI and Micro Optics

Both courses will be held at the MCF located at 12443 Research Parkway,
Suite 305, Orlando in Research Park {1 mile from the UCF campus. The
registration fee is $750 per course or $1200 for both courses. Fees
include course materials and meals (breakfast/lunch/breaks) all days.
Registration deadline is March 1 and space is limited.

Additional information and registration forms for all of these events can
be found at the AMPAC website: http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~ampac

Please contact Dr. Giannuzzi below for any additional questions.

We look forward to seeing you in March!




*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dept. of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Eng.,
University of Central Florida,
PO Box 162450, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
phone (407) 823-5770 fax (407) 823-0208 email
lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, 12443 Research
Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 phone (407) 275-4354,5,6 fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************







From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 14:32:39 -0500
Subject: Golf in March kicks off Florida local affiliates meeting

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The 2nd Annual AMPAC Golf Scholarship Invitational will be held on Sunday,
March 14, at the Ekana Golf Club in Oviedo, Florida, in conjunction with
the FL AVS/FSM conference. The tournament starts at 8:00 a.m. Entry fee
is $135 per player or $500 per foursome. There will be lots of prizes and
food! Hole sponsorships (both corporate and individual) are also
available. A corporate donation of $1000 will also include 4 golfers. A
corporate donation of $500 will include 2 golfers. Individual hole
sponsors may donate $100. Deadline for entries is February 26. The
tournament is limited to the first 80 golfers so register today! Proceeds
will benefit graduate student fellowships in Materials Science and
Engineering at UCF.


Additional information and registration forms for all of this event can be
found at the AMPAC website: http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~ampac

We look forward to seeing you in March!




*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dept. of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Eng.,
University of Central Florida,
PO Box 162450, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
phone (407) 823-5770 fax (407) 823-0208 email
lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, 12443 Research
Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 phone (407) 275-4354,5,6 fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************







From: oshel-at-terracom.net (Philip Oshel)
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 13:48:21 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM processing containers

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Jean,

This is easy and cheap to make:
_ /_____\ _
| | | |
| | | | {-- BEEM capsule
|_|_____ |_|
\ /
^ ^
|____|__ plankton netting

(I hope the ascii "art" survives the 'net...)

Cut out the center of the lid of a BEEM capsule, leaving a ring that still
snaps onto the body of the capsule as usual. Close the lid, trapping a taut
bit of plankton netting under it.

Cut off the lid from a second BEEM capsule and cut out its center as above.
Cut of the pyramidal end from the first BEEM capsule, and snap the cut-off
end over the new end of this capsule, again trapping a bit of plankton
netting.

The netting comes in various sizes, so you can get one small enough for
your needs, but use the largest size mesh you can to ease fluid flow.

Problem: when changing solutions before drying, the mesh will trap air. The
best way to deal with this is to leave the 2nd end of the capsule open, and
place the capsule mesh-end down in a 4mL Wheaton vial or similar. Change
solutions by sucking out the old solution from the vial outside the
capsule, and pipetting in the new solution into the open end of the
capsule. Don't fill the capsule/vial completely, or the specimens might
float out into the vial.

When ready to dry, snap on the 2nd lid with netting, suck some of the final
fluid change into the capsule so there is no air bubble, then CPD.

I've also dried marine gastropod larvae from HMDS, no CPD with good
results. These capsules work well for that also, and don't need the 2nd lid
then.

Phil

} I am attempting to examine embrylogical samples of a marine bivalve
} using SEM. But any containers I have used during the processing
} proceedure have proved indequate. I need containers which will hold
} samples down to a size of 30um. I have used filters placed in processing
} capsules but they are very awkward, and the sample has more often than
} not been lost during the proceedure.
} Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
} Jean Raleigh,
} Marine Zoology Dept.,
} Natioal University Galway
} Ireland

****be famous! send in a tech tip or question***
Philip Oshel
Technical Editor, Microscopy Today
PO Box 620068
Middleton, WI 53562
(608) 833-2885
oshel-at-terracom.net








From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 99 14:44:03 -0500
Subject: SEM "capsules" for processing

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Jean Raleigh wrote:
=============================================
I am attempting to examine embrylogical samples of a marine bivalve
using SEM. But any containers I have used during the processing
proceedure have proved indequate. I need containers which will hold
samples down to a size of 30um. I have used filters placed in processing
capsules but they are very awkward, and the sample has more often than
not been lost during the proceedure.
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
=============================================
Have you tried what are called "Microporous Specimen Capsules"? They are
available from SPI as well as several other of the main suppliers to the
microscopy and histology market. They come in three pore sizes, the
smallest being 30 um. They were designed and engineered just for your kind
of application.

As the pores get smaller and smaller, the exchange times of fluids during
the processing becomes longer. However, in this case patience can be a
virtue since at 30 um, we believe these capsules to be far superior to the
alternatives. And of course, 30 um entities are contained within the volume
of the capsule.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is a supplier of these microporous capsules and
would like to see their use increased! More information about these
particular capsules are available on our website given below.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-exchange.cc.trincoll.edu
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 1999 17:21:32 -0500
Subject: Crystallography software

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I am looking for a cpu-based aid for teaching crystallography at the
undergraduate level.

Is anyone in ListLand familiar with CaRIne Crystallography software from
France? This is popular in our chemistry dept., but I'm wondering whether
other packages exist with comparable (or superior) libraries and algorithms
to demonstrate 3D structures, rotate them, make substitutions, correlate
structural data with XRD or CBED data, etc, etc.

You can reply to me off-list. If others are interested, I can summarize
responses.

Thx, all--

Ann Hein Lehman, EM Facility Mgr
Trinity College, Hartford, CT
v 860-297-4289
f 860-297-2538
email: ann.lehman-at-exchange.cc.trincoll.edu





From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 16:06:29 +0000
Subject: Re: Thanks Br in epoxy resin

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Hello to you all!
Thanks to everyone for kindly responding to my recent
enquiry about the Br in epoxy resins; I apologise for not responding
sooner. Your answers were informative and on the basis of most of
the suggestions, I favour the idea that the Br is from the
resin itself and is not from an external i.e. contaminant source.
It appears that Br is added by manufacturers to some types of
epoxies. With regard to my particular resin, the company I got it
from has still to get back to me.
Regards

Martin Roe






From: Neson Fava :      nelsonfava-at-uol.com.br
Date: Sat, 23 Jan 1999 14:35:44 -0600
Subject: EDS

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Hi everybody! I am looking for a used EDS, in good conditions, for
installation on Jeol SEM. Any offer? Please inform price and I will
estimate the transport & handling costs. Thanks in advance, Sincerely,
Nelson Fava/Geosciences Institute/U. Brasilia, Brazil. MIcroprobe
CAMECA/SX50#359 and SEM Lab.







From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 03:09:33 -0500
Subject: Do You Know?

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Jim Pawley

3 D imaging of in vitro bio samples is a young technology with many new and
exciting facets.

For example: The university of Linz Austria has made great strides in
both
1- single molecule fluorescence and in
2- images characterizing the antibody antigen binding forces

Workshop beginning next Week end. See Web:
http//:www.molec.com/linz

George


-----Original Message-----
} From: James Pawley {jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu}


Hi Folks,

I was quite surprised that I had the only listing in answer to the call o=
f
Petra Wahlbring (with an EM912) who had problems of dirt in the TEM imagi=
ng
system!

Techniques for the identification and positioning of contamination within=

an EM column should be part of the general knowledge of every EM Unit. A=
re
there people who would like to take on a little more in terms of EM
maintenance? Eight years ago we took the Royal Microscopical Society
course "Monitoring and Maintaining the Electron Microscope" to Australia
and it now runs each October at the University of Sydney, it has also tak=
en
place in South Africa and Hong Kong.

If there is a demand in the United States, and an organisation who feel
they could host such a course, we would be pleased to help.

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: alfarhan :      alfarhan-at-KSU.EDU.SA
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 23:19:36 +0300
Subject: MSA certification - next round of Examination dates

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Dear Sir, Kindly send me the next round of Examination dates for the
MSA certification in Electron Microscopy. Thanks






From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 09:32:56 -0600
Subject: Summary: VPSEM ap contamination

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Hi,

Thought I'd send out the responses to my post regarding aperture
contamination in a VPSEM operated in the high vac mode.

I want to thank everyone who responded. Suggestions covered both improper
sample preparation and microscope design problems due to using it in the
high vac mode. I have passed the suggestions on and encouraged the SEM lab
to contact me if they arrive at a solution so I could post it to the
listserver.

Also if any one wants to contact an individual listed below, drop me an
email and I can provide their address.

Lou

-----
Harry Ekstrom wrote:

So, presumably, the signal is attenuated so much that simply by
replacing the final apertures...the problem goes away?
Is the inside of the chamber clean? ie Any contamination possibly from
the diffusion pump? Other possibilities are outgassing samples causing
contamination or a vacuum leak. How is the filament life?
----
Charles Garber wrote:

If these are semiconductor products, unless they are looking at photo resist
, there should not be anything to really crud up their column or their
apertures.

The only time I have seen this happen is when people were not cleaning the
aperture holder and insertion rod properly and contamination was migrating
down to the apertures and contaminating them.

The discover of this phenomenon was the basis of the Zaluzec patent and the
plasma cleaning interest.

If the vacuum system is acceptable, then you might want to suggest an extra
special cleaning of the aperture holder and insertion mechanism. I don't
want you to think that I am suggesting this in order to sell them a plasma
cleaner. Perhaps this might be of sufficient interest to Nestor Zaluzec at
Argonne that your friend could pay him some fee to actually test out if
doing a plasma cleaning of his insertion mechanism and aperture holder
assembly actually would lead to a reduced contamination rate.

I could of course be wrong about this so you might want to ask Nestor what
he thinks of my suggestion. But I think that at Argonne they do have some
mechanism for helping industrial problems in that kind of a situation.

------
Steve Chapman wrote:

Dirty final apertures must be down to problems with the gas from the
specimen or specimen chamber.

1. Could they use a bigger aperture without any problems? Most
people do not push the instrument to its limit so the "normal apertures"
could be too small for the application. A cure rather than a prevention!

2. If the specimen chamber has become highly contaminated try this.
Pump down the microscope and use an industrial hot air (hair) dryer on ALL
the metal areas. The vacuum will almost certainly fall back but as long as
you are not trying to heat up an area right by an "O" ring this is what you
should expect from the outgasing. Get the chamber hot is the secret.

3. Use an inflow of dry nitrogen gas to cut down the filth that may
enter from the environment.

4. Check the rotary pump fluid and its efficiency?

5. What is the vacuum level, have all the LV inlet systems closed
correctly?

----
Robert Foglia wtote:

I used to work for a company called High Yield Technology and they were selling
an InSitu particle monitoring probe sensor, which could be used in high vacuum.
I know they had developed an application for a Hitachi SEM which enabled the
user to real time monitor the cleanliness of their system. They initially
requested this sensor because they were seeing large amounts of contamination
within their system, and the probe sensor was used to monitor while they cycled
different valves and moved the robotics around (the robotic arm was scraping).
The company is located in Silicon Valley and they might be an option to
explore. By the way, they usually place the sensor on the exhaust port in order
to get as close to the wafer as possible.

------

John Arnott wrote:

Based on your message concerning the contaminated aperture, my feeling
is that the problem probably rests somewhere other than the aperture
itself.
But since there is the slightest possibility that there might be a
problem with the aperture perhaps we can assist you. Ladd produces the
vast majority of apertures/microholes used in the United States and the
aperture you have may very will be a Ladd aperture.
To make sure there is no residual contamination on an aperture we have a
post production protocol that is designed to eliminate any contamination
that results during production. In fact we have some
apertures/microholes used in fluid and gas control that are required to
be absolutely contamination free. We have a protocol to ensure that.
It is also important that an aperture be shipped or stored in a glass or
non-contaminating vial and that the aperture surface should not touch
tissue or even lint free cloth.
We would be glad to examine the aperture to see if the contamination was
a result of packaging, handling or the production process.
Please contact us if you if you wish us to do that.

-----
Thomas C. Isabell wrote

Regarding the cleaning of SEM apertures, have you considered plasma
cleaning?? We have had great success in removing the aperture strip from
the microscope, plasma cleaning it in our Model 1020 Plasma Cleaner, and
replacing it in the scope. Some of our results were published in a recent
MRS proceedings - MRS Symp. Proc. Volume 523, pp 31-38. If you are
interested in a copy, I could send one your way. Plasma cleaning returns
the aperture strips to their "as new" state and eliminates the need to
constantly replace them.

To take this one step further, if the apertures are indeed getting dirty
because of dirty specimens, our plasma cleaner has also been shown to
effectively clean specimens prior to insertion into the microscope. Some
of these results are also shown in the aforementioned MRS Proceedings. Our
instrument allows not only the cleaning of the specimen, but also the
specimen stub, and if needed, the specimen stage.

If you have any further questions about the technique or our instruments,
please do not hesitate to contact me. Additional information can be found
on our website, at www.fischione.com .


------
Lisa Montanaro wrote:

There are several reasons why the final aperture may be getting dirty on a
variable pressure SEM, and why this may be more noticeable on semiconductor
samples. Several causes contribute to contamination within SEM chambers. If
this system has been used for any other analysis other than semiconductor, at
low vac modes, residues from prior analysis may be lining the chamber walls -
these are difficult to remove even by baking the chamber out. Additionally,
this system probably has oil-cooled pumps - the deleterious effect of
backstreaming oils into chamber which "gums" onto the final aperture is well
established, but can be diminished with a strategically located dry N2 purge
port in the sample exchange chamber. Mounting media is also of concern - since
most conductive paints outgas, these vapors can also contaminate the F.A.
quickly, especially if the material is not exceedingly well dried. Simple
cleanliness may also be the culprit - by handling a metal sample fixture with
bare hands, oils and sweats are deposited on the fixture. These deposits love
to attach to the F.A. (and cold tip of EDS detectors too!) As most
semiconductor analysis requires fairly high magnification, and often lower
KeV, these problems are exacerbated. I've delt with these and many other
problems concerning the optimal performance of SEM's with semiconductor
materials, and would be pleased to look over his system for performance
improvements. Let me know if I may be of assistance!

-----
Randy Nestor wrote:

I'll take a stab at the problem. Most of these types of SEM's have
vacuum gradients from the chamber to the gun, even when run in the
"normal" mode. The worst vacuum is in the chamber, the best in the
gun. If your friend has any outgassing of the sample, the contaminants
are proalby finding their way to the final aperature. It seems these
apts are one way of controlling vacuum levels in different parts of the
scope. We have seen similar problems with our Hitachi 2460N. What
scope does your friend have?

-----

Ronald Vane wrote:

I have given the following advice to several users of variable pressure SEM
who dirty microscopes and contamination, and they all said it cured the
problem.

Don't leave it in high Vacuum mode all the time. Some variable pressure SEM
are very dirty due to backstreaming at high vacuum. They are designed for
low vacuum not high vacuum. By placing the system into low vacuum mode, the
chamber is placed into viscous flow vacuum dynamics which stops
backstreaming and purges out contaminants. Try leaving it in low vacuum
mode overnight for a month and check the results.
---
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?=C7=D1=20=BC=BA?= :      pibhan-at-kistmail.kist.re.kr
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 00:29:46 +0900
Subject: In, Zn, Ar

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To : scientist in MSA
I'm a graduate student at Electronic Ceramics Lab. Dept. of Ceramic
engineering Yonsei University. I've investigated electron diffraction of
gas clusters in Korea Institute of Science and Technology. Please let me
know electron-atomic scattering factor of In, Zn, and, Ar.
Thank you for your effort.

Sung Han
p.s. my e-mail address is pibhan-at-kistmail.kist.re.kr








From: VLADIS-at-MAINE.MAINE.EDU
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 99 09:12:31 EST
Subject: Hi Keith (osmium in xylene)

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Hi Keith,

At least for the specimens I happened to deal with so far (vertebrate
tissues, cell culture, bacteria, microalgae), the material normally will
not really blacken until you wash and start dehydrating it AFTER
osmication in traditional aqueous OsO4 solutions. While in aqueous OsO4,
it will remain brownish. (Unless, of course, you are using that
simultaneous, single solution glutaraldehyde/OsO4 fixation, or a
reducing buffer like PIPES, and have passed the time when it all
turns black...)

The explanation used to be that, at the stage of osmication, while some
of the OsO4, indeed, oxidizes nonsaturated lipids, etc., a lot of it
simply dissolves in the lipids of the specimen as nonreduced OsO4. Then,
say, the ethanol reduces that specifically accumulated OsO4, to form
the so called "osmium black".

As for making FRESH solutions of OsO4 in xylene (or CCl4, etc.),
I would just never have a spare OsO4 ampule (and enough paraffine
blocks to EM-reevaluate) to try that! :-)

Sincerely,
Vlad.

Vladislav V. Speransky
Postdoctoral Research Associate
School of Marine Sciences
University of Maine
5722 Deering Hall
Orono, ME 04469-5722
Ph: 207 581 2998
FAX: 207 581 2969
Email: vladis-at-maine.maine.edu





From: Doug Matthews :      dmatthew-at-providence.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 16:37:40 GMT
Subject: TEM-TUNEL

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Hi everyone,

I'm trying to adapt the TUNEL procedure of labeling cleaved DNA in
apoptotic cells for TEM level observation. Basically I just want to rework
it to utilize colloidal gold and localize the tagged 3'-OH ends of the
degraded DNA. TUNEL has been done for several years at the LM level, but
I've only come up with a handful of studies that successfuly nailed it with
plastic embedded tissues and gold conjugates... and of those few if any seem
to be A+ work (sometimes the specificity of the labelling looks a bit
sketchy.)
Anyone out there have any experience with this? I'm using a line of
chronic myelogenous leukemia cells that has a well characterized apoptotic
response to etoposide... previous ultrastructural studies show classic
apoptotic changes. Any input will be appreciated.

Doug Matthews






From: Angela Klaus :      avklaus-at-amnh.org
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 16:40:11 -0500
Subject: Variable Pressure SEMs

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Dear Colleagues,

I'm interested in finding out if there are any variable pressure SEMs
available for paid use in the NY/NJ area. Specifically, I'm interested in
doing some long-term imaging of large, uncoated specimens at very low mags
(10X and below).

Many thanks in advance.

Best regards,

Angela

---------------------------------------------
Angela V. Klaus

Manager, Core Microscopy Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
Voice: (212)769-5977, 5469
Fax: (212)769-5495
---------------------------------------------





From: ricardo :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 10:12:16 +1100
Subject: www.coleoptera.org

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Dear colleagues

www.coleoptera.org is working now, please be so kind and send me your
comments. There is also large index of entomologist who worked or working on
Tenebrionidae...

I apologise for crossposting.

Keep care and be of good cheer.

Regards

Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptiste
of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Collorado-Mansfeld

Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
(incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)

Temporally home address:
32 Girrawheen Ave.
Kiama NSW 2533
Australia
e-mail: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
ricardo-at-ans.com.au
(before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
and ricardo-at-login.cz )

http://www.coleoptera.org
phone : 0414 540 465 (Australia)
+61 414 540 465 (International)

Only after the last tree has been cut down,
only after the last river has been poisoned,
only after the last fish has been caught,
only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.








From: DUNNTEM-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 1999 19:33:52 EST
Subject: Light Microscope Donation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have received a letter asking if I knew of anyone who would donate two used
light microscopes for use by clinics in northern Burma. The doctors there are
currently using instruments with cracked lenses and no light source and have a
desperate need for a better instrument.

If you have a microsacope you could donate please contact me privately and I
can give you the details.

Probably the microscopes should have an oil objective and a built-in light
source though the latter is not absolutely essential.

Thank you.

Ted Dunn
The EMscope Company
Maui, Hawaii





From: hhlim-at-qes.po.my
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 16:58:37 +0800
Subject: LM: Cause of Fatigue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Anyone,

We are working with stereo microscope. We are more concern about the ope=
rator health of fatigue after peeping into the microscope. The color temp=
erature is about 3200K to 3950K. Anyone out there can suggest how long ca=
n one (normal person) looks into the microscope without causing fatigue ?=
We are now proposing for every 2 hours of looking into a stereo microsco=
pe, an operator will rest for 10 minutes. Anyone make any research to fin=
d out these ?
We do not want our operator to experience epilepsy. Please help.
Lim Hian Ho
Senior Marketing And Application Engineer
Wisma QES,
No.6 Jalan USJ 9/5P,
UEP Subang Jaya, 47620
Selangor, West Malaysia
Tel : 603-7241188 ext 207
Fax: 603-7244488
e-mail : hhlim-at-qes.po.my







From: Nelson Fava :      nfava-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 11:16:44 -0200
Subject: EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everybody in microworld!
I am looking for a second hand EDS, simple or equiped with an image
soft, to attach to a JEOL SEM. Any offer?
Thanks in advance,
Sincerely,
Nelson Fava.
EPMA CAMECA SX50 Lab.
Geosciences Institute/U. Brasilia/Brazil.







From: Will Jaeckle :      wjaeckle-at-titan.iwu.edu
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 07:40:17 -0600
Subject: RE: backscatter imaging of epon embedded sectioned biological

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Dear Colleagues:

I am interested in using backscatter elelctron imaging to evaluate the
distribution of iron in 1 um plastic sections of biological material. My
intent is to provide an independent measure of the distribution of iron in
my samples and compare this distribution with the distribution of iron as
evidenced through use of the ferrocyanide reaction on adjacent sections.
Any comments on the likelihood of success of such an endeavor and the
pitfalls of using BEI for sectioned material would be appreciated.

Thank you very much,

WB Jaeckle



==============================
Will Jaeckle
Department of Biology
Illinois Wesleyan University
P.O. Box 2900
Bloomington, IL 61702-2900
TELE: 309-556-3779
FAX: 309-556-3864
EMAIL: wjaeckle-at-titan.iwu.edu
=============================





From: EMSLLAB-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 08:14:25 -0600
Subject: SEEKING MICROSCOPISTS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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EMSL ANALYTICAL, INC. is currently HIRING MICROSCOPISTS for 24 nationwide
Laboratory locations.

} NOW HIRING FOR TEM MICROSCOPISTS
NATIONWIDE LOCATIONS SEM MICROSCOPISTS
PLM & PCM
MICROSCOPISTS


} SEEKING TO PURCHASE TEM, PLM, PCM, SEM MICROSCOPES



SEND RESUME / INFO TO : Mr. Joe Frasca
EMSL ANALYTICAL, INC.
107 Haddon Avenue,
Westmont,NJ 08108


FAX RESUME / INFO TO : (609) 858-4766







From: Nelson Fava :      nfava-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 12:53:40 -0200
Subject: EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi everybody in microworld!
I am looking for a second hand EDS, simple or equiped with an image
soft, to attach to a JEOL SEM. Any offer?
Thanks in advance,
Sincerely,
Nelson Fava.
EPMA CAMECA SX50 Lab.
Geosciences Institute/U. Brasilia/Brazil.






From: Anne.von.Euler-at-mtc.ki.se (Anne von Euler Matell)
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 16:02:12 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Help on heparin-gold conjungation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all,

Having been a subscriber to this list for half a year now, I'm convinced
that someone can help me with the following problem.
I want to use heparin conjugated with gold, without any "bridge" such as
albumin in between, but I cannot find any commercial source. Since I'm a
beginner in the gold business, is there any good recepy for the preparation
of heparin-gold?

Thanks in advance!

Anne







From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 11:31:37 EST
Subject: Re: LM: Cause of Fatigue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In a message dated 99-01-26 05:11:00 EST,
hhlim-at-qes.po.my-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

{ { Anyone out there can suggest how long can one (normal person) looks into
the microscope without causing fatigue ? We are now proposing for every 2
hours of looking into a stereo microscope, an operator will rest for 10
minutes. } }

Lim,

I do not have any research on the subject, but the two most common causes of
fatigue are: (1) eyestrain and (2) the physical strain on the neck, upper back
and arms from staying in one position for such a long time. As far as
eyestrain, I think your proposal for two hour blocks of time is realistic.

You don't mention the type of microscope, but if it is a fairly modern one you
can probably obtain a tilting "ergotube" for viewing, so the operator can find
the most comfortable position and adjust the viewing angle as needed. If this
is not possible, you can also get an ergonomic table that can be raised and
lowered either mechanically or via a motor. You can place the scope on the
table and adjust the height to suit the operators.

You might also consider putting a video system on the microscope so the
operator can choose to either look through the eyepieces or at a high
resolution monitor. There are also video inspection stations that can take
the place of the microscope entirely.

Good luck to you.

Best regards,

Bob
******************************
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti, Ph.D.
President
Microimaging Technologies, Inc.
Tucson, Arizona USA
Tel./Fax (520) 546-4986
rchiovetti-at-aol.com
Manufacturers' Representatives
Systems Integrators
Analog & Digital Imaging Systems
Clinical, Research & Industrial Microscopy
Cytology/Histology/Pathology/EM
*******************************





From: Karen S Pawlowski :      kna101-at-utdallas.edu
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 11:31:22 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: TEM-TUNEL

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Hi everyone,

I thought the "gold standard" for apoptosis is the ultrastructural changes
that can be seen by TEM and that the DNA labeling was developed in order
to view apoptosis/vs necrosis at the light level-over a larger area of
tissue? At least that is the idea I've gotten from articles that I have
read. Could someone please clarify this? Thanks in advance.

Karen Pawlowski
Sr. Research. Assoc. UT Southwestern Med. Ctr.
PhD candidate, UT Dallas

On Mon, 25 Jan 1999, Doug Matthews wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi everyone,
}
} I'm trying to adapt the TUNEL procedure of labeling cleaved DNA in
} apoptotic cells for TEM level observation. Basically I just want to rework
} it to utilize colloidal gold and localize the tagged 3'-OH ends of the
} degraded DNA. TUNEL has been done for several years at the LM level, but
} I've only come up with a handful of studies that successfuly nailed it with
} plastic embedded tissues and gold conjugates... and of those few if any seem
} to be A+ work (sometimes the specificity of the labelling looks a bit
} sketchy.)
} Anyone out there have any experience with this? I'm using a line of
} chronic myelogenous leukemia cells that has a well characterized apoptotic
} response to etoposide... previous ultrastructural studies show classic
} apoptotic changes. Any input will be appreciated.
}
} Doug Matthews
}
}
}






From: rpowell-at-mail.lihti.org (Rick Powell at Nanoprobes)
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 13:31:14 -0500
Subject: Re: Help on heparin-gold conjungation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anne:

We offer the 1.4 nm Nanogold=AE gold cluster label with several reactivities
for covalently labeling biomolecules. If you can selectively oxidise the
terminal reducing sugar of heparin to give an aldehyde residue, it should
react with Mono-amino-Nanogold=AE (you then reduce the resulting Schiff base
and purify the conjugate by gel filtration). Alternatively, if you can
selectively expose an amino- group, you can conjugate this with
Mono-Sulfo-NHS-Nanogold=AE.

Protocols for using these reagents are posted on our web site
(http://www.nanoprobes.com/Inf2021.html and
http://www.nanoprobes.com/Inf2025.html). I hope this helps,

Rick Powell
Nanoprobes, Incorporated

}
} Dear all,
}
} Having been a subscriber to this list for half a year now, I'm convinced
} that someone can help me with the following problem.
} I want to use heparin conjugated with gold, without any "bridge" such as
} albumin in between, but I cannot find any commercial source. Since I'm a
} beginner in the gold business, is there any good recepy for the preparation
} of heparin-gold?
}
} Thanks in advance!
}
} Anne


******************************************************************
* NANOPROBES, Incorporated | US Toll-free: (877) 808-2101 *
* 25 East Loop Road, Suite 113 | Tel: (516) 444-8815 *
* Stony Brook, NY 11790-3350, | Fax: (516) 444-8816 *
* USA | rpowell-at-mail.lihti.org *
* *
* NOW EASY TO FIND ON THE WEB: http://www.nanoprobes.com *
******************************************************************







From: Nelson Fava :      nfava-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 17:13:13 -0200
Subject: EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everybody in microworld!
I am looking for a second hand EDS, simple or equiped with an image
soft, to attach to a JEOL SEM. Any offer?
Thanks in advance,
Sincerely,
Nelson Fava.
EPMA CAMECA SX50 Lab.
Geosciences Institute/U. Brasilia/Brazil.








From: Nelson Fava :      nfava-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 17:38:22 -0200
Subject: EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everybody in microworld!
I am looking for a second hand EDS, simple or equiped with an image
soft, to attach to a JEOL SEM. Any offer?
Thanks in advance,
Sincerely,
Nelson Fava.
EPMA CAMECA SX50 Lab.
Geosciences Institute/U. Brasilia/Brazil.








From: Om Johari :      OmJohari-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 15:18:16 -0500
Subject: Prof. Hans Ris's Recent Review of Sci. Biol. Specimen Preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scanning Microscopy Supplement 10, 1996 (ISSN: 0892-953X / ISBN:
0-931288-49-5)

The Science of Biological Specimen Preparation for Microscopy

Edited by Marek Malecki and Godfried M. Roomans

Proceedings of the 14th Pfefferkorn Conference, Belleville, IL

Hardbound book with 31 papers; 466 + xii pages. Table of Contents
available on request.

Published by and available from:
Scanning Microscopy Intl., Box 66507, AMF O'Hare (Chicago), IL 60666-0507=
,
USA
FAX: (847) 985-6698 / E.mail: 73211.647-at-compuserve.com

----

BOOK REVIEW (published in January 1999 issue of the Journal of Biomedical=

Optics; vol 4 pages 191-192):

Advance in our knowledge of the molecular organization of living material=

rests on two kinds of technological development: (1) Microscope
instrumentation (2) Specimen preparation. This includes new techniques=

appropriate for a specific mode of microscopy, and information on any
structural alterations produced during such specimen preparation.

The present volume contains the proceedings of the 14th Pfefferkorn
Conference organized by Scanning Microscopy International and dedicated t=
o
the late Prof. G.E. Pfefferkorn.

The organizors and editors of this conference brought together 31 leading=

scientists in this field from the USA, Europe and Japan, to present and
discuss new techniques to prepare biological specimens for microscopy. =

Discussions with a panel of reviewers are added to each paper. There is
not space for a detailed discussion of each paper. I shall try to indica=
te
the general substance of the contributions.

In general, three unique features of this book are worth stressing.

The first, it reflects current trends in science towards interdisciplinar=
y
approaches in solving important biological questions. An essential part =
of
incorporating microscopy into these interdisciplinary approaches is
development of reporter molecules which will have features precisely
determined in biochemistry and molecular biology labs and which will rema=
in
stable in changing environment of living cells being labeled for various
modes of microscopy. Chapters by Heinfeld - nanogold, Kessels - boronate=
d
antibodies, Malecki - organo-metallic ligands, and Swartz - fluorescent
derivatives of proteins are concerned with the development of such new
probes which are based upon covalent bonds, therefore they can serve as
reliable markers for structures of interest. Moreover, chemically define=
d
features can be translated into their functional architecture e.g., as
shown for atomic force microscopy in the chapter by Woodward and
Zasadzinski or for life time imaging by Lakowicz. The detailed protocols=

will allow an investigator to have them easily modified for a particular
new application. This book also demonstrates how fruitful this
interdisciplinary approach can be e.g., as demonstrated in chapters by
DeBault and Gu, Malecki, and Nuovo, polymerase chain reaction developed f=
or
DNA amplification in molecular biology labs can be modified to determine
morphological localization of selected sequences. The book clearly
demonstrates, that in order to solve a biological question, it is nearly
impossible to categorize approaches and restrain an investigator to
traditional research techniques. To the contrary, the interdisciplinary
approaches create backgrounds and precedents for breaking the boundaries =
of
traditional and specialized areas of science and opening new possibilitie=
s.

The second, this book is also an attempt toward integrated microscopy. =

While many already published books were dedicated to very specialized are=
as
of one kind of microscopy, this one stands out as an eclectic (in a
positive sense), but comprehensive review of the most recent developments=

in various areas of microscopy. This is particularly close to my
scientific preferences, since I promoted this approach for many years. =

Integrated microscopy, allows us to overcome technical limitations of one=

kind of microscopy alone e.g., light microscopy of a living cell is limit=
ed
by resolution ~250 nm, while electron microscopy having atomic level of
resolution can be pursued only on frozen or fixed cells, therefore studyi=
ng
the same cells with both types of microscopy creates an opportunity to
study living cell phenomena at the molecular level. This approach is
elegantly exemplified in the chapters by Malecki, Peachey et al., Ralston=

and Ploug. It also demonstrates how beneficial and cross-fertilizing thi=
s
integrating approach can be e.g., in the chapters by Lyubchenko where a
technique of functional modifications of substrate surface used in TEM an=
d
SEM, now finds new applications in AFM. These chapters create not only a=
n
excellent starting point for a reader, but also collecting many other
techniques in one book, opens for an investigator a compendium of choices=
. =

The newest developments in specimen preparation for two-photon excitation=

fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, life-time imaging, ener=
gy
filtering transmission electron microscopy, etc. are all covered in this
one volume. Therefore, scientists attempting to solve a life sciences
problem with tools of modern microscopy can make a choice from the vast
variety of techniques and examples presented in this book. The detailed
hands-on specimen preparation protocols will guide them through. The
discussions with the reviewers will provide them with the critical
evaluation of choices.

The third, the book paves the road for future developments in microscopy.=
=

The chapters and discussions with the reviewers, fairly define current
technical limitations of various modes of microscopy and suggest possible=

ways towards overcoming these difficulties. In many cases, authors clear=
ly
state the directions of their future research. Therefore, not only it is=

updated information concerned with the status-quo, but also a proposal fo=
r
future research.

Specifically, the first group of papers deals with methods to study
chromatin and nucleic acids. In the first paper M. Malecki describes new=

methods of gene transfer, which were developed based upon incorporation o=
f
reporter molecules allowing us imaging of cellular pathways in living
cells, and in cryo-immobilized cells by energy filtered TEM from the cell=

surface to the chromatin. G.V. Childs describes methods to identify mRNA=

and proteins in the same cell, in tissue sections. L.E. De Bault and J. =
Gu
present detailed protocols for in situ hybridization, in situ transcripti=
on
and in situ polymerase chain reaction. M. Thiry developed the in situ
terminal transferase - immunogold technique to pinpoint specific nucleic
acid regions in thin sections. Scanning probe microscopy is represented =
by
five contributions. Hydration Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (Heim et al.=
)
is based on conductivity of surface adsorbed water molecules and can imag=
e
hydrophilic insulators and biological specimens such as collagen IV
molecules, TMV, and cryo-sectioned bovine tendon.

For atomic force microscopy imaging of macromolecules, a strong attachmen=
t
to the substrate is essential. Lyubchenko et al. show that treatment of
mica with aminopropyltriethoxy- silane will hold DNA in place for imaging=

even in water. They also introduced other chemically reactive mica
surfaces, hydrophobic or charged. Mueller-Reichert and Gross discuss DNA=

and DNA-protein assembly analyzed by TEM, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
(STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). An interesting new application =
of
STM is imaging of freeze-fracture replicas (Woodward and Zasadzinski). I=
t
also can examine interior interfaces and provides quantitative informatio=
n
about the vertical dimension of interior structures.

Four contributions discuss light microscope techniques for the imaging of=

living cells. The first of these by N.S. Allen and M.N. Bennet use Alfal=
fa
root hairs before and after treatment with Nod factors (produced by
Rhizobia) to study in live and fixed cells the role of actin and
endoplasmic reticulum in growth form change. Imaging was with a confocal=

laser scanning microscope. The paper by Peachey et al. describes
techniques to image cultured cells by phase, epifluorescence and confocal=

microscopy, and after fixation and critical point drying image the same
cell as whole mount with the Jeol 400kV-EX intermediate voltage TEM,
correlating structures seen in the living cell with the EM image. The
paper by D.R. Swartz on covalent labeling of proteins with fluorescent
compounds for imaging applications beautifully illustrates with
alpha-actinin how a protein can be covalently linked to a fluorophor
without interfering with its normal chemical interactions in the living
cell. This paper is important for all who need fluorescently labeled cel=
l
proteins for imaging applications. L. Edelman and A. Ruf describe a simp=
le
treatment to stabilize freeze-dried cells during or after low temperature=

embedding in Lowicryl, to prevent loss of material from thin sections
during wet cutting.

J.F. Hainfeld describes the techniques for labeling with Nanogold,
Undecagold and FluoroNanogold. This paper is essential for anybody who
requires gold labeling. The increasing availability of energy filtered
TEMs will facilitate immuno-cytochemistry by providing electron
spectroscopic imaging. Kessels et al. describe the development of
organo-boron compounds which can be incorporated into organic molecules
such as Fab'-boronated peptide
conjugates for immunochemistry.

The last paper by H. Sitte contains a masterful critical review of
cryofixation and the blueprints on how to build a cryomicrotome that can
provide useful cryosections. I think that these seventy pages contain th=
e
most valuable part of this volume.

Finally, this volume obviously contains a wealth of stimulating and usefu=
l
information. It bears testimony that microscopy is alive and well.

Hans Ris, Zoology and Integrated Microscopy Resource, University of
Wisconsin, Madison, WI

----

Copies of several other reviews are available on request.

----

Price: $95 (US delivery by uninsured mail) or $105 (elsewhere by uninsure=
d
mail); insured delivery, air mail, etc., are available for additional cos=
t,
please inquire.


REPRINTS or photo-copies of papers are available for (rates for delivery =
by
cheapest mail method); EACH:
$5 (up to 8 pages);
$10 (9-16 pages);
$15 (17-24 pages) and
$20 (25+ pages).





From: Marie Cantino :      cantino-at-ORACLE.PNB.UCONN.EDU
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 15:52:49 -0500
Subject: TEM resin problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear embedding experts,

Recently we have been having problems with a resin mixture that we have
been using for two years, until recently with good results. I am wondering
if anyone else has any ideas about what might be the problem.

The resin is a mixture of Araldite 6005 (about 23% by wt.) SPIpon 812(about
23%) and DDSA (about 54%). We store the unopened resin bottles in the
refrigerator, but warm them fully before opening. The opened, capped
bottles are stored in a vented cabinet at room temperature. We typically
make about 55 ml of resin at a time and store it without the accelerator
(DMP-30) in the freezer. Again, we always make sure the bottle is
completely warmed to room temp before opening it to use. To embed, we
dehydrate through propylene oxide and then 50:50 PO:resin overnight. The
next day the blocks are rolled for 4 hours or so in 100% resin + 1.5%
DMP-30, then polymerized in fresh resin with accelerator for 24-48 hours at
60=B0.

Several months ago we began getting blocks which are difficult to trim
smoothly; they seem to chip and crack. Although the resin sections well,
when sections are picked up they tended to disintegrate, or at best, showed
rifts and cracks throughout the resin. Increasing the curing time helps a
bit, but does not eliminate the problem. We have tried new bottles of all
the resins and the accelerator, without improvement. However, in some
cases the new bottles may be from the same lots as the old (we haven't kept
records of resin lot numbers).

Does this sound familiar? Specifically, we are wondering about storage and
shelf life of the resins. Are we inviting problems by storing unopened
bottles in the fridge (we have done so for years, but with the old Epon
812)? What about shelf life? The unopened bottles are not more than a
year old. Do you store your opened resin bottles in desiccators? At what
temperatures? How do you store resin mixtures? Finally, should DMP-30 be
added at the 50:50 stage? We had not done this in the past, did for a year
or so, then stopped doing it again and thought this wasn't a problem, but
perhaps it is. Any ideas would be welcome. Thanks

Marie



Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269-2131
Phone: 860-486-3588
=46ax: 860-4861936=20







From: micnaut-at-aol.com () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 18:33:25 -0600
Subject: retired chemist school volunteer needs help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Colleagues, can anyone help this person?
Reply directly to him ...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
-------------------------

Email: micnaut-at-aol.com
Name: julius simon
School: retired chemist school volunteer

State: florida

Question: i would like a description of a procedure for smear preparations
of onion root tips to demonstrate the varios stages of mitosis-that could
be quickly mastered by ahigh school bio student. I have a good scope with
an automatic ca mera

---------------------------------------------------------------------------







From: Lynn Savino :      scanning-at-fams.org
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 18:35:03 -0600
Subject: SCANNING 99

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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SCANNING 99

Updated program information now available for SCANNING 99

April 11-14, 1999, Chicago, Ill

please visit www.scanning-fams.org

Lynn







From: Sarka Lhotak :      lhotaks-at-fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 21:24:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM-TUNEL

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Doug,
I have tried the TUNEL technique for EM. I got a very clean and
specific labelling of heterochromatin in ALL nuclei, normal and apoptotic.
My explanation is that colloidal gold labels only on the surface of the
section. And there will be a lot DNA breaks at the surface due to sectioning
and that is where the reaction will occur. As far as I can remeber, I could
find only two references for EM. One of them (Thiery?) used this technique
as a staining for all DNA. If you want more info, please contact me and I
will dig deeper to find the references and the protocol I used (it worked
beautifully on paraffin sections).
Yours sincerely,

Sarka Lhotak

Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
lhotaks-at-mcmaster.ca






From: ROBIN CROSS :      R.Cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 08:46:05 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: TEM resin problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Marie

One of the most common causes of brittle tissue is exposure to
propylene oxide (or a mixture containing it) in the presence of air,
i.e. allowing the tissue to become exposed when in a propylene
oxide (or PO:resin mixture) stage.

One or more of your ingredients going "off" could also be the cause
of your problem, as you suggest. However, in over 30 years of TEM
embedding with a whole variety of raw materials, many of which
have stood on the shelf for years, we have very seldom experienced
this sort of problem.

For a reliable protocol and resin mixture how about trying the one
described in a paper I published several years ago? The reference
is:
Cross, R.H.M. (1989) A reliable epoxy resin mixture and its
application in routine biological transmission electron microscopy.
Micron & Microscopica Acta, 20(1), 1 - 7.

Good luck!

Robin




Robin H Cross
Director : EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
R.Cross-at-ru.ac.za (or eurc-at-giraffe.ru.ac.za)
tel: +27 46 603 8168 - fax: +27 46 622 4377
http://www.ru.ac.za/affiliates/emu/em.htm





From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 03:02:47 -0500
Subject: Re: Do You Know?

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Hi Andrey,

Sorry that you will have no chance of attending a "EM Maintenance" course=




From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 08:26:35 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM resin problems

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Marie

This is similar to a situation I was in many years ago. In my case it was self-induced because I was experimenting to find a mixture which would cut very large ultrathin sections. In that instance (as far as I can remember - it was late 1970's) I used a high anhydride:epoxy ratio combined with a partially hydrated anhydride. The latter was obtained by exposure to air over a long period, like the bottle was 10 years old before I got to it and it was pretty viscous.

Maybe your mixture already has the high A:E ratio and the anhydride has aged. Although I would not have thought that brittlenss would be the problem, DDSA is the long chain component whereas I was using both DDSA and MNA in my recipe and the MNA was the component which really gave hardness.

Brittleness was a sign of good cutability but it could be overdone! Then the sections would break up on cutting. One block would cut 3 mm square sections, and if you went down to grey in colour, they would simply dissolve on the water! They left bits of fixed tissue which were sort of de-embedded (I never loooked at these).

Brittleness was also induced by a long infiltration time - 48 hours at 35 Centigrade, then 24 hours at 45, followed by 24 hours at 60 C. This procedure induces sterical hindrance which catches the big molecules in certain configurations whereby they cannot form complete cross-linkage. A sign of this is that the blocks are thermoplastic - if you heat them in an oven, they get soft, you can impress the surface with tweezer tips etc. IS THIS TRUE OF YOURS?

Possibly you have aged components, or they have taken up water.

Alternatively, maybe your dehydration isn't complete. Water in the alcohol or acetone, or maybe propylene oxide (? don't know about this possibility, we haven't used it for 20 years or more because of the health aspect). Try adding molcular sieve to a sample of your dehydrating agent?

Good luck

Keith Ryan
late of Plymouth Marine Lab., UK






From: BNguyen260-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 07:33:37 EST
Subject: Re: TEM resin problems

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First of all it would be useful to clarify whether we are talking about a
true stereo microscope or a binocular microscope. I personally find stereo
microscopes a little more comfortable to work with - perhaps because you are
looking at something with a more natural perspective and light than when
examining a slide in transmitted light.

I would certainly think that a two hour working period may be possible but I
would suspect that there might be problems with general fatigue, attention
span, and even RSI (repetitive strain injury) if stage controls are being
rotated very regularly. It would probably be necessary during that time to
encourage 'micro-breaks' (meaning breaks of a few seconds every 10 or 15
minutes - rather than 'microscope breaks') as you should for display screen
equipment/computers. The general rule of thumb with computer rest periods is
little and often rather than saving time up over a couple of hours and I
suspect that the problems are similar with microscopes.

Other considerations should include ergonomics (Microscope, work area,
seating and the people using it - which of course is part of the ergonomics
equation).

I hope this helps.

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
----------
} From: "RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com"
To: hhlim; microscopy


Dear Marie,

Firstly, I 'm not quite sure how to store SPIPON-812, you should ask the
manufacturer, but with my knowlege, all epoxy resins are stored at room
temperature in a cool and away from direct sun light. Low temperature storage
is not recommended for epoxy resins, especially araldites and anhydrides, such
as Araldite 502, 6005, DDSA, NMA, NSA. DER... Meantime, DMP-30, DMAE, BDMA,
they are contained amino group (-NH-), storing them in the refrigerator will
increase its shelf life. Storing epoxy resins in the desiccator is the best.
Secondly, you can store the resin mixture (without the addition of DMP-30) in
the refrigerator for later use, but only 3 to 4 weeks is maximum, with well
protected from contamination with moisture.
After all, I think your sections problem is associated with the storage
condition of your resins.
For more general tips for embedding media, please refer to Electron Microscopy
Sciences catalog XIII, page 48.

Bang Nguyen
Electron Microscopy Sciences.





From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 09:09:13 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM EDXA standards

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Sally Stowe wrote:
}
} We are just setting up TEM EDXA in a multidisciplinary unit, and need to acquire standards covering a wide range of applications. Any recommendations, pitfalls etc? (Philips 430 TEM up to 300kV, Oxford ISIS ultra-thin window detector).
} thanks

Dear Sally,
Chuck Fiori published an article about using lithium borate
glass standards for biological work--the matrix is about the same as
that for resin/organic material. There may be someone who sells these
or similar standards. For frozen-hydrated work, one can dissolve a
known amount of an appropriate compound in a sucrose solution which
approximates the composition of tissue and cut cryo-sections. For
materials work, there are some commercially available standards.
It is important that the matrix of the standard match that
of the unknown, so one type does not fit all. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Patricia Bozzano :      bozzano-at-cnea.gov.ar
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:00:12 -0300
Subject: HELP:Electron Diffraction Simulations

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Dear Anyone:
I'm interested in finding out programs to simulate and to index
electron diffraction patterns. If it is possible, for windows.
Thaks in advance

Patricia Bozzano
Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica
Buenos Aires, Argentina.






From: garygill :      garygill-at-dcla.com
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 09:50:26 -0500
Subject: Re: LM: Cause of Fatigue

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Cytotechnologists who screen Pap smears, among other things, sit at a
microscope up to 8 hours daily. Comfort is obviously important. Among the
usual recommendations: sit upright, eyes forward (no bending of the neck),
use elbow or forearm rest pads (e.g., "Wedgies"), feet flat on the floor
(though some use a foot rest), break for 10 minutes hourly to stimulate
circulation and minimize the vigilance decrement, maintain room light at a
level comparable to the illumination intensity to minimize contrast
differences and eyestrain, and look "through the eyepieces" (i.e., at
infinity, relaxed accommodation), rather than "in the microscope".

I've coined a term to describe the collective response to the various ills
(e.g., varicose veins, hemorrhoids, panorama butt, elbow calluses,
repetitive strain injury, self-inflicted stab wounds from the dotting pens,
eyepiece grooves under the eyes, and bruised orbits) that can beset a long
sitting cytotechnologist: hyperchronokathistophobia, which translates to
"fear of sitting for extended periods of time." Think we can claim
workman's compensation and take early retirement?

Gary Gill

-----Original Message-----
} From: "RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 11:32 AM
To: hhlim-at-qes.po.mysparc5.microscopy.com;
microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


In a message dated 99-01-26 05:11:00 EST,
hhlim-at-qes.po.my-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

{ { Anyone out there can suggest how long can one (normal person) looks into
the microscope without causing fatigue ? We are now proposing for every 2
hours of looking into a stereo microscope, an operator will rest for 10
minutes. } }

Lim,

I do not have any research on the subject, but the two most common causes of
fatigue are: (1) eyestrain and (2) the physical strain on the neck, upper
back
and arms from staying in one position for such a long time. As far as
eyestrain, I think your proposal for two hour blocks of time is realistic.

You don't mention the type of microscope, but if it is a fairly modern one
you
can probably obtain a tilting "ergotube" for viewing, so the operator can
find
the most comfortable position and adjust the viewing angle as needed. If
this
is not possible, you can also get an ergonomic table that can be raised and
lowered either mechanically or via a motor. You can place the scope on the
table and adjust the height to suit the operators.

You might also consider putting a video system on the microscope so the
operator can choose to either look through the eyepieces or at a high
resolution monitor. There are also video inspection stations that can take
the place of the microscope entirely.

Good luck to you.

Best regards,

Bob
******************************
Robert (Bob) Chiovetti, Ph.D.
President
Microimaging Technologies, Inc.
Tucson, Arizona USA
Tel./Fax (520) 546-4986
rchiovetti-at-aol.com
Manufacturers' Representatives
Systems Integrators
Analog & Digital Imaging Systems
Clinical, Research & Industrial Microscopy
Cytology/Histology/Pathology/EM
*******************************






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 10:52:34 -0500
Subject: TEM resin

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Marie,
Our lab uses a variety of resins, ie, Spurrs, EMbed 812, Eponate 12,
araldite, some very old Epon 812, and we store all of it at room temp. away
from any water. We've had no problems with any of it. We also mix all
ingredients including accelerator, for at least 15-20 min. on a stir plate.
The more viscous resins need to be mixed first with a tongue depressor or
applicator stick first for a minute or so. We do add the accelerator
(BDMA, DMP-30, or DMAE)to the resin for the overnight 50:50 PO:resin step.
The next morning we add 2 changes of fresh resin (again, with accelerator)
for an hour each to make sure all the PO is gone and then embed at 60
degrees for 48 hrs. The only problem I've ever encountered similar to
yours was from using PO that had been opened alot and was nearly empty.
It evidently had gotten moisture in it. You might also check your absolute
alcohol for moisture.

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility]
University of Kentucky






From: Patricia Hales :      hales-at-med.mcgill.ca
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 09:30:22 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM Resin problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This may have nothing to do with your problem but we used to have seasonal
changes in our block/resin quality before we got a proper air
conditioning/heating system. Every summer when it was humid the resultant
blocks would be soft and sticky, every winter hard and brittle. To help
alleviate this problem our last step before actually embedding was to place
the tissues in pure resin and let them sit in a vacuum for an hour or so.
This might help if for some reason your humidity level in the lab has
changed lately.

Pat Hales
Dept. of Anatomy & Cell Biology
McGill University
hales-at-med.mcgill.ca






From: Rik Brydson :      MTLRMDB-at-LUCS-MAC.NOVELL.LEEDS.AC.UK
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 17:22:24 GMT0BST
Subject: EMAG '99 Conference Abstract Deadline March 19 1999

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Institute of Physics EMAG '99 Conference - 25-27th August 1999, Sheffield=
U.K.
(Co-sponsored by RMS and IOM)

Electron and scanning probe microscopy and related techniques.

Scientific Content
This biannual, three-day conference aims to bring together international S=
cientists and
Engineers both in Industry and Academia who employ electron and scanning p=
robe
microscopies, together with associated techniques such as surface science,=
in both imaging and
analytical applications. All aspects of Electron and Scanning Probe Micros=
copy/ Spectroscopy
will be discussed including:

o New Instrumentation (particularly Field Emission systems), Imaging and A=
nalytical
Techniques
o High resolution Electron Microscopy and Electron Crystallography
o Advanced SEM, Scanning Probe and Surface Science
o Advances in Microanalysis and Elemental/Chemical Imaging
o Microscopy of Catalysts, Sensors and Environmental Materials
o Ferrous/ Non-ferrous metals and Intermetallics
o Carbons, Ceramics, Electroceramics and Composites.
o Semiconductors, Superconductors and Magnetic Materials.
o Polymers
o Microscopy of Interfaces and Surfaces

Sessions will be arranged by topic and through international keynote plena=
ry lectures, invited
and contributed papers, both oral and poster, current state-of-the-art iss=
ues in the field will be
highlighted and discussed. Papers from postgraduate students are particula=
rly encouraged;
correspondingly registration fees will be kept low and student bursaries w=
ill be available
through the Institute of Physics EMAG group.

o On Tuesday 24 August, prior to the conference, there will also be an Adv=
anced School
on HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
Contact: c.j.hetherington-at-sheffield.ac.uk for further details

o A major trade exhibiton will be mounted in the purpose built Octagon Cen=
tre which will run
in parallel with the conference.
Contact: i.m.reaney-at-sheffield.ac.uk for further details


SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS - DEADLINE MARCH 19 1999
Both oral and poster contributions are invited. Abstracts should be approx=
. 300 words in
length and may include figures and diagrams.

Please submit abstracts either by:

o WWW
see http://www.iop.org/Confs/EMAG

o Email
send blank email to confs-at-ioppublishing.com with "EMAG instructions" as th=
e subject

o FTP
download the files "readme.txt" and "EMAG.tem" from
ftp.ioppublishing.com/outgoing/conferences/submisssions/EMAG/

In all cases please indicate whether you would prefer either ORAL or POSTE=
R presentation
and also which sessions you would prefer your contribution to be included =
within.

Nominal Sessions
o Interfaces and Surfaces (INT)
o Electron Crystallography (ECR)
o Catalysts/Sensors/Env. Materials (CAT)
o High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HRM)
o Semiconductors and Superconductors (SSC)
o SEM/EBIC/CL (SEM)
o Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM)
o Advanced Scanning Probe Techniques (SPT)
o Ceramics/Carbons/Composites (CCC)
o Metals/Intermetallics (MET)
o Plenary (PLE)

STUDENT BURSARIES
Students and young scholars are encouraged to apply for an EMAG bursary wh=
ich will
help meet costs incurred in attending the conference. Applications should =
be sent to
Dr R. Brydson, Department of Materials, School of Process, Environmental a=
nd Materials
Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT.
email: mtlrmdb-at-leeds.ac.uk

GENERAL ENQUIRIES
Contact: conferences-at-iop.org





_____________________________
Dr. Rik Brydson,
University Research Fellow,
Electron Optical Unit,
Department of Materials,
School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering
University of Leeds,
Leeds LS2 9JT,
U.K.

Tel: 44 + (0)113 233 2369
Fax: 44 + (0)113 242 2531
Web: http://www.materials.leeds.ac.uk

______________________________

**************************
Join email discussion list for all aspects of
Electron Microscopy and Analytical Spectroscopy (LEMAS)

send message "join lemas firstname lastname"
to mailbase-at-mailbase.ac.uk
**************************






From: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk (HASWELL Malcolm)
Date: 27 January 1999 07:02
Subject: retired chemist school volunteer needs

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The methods that I mention have been used for several years with
undergraduate students and can produce quite good results. Success seems to
depend, in part, on choosing the right sort of onion tips at the right time.


GROWING ROOT TIPS
We have tried both seeds and bulbs and have only really had good results
using root tips from onion bulbs which have been left to sprout over
suitable beakers of water (the bulb should rest on the neck of the beaker
and almost touch the water and after 1 to 2 weeks you should have a lot of
tips - CAUTION supermarket onions may be incapable of sprouting roots you
may have to try fresh ones). It is also possible that mitosis may vary at
different times of day so you may have to experiment with 'harvesting
times'.

STAINING METHODS
These are not my methods but have been handed down since the dawn of time -
the results are temporary mounts which should be examined soon after
preparation. Caution the stains are harmful and acids are used to hydrolyse
the cell walls/tissue. Also both methods use acetic acid solutions so the
smell can be overpowering in an open lab. DO YOUR RISK ASSESSMENT FIRST.
FEULGEN STAIN TECHNIQUE
1 Cut 1cm of root tip off onion,
2. fix in acetic alcohol (3:1) for at least 30 min
3. Hydrolyse in 1 molar/normal HCl at 60 deg C 10 - 15 min
4 Stain in Feulgen reagent for minimum of 60 min (IN THE DARK) - root tip
will become purple in meristem
5. Without letting specimen dry out = place the end 2-3mm of root tip on a
clean slide with a drop of 45% acetic acid
6. Cut root tip into 4 longitudinally then gently and carefully squash under
a coverslip - protecting your thumb several layers of paper towel.
7. Examine for mitosis
ACETIC ORCEIN TECHNIQUE
1, Cut 1cm of root tip off onion,
2. put into watch glass with concentrated HCl and absolute ethanol (1:1) for
10 min - NB take care when mixing this reagent
3. transfer root tips to watch glass with 45% acetic acid for 5 min
4. Without letting specimen dry out = place the end 2-3mm of root tip on a
clean slide with a drop of ACETIC ORCEIN
5. Cut root tip into 4 longitudinally then gently and carefully squash under
a coverslip - protecting your thumb several layers of paper towel.
6. Examine for mitosis

Good luck and take care.

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk

----------
} From: micnaut
To: Microscopy

Colleagues, can anyone help this person?
Reply directly to him ...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
-------------------------

Email: micnaut-at-aol.com
Name: julius simon
School: retired chemist school volunteer

State: florida

Question: i would like a description of a procedure for smear preparations
of onion root tips to demonstrate the varios stages of mitosis-that could be
quickly mastered by ahigh school bio student. I have a good scope with an
automatic ca mera






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 14:51:32 -0500
Subject: TEM resin problems

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Marie,
Our lab uses a variety of resins, ie, Spurrs, EMbed 812, Eponate 12,
araldite, some very old Epon 812, and we store all of it at room temp. away
from any water. We've had no problems with any of it. We also mix all
ingredients including accelerator, for at least 15-20 min. on a stir plate.
The more viscous resins need to be mixed first with a tongue depressor or
applicator stick first for a minute or so. We do add the accelerator
(BDMA, DMP-30, or DMAE)to the resin for the overnight 50:50 PO:resin step.
The next morning we add 2 changes of fresh resin (again, with accelerator)
for an hour each to make sure all the PO is gone and then embed at 60
degrees for 48 hrs. The only problem I've ever encountered similar to
yours was from using PO that had been opened alot and was nearly empty.
It evidently had gotten moisture in it. You might also check your absolute
alcohol for moisture. Good luck!

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility]
University of Kentucky
mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 15:58:45 -0500
Subject: TEM resin problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Marie,
Our lab uses a variety of resins, ie, Spurrs, EMbed 812, Eponate 12,
araldite, some very old Epon 812, and we store all of it at room temp. away
from any water. We've had no problems with any of it. We also mix all
ingredients including accelerator, for at least 15-20 min. on a stir plate.
The more viscous resins need to be mixed first with a tongue depressor or
applicator stick first for a minute or so. We do add the accelerator
(BDMA, DMP-30, or DMAE)to the resin for the overnight 50:50 PO:resin step.
The next morning we add 2 changes of fresh resin (again, with accelerator)
for an hour each to make sure all the PO is gone and then embed at 60
degrees for 48 hrs. The only problem I've ever encountered similar to
yours was from using PO that had been opened alot and was nearly empty.
It evidently had gotten moisture in it. You might also check your absolute
alcohol for moisture. Good luck!

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility]
University of Kentucky
mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu






From: HILDEGARD CROWLEY :      hcrowley-at-du.edu
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 14:59:59 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Reply:Resin Problems

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Hi,

1. I suggest that you not store your resins in the refrigerator. Room
temp is best, tightly closed

2. Make sure that your propylene oxide is dry. Keep it strictly closed.
Do not use small amounts which have been sitting in bottles.

3. Look up the dehydration schedule for your tissue in a textbook, or a
paper. For instance, liver and tongue (same size blocks) need vastly
differing dehydration and infiltration schedules.

4. Crucially important: Where did you get your formulation for your
resin mixture? Does it meet the requirements of WPE weights of the
components for a good TEM block? Have you contacted the manufacturer
about any changes they might have made recently? Are you dealing with
companies that are specialists for TEM supplies and carefully redistill
all components once they get them from the manufacturer? (Resins bought
after manufacture may contain many impurities at totally random times).
Why are you using 6005?
It is possible that your formulation is only marginally good, and is
easily "derailed" by minor differences in environments.

5. Also crucially important: All resin coming into contact with tissue
either during infiltration or during the final steps must be accelerated.
Accelerating only part of the resin coming into contact with tissue used
to be popular in the 60s. It is no longer considered good practice,
because it yields uneven infiltration.

6. Is your accelerator dry? Your accelerator should not be older than 6
months. It should be kept strictly closed and at room temp.

Good luck,
Hildy Crowley
University of Denver






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 18:41:49 -0600
Subject: vacuum pump repairs

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Hi Vacuum-folks,

We have 5 direct drive vacuum pumps (Hitachi CuteVac) that are in need of
repair. They are leaking oil (suspect the oil seal is shot) but otherwise
pump fine. Does anyone know where we could have them repaired? - Hitachi
does not do this type of work and I hate to throw them away at $3,000 each.


Thanks,

John


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################







From: Dr. David C. Bell :      dcb-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 21:12:45 -0500
Subject: Staining Chromosomes for TEM observation ?

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I am hoping that somebody knows the answer to this;

I have been asked to look at some chromosomes in the TEM,
and am wondering if someone knows of a good reference on
stains that can be used for this work.

If you know of a guide or papers on the preparation tasks involved
that would be of great help.

Many thanks

David


Dr. David C. Bell
Room 13-1818 E-mail: dcb-at-MIT.EDU
Center for Mat. Sci. and Eng. PH: (617) 253-3317
Massachusetts Institute of Technology FAX: (617) 258-6478
77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139





From: Ewald Eipper :      e.eipper-at-uni-tuebingen.de
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 08:00:27 +0100
Subject: nanobacteria

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Hi all,

I need informations about nanobacteria. Nonobacteria can act as
crystallization centers?

Thanks for your help

Ewald





From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 13:06:21 +0100
Subject: TEM: positions

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Postdoctoral positions at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm

Membrane protein structure/Electron crystallography

Two postdoctoral positions are immediately available for work on
structure
determinations of membrane-bound enzymes using cryo electron microscopy.
Two-dimensional crystals are available of proteins both in their native
states and in the form of reaction intermediates. The work will
initially be
concentrated on data collection and processing. Previous experience in
the
field of electron crystallography is advantageous.

The Center for Structural Biochemistry (CSB) is a unit at the Department
of
Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet and comprises research groups with
facilities for X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, electron
microscopy
and molecular modelling. CSB is located at the South Campus of
Karolinska
Institutet close to Stockholm, encompassing the Novum Research Center
and
Huddinge University Hospital. Excellent resources will be provided.

The postdoctoral positions/research associates are initially for two
years
with possibilities for extensions for up to four years.

Applications should be sent to Dr. Hans Hebert, Karolinska Institutet,
Department of Biosciences at Novum, S-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden together
with
a CV and the names of two referees. Inquiries: Hans.Hebert-at-csb.ki.se or
Philip.Koeck-at-csb.ki.se.

Closing date: March 5th 1999.





From: Cieslinski, Robert (RC) :      RCCIESLINSKI-at-dow.com
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 06:33:33 -0600
Subject: Polymer Microscopist Openings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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{ {...} }
Polymer Microscopist - Freeport, Texas and Midland,
Michigan

Company: The Dow Chemical Company

Location: Freeport, Texas and Midland, Michigan

Qualifications (education, certification, language, etc.) and Experience
required:
A candidate with a BS or MS degree in polymer science, material science
or chemistry is preferred with some prior experience in electron
microscopy.
Good written and oral communication skills and the ability to work both
independently and in a team environment are extremely important.

Job Overview:

The Surface/Microscopy/X-ray (SMX) Group in Dow's Corporate R&D
Analytical Science Laboratory has two professional level full time
openings for Polymer Microscopists, one position at each of the Dow's
facilities in Midland, MI and Freeport, TX. The primary responsibilities
include working with partners to support research projects involving new
and existing products in Dow's polymer businesses.

Key responsibilities will include:

1. Extensive problem solving.
2. Microscopy preparation technique experience including
ultramicrotomy and cryo-ultramicrotomy.
3. Operation of transmission electron microscope.
4. Interpretation of images.
5. Documentation of work.
6. Compliance with safety and quality programs.
7. Active member of project and SMX work teams.

Interested:
Please e-mail or send your resume and cover letter, with reference to
this ad to:
Email: R&D-at-Dow.com or The Dow Chemical Company, Workforce Planning
98-289, P. O. Box 150, Plaquemine, LA 70765. E-mail respondents must
list Job 98-289 and their last name as the first and second items on the
Subject line. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.
Only U.S. citizens or aliens who are authorized to work in the United
States will be considered for employment.

We are an equal opportunity employer and offer a competitive
compensation and benefits package including 401k, stock purchase,
tuition reimbursement and performance incentives. The Dow Chemical
Company is the fifth largest chemical company in the world with annual
sales of US$20billion. Dow manufactures and supplies chemicals,
plastics and agricultural products for customers in 164 countries and
employs approx. 43,000 people worldwide. For more news and information
about Dow, please visit our web site at www.dow.com.

Bob Cieslinski
Microscopy & Microanalysis
1897 E Bldg.
(517) 636-6875





From: Ewald Eipper :      e.eipper-at-uni-tuebingen.de
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 07:18:15 -0600
Subject: nanobacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,

I need informations about nanobacteria. How can I preparate kidney
stones for search to nanbacteria.

Thanks for your help

Ewald







From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 08:14:15 -0800
Subject: Re: vacuum pump repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John J. Bozzola wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi Vacuum-folks,
}
} We have 5 direct drive vacuum pumps (Hitachi CuteVac) that are in need of
} repair. They are leaking oil (suspect the oil seal is shot) but otherwise
} pump fine. Does anyone know where we could have them repaired? - Hitachi
} does not do this type of work and I hate to throw them away at $3,000 each.
}
} Thanks,
}
} John
}
} ####################################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} Center for Electron Microscopy
} Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901
} U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
} ####################################################################
Dear John,

I have never had any luck with anyone rebuilding these pumps at an
economical price. The companies that rebuild these pumps complain about
the parts availability. Moreover, the rebuild doesn't last more than one
year. At $600.00 to $1000.00 a rebuild it is cheaper in the long run to
buy a replacement. I have used Alcatel Model 2010 with sucess.

Good Luck

Earl Weltmer





From: Steve Collins :      stevesbt-at-erols.com -at-erols.com
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 12:07:43 -0500
Subject: Re: vacuum pump repairs

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Hi John:

There are several companies that offer rebuilding of vacuum pumps. One
that I know of that is very reputable is Torr International in New
Windsor, NY. You can reach them at ph: 914-565-4027 or visit their web
sight at www.torr.com. I am sure they can help bring your pumps back up
to spec. The contacts at Torr Int'l are Dr. Masud Naraghi and Mr. Jeff
Terranova.

Good luck,

Steve Collins
South Bay Technology East
4019 S. 16th St.
Arlington, VA 22204

Ph/fax: 703-486-7999
Email: scollins-at-southbaytech.com


} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com} } } } }

Celebrating our 35th year of Manufacturing Precision
Sample Preparation Equipment and Supplies for
Metallography, Crystallography and Electron Microscopy


John J. Bozzola wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi Vacuum-folks,
}
} We have 5 direct drive vacuum pumps (Hitachi CuteVac) that are in need of
} repair. They are leaking oil (suspect the oil seal is shot) but otherwise
} pump fine. Does anyone know where we could have them repaired? - Hitachi
} does not do this type of work and I hate to throw them away at $3,000 each.
}
} Thanks,
}
} John
}
} ####################################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} Center for Electron Microscopy
} Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901
} U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
} ####################################################################





From: Patricia Bozzano :      bozzano-at-cnea.gov.ar
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 14:13:10 -0300
Subject: Reprint

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi !!
One of my collagues is interested to found out a reprit of the paper:
Identification of a new Zr-Nb- Fe Phase
O.T.Woo and G.J.C.Carpenter. Proc. of the 12th Int. Congress for
Electron Micoscopy. San Fransisco Press, 132(1990)
Thank in advance








From: Randi Olsen :      randio-at-fagmed.uit.no
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 18:31:37 +0100
Subject: Re: Re-embedding methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 00:18 25.01.99 +0100, you wrote:
}

}
} I was interested in the use of osmium in xylene that you described. Does
the tissue blacken as
} in a water-solution or does it simply become yellowish/brown? I am curious
because the latter is
} what happens in the absence of water during freeze-substitution using e.g.
1% in acetone at -80
} *C, although the colour change probably happens when warming up from low
temperature.


Hello Keith.

According to the people here that most often works with this (Irene Lund)
the blocks are not as dark as with standard methods, but light brown. We
haven't done freeze-substitution with osmium, so it's not easy to compare
directly.
For this purpose we buy ampoulas with 0,1 gram OsO4.

Best regards
Randi Olsen
Randi Olsen
Department of Electron Microscopy
Faculty of Medicine
University of Tromso
MH-Breivika
N-9037 TROMSO
NORWAY

tel: +47 77 64 53 15
fax: +47 77 64 46 50
email: randio-at-fagmed.uit.no













From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 11:40:31 -0600
Subject: Re: vacuum pump repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hey John,

Just made a trip to our Physics machine shop. They have sent pumps to Kurt
J. Lesker in PA for repair. The cost to rebuild a 25 liter pump in 1997 was
~$600.

Kurt J. Lesker
1515 Worthington Ave.
Clairton, PA 15025
1-800-245-1656

Hope this helps,
Lou
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: Carl Henderson :      chender-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 12:19:28 -0500
Subject: Re: vacuum pump repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Duniway Stockroom (http://www.duniway.com) lists a rebuild for a Hitachi
VP-160 at $480. I assume that would come with shaft seals. Or you could
order the shaft seals from Hitachi and rebuild the pumps yourself. The
part number(s) ought to be in the CuteVac manual that came with the
pump/microscope. I did this several years ago on a pump from a Hitachi
S-570.

However, parts availability from Hitachi, in my experience, is not quick or
easy (even with part numbers).

Carl

Earl Weltmer wrote:
}
} John J. Bozzola wrote:
} } Hi Vacuum-folks,
} }
} } We have 5 direct drive vacuum pumps (Hitachi CuteVac) that are in need of
} } repair. They are leaking oil (suspect the oil seal is shot) but otherwise
} } pump fine. Does anyone know where we could have them repaired? - Hitachi
} } does not do this type of work and I hate to throw them away at $3,000 each.
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } John
} Dear John,
}
} I have never had any luck with anyone rebuilding these pumps at an
} economical price. The companies that rebuild these pumps complain about
} the parts availability. Moreover, the rebuild doesn't last more than one
} year. At $600.00 to $1000.00 a rebuild it is cheaper in the long run to
} buy a replacement. I have used Alcatel Model 2010 with sucess.
}
} Good Luck
}
} Earl Weltmer


======================================
Carl Henderson
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2501 C.C. Little Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA
(734) 936-1550 FAX (734) 763-4690
======================================







From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/27/99 6:41 PM
Subject: vacuum pump repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Potential lead:
Capital Equipment Co. (or Capital Vacuum) in the northern Virgina
area offered repair for many brands of equipment. I cannot locate
the address and do not know if they are still in business. A quick
search did turn up a company in Herndon, VA (named Capital...), but
I don't know if that is the correct one.

If the leak is not too fast, a tray under the pump is a cheap
solution.


Woody White
McDermott Technology, Inc



______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi Vacuum-folks,

We have 5 direct drive vacuum pumps (Hitachi CuteVac) that are in need of
repair. They are leaking oil (suspect the oil seal is shot) but otherwise
pump fine. Does anyone know where we could have them repaired? - Hitachi
does not do this type of work and I hate to throw them away at $3,000 each.


Thanks,

John


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################





From: Tom Phillips :      tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 11:55:05 -0600
Subject: Job posting for light microscopy core facility manager

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Internet Mail Server 2.1); Thu, 28 Jan 1999 12:59:39 -0500
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="============_-1294576389==_ma============"
Message-Id: {v04011727b2d654a02b0d-at-[128.206.162.35]}


--============_-1294576389==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Assistant or Associate Director
Molecular Cytology Core Facility

The Molecular Biology Program at the University of Missouri is seeking an
individual with experience in some or all of the following areas:

* confocal scanning laser microscopy
* bright field microscopy
* wide field fluorescence microscopy
* low light video microscopy
* image processing/analysis
* deconvolution
* all types of microtomy
* immunocytochemistry
* in situ hybridization
* Adobe Photoshop


The Assistant/Associate Director will be responsible for training users,
maintaining instruments and developing protocols for a campus-wide
multi-user light micrscopy facility. Electron Microscopy is not a part of
this facility. PhD desirable but not required for individuals with
extensive experience. Although an ideal candidate would have experience in
all of the areas listed above, candidates with extensive experience in
selected areas and who have the desire and capacity to learn the additional
areas will be considered. Excellent oral and written communication skills
are essential. Experience in a multi-user core facility would be viewed
positively. Women and minority candidates are especially encouraged to
apply. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until an
appropriate candidate is hired.

Address applications (CV and 3 letters of reference) or inquires to:

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Division of Biological Sciences
3 Tucker Hall, University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400.
573-882-4712
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu.



Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)
--============_-1294576389==_ma============
Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"

{bold} {bigger} {bigger} {bigger} Assistant or Associate Director

Molecular Cytology Core Facility


{/bigger} {/bigger} {/bigger} {/bold} The Molecular Biology Program at the
University of Missouri is seeking an individual with experience in some
or all of the following areas:


* confocal scanning laser microscopy

* bright field microscopy

* wide field fluorescence microscopy

* low light video microscopy

* image processing/analysis

* deconvolution

* all types of microtomy

* immunocytochemistry

* in situ hybridization

* Adobe Photoshop



The Assistant/Associate Director will be responsible for training
users, maintaining instruments and developing protocols for a
campus-wide multi-user light micrscopy facility. Electron Microscopy is
not a part of this facility. PhD desirable but not required for
individuals with extensive experience. Although an ideal candidate
would have experience in all of the areas listed above, candidates with
extensive experience in selected areas and who have the desire and
capacity to learn the additional areas will be considered. Excellent
oral and written communication skills are essential. Experience in a
multi-user core facility would be viewed positively. Women and
minority candidates are especially encouraged to apply. Review of
applications will begin immediately and continue until an appropriate
candidate is hired.


Address applications (CV and 3 letters of reference) or inquires to:


Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.

Division of Biological Sciences

3 Tucker Hall, University of Missouri

Columbia, MO 65211-7400.

573-882-4712

PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu.


Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility


3 Tucker Hall

Division of Biological Sciences

University of Missouri

Columbia, MO 65211

(573)-882-4712 (voice)

(573)-882-0123 (fax)

--============_-1294576389==_ma============--





From: Simon C. Watkins :      swatkins+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 14:12:09 -0500
Subject: specimen stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Folks: I am trying to get hold of a dual replica device for a Cressington
freeze fracture machine. An alternate possibility would be a dual replica
device from a Balzers 400
If anyone, anywhere, has one tucked in a drawer gathering dust etc. etc.
and would like to part with it (for the purchase price, or whatever they
feel is appropriate) please let me know as soon as possible
Thanks
Simon


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRC Path
Associate Professor Cell Biology and Physiology
Director, Center for Biologic Imaging
BSTS 225
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
Tel: 412-648-3051
Fax: 412-648-8330
Mobile: 412-607-3534
URL: http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----







From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 23:50:12 +0100
Subject: Re: retired chemist school volunteer ne

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----------
} Van: HASWELL Malcolm {malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk}
} Aan: Microscopy {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Onderwerp: RE: retired chemist school volunteer ne

} GROWING ROOT TIPS
..CAUTION supermarket onions may be incapable of sprouting roots you
} may have to try fresh ones).

This seems to become more and more a problem as onions are frequently
treated with growth inhibitors. Instead of onions, garlic (Alium sativum)
can be used! There was an article in MIKROKOSMOS some years ago, stating
that garlic isn't treated that way, at least not in Germany (Europe?).


} STAINING METHODS

Some of my modifications:

} FEULGEN STAIN TECHNIQUE
} 1 Cut 1cm of root tip off onion,
} 2. fix in acetic alcohol (3:1) for at least 30 min

fix in ethylalcohol 95%-acetic acid 3/1 (v/v) for about 30 min

} 3. Hydrolyse in 1 molar/normal HCl at 60 deg C 10 - 15 min

when an incubator or a water bath isn't available: use HCl, 5N, 40 min at
RT

} 4 Stain in Feulgen reagent for minimum of 60 min (IN THE DARK) - root tip

} will become purple in meristem
} 5. Without letting specimen dry out = place the end 2-3mm of root tip on
a
} clean slide with a drop of 45% acetic acid
} 6. Cut root tip into 4 longitudinally then gently and carefully squash
under
} a coverslip - protecting your thumb several layers of paper towel.
} 7. Examine for mitosis

} ACETIC ORCEIN TECHNIQUE
} 1, Cut 1cm of root tip off onion

fix in ethylalcohol 95%-acetic acid 3/1 (v/v) for about 30 min

} 2. put into watch glass with concentrated HCl and absolute ethanol (1:1)
for
} 10 min - NB take care when mixing this reagent

Wash in running water for at least 10 min

} 3. transfer root tips to watch glass with 45% acetic acid for 5 min

} 4. Without letting specimen dry out = place the end 2-3mm of root tip on
a
} clean slide with a drop of ACETIC ORCEIN

Slightly heat the slide untill steam apears, let cool, repeat this several
times until the meristem comes dark red-brown.apply new staining solution
when necesary. Don't let dry!

} 5. Cut root tip into 4 longitudinally then gently and carefully squash
under
} a coverslip - protecting your thumb several layers of paper towel.
} 6. Examine for mitosis

Slides can be made permanent. There are lots of methods, I use these: For
ACETIC ORCEIN-stained slides: use slides treated with Haupt's adhesive. Put
the slides after examination in a jar of water, the cover slip down. Wait
until the coverslip comes of. Wash slides and coverslips careful but
toroughly in distilled water, dehydrate in ethylalcohol, 2-propanol. Treat
with xylene and mount in DPX (or another resin). Most of the cells remain
on the slide (coverslip).

For cells stained with Feulgen: Use slides treated with Haupt's adhesive.
Put the slides after examination in a jar of water, the cover slip down.
Wait until the coverslip comes of. Wash slides and coverslips careful but
toroughly in distilled water, dehydrate in ethylalcohol 70%, stain in Light
Green or Fast Green FCF in ethylalcohol 70% (concentration not critical,
about .5% will do), dehydrate in ethylalcohol 90% and differentiate the
green in it, 2-propanol. Treat with xylene and mount in DPX (or another
resin). Most of the cells remain on the slide (coverslip). DNA: violet, RNA
(nucleoli): green (Light Green) or blue-green (Fast Green FCF).


} Malcolm Haswell
} Electron Microscopy
} School of Sciences
} Fleming Building
} University of Sunderland
} SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
} Tyne and Wear
} UK
}
} Tel (0191) 515 2872
} e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk

Yvan Lindekens.





From: Colin Reid :      creid-at-tcd.ie
Date: Friday, January 29, 1999 1:44 AM
Subject: Re: vacuum pump repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John,

I am surprised that Hitachi will not repair the pumps for you. We had
three pumps repaired ( Oil seals ) by Hitachi 1.5 years ago at minimal cost
during our TEM move. The pumps are still working perfectly & have no
leaks. It is not a major job to replace these seals yourself and in the
past we have replaced a couple, with no difficulty getting parts from
Hitachi (UK). The problem with replacement is seating the seals in evenly.
It requires patience which is probably why Martin ( Hitachi, UK ) did a
better job than us.

Colin


Colin Reid,
Electron Microscope Unit,
Trinity College Dublin,
Dublin 2,
Ireland.
Tel: 353-1-6081820
Fax: 353-1-6770438
email: creid-at-tcd.ie
-----Original Message-----
} From: Carl Henderson {chender-at-umich.edu}
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}






From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 22:10:40 -0500
Subject: Re: digital slide presentation (Mac)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am still using Eric Shelden's Presentit {shelden-at-umich.edu} to do my
digital presentations. It takes a folder full of PICT's and Quicktime's
and place them in name order. No fancy transitions or anything, but I find
that overkill. The main advantage is that it plays quicktimes cleanly and
at maximum frame rate with easy access to the quicktime controls for frame
by frame play. I keep a copy on my desktop so I can drag and drop a movie
or image on it anytime I need to look at something. Doing quicktime in
Powerpoint is tricky at best and requires a session with tech support to
find out how to make it work correctly. For making text slides, and
playing simple images Powerpoint is great although I still liked Persuasion
better since you could apply multiple formats to a single presentation.
The best of that lot may be Astound which is the only quicktime application
that implements a speed control for quicktime movie playback rate. Dave

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
75 N. Eagleville Rd.
U-125
Storrs, CT 06269
Knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860-486-2200
860-486-4331 (fax)







From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 29 Jan 1999 16:49:09 U
Subject: post-doc at EMAT, Belgium

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


REGARDING post-doc at EMAT, Belgium

Dear colleagues,

as of April 1, 1999, a 2-year TEM post-doc position will be available at =
the EMAT group in Antwerp. The research will consist of using advanced =
TEM techniques (HREM, EDX, EELS, low-dose, ...) for the study of new =
photographic materials in close colaboration with the Agfa-Gevaert =
company, one of the leading manufacturers of photographic material. The =
position is open to EC citizens or equalized persons.

I look forward to your applications,

Nick Schryvers
e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
fax: 32-3-2180257






From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 11:51:03 -0400
Subject: TEM: Ultramicrotomy

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Hi!
I have a question regarding the limits of Reichter-Jung Ultracut E
ultramicrotome. One of the students wants to cut 1 micrometer
sections of the blocks almost 5x5mm in diameter. So the sections
would be 1 micrometer thick, 5 mm wide, 5 mm high. My questions is is
what is the maximum size of the block face that can be safely (not
destroying the machine) cut on that type of the microtome. I
need to know numbers to back up my argument.
Thanks in advance
Dorota





From: Joel McClintock :      jmcclin-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 12:03:59 -0500
Subject: RE: vacuum pump repairs

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Dr. Bozzola, I am not sure that my reply to your posting went through as I
unknowingly did not follow protocol for this list server.
I can rebuild these inexpensively, return them quickly, test ultimate
vacuum, and provide a guarantee. I have rebuilt these pumps a couple hundred
times. You are right the seals harden over time due to heat from the pump.
Your also right in that it is silly to replace a perfectly good pump for $3K
that can be rebuilt for a couple hundred. Give me a call.
J. McClintock
(606)257-1242
(606)277-6507
jcmcclin-at-pop.uky.edu






From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 11:49:00 -0500
Subject: SEM Service in the Pittsburgh, PA area

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Dear John and all,
In the USA the Hitachi service company Hitachi Instruments, Inc. (HII) used
to have its Hitachi vacuum pumps rebuilt by Dunniway Stockroom (800)
446-8811 in Mountain View, CA. They (HII) found it uneconomic to do so and
stopped. Now for warranty and service repairs of Hitachi pumps they replace
them with Edwards pumps. The Hitachi pumps are thrown away! More of the new
EMs from Japan are showing up with the Edwards pumps new. Dunniway has told
me that the Hitachi pumps are hard to repair, and that there is no secondary
market for them. You can buy used/rebuilt pump from Dunniway for a
reasonable price. The Edwards replacement model for most Hitachi SEMs is
E2M12 with a rebuilt price of $1400.

Disclaimer: I am a only a Customer of Dunniway with no financial interest.


Ron Vane
XEI Scientific.
-----Original Message-----
} From: John J. Bozzola {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Dear fellow microscopists,

We are considering the purchase of a new semi-in-lens FESEM. Quality of
service is of paramount importance to me in terms of the selection process.
I would like to hear from others in the Pittsburgh area (say 500 mile
radius) about the quality of their SEM service (not necessarily FESEM
instruments) from the following vendors: LEO, JEOL, Hitachi, and Philips.
I'm interested in the good, the bad, and the ugly kind of stories.

The types of things that I'm interested in is time it took for installation,
timeliness (i.e. response time from the initial call), downtime,
satisfaction with their work, your confidence in the service engineers,
helpfulness in diagnosing problems and solving them over the phone without a
service call, etc.

Please respond directly to me. I will keep your responses confidential.

Thanks in advance.

-Scott Walck

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)






From: Scott Miller :      smiller-at-umr.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 11:17:31 -0600
Subject: SEM:Dried Wood

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Hello All,
Does anyone out there have any suggestions for getting good SEM cross=
sectional images from dried wood? I have a student who would like to image=
the microstructure of several types of wood. All the references I have=
found so far suggest cutting fresh or moist wood with a new razor blade to=
achieve good cross-sections. The student is studying the effects of two=
different drying techniques, and therefore soaking the wood in water is out=
of the question. Cutting the dried wood with razor blades has resulted in=
crushed, damaged cross sections.=20

Thanks,
Scott
F. Scott Miller
Electron Microscopy Lab smiller-at-umr.edu
University of Missouri-Rolla =20
223 McNutt Hall voice: 573 341 4727
Rolla, MO 65409 USA fax: 573 341 6934





From: SROUBEK :      pasroube-at-mtu.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 14:24:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: help on mounting medium

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I am looking for a mounting medium with a high
optical index (around 1.7). Once I used something
called piperin (n=1.68). Could you please let me know
where can one obtain such products?

Thanks

Pavel Sroubek

pasroube-at-mtu.edu





From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 14:44:01 -0500
Subject: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

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January 29, 1999

Fellow Microscopists,
I am soliciting your comments on what you consider the best approach to damp
vibrations when using a light microscope. We are in the process of
redesigning our light microscopy/image analysis work area and have a choice
between a conventional marble table and a Newport BenchTop vibration
isolation system (pneumatic). Which should it be? Are there other
possibilities to consider?

Thanks for a moment of your time.
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com






From: Nigel Browning :      browning-at-uic.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 13:52:40 -0600
Subject: Materials Science Symposium at Scanning 99

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I would like to draw your attention to the materials science symposium
being held as part of the Scanning 99 meeting in April this year. The
abstract deadline is February 15th (the same as MSA) and the abstract
format is the same as the MSA format. It is intended that there will
be contributed presentations as part of the program, and depending on
the number of submissions, the symposium may be extended for another
day. Please forward this e-mail to anyone you think may be interested
in attending the symposium.

{bold}



"Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic
Resolution" {/bold}



There will be a Materials Science symposium at Scanning 99 entitled
"Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution". Scanning 99 is
being held at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare in Rosemont, IL from April 11-14
1999. The "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution"
symposium is tentatively scheduled for Tuesday April 13th and will
consist of invited and contributed presentations. The details of the
conference and deadlines/forms for abstract submissions can be found at
http://www.scanning.org or details can be requested from Mary Sullivan
(e-mail: scanning-at-fams.org, tel:201-818-1010). Registration for
members of the Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society are at the
reduced rates of $150 for the whole conference or $50 for a single day
(all attendees of the MMMS symposium held at UIC last May are members
of MMMS).


A preliminary list of invited speakers and the titles for their
presentations is shown below.



{bold} Prof Ondrej Krivanek-University of Washington {/bold}


Title "Towards sub-Angstrom electron probes by Cs-corrected STEM."


{bold} Dr Max Haider-CEOS GmbH {/bold}


Title "Towards sub-Angstrom resolution by correction of spherical
aberration"


{bold} Dr J. Murray Gibson -Argonne National Lab {/bold}


Title "Statistical Measurement of Electron Scattering Fluctuations in
Amorphous

Materials - A new Structural Tool"


{bold} Prof Laurie Marks-Northwestern University {/bold}


Title "Picometer structure determination using Electron Diffraction"


{bold} Prof Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska-University of Wisconsin at
Milwaukee {/bold}


Title "Quantitative surface microscopy and diffraction over the length
scales:

Morphology and crystallography of polar oxide surfaces. "


{bold} Dr David Muller-Lucent Technologies {/bold}


Title "The end of the Roadmap for Silicon Dioxide: Atomic resolution
EELS of

of Hyper-Thin Gate Oxides"


{bold} Prof David Williams-Lehigh University {/bold}


Title "Atomic-Resolution X-ray Microanalysis in the TEM"


{bold} Dr Ed James-University of Illinois at Chicago {/bold}


Title "Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy on
the 200kV

FEGTEM"


{bold} Dr Stephen Pennycook-Oak Ridge National Lab {/bold}


Title "Atomic scale analysis of interfaces by Z-contrast STEM, EELS
and

first-principles theory"






___________________________________________________________________________


Nigel D. Browning, PhD

Assistant Professor

University of Illinois at Chicago

Department of Physics

845 West Taylor Street,

Chicago

IL 60607-7059. USA


Tel: 312-413-8164

Fax: 312-996-9016



http://interface.phy.uic.edu


___________________________________________________________________________







From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/29/99 11:17 AM
Subject: SEM:Dried Wood

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If the wood is very dry, you might try simply fracturing a piece.
A surface so prepared will have an extreme amount of relief, but it
may provid you with a less deformed microstructure.

Woody White
McDermott Technology Inc.


______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello All,
Does anyone out there have any suggestions for getting good SEM cross
sectional
images from dried wood? I have a student who would like to image the
microstructure of several types of wood. All the references I have found so
far
suggest cutting fresh or moist wood with a new razor blade to achieve good
cross-sections. The student is studying the effects of two different drying

techniques, and therefore soaking the wood in water is out of the question.
Cutting the dried wood with razor blades has resulted in crushed, damaged
cross
sections.

Thanks,
Scott
F. Scott Miller
Electron Microscopy Lab smiller-at-umr.edu
University of Missouri-Rolla
223 McNutt Hall voice: 573 341 4727
Rolla, MO 65409 USA fax: 573 341 6934





From: John Heckman :      heckman-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 15:21:13 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM:Dried Wood

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Scott,

It may well depend on the type of wood. Years ago I had some luck with
Quercus blocks by cleaning up the top surface with a sliding microtome
(e.g. AO 860) with a properly sharpened (and long) microtome knife set to a
high shear angle and using a small advance. There were still some crumbs in
the vessels but you could find good areas too.

I've never had much but frustration using razor blades on woody plants of
any kind and lately it seems most brands of single edge blades we use
around here for trimming blocks are softer and duller then they used to be.

cheers,
John Heckman


} Hello All,
} Does anyone out there have any suggestions for getting good SEM cross
} sectional images from dried wood? I have a student who would like to image
} the microstructure of several types of wood. All the references I have
} found so far suggest cutting fresh or moist wood with a new razor blade to
} achieve good cross-sections. The student is studying the effects of two
} different drying techniques, and therefore soaking the wood in water is
} out of the question. Cutting the dried wood with razor blades has
} resulted in crushed, damaged cross sections.
}
} Thanks,
} Scott
} F. Scott Miller
} Electron Microscopy Lab smiller-at-umr.edu
} University of Missouri-Rolla
} 223 McNutt Hall voice: 573 341 4727
} Rolla, MO 65409 USA fax: 573 341 6934







From: won-yong kim :      wykim-at-seas.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 15:22:02 -0600
Subject: Jet-polishing solution

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I am studying about Hf-Ta-V alloy. So, I want to make a TEM sample for
that alloy(Hf and Ta of 1/3, V of 2/3) by jet-electropolishing technique
using the apparatus made by Struers. I would like to know the
experimental condition including solution, temperature and cathode.
Please tell me about it who have experienced in that alloy.

won

Won-yong Kim
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Pennsylvania, LRSM building
3231 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104







From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 17:59:00 -0800
Subject: Re: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

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} redesigning our light microscopy/image analysis work area and have a choice
} between a conventional marble table and a Newport BenchTop vibration
} isolation system (pneumatic). Which should it be? Are there other
} possibilities to consider?
You are going to get lots of responses for cheap solutions using tennis
balls or spaldeen balls or inner tubes from bicyles or wheelbarrows or
layers of felt and sheets of concrete. Having no experience with these, I
can't comment on their efficacy.
However, the Newport or TMC table floating on air or N2 is going to be far
superior to the marble table. Guarranteed.
*******************************************************
* Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility *
* Albert Einstein College of Medicine *
* Bronx, NY 10461 (718) 430-2890 *
* work URL: http://www.ca.aecom.yu.edu/aif/ *
* personal URL: http://cammer.home.mindspring.com/ *
*******************************************************





From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 17:06:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: A-12 epoxy adhesive

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Dear Microscopy Listers,

Years ago, upon recommendation by folks out at Sharon Vacuum Company in Brockton
MA, I bought a two component epoxy kit called A-12 Epoxy Adhesisve from the
Armstrong Products Company on Argonne Road in Warsaw, Indiana, for repairing
leaks in vacuum systems. It also proved useful for sealing cracked plastic parts
and metal fittings on cryogenic systems, and for many other repairs. Great
stuff, and it cured to a beautiful milk chocolate brown tone.

I'm just about out now, and I've written to Armstrong Products and they are no
longer in existence,letter was not forwardable, etc.

Anybody out there know of their whereabouts? Or could you recommend any other
suitable replacement product?

Thanks,





Gib Ahlstrand
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: Doug Matthews :      dmatthew-at-providence.edu
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 00:57:12 GMT
Subject: SEM-Immunotagging

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Hi everyone,


I'm interested in doing some immuno work with the SEM. Basically
tagging colloidal gold onto a surface antigen on cultured cells. I've got
some old information and papers but as for up-to-date methodologies, I'm a
little sketchy. Does anyone have any good review papers on the use of immuno
surface markers w/ SEM (preferably colloidal gold?) Nothing too fancy. In
case it helps, I'm specifically looking at phosphotidylserine exposed on the
outer membrane leaflet during apoptosis in a cultured line of CML cells.
Thanks in advance.

Doug Matthews
Providence College








From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 99 23:27:01 -0500
Subject: Vacuum leak sealant

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gib Ahlstrand wrote:
===============================================
Years ago, upon recommendation by folks out at Sharon Vacuum Company in
Brockton MA, I bought a two component epoxy kit called A-12 Epoxy Adhesisve
from the Armstrong Products Company on Argonne Road in Warsaw, Indiana, for
repairing leaks in vacuum systems. It also proved useful for sealing
cracked plastic parts and metal fittings on cryogenic systems, and for many
other repairs. Great stuff, and it cured to a beautiful milk chocolate
brown tone.

I'm just about out now, and I've written to Armstrong Products and they are
no longer in existence,letter was not forwardable, etc.

Anybody out there know of their whereabouts? Or could you recommend any
other suitable replacement product?
=================================================
It is definitely not the same thing, but we (and a number of our customers)
have had excellent results with VACSEALŪ High Vacuum Leak Sealant. The
product can withstand repeated temperature cycling from liquid helium
temperatures to 450° C over long intervals of time.

It is described on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/vac/vacleak.html

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers this product for this kind of application
so we would have a vested interest in seeing it used more widely.

Chuck
===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 23:43:08 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

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Hello Paul.
Believe it or not 4 small inner tubes, inflated so that they have
no real tension before having a table top put on them work very well. I
have used this trick for Atomic force microscopy (AFM) & holography (on
a wooden table). Check out how pneumatic legs are made, aside from the
automatic leveling (option) they are not much different. An improvement
is to build a base consisting of layered, carpet, plywood, 8x8x16"
bricks (commonly called cinder blocks around here) up to the height
needed. There are a lot of optical tables on this planet set up this
way. You can get small tubes (6-8" dia) from cart & dolly vendors.
Another trick is to to build a sand box. Check books on do it
yourself holography Yea, I know these ideas don't look great but they do
work & save lots of money.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.






From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 1999 23:48:08 -0600
Subject: Re: A-12 epoxy adhesive

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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HI Gib.
Varian Vacuum Products has been selling "Torr Seal" for years. Don't know about it's
cryo properties.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.

Gib Ahlstrand wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Microscopy Listers,
}
} Years ago, upon recommendation by folks out at Sharon Vacuum Company in Brockton
} MA, I bought a two component epoxy kit called A-12 Epoxy Adhesisve from the
} Armstrong Products Company on Argonne Road in Warsaw, Indiana, for repairing
} leaks in vacuum systems. It also proved useful for sealing cracked plastic parts
} and metal fittings on cryogenic systems, and for many other repairs. Great
} stuff, and it cured to a beautiful milk chocolate brown tone.
}
} I'm just about out now, and I've written to Armstrong Products and they are no
} longer in existence,letter was not forwardable, etc.
}
} Anybody out there know of their whereabouts? Or could you recommend any other
} suitable replacement product?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Gib Ahlstrand
} Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
} 495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)625-8249
} 612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 13:05:33 +1100
Subject: RE: Dried Wood

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Scott -
I never found razor blades satisfactory on fresh wood and
rather suggest using a microtome with a permanent knife
(not a disposable). I have not tried myself using a
tungsten carbide knife but expect that this would give
still better results. Small triangular TC knives which fit
ultramicrotome chucks are an obvious and cheaper solution
than the big TC knives.

Diamond knife sections would be too thin for SEM purposes
but diamond knives can be used for facing a block. However,
those knives are expensive and the operation is risky.

Another alternative is the use of a series of wet and dry
papers on a lap. Use the paper wetted with kerosene or
another slowly evaporating solvent and when finished use
absolute alcohol to rinse. These papers are available to
about 2000 gird, which is still not fine enough for SEM.
For the final finish I suggest diamond lapping film. This
material is expensive but the diamond particles are
embedded with the plastic. The particles will rarely
contaminate the specimen, the particle size is available
down to 0.1 micrometre and the film is long lasting.

Using the grinding powder that is normally used for cutting
of rock, makes a mess of a specimen like wood.
Disclaimer PST is a supplier of some mentioned products.

Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Saturday, January 30, 1999 3:18 AM, Scott Miller
[SMTP:smiller-at-umr.edu] wrote:
}
} Hello All,
} Does anyone out there have any suggestions for getting
} good SEM cross sectional images from dried wood? I have a
} student who would like to image the microstructure of
} several types of wood. All the references I have found
} so far suggest cutting fresh or moist wood with a new
} razor blade to achieve good cross-sections. The student
} is studying the effects of two different drying
} techniques, and therefore soaking the wood in water is
} out of the question. Cutting the dried wood with razor
} blades has resulted in crushed, damaged cross sections.
}
} Thanks,
} Scott
} F. Scott Miller
} Electron Microscopy Lab smiller-at-umr.edu
} University of Missouri-Rolla
} 223 McNutt Hall voice: 573 341 4727
} Rolla, MO 65409 USA fax: 573 341 6934






From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 06:56:07 +0100
Subject: Re: help on mounting medium

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These were once very popular, especialy for preparations of diatoms, but
they seem very hard to find these days!
(I have posted a question regarding mounting media with high RI on Histonet
a few weeks ago: received only one answer...)
The only source I know of is a Dutch company called Euromex Microscopes.
They sell
Naphrax (RI = 1.710) in 25 ml bottles. Catalog nr = PB0267.
You can contact them trough email: info-at-euromex.nl
Yvan Lindekens.

----------
} Van: SROUBEK {pasroube-at-mtu.edu}
} Aan: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Onderwerp: help on mounting medium
} Datum: vrijdag 29 januari 1999 20:24
I am looking for a mounting medium with a high
} optical index (around 1.7). Once I used something
} called piperin (n=1.68). Could you please let me know
} where can one obtain such products?
}
} Thanks
}
} Pavel Sroubek
}
} pasroube-at-mtu.edu
}





From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 12:13:57 +0000
Subject: SEM:Dried Wood -Reply

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Scott

Could the sample be planed at low temperature? Such as in
a cryostat or cryoultramicrotome? The problem is that it
would have to be returned to room temperature without
condensation forming, maybe in a "sealed" container with dry
nitrogen or air+dessicant.

Maybe it could be impregnated with a non-aqueus medium. I
am wondering if 1-hexadecene (from Sigma) could be used. It
is used as a mdium for filling gas spaces etc in leaves before
high pressure freezing is carried out. It is a non-aquous,
non-toxic, non-osmotically active type of paraffin. I am not
sure about its removal afterwards.

Something that would sublime would be favoured! Maybe one
of the media used instead of critical point drying?
Hexamethyldisilazane? Combined with low temperature
sectioning?

Another primitive approach would be to put it in liquid
nitrogen in a styrofoam contained with a metal "plate" on the
bottom and fracture the sample across with a cooled razor
blade (held in tweezers) whacked with a hammer. Then it
needs rewarming as above, in a container with dessicant
(fresh phosphorus pentoxide, in fine powder form, is my
favourite - this is a vicious chemical so beware of inhalation
of the dust), preferably with dried nitrogen gas leaking
through to prevent air plus atmosheric moisture ingressing.

Enough!

Keith Ryan
c/o Plymouth Marine Lab., UK







From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 11:51:24 +0000
Subject: TEM: Ultramicrotomy -Reply

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Hello Dorota

At the recent resin cutting workshop in Seefeld (Austria),
Prof. Sitte (who has had a lot to do with the design of
Reichert/Leica ultramicrotomes) said that it is possible on
modern instruments to cut 5 or 6 mm across by 12 mm in
length. For TEM examination, ther grid size is the limiting
factor! I have cut 2.5 x 2.5. mm ultrathinns for TEM.
Someone else here has cut roughly the same size 0.5-1.0
micrometers thick, without a "boat"/water bath, of
freeze-dried tissue, dry mounted, for x-ray microanalysis.

I would say that 5 x 5 mm, 1 micron thick should not be a
problem for the instrument providing that the approach and
trimming is done carefully and that the specimen is not very
hard. The specimen should section easily, if it "sticks" on
the knife and doesn't pass to cut a section then I would think
again.

That is my two pennyworth (two cents?)

Keith Ryan
c/o Plymouth Marine Lab., UK





From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 22:11:32 +1100
Subject: RE: help on mounting medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Pavel:
I don't know about Piperine, maybe somebody else can help
with that. However, Meltmounts are available in a range of
several refractive indices, including 1.68 and 1.704.
The Meltmount quickstick is applied to a slide on a
hotplate and after mounting the coverslip, the medium
instantly solidifies at room temperature. The coverslip
may be removed at anytime by re-heating the slide.
Disclaimer:
Meltmount-Quickstick are available from PST and other
microscopy suppliers.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Saturday, January 30, 1999 5:24 AM, SROUBEK
[SMTP:pasroube-at-mtu.edu] wrote:
}
} I am looking for a mounting medium with a high
} optical index (around 1.7). Once I used something
} called piperin (n=1.68). Could you please let me know
} where can one obtain such products?
}
} Thanks
}
} Pavel Sroubek
}
} pasroube-at-mtu.edu






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 09:22:09 -0500
Subject: TEM thick sectioning

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Dorota,
I also have a Reichert ultracut and it does fine with very large thick
sections. Knives tend to suffer however. Depending on your sample, you may
find that you'll need a diamond histo knife. Glass however will also work .
MG Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky






From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-exchange.cc.trincoll.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 09:23:36 -0500
Subject: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

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Have you been experiencing trouble with vibration before now?

I'm on the 4th floor of my building, which has a lot of activity during the
day. In my lab there are 4 sectioning stations with ultramicrotomes lined up
in the same room, sited against the same wall. Three are on marble tables,
one is on a 'floating' table.

Hands down, the N2-damped table beats out the marble tables.

For any critical work, the microtome on the floating table is usable at any
hour of the day, while those on marble tables usually must be used
after-hours, after traffic in the building has eased. The vibration in the
floor is easily visible in the water's surface on any of the 3 marble
tables; it is damped out in the N2-table. Well worth the investment.

Good luck!
Ann Lehman
EM Facility Mgr
Trinity College
Hartford, CT
v 860-297-4289
f 860-297-2538
e ann.lehman-at-exchange.cc.trincoll.edu

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gerroir, Paul J [mailto:Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com]
Sent: Friday, January 29, 1999 2:44 PM
To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com


January 29, 1999

Fellow Microscopists,
I am soliciting your comments on what you consider the best approach to damp
vibrations when using a light microscope. We are in the process of
redesigning our light microscopy/image analysis work area and have a choice
between a conventional marble table and a Newport BenchTop vibration
isolation system (pneumatic). Which should it be? Are there other
possibilities to consider?

Thanks for a moment of your time.
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com






From: Karen Rethoret :      rethoret-at-yorku.ca
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 09:41:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Paul,

We do a lot of extremely sensitive micromanipulation work here with the LM
and have a few very effective anti-vibration systems.

We placed a heavy slab (approx. 400lb) 2' x 3' of Boiler Plate Steel on
top of about 150 tennis balls on a well supported bench. The steel is
well-protected and finished to make a clean, safe work area.
Total cost was about $250. Cdn.

If you'd like more details, you can contact me off-line.

Karen Rethoret
Microscopy Lab
York University
Toronto, Ont.
416-736-2100 x33289


On Fri, 29 Jan 1999, Gerroir, Paul J wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} January 29, 1999
}
} Fellow Microscopists,
} I am soliciting your comments on what you consider the best approach to damp
} vibrations when using a light microscope. We are in the process of
} redesigning our light microscopy/image analysis work area and have a choice
} between a conventional marble table and a Newport BenchTop vibration
} isolation system (pneumatic). Which should it be? Are there other
} possibilities to consider?
}
} Thanks for a moment of your time.
} Paul
}
} Paul J. Gerroir
} Microscopy
} Materials Characterization
} Xerox Research Centre of Canada
} 2660 Speakman Drive
} Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1
}
} Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
} FAX: (905) 822-7022
} e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
}
}






From: Scott Henderson :      Henderson-at-msvax.mssm.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 09:57:55 -0500
Subject: technical positions available (TEM, LM)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Research Opportunities
Mount Sinai School of Medicine is a leader in medical research and
education. The establishment of our new Microscopy Center has created
opportunities for experienced Microscopists with a BS/BA or MS in Biology
or Life Sciences. All applicants should have excellent organizational and
communication skills, an understanding of basic laboratory procedures, and
the ability to manage a large and varied workload.

Electron Microscopist
The successful candidate will participate in ultrastructural
studies of various biological systems. Qualifications include at least 2
years of experience in routine electron microscopy procedures (TEM, SEM),
ultramicrotomy, immunogold labelling, specimen preparation, photographic
darkroom work, and routine maintenance of equipment. Individuals with
immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experience are desirable. Code:
EM

Light Microscopist
The successful candidate will participate in biomedical studies
that use a variety of advanced light microscopic techniques. Duties will
include maintaining equipment, instructing users in equipment operation,
and sample preparation. Qualifications include at least 2 years of
experience in fluorescence and confocal microscopy, immunofluorescence
labelling, in situ hybridization, digital imaging and analysis, cell
culture, and histological techniques. Strong computer skills are essential.
Code: LM

We offer a salary commensurate with experience and excellent benefits. For
consideration, please mail your resume, which must indicate code for
position of interest, to:

Scott Henderson, Ph.D.,
Director, Microscopy Center,
Box 1007,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine,
One Gustave L. Levy Place,
New York, NY 10029-6574

http://www.careermosaic.com/mountsinai

We are an equal opportunity employer fostering diversity in the workplace.

______________________________

Scott Henderson, Ph.D.
Director of Microscopy,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine,
Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy,
Box 1007,
One Gustave L. Levy Place,
New York, NY 10029-6574

(212) 241-5018

e-mail: Henderson-at-msvax.mssm.edu
http://www.mssm.edu/cellbio/faculty/henderson.html







From: Robert Champaign :      r-champaign-at-ti.com
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 09:32:04 -0800
Subject: Re: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Paul, we use a combination of marble tables and pneumatic shock absorbers
on our microscopes. We have been very happy with the results. One of our
microscopes has the bench top vibration table which is also very good.



At 02:44 PM 1/29/99 -0500, Gerroir, Paul J wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From: greg :      greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 10:40:02 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM-Immunotagging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Doug:
Try this paper. You will have to adapt the
protocol to fit your needs. If you have any
questions please feel free to call.

Coller, Barry S., Kutok, J.L., Scudder, L.E.,
Galanakis, D.K., West, S.M., Rudomen, G.S.,
Springer, K.T. . Studies of Activated GPIIb/IIIa
Receptors on the Luminal Surface of Adherent
Platelets: Paradoxical Loss of Luminal Receptors
When Platelets Adhere to High Density Fibrinogen.
J. Clin. Invest. (1993) Vol. 92, pp. 2796-2806.

Doug Matthews wrote:

} Hi everyone,
}
} I'm interested in doing some immuno work with the SEM. Basically
} tagging colloidal gold onto a surface antigen on cultured cells. I've got
} some old information and papers but as for up-to-date methodologies, I'm a
} little sketchy. Does anyone have any good review papers on the use of immuno
} surface markers w/ SEM (preferably colloidal gold?) Nothing too fancy. In
} case it helps, I'm specifically looking at phosphotidylserine exposed on the
} outer membrane leaflet during apoptosis in a cultured line of CML cells.
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Doug Matthews
} Providence College
}
}

--
Regards,
Gregory Rudomen
Technical Specialist
University Microscopy Imaging Center
State University of New York at Stony Brook
516-444-3126
Greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
***************************************
Standard disclaimer: The opinions expressed
in this communication are my own and do
not necessarily reflect those of the University
Microscopy Imaging Center.
***************************************





From: Charles Butterick :      cbutte-at-ameripol.com
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 10:40:58 -0600
Subject: LKB Knifebreaker

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Greetings,

Does anyone know where I can get a used LKB knifebreaker II that's in
pretty good shape?

Thanks in advance

Chuck Butterick
Engineered Carbons, Inc.






From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 12:49:09 -0400
Subject: TEM:Ultramicrotomy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi!
Thanks to all of you who responded to my posting. All suggestions are
very helpful. I forgot to add that the tissue (lung from rat) is
embedded in Epon/Araldite. It is not cryosectioning.
Thanks again
Dorota





From: William A. Monroe :      monroe-at-emcenter.msstate.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 13:44:07 -0600
Subject: Antibodies for Salmonella, Clostridium and Campylobacter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings,

I am submitting a request for a faculty member who is not a member of the
list. The researcher wishes to locate, for sale, antibodies and/or
conjugated antibodies for Salmonella, Clostridium and Campylobacter.

Any replies may be directed to my e-mail address and not to the list.

With Best Wishes,

Bill Monroe

Bill Monroe
EM Center
Mississippi State University
(601)-325-3019 Lab
Fax 325-0246







From: Kevin Croat :      tkc-at-howdy.wustl.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 1999 14:55:16 -0600
Subject: SEM-compatible conductive epoxy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings,
I'm looking for a conductive epoxy (for materials science use) in
which I can embed metal samples, sand and polish, and then look at them
in a field emission SEM. I have seen this used at other facilities, so
I know it exists. I found something at Electron Microscopy Sciences
that I thought might work, but the product has been discontinued. Does
anyone know of an epoxy that can be used for the above application?

Any replies can be directed to me personally.

Thank you,
Kevin Croat
tkc-at-howdy.wustl.edu
Dept. of Physics
Washington University in St. Louis





From: Marie Cantino :      cantino-at-ORACLE.PNB.UCONN.EDU
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 17:12:03 -0500
Subject: TEM- Resin problems. . . thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear fellow microscopists,

Thanks to all those who responded to my question about resin problems. I
got a number of good suggestions, mostly related to storage (most people
thought storing resins in the fridge was unnecessary and probably a bad
idea), use of accelerator (several people suggested that I switch to BDMA
or add DMP-30 to all infiltrating steps) or water contamination in any of
the components (several people suggested replacing all resins). We will
definitely be following up. Many thanks for taking the time to reply.

Marie

Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269-2131
Phone: 860-486-3588
Fax: 860-4861936







From: Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 19:20:32 -0500
Subject: MSA Professional Technical Staff Awards

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The Microscopy Society of America (MSA) and the MSA Technologists' Forum
are the sponsors of the Professional Technical Staff Awards (PTSA) to
provide assistance on a competitive basis to full-time professional staff
who submit papers for presentation at Microscopy and Microanalysis '99 (M&M
'99). The deadline (15 February 1999) is fast approaching! Eligible
applicants: you are encouraged to submit an abstract and supporting
documentation. Managers: you are encouraged to support eligible staff
members in this effort. Please read the following, taken from the M&M '99
Registration Bulletin, for more information.

It is the intent of this award to stimulate attendance at M&M '99 for
professional technical staff who ordinarily might not participate in the
meeting, and to encourage employers to support their staff in professional
activities. Awardees will be selected based on the quality of an abstract
submitted for presentation at M&M '99. The applicant must be the first
author of the submitted abstract. Applicants must be full paid-up members
of MSA at the time of application. The awards consist of free full
registration for the meeting, a copy of the Proceedings and the Sunday
evening social event. MSA will reimburse awardees up to $600 for travel,
lodging and other expenses. There will be a maximum of four awards given.
Successful applicants must present their abstracts personally at M&M '99 in
order to receive the award. They are expected to attend and participate in
the entire meeting. Former winners will not be eligible for another award.
Applications shall consist of: (1) a supporting letter from the applicant's
employer, manager or supervisor, attesting to the applicant's status as a
full-time professional staff member; (2) a scientific abstract (original
and 4 photocopies) for presentation, as described in the Registration
Bulletin, accompanied by a completed Data Form (available on-line at
http://resolution.umn.edu:591/MandM/DataEntry.html, or if inaccessible, by
calling the Meeting Manager at 708/361-6045; electronic submission of the
Data Form is encouraged); (3) a copy of the abstract to be sent by 15
February 1999 to the Chair of the Technologists' Forum: Ms. Beverly E.
Maleeff, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Safety Assessment-US, UE0462,
709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406. Phone: 610/270-7987; Fax:
610/270-7202; e-mail: Beverly_E_Maleeff-at-sbphrd.com.
In order to be considered, completed applications must be received by 15
February 1999. Abstracts will be judged by the MSA Technologists' Forum.
All applicants will be notified of the outcome in early March. Applicants
not receiving the award will have the opportunity to withdraw their
abstract if necessary.


Regards,
Bev Maleeff
Chair, MSA Technologists' Forum







From: Ken Tobin :      kjtobin-at-uic.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 19:40:48 -0500
Subject: Petrographic Thin Sections

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Hi, there,

I'd like to thank all those who responsed to my question. It is clear now
that we should use double glid (Ni) instead glue to hold the sammple.
Attached are messages I've received.

Maoxu Qian
-----------------------------------------------------------

} From zrdai-at-u.washington.edu Mon Feb 1 16:06:29 1999

You might consider the following, (a thick, rather crude adhesive). It is: Sauereisen Insa-Lute adhesive, No. 1 paste. We used it to hold U-Si slices for polishing mechanically. The as mounted slices were then ion irradiated in a UHV vacuum chamber at 350 C approximately. The glue held pretty well, but can't be dissolved-unless the company has a special solvent. It outperformed several "high temp" glues that I tried on hotplate tests. Source:
Sauereisen
160 Gamma Drive
Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania, 15238-2989

Phone: (412) 963-0303 FAX: (412) 963-7620

Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Div.
9700 So. Cass Ave.
Argonne, Ill., 60439

160 Gamma Drive
} -----------------------------------

} From stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za Mon Feb 1 16:06:29 1999


I was wondering if anyone in the microscopic community could recommend an
outfit that can polish petrographic thin sections for EMP work. I need to
can the samples processed within a month timeframe and I am willing to pay
some for this. Many thanks







From: mike_boykin-at-pop.mindspring.com (Mike Boykin)
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 21:39:27 -0500
Subject: US TEM Cryo Techniques Workshop

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The Emory University Neurology Microscopy Laboratory, the University of
Georgia Botany Department EM Laboratory, and Leica Microsystems, Inc.

Present a Cryo Techniques and Immunogold Workshop.

April 18-23, 1999 at the Campus of Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Objectives

1. To provide researchers the opportunity to learn the theory and practice
of cryo techniques for biological sample preparation and immunogold labeling.

2. To permit participants to process their own samples using these
techniques under expert guidance.

Techniques to be covered:

1. High pressure freezing
2. Cryo substitution,
3. Cryo ultramicrotomy
4. Immunogold labeling.


Workshop Faculty

Dr. Wim Voorhout
University of Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Dr. Jan Leunissen
Aurion Immunogold Reagents and Accessories, The Netherlands

Dr. Steven Hersch
Emory University, Department of Neurology

Ms. Beth Richardson
University of Georgia, Department of Botany

Fees

High Pressure Freezing $175.00
Cryosubstitution $175.00
Cryo ultramicrotomy $175.00
Immunogold labeling $175.00
All $550.00

Contact

Ms. Hong Yi
Department of Neurology
Emory University
404-727-8692
hyi-at-emory.edu

Mike Boykin
Leica Microsystems, Inc.
800-248-0665 X5092
Mike_Boykin-at-Mindspring.com







From: agamemnon :      lykurgos-at-mail.magmacom.com
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 1999 22:53:58 -0500
Subject: SiO2 Dry Etch

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Good Day,

Does anyone know of a dry etch that has a high selectivity to etch
SiO2 preferentially to Si? We need to image these samples in a SEM.

Thanks,

Jeff





From: atitkov-at-micl.com.au
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 13:46:53 +0800
Subject: Alumina particles

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I was requested to identify a crystal phase of small (5-7 micron) alumina
particles embedded into copper. There are only a few particles, and all of them
are on the surface. Any ideas how it can be done?

Thanks,

Alexander Titkov
Millennium Inorganic Chemicals
PO Box 245
Bunbury WA 6231
Australia
Ph 61 8 9780 8505 W
FAX 61 8 9780 8500
E-mail: atitkov-at-micl.com.au







From: Stuart Kearns :      Stuart.Kearns-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 09:17:35 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: EPMA - TAP crystal JEOL JXA-8600

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Hi Folks,

Do any of you probers out there have a spare TAP crystal
for a JEOL 8600/733 probe that they may be willing to sell?
..we've had something of an accident..

Thanks,

Stu
--------------------------------------------
Stuart Kearns
Electron Microbeam Laboratories
Department of Earth Sciences
University of Bristol
Queens Road
Bristol BS8 1RJ
UK
tel: (0)117 954 5435
fax: (0)117 925 3385
e-mail: Stuart.Kearns-at-bristol.ac.uk
http://eugf.gly.bris.ac.uk
--------------------------------------------






From: Robert Santoianni :      Robert_Santoianni-at-emory.org
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 06:27:53 -0500
Subject: LKB Knifemaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To Chuck Butterick at Engineered Carbons, Inc.

Which model(s) are you looking for?

Bob Santoianni
robert_santoianni-at-emory.org





From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 09:11:14 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM-compatible conductive epoxy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Kevin,

When I was an undergraduate research assistant at Wash U, I worked in the
McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences. They were using an epoxy called
E-7 which I have been using ever since. It comes in two parts (A & B) which
you mix in a 2 to 1 ratio. Curing time is 2 hours at 150 degrees F. If
cured right, there is really no outgassing or beam damage, even at higher
micrprobe currents. Contact Pat Swan on the 4th floor, he might still use
it. You can buy it from:

Techkits
PO Box 105
Demerest, NJ 07627
201-768-7334

The latest price was $17.25/set for {10 sets. Hope this helps,
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 11:11:58 -0500
Subject: PITTCON '99 New Equipment Review

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To all equipment and software manufacturers:

(NOTE: this is a non-commercial message)

American Lab will be running an extensive review of new equipment being
displayed at the upcoming PITTCON meeting (March 7-11, Orlando). For the
first time, microscopy and related imaging will have its own section, as
part of the on-going FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY column. If you are:
(1) showing products which have not been exhibited or presented at a prior
PITTCON and/or
(2) introducing new products at this PITTCON
please send copies of press kits, press releases, slides/product shots, and
any other information to me at the address below. Indicate on the envelope
that this is for the PITTCON Microscopy/Imaging review.

This article will need to go to press shortly after the meeting, so if I
can get a head start on your materials, I would greatly appreciate it.
Also, I will be on the show floor, following through on any materials
received, so please enclose your booth number, name of a pertinent contact,
and, if possible, a selection of times when they might be in your booth.

This article will appear in the May issue of American Lab.

Please call/email if you have any questions. Thanks in advance for your
assistance.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Marketing & Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Contributing editor to American Lab ("Focus on Microscopy" column)










From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 99 11:36:28 -0500
Subject: "Dry etching" of SiO2/SEM exam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

"Jeff" wrote:
==============================================
Good Day,

Does anyone know of a dry etch that has a high selectivity to etch SiO2
preferentially to Si? We need to image these samples in a SEM.
=================================================
This is usually done in a plasma etcher, using CF4 or some other reactive F
gas of the more expensive types. You can get more information about this on
our website given below. Typically, in a 100 watt barrel etcher, you can
remove 1 um of SiO2 in about 30 minutes. The process is completely dry and
is used in failure analysis laboratories.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================







From: Max Snodderly :      maxs-at-vision.eri.harvard.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 12:09:53 -0500
Subject: LM-Historesin Plus immunocytochemistry

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We are beginning to use the Historesin plus embedding medium supplied by
Leica for immunocytochemistry of the retina by light microscopy. We will
be using the images to count photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial
cells of animals fed special diets to examine the effects of nutrition on
the retina. I would like to communicate with others who have used this
product to learn the best ways of storing material to preserve
immunoreactivity for long periods of time and to share information on other
technical issues.

You can respond to me directly at the address below.

Max Snodderly, Ph.D.
Schepens Eye Research Institute
20 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114, USA

****Please note changes in phone and fax numbers:

Telephone: 617-912-0255.
Fax: 617-912-0101.
E-mail Maxs-at-vision.eri.harvard.edu





From: CrushStone-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 12:09:09 EST
Subject: Re: Petrographic Thin Sections

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In a message dated 2/1/99 9:03:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, kjtobin-at-uic.edu
writes:

{ { I was wondering if anyone in the microscopic community could recommend an
outfit that can polish petrographic thin sections for EMP work. I need to
can the samples processed within a month timeframe and I am willing to pay
some for this. } }

We recommend:

Mineral Optics Laboratory
29 "A" Street, P. O. Box 828
Wilder, Vermont 05088 USA
802-295-9373
802-295-7540 (FAX)



Yours truly,
Steve Stokowski
Stone Products Consultants
Concrete Petrographers
10 Clark Street, Suite A
Ashland, Massachusetts, 01721 USA
508-881-6364
http://members.aol.com/CrushStone/petro.htm






From: Gang Ning :      gning-at-mcw.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 11:17:26 -0600
Subject: wants

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
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Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello to all!

I am looking for a set of negative cassettes (30 plates), a cassette
magazine box, and a cassette receiver box for Hitachi-600 TEM. Please
let me know if any of you or your friends have a Hitachi TEM being taken
down apart and wants to give away or trade these things.

Thanks in advance.

Gang Ning
EM Facility
Medical College of Wisconsin
414-456-8344




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n: Ning;Gang
org: Medical College of Wisconsin
email;internet: gning-at-mcw.edu
title: Ph.D.
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From: Gang Ning :      gning-at-mcw.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 12:12:47 -0600
Subject: Wants

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------270C3E9348A24106DB53A0D9
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello to all!

I am looking for a set of negative cassettes (30 plates), a cassette
magazine box, and a cassette receiver box for Hitachi-600 TEM. Please
let me know if any of you or your friends has a Hitachi TEM being taken
down apart and wants to give away or trade these things.

Thanks in advance.

Gang Ning
EM Facility
Medical College of Wisconsin
414-456-8344



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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
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begin: vcard
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n: Ning;Gang
org: Medical College of Wisconsin
email;internet: gning-at-mcw.edu
title: Ph.D.
x-mozilla-cpt: ;0
x-mozilla-html: FALSE
version: 2.1
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From: Sally Burns :      burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 13:46:24 -0500
Subject: TEM: Cover slips for sectioning

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Colleagues will be growing Vero cells (Green Monkey Kidney Cells) and
intestinal epithelial cells on cover slips for subsequent ultrathin
sectioning and TEM examination. I am interested to know which cover slips
are best to use for this purpose. Can they be purchased sterile? I have
checked the Ted Pella and EMS catalogs, they both sell non sterile
cellulose acetate cover slips. Are there compatibility issues with resins
and solvents? I am interested in any tips or tricks to smooth the way.
Thanks, Sally Burns

Sally Burns
Center for Electron Optics
B5 Pesticide Research Center
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48823
(517) 355-5004 Phone
(517) 353-5598 FAX

burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu





From: Tong Wang :      tong-at-jlab.org
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 13:57:28 -0500
Subject: flexible microneedle

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Hi,

I need some microneedles to dislodge some very fine particles (micron size)
on my sample but still flexible enough to bend.
Any information is appreciated.

Tong








From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 10:11:33 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: flexible microneedle

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Hi, Tong-

As an electron microscopist who has come from a neurophysiology
background, I have used various fine needles for "dusting" off debris.
You need to find the one that feels right.

Cat whiskers are long, pointy, strong, and flexible. They are
particularly good for chasing tiny bubbles out of microelectrodes or
capillary tubes.

Finely drawn glass. Heat a pipet or rod over a Bunsen burner and draw it
out until it breaks. Find somewhere along the long string that has the
right size and flexibility, but won't break and leave more debris!

Cactus spines. They come in many shapes and sizes. Also useful for
pinning down things for dissection that can't come into contact with
metal.

Find someone in neurobiology who does microelectrode recording and get
them to make some electrodes, which are capillary tubes drawn to a very
fine point. You can probably get some in the micron range. Beveled,
even!

Insect Minutin pins mounted on a stick are very strong, but may scratch
your substrate. They can be ground down for a finer point.

Eyelashes, beard hair, and other body hairs each have different
properties. Have fun experimenting.

Good luck!

Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************






From: David Barnard :      David.Barnard-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 15:12:53 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: flexible microneedle

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Tong,

We have used tungsten needles of about that dimension with our high-
voltage electron microscope.. what we were looking for was a rather rigid
"needle point" on which to mount micron sized objects. It was found that when
we attempted to move these small specimens around and to get them to stick to
the needles, the needles would bent very easily when they contacted the glass
slides our specimens were prepared on. So you might try tungsten.
We made them by electrolytically etching 5 mil. tungsten wires in NaNo3
solution, connecting the tungsten wire and a small graphite rod (1/8 inch
dia.) to each of the terminals of a 6 volt AC transformer ( yes AC! ) and
dipping both into the solution.The graphite rod was dipped well into the
solution but the wtungsten would be dipped only an 1/8 inch or less below the
surface. After a number minutes the wire would etch to a very small point,
which could be examined under a light microscope until it was small enough
for the application. Good luck.

Dave Barnard

HVEM Lab
NYS Dept Health
Wadsworth Ctr
Albany NY






From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Tue, 02 Feb 1999 13:54:38 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TEM: Cover slips for sectioning

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For TEM of cultured cells, we grow the cultures on
"Thermanox" tissue culture coverslips. From Nalge Nunc
INternational, 50 sterile coverslips, 13 mm in diameter is
catalog 174950. EMS also sells these thermanox cover
slips in a variety of sizes (see page 143 of their cat
XIII). The coverslips can be treated with all the same
chemistry as tissue including propylene oxide and Spurrs
epoxy, which are two components which solubilize
polystyrene. These thermanox coverslips can be sunk cell
side up in freshly made Spurrs, then following
polymerization the coverslips can be removed by first
sawing a small area of the epoxy/cell/substrate, then
immersing in liquid nitrogen for a few seconds, then prying
away the substrate. Now the embedded cells are immediate
on the epoxy. Re-embed two fragments of the culture face
to face for cross-sections, or cut the block parallel to the
face for tangential sections. We particularly like the
round 13 mm thermanox coverslips for immunocytochemistry of
cultured cells since they can be floated cell side down in
a drop of 100 microlitters antibody - gold conjugate,
conserving reagents.

If you would like to grow a larger culture, you could also
use "permanox" culture dishes, which are equally resistant
to chemicals common in TEM processing. These are also
available through EMS and other suppliers.

Good luck,

Doug
----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Microscopy Unit
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97201
503-221-3434
DRK-at-shcc.org






From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 16:49:32 -0500
Subject: FL AVS/FSM Meeting Program

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Orlando in March!!!! To Register follow the local meetings in
www.vacuum.org or http://www.msa.microscopy.com

Over 30 Invited Talks, 40 vendors, and over 40 student posters!

Golf Tourny on Sunday March 14 - www.pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~ampac

AVS short courses and UCF/Vendor Sponsored Short Courses in Tripod Polisher
and FIB TEM Specimen Preparation see www.pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~ampac
-----------------------------

Monday March 15, 1999


Opening and Keynote Address

8:00-8:15 am Welcome and Introduction, Lucille Giannuzzi, 1999 FL
AVS/FSM Program Chair

8:15-9:00 am Keynote Address, Sam Durrance, Astronaut, Professor,
University of Central Florida



Monday, March 15, 1999

Session I: Thin Films

Session Moderator: Maggie Puga-Lambers, University of Florida


9:00-9:25 am Tim Anderson, Chemical Eng. Dept., University of Florida

9:25-9:50 am CONCENTRATION DEPTH PROFILING OF IMPURITIES AND DOPANTS IN
FLAT
PANEL DISPLAYS AND GLASSES BY SIMS, Temel Buyuklimanli, Evans East

9:50-10:15 am MODIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECT STATES IN ZnO
FILMS,
Gregory J. Exarhos and Charles F. Windisch, Jr., Pacific Northwest
National Laboratory

10:15-10:45 am Coffee Break

10:45-11:10 am FUNDAMENTALS OF TUNGSTEN CMP DURING CMOS DEVICE FABRICATION,
Rajiv Singh, Engineering Research Center for Particle Science and
Technology, University of
Florida

11:10-11:35 am SURFACE ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS IN SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY,
Bridget Rogers, Vanderbilt University

11:35-12:00 pm THE INFLUENCE OF AIR ON THE PROPERTIES OF THIN FILMS DEPOSITED
FROM BEAMS OF NANOPARTICLES USING A COPPER SOURCE, F. K. Urban, III,
A. Khabari, A. Housseini-Tehrani, P. Griffiths, and G. Fernandez

12:00-1:00 pm Lunch
Monday, March 15, 1999

Session II: Microscopy of Biological Samples


Session Moderator: Karl Muffly, University of South Florida
Jo Ann Moore, University of South Florida


9:00-9:25 am DIGITAL MANIPULATION OF ACQUIRED IMAGES, WHAT IS POSSIBLE VS.
WHAT IS ETHICAL, John Kinnamon, University of Denver and The Rocky
Mountain Taste and
Smell Center

9:25-9:50 am THE USE OF CORRELATIVE MICROSCOPY IN BIOLOGICAL PROBLEM
SOLVING, Ralph Albrecht, University of Wisconsin

9:50-10:15 am APPLICATIONS OF A 300 KV, FIELD EMISSION ELECTRON
MICROSCOPE IN
STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY, Kenneth A. Taylor, Florida State University
Institute for Molecular
Biophysics

10:15-10:45 am Coffee Break

10:45-11:10 am DECONVOLUTION VS STANDARD FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY, Karl
Muffly,
University of South Florida College of Medicine

11:10-11:35 am SURFACE AND MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF BIOMATERIALS AS THEY
CHANGE IN VIVO: HOW FAR ARE WE FROM NEEDED DATA?, Chris Batich
and Anthony Brennan, University of Florida

11:35-12:00 pm CARBOHYDRATE DEPOSITION PATTERNS IN ETIOLATED SOYBEAN SEEDLINGS
GROWN IN MICROGRAVITY, E.C. Stryjewski, NASA Gravitational Biology
Laboratory,
Dynamac Corp., K.M. Johnson, National Research Council, NASA/KSC,
W.C. Piastuch1,
H.G. Levine1, and L.H. Levine, NASA Gravitational Biology
Laboratory, Dynamac Corp.,
O. Martynenko3, and V. Prima,, Institute for Molecular Biology and
Genetics, National Academy
Of Sciences, Ukraine

12:00-1:00 pm Lunch

1:30-3:30 pm WORKSHOP ON MANIPULATING DIGITAL IMAGES, John Kinnamon,
University of
Denver and The Rocky Mountain Taste and Smell Center

3:30-4:00 pm Florida Society for Microscopy Annual Business Meeting

3:30-6:00 pm Competition Session and Student Competition (Session IV)
Monday, March 15, 1999

Session III: Surface Science and Analysis

Session Moderators: Sudipta Seal, University of Central Florida


1:00-1:25 pm WETTABILITY AND INTERFACES IN METAL/NITRIDE SYSTEMS,
Natalia Sobczak,
Foundry Research Institute, Cracow, POLAND

1:25-1:50 pm SOFT X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY IN MATERIALS SCIENCE,
E. Joseph Nordgren, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

1:50-2:15 pm MAGNETIC PHASE DIAGRAMS OF ULTRA-THIN FILM BINARY ALLOYS
FOR SPIN-VALVE APPLICATIONS, Brian Tonner, University of Central
Florida

2:15-2:40 pm PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF HIGH RESOLUTION XPS WITH MONOCHROMATIC
AlKA X-RAYS, A.C. Miller, Lehigh University

2:40-3:05 pm STUDIES OF OXIDATION AND CORROSION USING AN ANAEROBIC CELL
APPROACH, Peter M.A. Sherwood, Kansas State University

3:05-3:30 pm MICRO-ESCA/NEXAFS AT A THIRD GENERATION SYNCHROTRON LIGHT
SOURCE, J. H. Underwood, U. Kleineberg, S. Mrowka, P. J. Batson, S.
B. Rekawa, M. S. Jones,
R. C. C. Perera, P. N. Ross, University of California, Berkeley

3:30-4:00 pm Coffee Break

3:30-6:00 pm Competition Session and Student Competition (Session IV)



Monday, March 15, 1999

Session IV: Poster Session

Session Moderators: Larry Plew, Cirent Semiconductor


CHARACTERIZATION AND SURFACE ANALYSIS OF HYDROXOCARBONATE COMPOUNDS, B. B.
Adhyaru, K. R. Williams, and V.Y. Young, University of Florida

INTERFACIAL REACTIONS BETWEEN METAL/P-GaN FOR FORMATION OF OHMIC CONTACTS,
M. Ahonen, B. Liu, P.H. Holloway, University of Florida

SURFACE METASTABLE STRUCTURE OF KTa03 (001) BY HELIUM ATOM SCATTERING, E.
A. Akhadov, T. W. Trelenberg, J. A. Li, J. G. Skofronick, S. A. Safron,
Florida State University and L. A. Boatner, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

SIMS STUDY OF DIFFUSION PHENOMENA OF METAL ELEMENTS IMPLANTED INTO SILICON,
Elvira V. Anoshkina,a,b) Hughes Francois-Saint-Cyr,a,b,c) Ashfaq
Hussain,a,b) , Isaiah Oladeji,d) Fred A. Stevie,e) Lee Chow,b,d) Dan Zhou
a-dUniversity of Central Florida, eCirent Semiconductor

FAILURE ANALYSIS : AN AES-SEM STUDY, K. R. Beaulieu, (UNDERGRADUATE) A. S.
Kale, S. Seal, V. Desai, University of Central Florida

IDENTIFICATION OF SURFACE CHEMICAL FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN POLYMER MEMBRANES:
AN X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY STUDY, Sharon D. Beverly 1,2, Satyajit
V. Shukla, 3,4 Seungkwan Hong, 2 and Sudipta Seal3, 4, 1NASA, 2-4University
of Central Florida

STUDY OF CORROSION FAILURES UNDER ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS, L.A. Bracho, V.
H. Desai, S. Seal, University of Central Florida

ANISOTROPIC PATTERN TRANSFER IN GaN BY PHOTO-ENHANCED WET ETCHING, Hyun
Cho(1), S.M. Donovan(1), C.R. Abernathy(1), J. Han(2), R.J. Shul(2), F.
Ren(3) and S.J. Pearton(1), (1) & (3) University of Florida (2) Sandia
National Laboratories

NOVEL EMITTER BASE SELF-ALIGNED PROCESS FOR AlGaN/GaN HETEROJUCTION BIPOLAR
TRANSISTORS, X. A. Cao1, H. Cho1, S. J. Pearton1, C. R. Abernathy1, F.
Ren1, J. Han2, R. J. Shul2, and A. G. Baca2, 1 University of Florida, 2
Sandia National Laboratories

HELIUM ISOLATION IMPLANT FOR GALLIUM NITRIDE BASED FIELD EFFECT
TRANSISTORS, G. Dang1, X. Cao1, F. Ren1, S.J. Pearton1, J. Hang2, and R. J.
Shul2, 1University of Florida, 2Sandia National Labs

CAPILLARIZATION OF SKELETAL MUSCLE IN RATS UNDERGOING HEART FAILURE, Hans
Degens, Rebecca K. Anderson, Karl E. Muffly and Stephen E. Always,
University of South Florida

UN-ANNEALED AND ANNEALED PD ULTRA-THIN FILM ON SIC CHARACTERIZED BY ATOMIC
FORCE MICROSCOPY, SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY, AND X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON
SPECTROSCOPY, K. Elshot, Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826, W. Lu, D.T. Shi,E.
Bryant, K. Lafate, H. Chen, A. Burger, W. E. Collins, Department of
Physics, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208

FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES ON E-BEAM EVAPORATED ZnS:Mn AND Zn1-xMgxS:Mn
ELECTROLUMINESCENT THIN FILMS, Tao Feng, Mark Davidson, Paul Holloway,
University of Florida

DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A COMPUTERIZED DATA ACQUISITION AND
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A NANOPARTICLE DEPOSITION SYSTEM, Frank K. Urban and G
Fernandez, Florida International University, Miami, Florida

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DIFFUSION PROPERTIES OF Mg, Cl, K, Ge, AND Mo IN
SILICON BY SIMS,
Hughes Francois-Saint-Cyr,a,b,c) Elvira V. Anoshkina,a,b) Ashfaq
Hussain,a,b) ,Fred A. Stevie,e) Lee Chow,c,d) Kathleen Richardson, a,b,c)
and Dan Zhou a,b), a-dUniversity of Central Florida, eCirent Semiconductor

A STUDY OF THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF KTAO3 DOPED WITH CA, BA, SR, AND NB,
P.W. Gresser
Florida State University

NOZZLE DESIGN IN A DIFFERENTIALLY PUMPED NANO-PARTICLE INSTRUMENT, Peter D.
Griffiths and Frank K. Urban, Florida International University

INTERFACIAL CHRACTERISTICS OF AlN TO Si, SiC AND GaN, K. Harris, B. P.
Gila, F. Ren, J. Deroaches, K. N. Lee, J. D. MacKenzie, C. M. Zitterling+,
M. Ostling+, S. N. G. Chu**, C. R. Abernathy, and S. J. Pearton, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL, +KTH, Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm, **Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies

SELECTIVE DRY ETCHING USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMAS: GaAs/AlGaAs AND
GaAs/InGaP, D.C. Hays, H. Cho, K.B. Jung, Y.B. Hahn*, C.R. Abernathy, S.J.
Pearton, and F. Ren, University of Florida, W.S. Hobson, Bell Laboratories,
Lucent Technologies

HOT FILAMENT CVD OF DIAMOND THIN FILMS, Ashfaq Hussain, Lee Chow, and
Dan Zhou, University of Central Florida

QUANTITATIVE COMPARISON OF VON WILLBRAND FACTOR (VWF) EXPRESSION IN HUMAN
NON-MALIGNANT AND MALIGNANT TISSUE USING CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY
(Undergraduate), D Janarious, J Biggerstaff, JL Francis, Walt Disney
Memorial Cancer Institute

DIETARY MODIFICATION AND THE ALZHEIMER'S-LIKE PHENOTYPE IN mAPP/mPS1
TRANSGENIC MICE, P.T. Jantzen, M.N. Gordon and D.G. Morgan, University of
South Florida

COMPARISON OF CHARACTERISTICS DRY ETCHING OF LaCaMnO3, NiMnSb AND NiFe THIN
FILMS, K. B .Jung(1), Hyun Cho(1), J. J. Wang(1), J. Caballero(1), Tao
Feng(1), J. R. Childress(2), K. H. Dahmen(3) and S. J. Pearton(1),
(1)University of Florida, (2)IBM Almaden Research Center (3)Florida State
University

FABRICATION OF DC-MAGNETRON SPUTTERED 70Ti-30Al THIN FILMS, A. S. Kale, K.
R. Beaulieu, K. B. Sundaram, V. H. Desai, S. Seal, University of Central
Florida

THE ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY INVETIGATION OF THIN FILM DEPOSITED FROM
NANOPARTICLE SOURSE, F.K. Urban, A. Khabari, Florida International
University

COMPARISON OF ZnS:TbOF THIN FILMS DEPOSITED BY R.F MAGNETRON SPUTTERING
USING ZnS, TbOF MIXED TARGET AND SEPERATED ZnS,TbOF TARGETS, Jongpyo Kim,
Mark Davidson, Barbara Speck, David Moorehead, Qing Zhai, and Paul
Holloway, University of Florida

ELECTRON BEAM DEGRADATION OF OXIDE AND SULFIDE THIN FILM PHOSPHORS FOR
FIELD EMMISION DISPLAYS, Caroline A. Kondoleon, Billie Abrams, Philip Rack*
and Paul Holloway, University of Florida, Rochester Institute of Technology

ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITED SILICON NITRIDE FOR
T-GATE PASSIVATION, J. LaRoche1, F. Ren1, S.J. Pearton1, J. R. Lothian2,
J.W. Lee3, and D. Johnson3, 1University of Florida, 2Multiplex Inc,
3Plasma-Therm, Incorporated

DRY ETCHING OF BaSrTiO3 AND LaNiO3 THIN FILMS IN INDUCTIVELY
COUPLED PLASMAS, K. P. Lee, K. B. Jung, A.Srivastava, D. Kumar, R. K.
Singh and S. J. Pearton, University of Florida

EFFECTS OF Ni THICKNESS ON Ni/Ti/Ag OHMIC CONTACT TO p-GaN, B. Liu, M. H.
Ahonen and P. H. Holloway, University of Florida

TITANIUM MAGNESIUM NICKEL ALLOY AND HYDROGEN STORAGE, Janice K. Lomness,
Sudipta Seal, Michael D. Hampton, and Meredith Stowell (Undergraduate),
University of Central Florida

(Undergradutate) CHARACTERIZATION OF BEAM PRODUCED BY PULSED ARC CLUSTER
ION SOURCE, Samantha A. Moore and Anne J. Cox, Eckerd College

COMPARISON OF THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ELECTROLUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF
ZnS:Mn DEPOSITED BY SPUTTERING AND ATOMIC LAYER EPITAXY, David J. Moorehead
Karen E. Waldrip, M.R. Davidson*, J.H. Lee, B. Pathangey*, M.Puga-Lambers*,
K.S. Jones, P.H. Holloway, University of Florida, and S.S. Sun and C.N.
King, Planar Systems

TRI-LAYER ELECTRON BEAM RESIST FOR SUBMICRON T-GATE GaN BASED FIELD EFFECT
TRANSISTORS, M. Mshewa, H. Hudspeth, F. Sharifi, S. J. Pearton, and F.
Ren, University of Florida

A MODIFICATION OF THE VARIABLY DAMPED LEAST SQUARE ALGORITHM ASSISTED BY
MEASUERED DATA POINTS AND DERIVATIVE PRESELECTION FOR IMPROVEMENT OF
SOLUTIONS, J. Pontillo, F.K. Urban, Florida International University

PULSED CURRENT ELECTROMIGRATION, Cross Reardon and Rolf Hummel, University
of Florida

ILLUSTRATION OF CAPILLARY PERFUSION IN HYPERTROPHIED CARDIAC MUSCLE USING
THE FLUORESCENT DYE, THIOFLAVIN-S, Corey A. Schoder, Hans Degens, Don R.
Hilbelink, Karl E. Muffly
University of South Florida

FORMATION OF SILVER SULFIDE NANO-PARTICLES BY NOVEL SOL-GEL METHOD FOR
INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS, S. Shukla and S. Seal, University of Central
Florida

CO-LOCALIZATION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN (GFAP), OX-42 AND OX-6
IN SPINAL CORD FOLLOWING SCIATIC NERVE DAMAGE, Stacy Sinibaldi, Edward
Haller, and Samuel Saporta University of South Florida

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CONSORTIUM BETWEEN THE RED TIDE CAUSING
DINOFLAGELLATE GYMNODINIUM BREVE, AN UNIDENTIFIED BACTERIUM AND A PHAGE,
Theresa R. Slifko, Lee Houchin, Anthony Greco, and John H. Paul, University
of South Florida

INVESTIGATIONS INTO CHEMICAL MECHANICAL POLISHING OF TUNGSTEN USING VARIOUS
ELECTROCHEMICAL AND SURFACE SCIENCE TECHNIQUES, Dnyanesh Tamboli, Sudipta
Seal, Vimal Desai
University of Central Florida

THE MINERAL CONTENT AND CELLULAR STRUCTURE OF HETEROTOPIC BONE, Gregory S.
Taylor
University of Florida College of Medicine, and Melinda K. Harman and W.
Andrew Hodge, Orthopaedic Research Laboratory

EFFECTS OF FIB OPERATING CONDITIONS ON BEAM DAMAGE OCCURRING IN SILICON TEM
SAMPLES, C.A. Urbanik, B.I. Prenitzer, L.A. Giannuzzi, S.R. Brown1, R.B.
Irwin1, B. Rossi2 , T.L. Shofner2, and F.A. Stevie1, University of Central
Florida, 1Cirent Semiconductor, 2The Bartech Group

IMPROVED PERFORMANCE IN THIN FILM ELECTROLUMINESCENT PHOSPHORS BY DONOR
DOPING, K.E. Waldrip, J.S. Lewis, III, Q. Zhai, D. Moorehead, M.R.
Davidson*, and P.H. Holloway, University of Florida, and S.S. Sun, Planar
Systems, Inc.

EFFECTS OF FLUX AGENTS ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ELECTROLUMINESCENCE OF
SPUTTERED ZnS:Mn THIN FILM PHOSPHORS, Qing Zhai, Karen Waldrip, Jay Lewis,
Jungpyo Kim, David Moorhead, Jinghong Li, Kevin Jones, and Paul Holloway,
Maggie Puga-Lambers, Barbara Speck, and Mark Davidson, Microfebritech,
University of Florida

ICP Cl/Ar PLASMA DAMAGE ON GaN SCHOTTKY, A. Zhang1, H. Cho, F. Ren1, S.J.
Pearton1, J. M. Van Hove2, P. P. Chow2, R. Hickmand2, J. J. Klaasen2 and R.
J. Shul3, 1University of Florida, 2SVT Associates, 3Sandia National Labs

MICROSTRUCTURE EVALUATION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING USING FIB
TECHNIQUES, Hanlin Zhang, Brian Kempshall, Carrie Urbanik and Lucille A.
Giannuzzi, University of Central Florida



Tuesday, March 16, 1999

Session V: Microscopy of Physical Samples


Session Moderator: Lucille A. Giannuzzi, University of Central
Florida

8:30-8:55 am ANALYTICAL MICROSCOPY IN THE REAL SEMICONDUCTOR PROCESSING
WORLD, Ron Anderson, IBM Analytical Services

8:55-9:20 am FIB APPLICATIONS IN MATERIAL SCIENCE PROBLEMS, M.W. Phaneuf,
J. Li, G.A. Botton*, L. Weaver, Fibics Incorporated, *Materials
Technology Laboratory

9:20-9:45 am FOCUSED ION BEAM IMAGING OF MICROELECTRONIC STRUCTURES,
Ann N. Campbell, Sandia National Laboratories

9:45-10:10 am DETERMINATION OF THE COMPOSITION OF GRAIN BOUNDARIES AND
INTERFACES BY X-RAY MICROANALYSIS, David B. Williams, Lehigh University

10:10-10:40 am Coffee Break

10:40-11:05 am MATERIALS APPLICATIONS OF ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY, Altaf Carim,
The Pennsylvania State Univeristy

11:05-11:30 am PHASE MAPPING AND PHASE IDENTIFICATION USING ELECTRON
BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION, David J Dingley and Stuart I Wright,
TexSEM Laboratories

11:30-11:55 pm AFM, Phil Russell, North Carolina State University

12:00-1:00 pm Lunch and Vendor Talks (Session VI)


Tuesday, March 16, 1999

Session VI: Vendor Presentations

Session Moderators: Fred Stevie, Cirent Semiconductor

12:10-12:20 pm LOW ENERGY ION MILLING FOR TEM, David Henriks, South Bay
Technologies

12:20-12:30 pm INNOVATIONS IN MASS FLOW CONTROLLERS FROM UNIT, Greg Vaughan,
Schoonover, Inc.

12:30-12:40 pm RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY, Matt Thompson,
Digital Instruments

12:40-12:50 pm NEW PRODUCTS FROM SPECS: Er-LEED, ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION EEES:
DELTA0.5, AND PLASMA UV SOURCE UV300, Dietrich von Diemar, SPECS U.S.A.



Tuesday, March 16, 1999

Session VII: Electronic Materials

Session Moderator: Drew Hoff, University of South Florida


1:00-1:25 pm LOW FIELD ELECTRON EMISSION FROM UNDOPED NANO-STRUCTURED
DIAMOND, W. Zhu, G. P. Kochanski and S. Jin, Bell Laboratories,
Lucent Technologies

1:25-1:50 pm SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATIONS OF NANOCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND FILMS,
Dieter M. Gruen, Argonne National Laboratory

1:50-2:15 pm CHARACTERIZATION OF SHALLOW JUNCTIONS USING SECONDARY ION MASS
SPECTROMETRY, Charles W. Magee, I.M. Abdelrehim, T.H. Buyuklimanli,
J.T. Marino and
W. Ou, Evans East

2:15-2:40 pm NOVEL PROCESSING OF ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, W. V. Lampert,
Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, OH

2:40-3:05 pm GaN BASED ELECTRONICS FOR HIGH TMEPERATURE APPLICATION, F.
Ren1,
S. J. Pearton1, C. R. Abernathy1, J. M. Van Hove2, P. P. Chow2, R.
Hickmand2, J. J. Klaasen2,
J. Han3, A. G. Baca3, and R. J. Shul3, 1University of Florida, 2SVT
Associates, 3Sandia National
Labs

3:05-3:30 pm LOW ENERGY IMPLANTATION AND SHALLOW JUNCTIONS IN Si, Kevin
Jones,
University of Florida

3:30-4:00 pm Coffee Break, Student Awards and Door Prizes









From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 16:53:50 -0500
Subject: TEM Specimen Preparation Short Courses

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TEM Specimen Preparation Short Courses

Tripod Polisher, instructor: Ron Anderson March 12-13
FIB, instructors: Lucille Giannuzzi and Fred Stevie March 18-19

in conjunction with the FL AVS/FSM meeting week of March

for information see www.pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~ampac or contact lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dept. of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Eng.,
University of Central Florida,
PO Box 162450, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
phone (407) 823-5770 fax (407) 823-0208 email
lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, 12443 Research
Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 phone (407) 275-4354,5,6 fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************







From: David Joswiak :      joswiak-at-orca.astro.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 16:19:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: flexible microneedle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tong - You might find that a glass needle will work for your purpose and
you can easily make them yourself to almost any desired thinness. Simply
take a thin 8 or 10 inch long glass rod (can be hollow too) and heat near
the center with a bunsen burner or other source. After glowing pull the
ends apart and you will draw the glass down to a suitable thickness. At
the micron level glass is relatively strong for moving particles and as
you will find quite flexible.

Dave Joswiak
Dept. of Astronomy
Univ. of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-7702

On Tue, 2 Feb 1999, Tong Wang wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Hi,
}
} I need some microneedles to dislodge some very fine particles (micron size)
} on my sample but still flexible enough to bend.
} Any information is appreciated.
}
} Tong
}
}
}
}
}






From: Jeremy Mitchell :      jeremy-at-lanl.gov
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 1999 16:26:42 -0700
Subject: Postdocs Positions

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Postdoctoral Positions in Nuclear Materials Science - PD994571

The Materials Science and Processing Group (NMT-11) at Los Alamos National
Laboratory is seeking qualified applicants to fill two postdoctoral
positions in the science of nuclear materials. Successful candidates will
work with technical staff members in the Materials Science and Technology
(MST) and Nuclear Materials and Technology (NMT) Divisions. Both positions
require the willingness to work on radioactive materials and the ability to
obtain a DOE Q clearance (which usually requires US citizenship).

Position One: Electron Microscopy of Plutonium and Ceramic Actinide Waste
Forms. The individual will have access to (a) the Electron Microscope
Facility in MST for microstructural studies of unirradiated and surrogate
materials and (b) the Materials Characterization Facility in NMT for
analysis of radioactive materials. Techniques available for this research
include SEM, OIM, TEM, HRTEM and STEM. This work will support research
efforts in radiation effects in ceramics and plutonium characterization for
weapons programs. Candidates must have prior experience in electron
microscopy and microanalysis. Contact Jeremy Mitchell (505-665-3934,
jeremy-at-lanl.gov) or Kurt Sickafus (505-665-3457 kurt-at-lanl.gov) for further
technical information.

Position Two: Radiation Damage in Metals, Self-radiation Damage in
Plutonium Metal, Alloys and Compounds. This work is basic research in
support of plutonium metallurgy and chemistry for the weapons programs.
Candidates must have prior experience in x-ray and/or neutron diffraction
and the associated data analysis with GSAS, knowledge of mechanisms of
radiation damage in metals and some knowledge of condensed matter physics.
The individual will also have access to calorimeters, SEM, OIM, and TEM.
Contact Luis Morales (505-665-7703 lmorales-at-lanl.gov) for additional
technical information.

A Ph.D. in Materials Science, Metallurgical Engineering, Geosciences, or a
related field completed within the last three years or soon to be completed
is required. Candidates may compete for a Director's Fellowship and
outstanding candidates may be considered for the prestigious J. Robert
Oppenheimer, Richard P. Feynman or Frederick Reines Fellowships. Further
details about the Postdoctoral Program may be found at:
http://www.hr.lanl.gov/postdoc/ For consideration, submit a resume and
publications list along with a cover letter outlining current research
interests to postdoc-jobs-at-lanl.gov (no attachments, please!)

OR SUBMIT TWO COPIES to:

Postdoc Program Office, PD994571
MS P290
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos, NM 87545

NOTE: Advertisement #PD994571 must be referenced in the e-mail Subject line
(or the address) and cover letter.

Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Individuals with
disabilities needing reasonable accommodation should call (505) 667-8622. A
Teletype Device for the Deaf (TDD) is available by calling (505) 665-5357.
Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California
for the US Department of Energy.
============================
Jeremy N. Mitchell
MS G730, NMT-11
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos, NM 87545
Phone: 505-665-3934
Fax: 505-665-4013





From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 03:18:26 EST
Subject: Re: TEM: Cover slips for sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sally,
The coverslips that everyone uses is my Thermanox plastic coverslps which are
sterile and come in many different sizes depending on your need. They may be
found wither in our hard copy catalog or on our website at www.emsdiasum.com.
Go to our online catalog and click chapter 7. They are listed under
Thermanox. In our hard copy catalog XIII they may be found on page 143.
Please let me know if I may be of further assistance to you.

Sincerely,
Electron Microscopy Sciences
215-646-1566





From: Manzor Brian BP :      brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 08:56:23 -0000
Subject: TEM: Sample preparation of pigments

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Hi

The best way I know of preparing pigments for TEM analysis is by blowing an
aerosol of the sample dispersed in alcohol/water solution over a hot plate
and collecting the sample on a grid placed at the far end of the hot plate.
The company I work for is concerned about the safety issues surrounding this
so does anybody know of any less hazardous sample preps. or a simple
containment facility for the aerosol spray? I thought about building a
glass box for containment but are there any commercially available
containment/sample prep. units?

Thanks

Brian Manzor
e-mail: brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com







From: Manzor Brian BP :      brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 11:27:33 -0000
Subject: TEM: Sample preparation of pigments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

The best way I know of preparing pigments for TEM analysis is by blowing an
aerosol of the sample dispersed in alcohol/water solution over a hot plate
and collecting the sample on a grid placed at the far end of the hot plate.
The company I work for is concerned about the safety issues surrounding this
so does anybody know of any less hazardous sample preps. or a simple
containment facility for the aerosol spray? I thought about building a
glass box for containment but are there any commercially available
containment/sample prep. units?

Thanks

Brian Manzor
e-mail: brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com






From: Michael Reiner :      a2811111-at-smail.Uni-Koeln.DE
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 1999 14:26:41 +0100
Subject: Re: flat embedding of vibratome sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Michael!
To avoid tissue curling try 50% or 30% ETOH in the first dehydrating step.
You can do dyhradation in cell-culture multiwells.
You=B4ll have to remove the specimens if you=B4d like to use Propylene ox=
ide
because this interacts with the multi-well plastic.
If you like to embed the sections flat, do it on silicated glass slides(o=
r
try a slide, coverd with slightly fatted aluminium foil) , put a drop of
Epon/araldite on it, leave it at 45=B0C in the oven (12-24h) and then put=
BEEM
Capsules filled with Epon/araldit on the top(take care of bubbles!) ,
polymerize 2 days at 60=B0C. If you can=B4t remove the glass slide easily=
, try
it with fluid nitrogen.
Good luck,
Michael

MICHAEL DELANNOY schrieb:

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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m
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
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} Greetings,
} I need assistance with flat embedding of rat cerebellum
} (IEM-DAB), that is 100 um thick and 1.5 x 0.5 cm dimensions. Basically
} we are worried about tissue curling during the dehydration. My first
} inclination is argarose embed (before epon), but I would take any exper=
t
} advise.
} Thank you,
}
} Mike D








From: corwinl-at-pt.cyanamid.com
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 1999 09:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: TEM: Sample preparation of pigments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Sprays can be contained to some extent within a box for spraying
thin-layer chromatographic plates, 20 x 20 cm or a little larger. This
has to be placed in a hood, since it won't catch and retain the
smallest droplets. They come in cardboard and plastic versions. I
can't find one in VWR, but any big Web catalog with a search
capability should lead you to one.


Leonard Corwin
Research Chemist
Fort Dodge Animal Health
Princeton, NJ 08543-0400





From: Luc Harmsen :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 17:45:11 +0200
Subject: WDS Training in South Africa

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Hi all.
We have identified a need for some hands on WDS training here in South =
Africa. A number of our clients have either changed operators or =
upgraded to new integrated systems. So we would like to know if there is =
any one who would be able to help with presenting a WDS course here in =
South Africa. No need to panic, South Africans do have money and are =
willing to pay, not too much mind you.=20

We are open to the course content, however would like to cover a bit of =
customer care operations, calibration and set up and then theory and =
hands on operation.=20
We will have a Jeol 733 with an Advanced Microbeam / Edax integrated =
system available by about June onwards.=20

If any one is interested please let us know so we can discuss details.
Thanks

Luc Harmsen=09
Anaspec, South Africa
International technical support on microscopy.
Tel: +27 (0) 11 476 3455
Fax:+27 (0) 11 476 7290
anaspec-at-icon.co.za







From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 12:19:06 -0500
Subject: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation; Summary and Thanks.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,
Thanks to all those who offered suggestions for the damping of vibrations
sometimes experienced when using a light microscope. Once again you have
proven to be an ingenious lot! Users have their microscope sitting on
platforms supported by any of the following; tennis balls, "sandwiches" of
bubble pack and aluminum plates or inner tubes all of which indicates that
the pneumatic tables or benchtop isolation systems are preferable to the
marble tables. An alternative approach is to support the microscope on a
platform beneath which are sandwiched layers of Sorbothane (elastomer) and
aluminum plates. One simple suggestion was to "plant" each leg of a
conventional table; supporting your microscope, into its own little box of
sand. I'm a little wary of this last suggestion as some of the laboratory
wildlife might find the sand an attractive litter box!

Regards,
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com






From: Robert Santoianni :      Robert_Santoianni-at-emory.org
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 1999 11:18:24 -0500
Subject: EM on Paraffin Processed Specimens

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To Dr. Naseem:
TEM results on paraffin processed tissue will only be as good as the
processing procedure used by the histology lab. In my experience, most
histology labs use a very aggressive protocol, which causes extraction
of cellular components to the point where only nuclei and possibly cell
membranes might be recognizable. Laboratories that handle large
volumes and are concerned with quick turnaround generally dehydrate
and clear the heck out of specimens so they don't have to go back and
reprocess if something was too big, not well fixed, etc. Our laboratory
provides good fixation, gentle dehydration, clearing and infiltration of
routine histology specimens so that when I have to do EM on one of
these, there is usually enough cellular matrix left to make the effort
worthwhile. I have been able to resolve Birbeck bodies, tonofilaments,
junctions, microvilli and immune complex deposits (in glomeruli) in paraffin
processed specimens.
Good luck!
Bob Santoianni
Emory University Hospital
Atlanta, Georgia
robert_santoianni-at-emory.org





From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Wed, 03 Feb 1999 11:09:58 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Processing cell cultures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To process cell cultures for grown on round, 13 mm
Thermanox tissue culture cover slips for TEM, we use the
following hardware:

For fixation, we use porcelain multi-well dishes. These
are what most people refer as "staining dishes". They are
white, measure about 3.5 x 4.5" and have 12 depressions.
We use these for glutaraldehyde, buffer rinses and OsO4.
OsO4 can be completely rinsed from the dishes. Once in the
last buffer after OsO4 and prior to ethanols and propylene
oxide, we transfer the disks to 50 ml polypropylene culture
tubes, such as Fisher 05-539-7 (these are sterile, but
certainly it is not necessary to pay for sterile
containers). There is plenty of room to enter a pipette
for fluid exchange without touching the culture disks, and
the culture surface will not touch the walls of the
cylindrical tube so there is no worry that the cells will
be rubbed off. Given the depth of the tube, we do not
worry too much that the culture will dry out as fluids are
exchanged, since the atmosphere within the tubes is fairly
saturated with solvent vapor. Still, fluid exchange is
done quickly. The polypropylene tubes are resistant to
P.O. and Spurrs. Do not use tubes made from polystyrene as
they will dissolve. Once infiltrated with the last change
of epoxy, we fill a resin-resistant container with epoxy to
a minimum depth of 5 mm, sink the disk so that the cells
face up, then polymerize the epoxy. We steal the
polypropylene lids from wheaten snap-cap vials (Fisher
#0333520E) which are of the appropriate diameter for
embedding 13 mm coverslips. Wearing a dust mask, We use a
jewelers saw to free small blocks of embedded culture,
loosen the cover slip with liquid nitrogen, then remove the
disk which exposes the culture to the surface of the block.
We then either re-embedded (in some of the same batch of
media which was used to infiltrate the culture) face to
face for cross sections, or cut the blocks parallel to the
culture surface for tangential sections.

Good luck,

Doug Keene
EM Facility
Shriners Hospital for Children
DRK-at-shcc.org






From: Stephen Edgar :      s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 13:31:08 +1200 NZDT
Subject: Re: SEM:Dried Wood

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}
} Hello All,
} Does anyone out there have any suggestions for getting good SEM
} cross sectional images from dried wood? I have a student who would
} like to image the microstructure of several types of wood. All the

}
} Thanks,
} Scott

Hi Scott,

I think the classic paper you want is Exley et al. (1973 ?)
J. Microscopy, vol 101, 21-30 "Preparation of wood specimens for the
scanning microscope".

I don't have a copy handy to check, but I think this paper emanated
from good ol' New Zealand! As I recall, the authors were able to cut
fresh lignified wood satisfactorily using a fresh razor blade for
each cut, and then cleaned the surfaces with hypochlorite solution
before drying and coating. Most specimens were OK with just air
drying but delicate features needed CPD. The authors often cut the
one specimen in two planes to good effect, e.g. transverse and radial
longitudinal.

If you want to look at long-dead wood it might be too hard to cut
cleanly. You might need to soak it in something first. Exley et al.
might have suggestions.


Regards

Stephen Edgar

Electron Microscope Unit, Pathology Department
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand

email address: s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz
Phone : +64-9-3737599 extn 6473 (GMT + 12h)
Fax : +64-9-3737459





From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 1999 22:22:12 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Microscope - Vibration Isolation; Summary and Thanks.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-----Original Message-----
} From: Gerroir, Paul J {Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com}

} One simple suggestion was to "plant" each leg of a
} conventional table; supporting your microscope, into its own little box of
} sand. I'm a little wary of this last suggestion as some of the laboratory
} wildlife might find the sand an attractive litter box!


Mix red pepper with the sand that will keep the kitty out of the sand.

Gordon

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Owner PRAG-L PRactical AGriculture List www.couger.com/prag-l
Stillwater, OK 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00






From: xuy-at-warren.med.harvard.edu (Yuhui Xu)
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 10:05:08 -0800
Subject: Antibody source

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Dear Colleagues:

I need to buy McAb and polyclonal ab againt rat and human TNF alpha. Could
any of you tell me where I can get from?

Thanks for the help.
Yuhui Xu
DFCI, HMS





From: Gerry.Griffin :      Gerry.Griffin-at-Med.Nyu.Edu
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 10:24:18 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Electron Microscope Disposal

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I posted a notice several months back about a Siemens 101 Transmission
Electron Microscope that was up for grabs. Although we had some interest,
no one decided to take it. At this point, we have a major space crunch
and need to dismantle and get rid of it. I've been told it contains 25
gms of liquid mercury which should be removed before disposal. Can anyone
refer me to a technician familiar with this equiment in the NY area who
could assist us in this project. Thanks in advance for your help. Please
reply directly to me. I am also posting this notice on the safety list.
----------------------------------------
Gerry Griffin
Environmental Services
NYU Medical Center
Email: Gerry.Griffin-at-med.nyu.edu






From: fhernandez-at-iarc.fr
Date: Thu, 04 Feb 1999 17:26:08 +0100
Subject: LM: BODIPY-TR-CERAMIDE

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I'm studying the transport and localization of some proteins in the
cytoplasm of cultured cells. The cells are fixed in paraformaldehyde and
stained with a avidin-biotin-fluorescein system.
I need to do double staining for this protein and the Golgi, so I intend
to use the Bodipy-tr-ceramide probe, as suggested by Molecular Probes .

I would like to know if someone has experience or worked with this
specific probe. Particularly I need to know if this probe may be used
with fixed cells, that is, after the cells are fixed.

I will be very grateful for any information

Thanks in advance

Francisco Javier Hernandez-Blazquez
IARC-WHO
Unit of Multistage Carcinogenesis
150 Cours Albert Thomas
Lyon - France





From: Don Chernoff at ASM :      asm-at-indy.net
Date: Thu, 04 Feb 99 15:52:54 -0500
Subject: AFM/STM: used equipment wanted.

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We are interested in buying a variety of used AFM and STM equipment.
To see our wish list, go to our web page (or contact us directly)
http://a1.com/asm/wantused.htm

thanks
Don Chernoff



Advanced Surface Microscopy, Inc. E-Mail: asm-at-indy.net
6009 KNYGHTON RD. Voice: 317-251-1364
INDIANAPOLIS IN 46220 Toll free: 800-374-8557 (in USA)
web: http://www.a1.com/asm Fax: 317-254-8690
(note: "a1"= letter "a", numeral "1")








From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 16:52:34 -0600 (CST )
Subject: Position Available

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I am looking for a postdoc/visiting scientist who will
do developmental work on Direct Methods for structure determination
using dynamical electron diffraction data. If you know of anyone
who has:
a) A good diffraction background
b) A good crystallography background
c) Good computer skills
Please ask them to contact me. The position is available now.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++






From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gaugler-at-calweb.com
Date: Thu, 04 Feb 1999 16:07:01 -0800
Subject: Bringing Amray 1600 alive

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I just got an Amray 1600 with turbo and would like to
correspond with others who are using this instrument.
If there are any quirks about it, I would like to know what
they are. If anyone has brought one up after several
years of storage, I'd REALLY like to hear from you.

I'm hoping to be able to take 4x5" sheet film pix and 120
roll film pix.

Any info on the care and feeding of the turbo pump, roughing
pump and inevitable column cleaning would be appreciated.
I'm told that this SEM can take good pictures. I'm hoping to
find out if this is true.


Cheers,
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.






From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 02:52:13 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscope Disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Gerry,

Having serviced Siemens microscopes I can tell you that the source of th=
e
mercury is a mercury diffusion pump. This pump is situated between the
rotary pump and the "oil" diffusion pump in the vacuum circuit.

So that is where the mercury is now to dispose of it is another problem?

Stay safe.

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide






From: Ulf Jondelius :      ulfj-at-nrm.se
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 09:22:31 +0100
Subject: TEM Leo 912AB an microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am currently in the process of acquiring a TEM with accessory equipment.
We are starting a new TEM-lab here at the Swedish Museum of Natural History.

One of the instruments I am considering is the LEO 912 AB. Anyone on the
list with experience of that microscope? We will primarily be doing
morphology including ESI imaging of thick sections, but not analytical work
or cryo.

Also: any recommendations on which ultramicrotome to choose.

TIA

Ulf Jondelius



Ulf Jondelius, Invertebrate Zoology
Swedish Museum of Natural History
P.O.B. 50007, 104 05 Stockholm, Sweden
phone: Int + 46 (0)8 666 5160
fax: Int + 46 (0)8 666 4125
e-mail: ulfj-at-nrm.se






From: P.Bond-at-plymouth.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 9:38:40 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM: Cover slips for sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sally

Here's a few comments to follow from Doug Keene's reply to you
celss on coverslips question.

You can process and section Thermanox quite easily with cells
grown on them.

Orientation problems can be overcome if you cut the coverslip to
fit a BEEM capsule before you innoculate with cells. I have seen
good results with various cell types, and if you taper the cut
coverslip to fit into the BEEM pot, trimming the block is pretty
quick too. If you need, you can also bend up the coverslip at the
non-tapered end to indicate which side the cells are growing.

Spurrs resin seems pretty good, but there can be some
delamination between the coverslip and resin, but not always!

Hope this helps.


Plymouth Electron Microscopy Unit
University of Plymouth
Drake Circus
Plymouth
Devon
UK PL4 8AA
Tel: 01752 233092
Fax: 01752 233092
email: pbond-at-plymouth.ac.uk






From: Didier Le Thiec :      le_thiec-at-nancy.inra.fr
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 1999 11:10:18 +0100
Subject: to colorize SEM pictures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

I need to colorize some SEM pictures but I do not know which
programm to use. If someone can help me, I use PC or Macintosh computer.
Thanks a lot for your help
Best regards

Didier


--------------------------------------------
Didier Le Thiec
I.N.R.A. Centre de Recherches Forestieres
Unite d'Ecophysiologie Forestiere
Laboratoire de Pollution Atmospherique
54280 Champenoux - France

Tel : 33 (0)3 83 39 40 98
Fax : 33 (0)3 83 39 40 69
E-mail : le_thiec-at-nancy.inra.fr
http://vectra.nancy.inra.fr/pollu/index.htm
-------------------------------------------







From: Chris Gilpin :      cgilpin-at-fs1.sem.man.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 14:18:57 -0000
Subject: imaging CD-Rom surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi all

To save a long search can anyone remember which months archive of the
listserver the discussion about preparing cd-roms for sem is in??



Chris

Chris Gilpin
Experimental Officer
Biological Sciences EM Unit
G452 Stopford Building
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PT
phone +44 0161 275 5170
Fax +44 0161 275 5171 Chris Gilpin
http://www.empgu.man.ac.uk









From: Sharon Drew :      drewsh-at-smtpgw2.musc.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 1999 09:45:23 -0500
Subject: CAP AND CLIA REG'S FOR TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am now running a clinical path, diagnostic EM lab. but
must reduce my storage.
What are the clia and cap regs on how long to keep transmission
em blocks, thick section slides, grids and phot mic's?
I am being reduced from a 3 room lab to a room and a closet.
thanks for you help.
S. Drew






From: Nigel Browning :      browning-at-uic.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 09:05:16 -0600
Subject: Interfaces symposium at MSA 99

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





{bold} Atomic Structure and Microchemistry of Interfaces {/bold}


Symposium at the Microscopy & Microanalysis '1999, August 1-5, 1999,
Portland


Organizors: Xiaoqing Pan, University of Michigan; Nigel Browning,
University of Illinois-Chicago


This symposium will focus on, but is not limited to, the application of
different

microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to the study of interfaces in

advanced materials. It includes heterostructural interfaces, grain

boundaries, planar defects in crystalline structure, and crystal
surfaces

in metals, ceramics, semiconductors, electronic device materials, and
their

heterostructures. Techniques include conventional TEM, HRTEM, in-situ

electron microscopy, Z-contrast imaging, cross-section STM and AFM,
EDS,

EELS, ELNES, and high spatial resolution elemental mapping. This
symposium

will emphasize on the physical properties of materials related to

interfaces, which includes atomic structure, bonding characteristics,

chemical compositions, segregation behavior, interfacial stress, local

electronic structure, structure and composition evolution in different

environments. Papers on the structure-property relationships of
materials

closely related to interfaces and surfaces are strongly encouraged.


{bold} Invited Speakers include: {/bold}


Manfred Ruehle (MPI-Stuttgart, Germany)

C. Barry Carter (Univ. of Minnesota)

Stephen Pennycook (ORNL)

Yimei Zhu (Brookhaven National Lab)

Ulrich Dahmen (Berkeley)

V. P. Dravid (Northwestern),

Z. L. Wang (Gegia Tech)

P. M. Ajayan (RPI)

David Muller (Bell Lab)

Colin Humphreys (UK)

J.C. Jiang (U of Mich)

S. Stemmer (U of Illinois at Chicago).



{bold} ************************Abstracts due on February 15,
1999************************ {/bold}




___________________________________________________________________________


Nigel D. Browning, PhD

Assistant Professor

University of Illinois at Chicago

Department of Physics

845 West Taylor Street,

Chicago

IL 60607-7059. USA


Tel: 312-413-8164

Fax: 312-996-9016



http://interface.phy.uic.edu


___________________________________________________________________________







From: Nigel Browning :      browning-at-uic.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 09:09:07 -0600
Subject: symposium at MSA 99

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





{bold} Atomic Structure and Microchemistry of Interfaces {/bold}


Symposium at the Microscopy & Microanalysis '1999, August 1-5, 1999,
Portland


Organizors: Xiaoqing Pan, University of Michigan; Nigel Browning,
University of Illinois-Chicago


This symposium will focus on, but is not limited to, the application of
different

microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to the study of interfaces in

advanced materials. It includes heterostructural interfaces, grain

boundaries, planar defects in crystalline structure, and crystal
surfaces

in metals, ceramics, semiconductors, electronic device materials, and
their

heterostructures. Techniques include conventional TEM, HRTEM, in-situ

electron microscopy, Z-contrast imaging, cross-section STM and AFM,
EDS,

EELS, ELNES, and high spatial resolution elemental mapping. This
symposium

will emphasize on the physical properties of materials related to

interfaces, which includes atomic structure, bonding characteristics,

chemical compositions, segregation behavior, interfacial stress, local

electronic structure, structure and composition evolution in different

environments. Papers on the structure-property relationships of
materials

closely related to interfaces and surfaces are strongly encouraged.


{bold} Invited Speakers include: {/bold}


Manfred Ruehle (MPI-Stuttgart, Germany)

C. Barry Carter (Univ. of Minnesota)

Stephen Pennycook (ORNL)

Yimei Zhu (Brookhaven National Lab)

Ulrich Dahmen (Berkeley)

V. P. Dravid (Northwestern),

Z. L. Wang (Gegia Tech)

P. M. Ajayan (RPI)

David Muller (Bell Lab)

Colin Humphreys (UK)

J.C. Jiang (U of Mich)

S. Stemmer (U of Illinois at Chicago).



{bold} ************************Abstracts due on February 15,
1999************************ {/bold}





___________________________________________________________________________


Nigel D. Browning, PhD

Assistant Professor

University of Illinois at Chicago

Department of Physics

845 West Taylor Street,

Chicago

IL 60607-7059. USA


Tel: 312-413-8164

Fax: 312-996-9016



http://interface.phy.uic.edu


___________________________________________________________________________







From: Nigel Browning :      browning-at-uic.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 09:11:45 -0600
Subject: Materials Science Symposium at Scanning 99

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to draw your attention to the materials science symposium
being held as part of the Scanning 99 meeting in April this year. The
abstract deadline is February 15th (the same as MSA) and the abstract
format is the same as the MSA format. It is intended that there will
be contributed presentations as part of the program, and depending on
the number of submissions, the symposium may be extended for another
day. Please forward this e-mail to anyone you think may be interested
in attending the symposium.

{bold}



"Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic
Resolution" {/bold}



There will be a Materials Science symposium at Scanning 99 entitled
"Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution". Scanning 99 is
being held at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare in Rosemont, IL from April 11-14
1999. The "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution"
symposium is tentatively scheduled for Tuesday April 13th and will
consist of invited and contributed presentations. The details of the
conference and deadlines/forms for abstract submissions can be found at
http://www.scanning.org or details can be requested from Mary Sullivan
(e-mail: scanning-at-fams.org, tel:201-818-1010). Registration for
members of the Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society are at the
reduced rates of $150 for the whole conference or $50 for a single day




From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 1999 09:21:34 -0600
Subject: Re: imaging CD-Rom surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The discussion was last September, maybe on into October. I will send you a
copy of the summary that I have on hand.

Warren S.

At 02:18 PM 2/5/99 +0000, you wrote:
}
} Hi all
}
} To save a long search can anyone remember which months archive of the
} listserver the discussion about preparing cd-roms for sem is in??
}
} Chris Gilpin
} Experimental Officer
} Biological Sciences EM Unit
} G452 Stopford Building
} Oxford Road
} Manchester
} M13 9PT
} phone +44 0161 275 5170
} Fax +44 0161 275 5171 Chris Gilpin
} http://www.empgu.man.ac.uk
}





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 1999 13:15:54 -0500
Subject: Course Reminder: Applied Optical Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just a reminder:ACS's Applied Optical Microscopy will be held in
conjunction with PITTCON, March 5-7, in Orlando, Florida.

This is a three-day, hands-on total immersion workshop. Although this
workshop is offered under the American Chemical Society Short Course
programming, it is not just for chemists. The curriculum focuses on key
techniques to help you be more effective in the lab. Topics range from
alignment, care and cleaning to contrast techniques and basic measurement.
There is also a special Saturday evening program on video and digital
imaging and a full day on qualitative and quantitative Polarized Light
Microscopy. Participants are encouraged to bring samples.

For details and registration information, visit the MME website
{http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education} or call the course coordinator,
Barbara Foster

Barbara Foster
Course Coordinator
ACS Applied Optical Microscopy Course
c/o Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
(413)746-6931 Fax: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com







From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 1999 13:43:58 -0600
Subject: Re: imaging CD-Rom surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


According to some of the messages I saved, the dates are mid-August and
September '98. Hope this helps.

Chris Gilpin wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi all
}
} To save a long search can anyone remember which months archive of the
} listserver the discussion about preparing cd-roms for sem is in??
}
} Chris
}
} Chris Gilpin
} Experimental Officer
} Biological Sciences EM Unit
} G452 Stopford Building
} Oxford Road
} Manchester
} M13 9PT
} phone +44 0161 275 5170
} Fax +44 0161 275 5171 Chris Gilpin
} http://www.empgu.man.ac.uk

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-598-1291
KFAB Physical Analysis Lab
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~







From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Feb 1999 16:23:21 -0500
Subject: Equation for gamma correction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I was just asked to provide the equation for gamma adjustment to image
contrast. I had always assumed that it was just

Output = (Input)^gamma i.e. a simple power law.

Thus for gamma = 0.5 you get a square root curve and for gamma = 2.0 you have a
parabola. However, the contrast curves in various books I've checked do not
appear to be a power law, but look more like circular arcs. Unfortunately
these books only describe gamma but do not provide the equation. Are the
curves just artist's license or is my understanding of the gamma correction
wrong?

If you include Contrast and Brightness, I would expect the general equation to
be

Output = B + C*(Input)^gamma

Where B = Brightness and C = Contrast.

Thanks,
Henk Colijn
Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
A pessimist fears that this is true.






From: funk-at-noran.com (Toby Funk)
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 21:39:36 -0600
Subject: Confocal Microscopy District Sales Manager

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


NORAN Instruments
2551 West Beltline Highway
Middleton, WI 53562

Employment Opportunities - Confocal Microscopy Dist\rict Sales Manager

Location: Flexible - Midwest, West Coast, USA

Following a very successful year, NORAN Instruments is pleased to announce
employment opportunities within its Confocal Sales Division.

The position of District Sales Manager will be responsible for all confocal
sales activities within a predefined region of the United States.

Functions will include:
* Evaluation and qualification of customer needs
* Demonstration of confocal systems, including configuration and setup
* Coordination of installation and initial user training

Necessary qualifications include:
* B.A. or B.S. degree in Natural Sciences. Advanced degree desirable.
* One year's hands on experience with light microscopy techniques.
* Experience and practical knowledge of Confocal microscopy applications.
* Experience with computer image analysis and processing preferred.
* Sales experience is highly desirable.

The position requires travel of up to 50% within designated sales region.

For consideration, please fax or e-mail your resume in confidence to:

Adam Myerov
Sales Manager
NORAN Instruments
fax: 617 491 9166
myerov-at-noran.com






From: Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 05 Feb 99 22:41:54 -0800
Subject: TEM:Ca in fixative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

Could some kind, knowledgable person explain why the addition of calcium =
to fixatives (buffered aldehydes, biological material, resin embedding and =
TEM) is important? =

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org






From: Pawel :      zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 1999 16:44:36 +0100
Subject: Reichert MeF microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BE51EF.FB6FE300
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-2"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


I am looking for any written materials concerning Reichert MeF =
microscope. I have one in mint condition (probably never used), but =
without any instructions. The microscope was made after 1954. It is now =
disassembled and, although I know more or less how to put it together, I =
would rather like to do it according to producer's advices.

I am not sure if my question fits to this mailing list, but I think that =
history of microscopy would be of interest for some of us.

Thank you

Pawel Karaszkiewicz
zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl
=20

------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BE51EF.FB6FE300
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-2"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

{!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"}
{HTML}
{HEAD}

{META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-2 =
http-equiv=3DContent-Type}
{META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.71.2016.0"' name=3DGENERATOR}
{/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} I am looking for any =
written=20
materials concerning Reichert MeF microscope. I have one in mint =
condition=20
(probably never used), but without any instructions. The microscope was =
made=20
after 1954. It is now disassembled and, although I know more or less how =
to put=20
it together, I would rather like  to do it according to producer's=20
advices. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT face=3DArial size=3D2} I am not sure if my question fits to =
this mailing=20
list, but I think that  history of microscopy would be of interest =
for some=20
of us. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} Thank you {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} Pawel =
Karaszkiewicz {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial size=3D2} {A=20
href=3D"mailto:zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl"} zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl {/A} {/FONT} {=
/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial =
size=3D2}     =20
{/FONT} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BE51EF.FB6FE300--






From: info :      info-at-zeus.csd.auth.gr
Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 18:13:38 +0200
Subject: Re: to colorize SEM pictures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Didier,

There is a Win95/WinNT program called EIKONA3D for volumetric image
processing,
analysis and visualization, which provides special features and tools
for working with image sequences originated from microscopy
(e.g. 3D image processing, image alignment, 3D reconstruction, 3D
visualization, volume rendering, surface rendering, 3D registration, etc.).
One of the tools it provides is 3D segmentation of a 3D data set
(image sequence) and labeling/colorization of 3D regions.
See the site: http://www.alphatecltd.com/eikona3d.html

Best regards,
Nikos Nikopoulos

At 11:10 AM 2/6/99 +0100, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Michael J. Herron :      herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Sun, 07 Feb 1999 14:46:11 -0600
Subject: Re: to colorize SEM pictures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Didier ,

I have used Adobe PhotoDeluxe which is available (and pretty cheap) for
both the Mac and PCs. The program is deceptively simple, but quite
usefull if you look into it a bit.

By adding a transparent layer, you can colorize the image without
actually modifying it. Once a colored layer is created the colors can
be rapidly changed to fit your tastes.

Photoshop will do the same....but for a much higher price, and learning curve.


} } Dear all,
} }
} } I need to colorize some SEM pictures but I do not know which
} } programm to use. If someone can help me, I use PC or Macintosh computer.
} } Thanks a lot for your help
} } Best regards
} }
} } Didier
} }

--
_______________________________________________
/ Michael J. Herron /
/ U of MN,Medicine/Infectious Diseases /
/ herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu /
/ http://128.101.243.213 /
/__________________________________________/





From: Stephen Edgar :      s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 16:13:35 +1200 NZDT
Subject: LM: A stain for mitochondria?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I have some samples of muscle tissue in which I would like to
determine the distribution of mitochondria within each myocyte.

My life would be made easier, and the sample size bigger, if I could
do this at the LM level rather than in the TEM. I figure that the
mitochondria will be visible in the LM because they occur in large
groups in this tissue, rather than singly. Also, I don't need to
see every mitochondrion, just the general pattern.

The question is: does anyone know of a suitable specific stain? I am
after a bright-field permanent stain that will work on semi-thin resin
sections, not a fluorescent or antibody method. A nice old-fashioned
stain!

So far the tissue has been fixed in glutaraldehyde but not processed
further.
Regards

Stephen Edgar

Electron Microscope Unit, Pathology Department
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand

email address: s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz
Phone : +64-9-3737599 extn 6473 (GMT + 12h)
Fax : +64-9-3737459





From: fhernandez-at-iarc.fr
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 11:01:52 +0100
Subject: LM: GOLGI STAIN: BODIPY-TR-CERAMIDE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm studying the transport and localization of some proteins in the
cytoplasm of cultured cells. The cells are fixed in paraformaldehyde and
stained with a avidin-biotin-fluorescein system.
I need to do double staining for this protein and the Golgi, so I intend
to use the Bodipy-tr-ceramide probe, as suggested by Molecular Probes .

I would like to know if someone has experience or worked with this
specific probe. Particularly I need to know if this probe may be used
with fixed cells, that is, after the cells are fixed.

I will be very grateful for any information

Thanks in advance

Francisco Javier Hernandez-Blazquez
IARC-WHO
Unit of Multistage Carcinogenesis
150 Cours Albert Thomas
Lyon - France





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 08:23:37 -0500
Subject: Re: Reichert MeF microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 04:44 PM 2/6/99 +0100, Pawel wrote:

Dear Pawel,


I have copies of the operations manuals for both the MeF3 and for its
camera system and would be happy to provide you with copies. There would
be a slight fee for copying and postage. Please let me know if you are
interested.


Best regards,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.


125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

MME is America's first national consortium providing

customized on-site workshops in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.




} } } }

{excerpt}

{fontfamily} {param} Arial {/param} {smaller} I am looking for any written
materials concerning Reichert MeF microscope. I have one in mint
condition (probably never used), but without any instructions. The
microscope was made after 1954. It is now disassembled and, although I
know more or less how to put it together, I would rather like to do it
according to producer's advices.

{/smaller} {/fontfamily}

{fontfamily} {param} Arial {/param} {smaller} I am not sure if my question
fits to this mailing list, but I think that history of microscopy would
be of interest for some of us.

{/smaller} {/fontfamily}

{fontfamily} {param} Arial {/param} {smaller} Thank you

{/smaller} {/fontfamily}

{fontfamily} {param} Arial {/param} {smaller} Pawel Karaszkiewicz

{ {mailto:zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl} zekarasz-at-cyf-kr.edu.pl



{/smaller} {/fontfamily}

{/excerpt} { { { { { { { {










From: fhernandez-at-iarc.fr :      XY0YX534d54503a405370617263352e4d6963726f73636f70792e436f6d405370617263352e4d6963726f73636f70792e436f6d405370617263352e4d6963726f73636f70792e436f6d405370617263352e4d6963726f73636f70792e436f6d-at-oxford.usa.com
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 05:01:00 -0500
Subject: LM: GOLGI STAIN: BODIPY-TR-CERAMIDE

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I'm studying the transport and localization of some proteins in the
cytoplasm of cultured cells. The cells are fixed in paraformaldehyde and
stained with a avidin-biotin-fluorescein system.
I need to do double staining for this protein and the Golgi, so I intend
to use the Bodipy-tr-ceramide probe, as suggested by Molecular Probes .

I would like to know if someone has experience or worked with this
specific probe. Particularly I need to know if this probe may be used
with fixed cells, that is, after the cells are fixed.

I will be very grateful for any information

Thanks in advance

Francisco Javier Hernandez-Blazquez
IARC-WHO
Unit of Multistage Carcinogenesis
150 Cours Albert Thomas
Lyon - France









From: Ed Calomeni :      ecalomeni-at-mco.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 10:39:03 -0500
Subject: Re: CAP AND CLIA REG'S FOR TEM

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Hi Sharon,

How can you run a lab with the space you are getting? Everytime we are =
CAP inspected we are cited (non binding) for lack of space. We have 5 =
large rooms that are used for clinical purposes. Fight with the powers =
that be on this CAP requirement as opposed to throwing out clinical =
specimens.(ie blocks, slides, etc.)

If more room is not posible, how about off site storage? If I had to, I =
could store blocks, prints, negs, thicks, etc in a 10 x 10 foot room. =
(not much room to move in ) that we have collected in the lab since 1974. =
=20

I do not actually now the real requirements that you are asking about, but =
check with the histology lab and use those rules as guidelines.

Best of Luck,

Ed

} } } Sharon Drew {drewsh-at-smtpgw2.musc.edu} 02/05 9:45 AM } } }
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I am now running a clinical path, diagnostic EM lab. but
must reduce my storage.
What are the clia and cap regs on how long to keep transmission
em blocks, thick section slides, grids and phot mic's?
I am being reduced from a 3 room lab to a room and a closet.
thanks for you help.
S. Drew
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=20







From: Robert Mixon :      mixonr-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 08:19:59 -0800
Subject: Re: LM: A stain for mitochondria?

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Why not use Janus green (that's an old "mitochondrial" stain?? Bob Mixon

} } } "Stephen Edgar" {s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz} 02/07 8:13 PM } } }
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Hi all,

I have some samples of muscle tissue in which I would like to=20
determine the distribution of mitochondria within each myocyte.=20

My life would be made easier, and the sample size bigger, if I could=20
do this at the LM level rather than in the TEM. I figure that the=20
mitochondria will be visible in the LM because they occur in large=20
groups in this tissue, rather than singly. Also, I don't need to=20
see every mitochondrion, just the general pattern.

The question is: does anyone know of a suitable specific stain? I am=20
after a bright-field permanent stain that will work on semi-thin resin=20
sections, not a fluorescent or antibody method. A nice old-fashioned=20
stain!

So far the tissue has been fixed in glutaraldehyde but not processed=20
further.
Regards

Stephen Edgar

Electron Microscope Unit, Pathology Department
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand

email address: s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz=20
Phone : +64-9-3737599 extn 6473 (GMT + 12h)
Fax : +64-9-3737459







From: Henry Eichelberger :      heichelb-at-binghamton.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 11:57:40 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM:Ca in fixative

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Hi Paul,
During aldehyde fixation the calcium ions tend to leach out, thus the
addition of CaCl2 to the buffer solution. Of course there are other
important factors to consider such as pH, osmolality, and choice of buffer
(PIPES, MOPES, or Cacodylate instead of Phosphate which may result in some
percipitation). MgCl2,and KCl are are also sometimes added; depending on
what is important to preserve. (Gronblad,M., (1983) Cell Tissue Res.
229,627 and Glauert, A.M., 1975. Fixation, dehydration, and embedding of
Biological specimens. Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy. Amer.
Elsevier Pub. Co.,Inc., New York 207pp.



At 10:41 PM 2/5/99 -0800, you wrote:
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Binghamton,NY 13902-6000
phone: (607)-777-2682
fax: (607)-777-6521
email: heichelb-at-binghamton.edu





From: A.M. Al-Mayouf :      amayouf-at-KSU.EDU.SA
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 21:32:43 +0300
Subject: SEM-IMAGES

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------52E001D5E7420FECEBB67733
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all
I am wondering if there is any source for SEM images that can be
downloaded as "pdf" files.
The images are for corroded metals.
Regards
Mayouf

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fn: Dr. Abdullah .M. Al-Mayouf
n: Al-Mayouf;Dr. Abdullah .M.
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adr;dom: King Saud University, College of Science;;Dept. of Chemistry, P.O. Box 2455;Riyadh-11451;Saudi Arabia;;
email;internet: amayouf-at-ksu.edu.sa
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From: Dr. Ranan Gulhan Aktas :      ranaoz-at-turk.net
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 23:39:10 +0200
Subject: Juxtaglomerular cells in kidney

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--------------A1285E1B1FD5E92FAE2ED561
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello all,

I would like to demonstrate the juxtaglomerular cells(=myoepitheloid
cells) of kidney on semi-thin sections by using different staining
methods. I remember reading a very nice method to show these cells.
However, I can not find it now.

I will greatly appreciate if you could send me the suitable staining
methods which you used before and also your suggestions about that.

Thanks in advance.

Best regards,

Ranan Gulhan AKTAS, M.D.
Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine
Pathology Department
Edirne 22030
Turkey

Tel: +90 284 235 44 68
Fax: +90 284 235 76 52
e-mail: ranaoz-at-turk.net

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org: Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine
adr: Trakya University, Faculty of Medicine;;Pathology Department;Edirne;;22030;Turkey
email;internet: ranaoz-at-turk.net
title: M.D.
tel;work: +90 284 235 76 42 (ext. 15 37)
tel;fax: +90 284 235 76 52
tel;home: +90 284 235 44 68
x-mozilla-cpt: ;0
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--------------A1285E1B1FD5E92FAE2ED561--






From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Friday, February 05, 1999 4:23PM
Subject: Equation for gamma correction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Henk,
I think that your equation is wrong. The gamma correction is Out = (In)
^(1/gamma). This gives a parabola (upwards turning) for gamma=1/2 which
will expand the contrast in the bright region at the expense of the dark
regions of the image. For gamma=2, it is a square root function (also a
parabola on its side) that will expand the contrast in the dark regions at
the expense of the light region. I assume that you would normalize the
output range so that it was 0 to 255 with a suitable coefficient in the
equation. The curves should go through 0 and 255, so there is no offset
constant in the equation.
-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."


----------
} From: Hendrik O. Colijn
To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Hi all,

I was just asked to provide the equation for gamma adjustment to image
contrast. I had always assumed that it was just

Output = (Input)^gamma i.e. a simple power law.

Thus for gamma = 0.5 you get a square root curve and for gamma = 2.0 you
have a
parabola. However, the contrast curves in various books I've checked do not
appear to be a power law, but look more like circular arcs. Unfortunately
these books only describe gamma but do not provide the equation. Are the
curves just artist's license or is my understanding of the gamma correction
wrong?

If you include Contrast and Brightness, I would expect the general equation
to
be

Output = B + C*(Input)^gamma

Where B = Brightness and C = Contrast.

Thanks,
Henk Colijn
Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
A pessimist fears that this is true.






From: Jeff Linnell :      jeff-at-liquidesign.com
Date: Mon, 08 Feb 1999 20:08:55 -0500
Subject: seeking footage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for public domain images from electron microscopes or
anyone in the New York area that might be interested in collaborating
with a design firm to produce a high profile television spot. Any help
would be appreciated..


Jeff Linnell
Liquid Design Group
jeff-at-liquidesign.com






From: Michel Deschuyteneer :      deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Date: Tue, 09 Feb 1999 09:34:06 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM Leo 912AB an microtome

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Ulf,

My laboratory is equipped with a LEO 912 Omega, the model before the AB if
I'm not mistaken, which was purchased 4 years ago. This is an excellent
instrument, powerful, versatile and dependable. I use it mostly for
conventional and cryo-EM with excellent results. I would reccomend it
without hesitation.

For microtome, I have been a satisfied Reichert Ultracut user for years,
which is why I bought an Ultracut S for my lab 4 years ago. The fully
motorized controls needed getting used to in the beginning but have proven
remarkably reliable.

Usual disclaimer: I have no interest or relation to either company other
than being a very satisfied customer.

If you have specific questions, don't hesitate to contact me.

Regards,
Michel
****************************************************
Michel Deschuyteneer, Ph.D. deschuyt-at-sbbio.be
Scientist Electron Microscopy Laboratory

SmithKline Beecham Biologicals
Rue de l'Institut, 89 B1330 Rixensart, BELGIUM
Tel: +32-2-656 9290 Fax: +32-2-656 8164
****************************************************
Standard disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this
communication are my own and do not necessarily
reflect those of SmithKline Beecham.
****************************************************






From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 10:52:06 +0100
Subject: Re: A stain for mitochondria?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There are a lot of (older) techniques for fixation and staining of
mitochondria:

* Altmann's method and modifications (Benoit, Bensley-Cowdry, Kull-Champy,
Volkonsky...)
* Benda's method
* Regaud's method
* Dietrich-Parat-Kultschitzky
* ...

Impregnations (Ag, OsO4):

* Cajal
* d'Achucarro-Hortega
* ...

Never used one of those, so I don't know if these are possible after
fixation in glut_de. At least some are possible, acc. to the text, after
fixation in "formaldehyde-based fixatives" and "postfixation" in potasium
dichromate...

These are all described in Langeron, M: "Precis de microscopie", Masson,
Paris, 1934...

Can send you a copy of the protocols if you want (*.tif, *.jpg,
whatever...it's in French).

Yvan Lindekens.

----------
} Van: Stephen Edgar {s.edgar-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} Aan: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Onderwerp: LM: A stain for mitochondria?
} Datum: maandag 8 februari 1999 5:13

} I have some samples of muscle tissue in which I would like to
} determine the distribution of mitochondria within each myocyte.
}
} The question is: does anyone know of a suitable specific stain? I am
} after a bright-field permanent stain that will work on semi-thin resin
} sections, not a fluorescent or antibody method. A nice old-fashioned
} stain!
}
} So far the tissue has been fixed in glutaraldehyde but not processed
} further.
} Regards
}
} Stephen Edgar






From: maureen_d_hunt-at-amoco.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 07:45:32 -0600
Subject: Instructions for Boston-Bradley Adjustable Blade

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Our group has inherited a Boston-Bradley Adjustable Blade manufactured
by Gardener Laboratory of Bethesda, MD. During an on-line search we
were able to determine that the company existed in 1952, but no other
information was available.

We believe this to be a crude microtome. It has a stainless steel
"clamp" and brass inserts that are labeled with exact thickness from
0.001 to 0.101mil. The clamp is a rectangular block with 3/4" on each
end 5mm higher than the center section

Profile ____ ____
____________

Along one side of this center section is an adjustable stainless steel
slab with an arrow pointing to the center of one edge. The knurled
knobs are on the other side of the center section. This slab may be
adjusted such that it is above or below the center height. It may
also be loosened from the center area so that it is a distance from
the center.

It seems that the only way to cut would be to raise the slab, place a
specimen on the center area (top down), hold the specimen in place and
cut it off with a razor blade. This seems upside-down to every other
microtome I have dealt with.

Has anyone ever used one of these? We need a crude sledge microtome
and this may fit our needs if we could just figure out how to use it.

Thank-you for your help.

Maureen Hunt
BP-Amoco p.l.c.






From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 06:44:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM:Ca in fixative

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Hello,

I had always been told that it helped to preserve the membranes. I've
never tested that information, however.

Bob Underwood
Derm Research Center
U of Washington

On 5 Feb 1999, Webster wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Could some kind, knowledgable person explain why the addition of calcium to fixatives (buffered aldehydes, biological material, resin embedding and TEM) is important?
} Regards,
}
} Paul Webster, Ph.D
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles, CA 90057
} phone:213 273 8026
} fax: 213 413 6739
} e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
}
}
}






From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 08:55:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: seeking footage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} I am looking for public domain images from electron microscopes or
} anyone in the New York area that might be interested in collaborating
} with a design firm to produce a high profile television spot. Any help
} would be appreciated..
}
} Jeff Linnell

Jeff -

You'll find a wide variety of images hotlinked at the end of the
"Microscopy for Children" bibliography on the Project MICRO web page (URL
below). Don't miss the secondary set of links available at "K-12
microscopy resources". Some may be public domain, some are not; you need
to check after you've found what you want. There's a stock photo CD-ROM
(colorized SEM) available from Corel; it's also in the bibliography .

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Winston Wiggins :      wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 99 11:25:45 PST
Subject: Philips CM/EM400 Series Specimen Holder

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MSA List Recipients,
If anyone in possession of a spare Philips CM or EM400 series
specimen holder (rod), either regular, low-background, or
double-tilt, is willing for a nominal fee or goods and services
to part company with said device, please contact me immediately
at any of the numbers below. I will be more than appreciative
and most remunerative. Thanks.
Winston

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Winston W Wiggins, Supervisor 2/9/99 11:25:46 AM
CRC-Electron Microscopy Lab. Ofc:704/355-1267
Carolinas Medical Center Fax:704/355-7648
P.O. Box 32861 Lab:704/355-7220
Charlotte,NC 28232-2861 USA Eml:wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~






From: Cieslinski, Robert (RC) :      rccieslinski-at-dow.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 11:54:46 -0500
Subject: Polymer Microscopist Openings

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} Polymer Microscopist - Freeport, Texas and Midland,
} Michigan
}
} Company: The Dow Chemical Company
}
} Location: Freeport, Texas and Midland, Michigan
}
} Qualifications (education, certification, language, etc.) and
} Experience required:
} A candidate with a BS or MS degree in polymer science, material
} science or chemistry is preferred with some prior experience in
} electron microscopy.
} Good written and oral communication skills and the ability to work
} both independently and in a team environment are extremely important.
}
} Job Overview:
}
} The Surface/Microscopy/X-ray (SMX) Group in Dow's Corporate R&D
} Analytical Science Laboratory has two professional level full time
} openings for Polymer Microscopists, one position at each of the Dow's
} facilities in Midland, MI and Freeport, TX. The primary
} responsibilities include working with partners to support research
} projects involving new and existing products in Dow's polymer
} businesses.
}
} Key responsibilities will include:
}
} 1. Extensive problem solving.
} 2. Microscopy preparation technique experience including
} ultramicrotomy and cryo-ultramicrotomy.
} 3. Operation of transmission electron microscope.
} 4. Interpretation of images.
} 5. Documentation of work.
} 6. Compliance with safety and quality programs.
} 7. Active member of project and SMX work teams.
}
} Interested:
} Please e-mail or send your resume and cover letter, with reference to
} this ad to:
} Email: R&D-at-Dow.com or The Dow Chemical Company, Workforce
} Planning 98-289, P. O. Box 150, Plaquemine, LA 70765. E-mail
} respondents must list Job 98-289 and their last name as the first and
} second items on the Subject line. Only those selected for an
} interview will be contacted. Only U.S. citizens or aliens who are
} authorized to work in the United States will be considered for
} employment.
}
} We are an equal opportunity employer and offer a competitive
} compensation and benefits package including 401k, stock purchase,
} tuition reimbursement and performance incentives. The Dow Chemical
} Company is the fifth largest chemical company in the world with annual
} sales of US$20billion. Dow manufactures and supplies chemicals,
} plastics and agricultural products for customers in 164 countries and
} employs approx. 43,000 people worldwide. For more news and
} information about Dow, please visit our web site at www.dow.com.
}
} Bob Cieslinski
} Microscopy & Microanalysis
} 1897 E Bldg.
} (517) 636-6875
}





From: Winston Wiggins :      wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 99 12:33:18 PST
Subject: Philips CM/EM400 Series Specimen Holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
} MSA List Recipients,
} If anyone in possession of a spare Philips CM or EM400 series
} specimen holder (rod), either regular, low-background, or
} double-tilt, is willing for a nominal fee or goods and services
} to part company with said device, please contact me immediately
} at any of the numbers below. I will be more than appreciative
} and most remunerative. Thanks.
} Winston
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Winston W Wiggins, Supervisor 2/9/99 11:25:46 AM
} CRC-Electron Microscopy Lab. Ofc:704/355-1267
} Carolinas Medical Center Fax:704/355-7648
} P.O. Box 32861 Lab:704/355-7220
} Charlotte,NC 28232-2861 USA Eml:wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}

-----------------End of Original Message-----------------






From: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk (HASWELL Malcolm)
Date: Tue, 09 Feb 1999 17:16:55 GMT
Subject: BSA, bacitracin & negative stains

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Dear all

can anyone tell me if people still use BSA or bacitracin as 'wetting agents'
when negative staining? I cannot find reference to them in any of my texts
but I have used them since the dawn of time, so I think I have just lost the
references and/or they've gone out of fashion.

If anyone has advice on use, advantages of particular chemicals or
references I would be grateful.

thanks

Malcolm

PS our glow discharge unit doesn't work - so I can't use that.

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk






From: Winston Wiggins :      wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 99 13:50:46 PST
Subject: FW: Philips CM/EM400 Series Specimen Holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




}
} MSA List Recipients,
} If anyone in possession of a spare Philips CM or EM400 series
} specimen holder (rod), either regular, low-background, or
} double-tilt, is willing for a nominal fee or goods and services
} to part company with said device, please contact me immediately
} at any of the numbers below. I will be more than appreciative
} and most remunerative. Thanks.
} Winston
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Winston W Wiggins, Supervisor 2/9/99 11:25:46 AM
} CRC-Electron Microscopy Lab. Ofc:704/355-1267
} Carolinas Medical Center Fax:704/355-7648
} P.O. Box 32861 Lab:704/355-7220
} Charlotte,NC 28232-2861 USA Eml:wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}

-----------------End of Original Message-----------------







From: Greg Strout :      gstrout-at-ou.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Feb 1999 13:56:55 -0600
Subject: Re: seeking footage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have an "Image Galleries" page on the WWW-Virtual Library for
microscopy site where you may be able to find something suitable.
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/image.shtml

--
==================================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
WWW Virtual Library for Microscopy:
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not necessarily those of
the University of Oklahoma
==================================================================


Jeff wrote:

} I am looking for public domain images from electron microscopes or
} anyone in the New York area that might be interested in collaborating
} with a design firm to produce a high profile television spot. Any
help
} would be appreciated..
}
} Jeff Linnell

Jeff -

You'll find a wide variety of images hotlinked at the end of the
"Microscopy for Children" bibliography on the Project MICRO web page
(URL
below). Don't miss the secondary set of links available at "K-12
microscopy resources". Some may be public domain, some are not; you
need
to check after you've found what you want. There's a stock photo CD-ROM

(colorized SEM) available from Corel; it's also in the bibliography .

Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO:
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html

--
==================================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
WWW Virtual Library for Microscopy:
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not necessarily those of
the University of Oklahoma
==================================================================







From: Cesar D. Fermin Ph.D. :      cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 14:06:57 -0600
Subject: Morphology Core

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi folks, it has been a while but I am back and of course I need help.

I should submit a proposal to my Dean and Chancellor on a potential
centralized morphology core (CMC). They want to see numbers for
outlay-cost-income, and I am having trouble coming up with any cost about
structure, maintenance.

I will very much appreciate either a brief response to the points below
or someone pointing pointing me to a source for this information on the
web (phone numbers or email addresses of members with such information
will be appreciated). I am envisioning a CMC to provide under one roof:
TEM, SEM, Digital Imaging, Confocal, Atomic Force Microscopy and
ancillary services such as frozen, histo, immuno-histo and photography.
I realize that information for all these may come from different places.
Overall, what I need is just an approximate idea for:

1) Cost to operate existing facilities in academic centers?

2) What is the cost for maintaining equipment present at those facilities
and to upgrade components?

3) What is the cost to internal and outside users?
-Do you charge per case, number of blocks, number of samples, number of
cuts?

-How many prints do you provide and at what magnifications for each
case?

-Do you retain negatives and when you do not, do you charge extra?

-Charges for embedding cutting and staining frozens, paraffin?

-Charges for plastic processing (JB-4, historesin, etc), sectioning and
staining?

-Charges for dupplicating slides, making slides, prints,

-Charges for preparing PhotoShop publication quality composites on
color sublimation paper?

-Charges for using microscopy equipment

-Light without and with phase, Normaski, fluorescence, etc.

-Digital confocal optical sectioning, reconstruction, etc.

4) Exceptions.

a) Do junior faculty get service for less than senior and funded
faculty?

b) Are there internal mechanisms for covering the costs of
promising-emerging faculty, but
without active support?


c) How many places have internal mechanisms such as the now extinct NIH
BSRG to cover
costs?

d) Are any of those costs derived directly or indirectly from grant
overheads?

5) Space now housing the facility you describe?


6) How many of the facilities started with external funds?


7) How many of the facilities started with Dean or Chancellor funds?


8) Any other information I miss, but you consider important when
considering a CMC?


9) In particular I want to show that most CMC DO NOT make a profit,
because of the huge costs for maintenance contract on equipment???

10) Is there anyone out there getting internal support from grant's
overhead, and is the money used for CMC considered an incentive-kick-back
to funded invetigators?


11) How many of the existing CMC out there offer Cell Sorting (flow) as
part of the morphology services?

-Arrangements?

-Maintenance?

-Support?

-Internal and external charges?


Thanks a lot. I will collate and post the results.

*Disclaimer: Whatever... is not Tulane opinion!
Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology & Otolaryngology
web:[ http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/ferminlab/] or
[http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/imaging/] Internet:
[cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu]
1430 Tulane Ave/SL79 New Orleans, La 70112-2699
Fax 504 587-7389, Voice 584-2521, Main Office 588-5224






From: Cieslinski, Robert (RC) :      rccieslinski-at-dow.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 14:08:51 -0600
Subject: Michigan Microscopy and Microanalysis Local Affiliate Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Early Announcement


The Michigan Microscopy and Microanalysis (MMM) Society will hold its
Spring Meeting on May 7, 1999 at the Genoa Woods Conference Center, 7707
Conference Center Drive, Brighton, MI. The program chair is still
soliciting additional student papers for the meeting. If interest or
you would like more details on the meeting contact the local affiliate
president, Rob Eversole email at eversole-at-wmich.edu.





From: Vickie Frohlich :      vickie-at-MACC.WISC.EDU
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 14:51:03 -0600
Subject: MSA Symposium Announcement

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--============_-1293529032==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

MSA (the Microscopy Society of America)
is making a concerted effort to provide a forum for multiphoton
imagers to gather for candid discussions concerning the new technique.

This year's event is condensed to a one day symposium,

#31 Multi-Photon Excitation Microscopy: the Next Generation
2 or 3 AUG 99 in Portland, OR

This year there will be far less time available; however, there are several
important goals for this symposium:
1) invite all new speakers for the various applications presentations
2) presentations describing the commercial systems currently available
3) provide a question and answer session forum for technique education


Poster and abstract submissions are welcome, but please hurry since the
deadline for abstract inclusion is 15 FEB 99. See
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/


The morning session covers a variety of strong applications of (currently
quite expensive) ultra-short pulse laser based fluorescence microscopy...

Karel Svoboda, Ph.D Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
"2PELSM for High-Resolution Imaging in Scattering Biological Tissues:
Applications to Neuroscience"

Jayne Squirrell University of Wisconsin
"2PEFM of Cytoplasmic Organization in Living Mammalian Embryos"

Mary Dickinson, Ph.D. Caltech
"Biological Applications of Chromophores With Large Two-Photon Cross-Sections"

Christopher Navara, Ph.D Wayne Hughes Institute
"Dynamic Drug Effects Monitoring"

Paul M W French, Ph.D Imperial College of Science, Technology
and Medicine
"Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Biological Tissue"


Afternoon question/answer session panel:
to include the morning speakers, plus

Dave Piston, Ph.D Vanderbilt University
Warren Zipfel, Ph.D Cornell University
Rebbeca Williams Cornell University
Vickie Centonze-Frohlich, Ph.D University of Wisconsin
John White, Ph.D University of Wisconsin

In addition, we plan to have vendor presentations and handouts for
the commercially available two (multi) photon systems.

==============================================

David L. Wokosin
Instrumentation Development Engineer
Integrated Microscopy Resource
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1205

(608) 265-3083 FAX: (608) 265-4076
email: scopedoc-at-macc.wisc.edu
http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/imr.htm

=============================================

********************************************************************************
Victoria Centonze Frohlich, Ph.D.
Deputy Director, IMR
University of Wisconsin, Madison
P(608) 263-6288
F(608) 265-4076
http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/home.htm
********************************************************************************
--============_-1293529032==_ma============
Content-Type: text/enriched; charset="us-ascii"

MSA (the Microscopy Society of America)

is making a concerted effort to provide a forum for multiphoton

imagers to gather for candid discussions concerning the new technique.


This year's event is condensed to a one day symposium,


{bold} #31 Multi-Photon Excitation Microscopy: the Next Generation

{/bold} 2 or 3 AUG 99 in Portland, OR


This year there will be far less time available; however, there are
several important goals for this symposium:

1) invite all new speakers for the various applications presentations

2) presentations describing the commercial systems currently
available

3) provide a question and answer session forum for technique
education



Poster and abstract submissions are welcome, but please hurry since the
deadline for abstract inclusion is 15 FEB 99. See
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/



The morning session covers a variety of strong applications of
(currently quite expensive) ultra-short pulse laser based fluorescence
microscopy...


Karel Svoboda, Ph.D Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

"2PELSM for High-Resolution Imaging in Scattering Biological Tissues:

Applications to Neuroscience"


Jayne Squirrell University of Wisconsin

"2PEFM of Cytoplasmic Organization in Living Mammalian Embryos"


Mary Dickinson, Ph.D. Caltech

"Biological Applications of Chromophores With Large Two-Photon
Cross-Sections"


Christopher Navara, Ph.D Wayne Hughes Institute

"Dynamic Drug Effects Monitoring"


Paul M W French, Ph.D Imperial College of Science,
Technology and Medicine

"Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Biological Tissue"



Afternoon question/answer session panel:

to include the morning speakers, plus


Dave Piston, Ph.D Vanderbilt University

Warren Zipfel, Ph.D Cornell University

Rebbeca Williams Cornell University

Vickie Centonze-Frohlich, Ph.D University of Wisconsin

John White, Ph.D University of Wisconsin


In addition, we plan to have vendor presentations and handouts for

the commercially available two (multi) photon systems.


==============================================


David L. Wokosin

Instrumentation Development Engineer

Integrated Microscopy Resource

University of Wisconsin-Madison

1675 Observatory Drive

Madison, WI 53706-1205


(608) 265-3083 FAX: (608) 265-4076

email: scopedoc-at-macc.wisc.edu

http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/imr.htm


=============================================



********************************************************************************

Victoria Centonze Frohlich, Ph.D.

Deputy Director, IMR

University of Wisconsin, Madison

P(608) 263-6288

F(608) 265-4076

http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/home.htm

********************************************************************************

--============_-1293529032==_ma============--





From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Feb 1999 16:04:44 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Morphology Core

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Cesar-
you mention what you envision in a CMC
what equipment do you currently have?
what equipment will you be purchasing?
I have used NIH microscopy centers, and I have managed institutional
microscopy facilities. The more money you have for staff the better your
facility will operate. It is best if you have one staff member per
microscope. It gets crazy if your staff is over worked. You will find
maintenance costs will be lower, the quality of results will improve, and
overall costs will decrease. Maintenace contracts are a killer, we were
once paying over $95,000 per year on service contracts for 4 EM scopes. It
was driving prices through the roof, try to negotiate with the
manfacturers. If you buy all new scopes, maybe buy from one vendor, and
see if they will throw in a service engineer as part of the package, or
hire a maintenance person yourself. Try to set costs in a per protocol
fashion avoid itemizing. If you need any more specifics please feel free
to contact me directly.
-Mike


On Tue, 9 Feb 1999, Cesar D. Fermin Ph.D. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi folks, it has been a while but I am back and of course I need help.
}
} I should submit a proposal to my Dean and Chancellor on a potential
} centralized morphology core (CMC). They want to see numbers for
} outlay-cost-income, and I am having trouble coming up with any cost about
} structure, maintenance.
}
} I will very much appreciate either a brief response to the points below
} or someone pointing pointing me to a source for this information on the
} web (phone numbers or email addresses of members with such information
} will be appreciated). I am envisioning a CMC to provide under one roof:
} TEM, SEM, Digital Imaging, Confocal, Atomic Force Microscopy and
} ancillary services such as frozen, histo, immuno-histo and photography.
} I realize that information for all these may come from different places.
} Overall, what I need is just an approximate idea for:
}
} 1) Cost to operate existing facilities in academic centers?
}
} 2) What is the cost for maintaining equipment present at those facilities
} and to upgrade components?
}
} 3) What is the cost to internal and outside users?
} -Do you charge per case, number of blocks, number of samples, number of
} cuts?
}
} -How many prints do you provide and at what magnifications for each
} case?
}
} -Do you retain negatives and when you do not, do you charge extra?
}
} -Charges for embedding cutting and staining frozens, paraffin?
}
} -Charges for plastic processing (JB-4, historesin, etc), sectioning and
} staining?
}
} -Charges for dupplicating slides, making slides, prints,
}
} -Charges for preparing PhotoShop publication quality composites on
} color sublimation paper?
}
} -Charges for using microscopy equipment
}
} -Light without and with phase, Normaski, fluorescence, etc.
}
} -Digital confocal optical sectioning, reconstruction, etc.
}
} 4) Exceptions.
}
} a) Do junior faculty get service for less than senior and funded
} faculty?
}
} b) Are there internal mechanisms for covering the costs of
} promising-emerging faculty, but
} without active support?
}
}
} c) How many places have internal mechanisms such as the now extinct NIH
} BSRG to cover
} costs?
}
} d) Are any of those costs derived directly or indirectly from grant
} overheads?
}
} 5) Space now housing the facility you describe?
}
}
} 6) How many of the facilities started with external funds?
}
}
} 7) How many of the facilities started with Dean or Chancellor funds?
}
}
} 8) Any other information I miss, but you consider important when
} considering a CMC?
}
}
} 9) In particular I want to show that most CMC DO NOT make a profit,
} because of the huge costs for maintenance contract on equipment???
}
} 10) Is there anyone out there getting internal support from grant's
} overhead, and is the money used for CMC considered an incentive-kick-back
} to funded invetigators?
}
}
} 11) How many of the existing CMC out there offer Cell Sorting (flow) as
} part of the morphology services?
}
} -Arrangements?
}
} -Maintenance?
}
} -Support?
}
} -Internal and external charges?
}
}
} Thanks a lot. I will collate and post the results.
}
} *Disclaimer: Whatever... is not Tulane opinion!
} Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology & Otolaryngology
} web:[ http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/ferminlab/] or
} [http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/imaging/] Internet:
} [cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu]
} 1430 Tulane Ave/SL79 New Orleans, La 70112-2699
} Fax 504 587-7389, Voice 584-2521, Main Office 588-5224
}
}
}






From: Maureen Hunt :      huntmd1-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 16:34:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Boston-Bradley Adjustable Blade

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--0-1957747793-918606429=:4074
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Disposition: inline



note: forwarded msg attached.


==
Hello Everybody!

_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free -at-yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com

--0-1957747793-918606429=:4074
Content-Type: message/rfc822

Received: from [209.156.13.156] by web507.yahoomail.com; Tue, 09 Feb 1999 16:26:02 PST



Our group has inherited a Boston-Bradley Adjustable Blade manufactured
by Gardener Laboratory of Bethesda, MD. During an on-line search we
were able to determine that the company existed in 1952, but no other
information was available. We believe this to be a crude microtome.

It has a stainless steel "clamp" and brass inserts that are labeled
with exact thickness from 0.001 to 0.101mil. The clamp is a
rectangular block with 3/4" on each end 5mm higher than the center
section

Along one side of this center section is an adjustable stainless steel
slab with an arrow pointing to the center of one edge. The knurled
knobs are on the other side of the center section. This slab maybe
adjusted such that it is above or below the center height. It may
also be loosened from the center area so that it is a distance from
the center.
It seems that the only way to cut would be to raise the slab,place a
specimen on the center area (top down), hold the specimen in place and
cut it off with a razor blade. This seems upside-down to everyother
microtome I have dealt with.

Has anyone ever used one of these? We need a crude sledge microtome
and this may fit our needs if we could just figure out how to useit.


Thank-you for your help.

Maureen Hunt
BP-Amoco p.l.c.



_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free -at-yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com






From: George Theodossiou :      george.theodossion-at-rmit.EDU.AU
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 11:09:33 +1100
Subject: Denka Supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,

We just replaced the filament in our Jeol 2010, with a Denka filament
can anyone tell me who the supplier is in australia, or elsewhere, I'd
like to buy another.
The filament is a Denka LaB6 Cathode LKSH M3 104051

Thanks George

George Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
GPO Box 2476V
Melbourne 3001
Victoria Australia
Ph: +61 3 9925 3394
Fax: +61 3 9925 5290





From: George Theodossiou :      george.theodossion-at-rmit.EDU.AU
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 12:26:14 +1100
Subject: Denka Supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

We just replaced the filament in our Jeol 2010, with a Denka filament
can anyone tell me who the supplier is in australia, or elsewhere, I'd
like to buy another.
The filament is a Denka LaB6 Cathode LKSH M3 104051

Thanks George

George Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
GPO Box 2476V
Melbourne 3001
Victoria Australia
Ph: +61 3 9925 3394
Fax: +61 3 9925 5290





From: mike_boykin-at-pop.mindspring.com (Mike Boykin)
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 23:09:05 -0500
Subject: US Materials Ultramicrotomy Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ultramicrotomy of Materials


Leica Microsystems, Diatome US, and Electron Microscopy Sciences, announce
another in a series of TEM Specimen Preparation workshops. This seminar
will focus on the hands on participation of the following techniques:

Embedding of industrial samples Specimen trimming

Ultramicrotomy of hard materials Ultramicrotomy of polymers

Collection & handling of sections Staining of polymer sections

Low temperature ultramicrotomy

The format of our workshop is half day lecture and half day bench work in
small working groups. Video attachments will be used on the ultramicrotomes
in order to maximize the teaching experience for all involved. Samples will
be supplied by the course instructors. Participants are encouraged to bring
their own samples to work with as time allows.


Course Speakers & Instructors

Dr. Tom Malis Mr. Bob Vastenhout
CANMET DOW Chemical
Characterization Group Leader Polymer Microscopist
Materials Technology Laboratory Analytical Science Department
Ottawa, Ontario Terneuzen, The Netherlands


Mr. Helmut Gnagi
Product Manager
Microtomist Extaordinaire
Diatome, Ltd., Switzerland



Hosted by: JoAn Hudson
Clemson University
Microscopy Facility
Clemson, SC

When: June 9-11, 1999

Tuition: $1,400.00

Includes three nights lodging at the lakefront Conference Center & Inn at
Clemson University, continental breakfast and lunch daily, one group
dinner, course supplies, and lab charges.

Contact: Mike Boykin, Leica Microsystems, Inc. 800-248-0665 X5092







From: HORSWMN-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 23:24:45 EST
Subject: need microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Are there any grants available to purchase microscopes for an elementary
school in California?





From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 23:55:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LM Experience with Accu-Scope or Wang BioMed?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

If you are or were using Accu-Scope (3001, 3002, 3018PH etc.) or
Wang Biomed (3002, 3004) microscopes - please share your opinion
about them and your experience with me.

What did you use it for? Did it prove suitable for the task? Did
you have any problems with it? Was its optical/mechanical quality
OK for you and for the job?

If you had to use technical support, how helpful/quick were they?

If you used other microscopes too - how do they compare?

Depending on how interesting the answers would be to the other
list members, you may either post the replies to the list, or
e-mail me directly.

Thank you!
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}





From: Elektronmikroskopie EM 2075 Lab1-5 NW11 :      lab1-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 1999 12:59:24 CAT-2
Subject: Ruthenium O4 in biology

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Dear Listmembers,
Does anybody use or have used ruthenium tetroxide as a fixative for
biological material? Any references?
Thanks in advance.
Chris vd Merwe.





From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 1999 13:13:02 -0400
Subject: EDS Mineralogy Text

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I wonder if anyone knows a good textbook for EDS of minerals? I used to
have one in the lab, but it's gone missing, and I don't remember the title
or author(s). It had the mineralogical characteristics of most or all of
the common minerals, and included typical EDS spectra for each one. A very
valuable book for a lab that does a lot of geological work, and I'd really
like to replace it (and maybe chain it to the wall this time!)

F.C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada B2Y 4A2





From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 08:10:49 -0600
Subject: Text on EDS Mineralogy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Can anyone recommend a good text on EDS of minerals? We used to have a good
one in the lab, which described the characteristics of various common
minerals, and showed typical EDS spectra for them. Unfortunately, it's
disappeared and I cannot remember the title or author, so I guess it's time
for a new one.

F.C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada B2Y 4A2







From: Pat Zerfas :      zerfas-at-codon.nih.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 09:33:13 -0500
Subject: Print processor

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Dear microscopists,
Our facility needs to replace our print processor. I have looked
at several models and wanted some feedback about what models work well. We
are limited on the amount of space we can use. The processor can not be
any larger then 40" X 38", needs to be easy to clean and durable. We are
considering purchasing the ILFORD 2150, but heard it may have lots of
problems.

Thank you,

Patricia Zerfas
NIH
Bethesda, MD USA







From: Henry Eichelberger :      heichelb-at-binghamton.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 10:22:44 -0700
Subject: Re: BSA, bacitracin & negative stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Cheers Malcolm,
Yes, the bacitracin wetting technique is still valid as ever. The
reference you want is: D.W. Gregory and B.J.S. Pirie, Wetting agents for
electron microscopy of biological specimens. Proc. Fifth European Congress
on Electron Microscopy, (1972). 234-235. David Gregory recommended using a
minimum concentration of 7.5 ug/cm3 for formvar coated grids and 10 ug/cm3
on carbon coated formvar or carbon grids as a wetting agent. All the best,
Henry

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Malcolm wrote:
}
} Dear all
}
} can anyone tell me if people still use BSA or bacitracin as 'wetting agents'
} when negative staining? I cannot find reference to them in any of my texts
} but I have used them since the dawn of time, so I think I have just lost the
} references and/or they've gone out of fashion.
}
} If anyone has advice on use, advantages of particular chemicals or
} references I would be grateful.
}
} thanks
}
} Malcolm
}
} PS our glow discharge unit doesn't work - so I can't use that.
}
} Malcolm Haswell
} Electron Microscopy
} School of Sciences
} Fleming Building
} University of Sunderland
} SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
} Tyne and Wear
} UK
}
} Tel (0191) 515 2872
} e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
}
}
}
Henry Eichelberger, EM Facility Manager
Department of Biological Sciences Binghamton, University

Binghamton,NY 13902-6000
phone: (607)-777-2682
fax: (607)-777-6521
email: heichelb-at-binghamton.edu





From: Steve Widing :      swiding-at-astro.ocis.temple.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 11:08:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Microtome parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Does anyone know of a source for parts for a LKB Huxley Ultra
Microtome?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Widing
Temple University







From: Laurie Wallin :      lcarmitchel-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 08:41:52 -0800
Subject: CLSM - Need help on Zeiss 510 3D reconstruction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am working with the Zeiss LSM 510 Confocal microscope, and am having
trouble achieving 3D image reconstruction using the 3D for LSM program. Do
you have any recommendations, or know of the resources available through
which I can learn this technique? I'd appreciate any information you have
on the topic!

-----------------------------------------
Laurie Wallin
Technician
UCSD Department of Anesthesiology and Neuropathology
9500 Gilman Drive 0629
La Jolla, CA 92093
(619)534-1339 or 822-3271







From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 09:22:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: need microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Are there any grants available to purchase microscopes for an elementary
} school in California?

On a national level, no; but there may be an announcement from a major
corporation soon that could help you. Your best current possibility is a
local corporation that supports education. You'll need about $1000; you'll
find the rationale for that figure and advice on what to buy on the Project
MICRO web page (URL below). Although I can't supply the funding, I CAN
help you write a proposal, and I can write a supporting letter (but I'll be
on vacation 2/18-3/28). Where are you located? California is a big state!


Caroline Schooley
Educational Outreach Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html







From: Henry Eichelberger :      heichelb-at-binghamton.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 13:45:52 -0700
Subject: Re: Ruthenium O4 in biology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Chris,
Ruthenium tetroxide is slow penetrating, but some structures are better
preserved by its use. Examples: Madison, K. C., et. al. J. Invest.
Dermatology 88 (1987) 714. and Eichelberger, et. al., Proc. Microscopy &
Microanalysis 1994, 270. Best regards, Henry
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chris vd Merwe wrote:

} From: "Elektronmikroskopie EM 2075 Lab1-5 NW11" {lab1-at-ccnet.up.ac.za}
} Organization: University of Pretoria
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Date: Thu, 10 Feb 1999 12:59:24 CAT-2
} Subject: Ruthenium O4 in biology
} Priority: normal
} X-mailer: Pegasus Mail for Windows (v2.42a)
}
} Dear Listmembers,
} Does anybody use or have used ruthenium tetroxide as a fixative for
} biological material? Any references?
} Thanks in advance.
} Chris vd Merwe.
}
}
Henry Eichelberger, EM Facility Manager
Department of Biological Sciences Binghamton, University

Binghamton,NY 13902-6000
phone: (607)-777-2682
fax: (607)-777-6521
email: heichelb-at-binghamton.edu





From: Jim Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mailserv.mta.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 14:58:10 -0400
Subject: RE: EDS Mineralogy Text

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} I wonder if anyone knows a good textbook for EDS of minerals? I
used to
} have one in the lab, but it's gone missing, and I don't remember the
title
} or author(s). It had the mineralogical characteristics of most or all
of
} the common minerals, and included typical EDS spectra for each one. A
very
} valuable book for a lab that does a lot of geological work, and I'd
really
} like to replace it (and maybe chain it to the wall this time!)

} F.C. Thomas
} MicroAnalysis Facility
} Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
} Bedford Institute of Oceanography
} Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
} Canada B2Y 4A2

Perhaps you're thinking of "SEM Petrology Atlas" by Joann E. Welton,
Chevron Oil Field Research Company, published by the American
Association
of Petroleum Geologists, 1984. And no, you can't have my copy! Don't
know
if it's still in print, but amazon.com will hunt around for a used copy
for you (for
a small fee, of course).

Cheers, eh?

Jim

--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca







From: Winston Wiggins :      wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 99 14:53:24 PST
Subject: RE: Print processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Patricia,
Of the many print processors I've used, I'd choose the Ilford above
them all. The older versions have a problem blowing fuses but that
is supposed to have been corrected with the new models. The only
difficulty I had was that with heavy usage, it must be cleaned
more often which, for me, was more of a nuisance than a problem.
It's easy to use and durable, not to mention relatively inexpensive.
Go for it.
Winston

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Winston W Wiggins, Supervisor 2/10/99 2:53:24 PM
CRC-Electron Microscopy Lab. Ofc:704/355-1267
Carolinas Medical Center Fax:704/355-7648
P.O. Box 32861 Lab:704/355-7220
Charlotte,NC 28232-2861 USA Eml:wwiggins-at-carolinas.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~






From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 22:10:04 +0100
Subject: Online Metallographic Etch's Database

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

Today I was realesed online free Metallographic Etch's Database.
This database is designed to allow you to quick find etchant via
powerfull keyword search engine written in Perl. Here are some key
features:

1763 records in the database
75 etchants for macro etching
1359 etchants for micro etching
1103 etchants for chemical etching
218 electrolytes for electrolytic etching
75 etchants for physical etching
329 electrolytes for electropolishing

Keyword search engine
Browse database by macroetching
Browse database by microetching
Browse database by chemical etching
Browse database by electrolytic etching
Browse database by physical etching
Browse database by electropolishing
Powerfull online help

For more information please see link at microscopy
vendors database:
http://www.kaker.com/mvd/vendors.html

Henrik Kaker
--
SEM-EDS Laboratory
Metal Ravne
Slovenia
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/index.html





From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 15:34:22 -0600
Subject: Re: Text on EDS Mineralogy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Can anyone recommend a good text on EDS of minerals? We used to have a good
} one in the lab, which described the characteristics of various common
} minerals, and showed typical EDS spectra for them. Unfortunately, it's
} disappeared and I cannot remember the title or author, so I guess it's time
} for a new one.
}
} F.C. Thomas


Frank,

I think the book you are referring to is SEM Petrology Atlas by Joann E.
Welton.
It was published in 1984 by The American Association of Petroleum
Geologists, Tulsa, OK 74101. ISBN 0-89181-653-4.

Hope this helps.
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Room 101
Department of Geological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777
(573) 882=5458 fax
www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html





From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 16:46:19 -0500
Subject: Ilford print processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Patricia,
Our facility has had an Ilford 2150 for 8 years. Though it has had
breakdowns, repairs are fairly simple. I feel that the service contract is
too expensive for what you get, which is someone walking you through a
repair over the phone. I'm no mechanic but I've been able to deal with most
of the problems myself and Iford will sell parts if you need to replace
something. The one thing that has made the biggest difference in the
trouble free operation of the machine is the addition of a dirt/rust filter
on the water supply line. After we did that we really have had no problems
except for an occassional plumbing leak (also fixable if you can operate a
wrench). You'll also find that you don't need to change the chemicals as
often as the manufacturer suggests, as they can be expensive. If you need
any more information don't hesitate to contact me.

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky Medical Center






From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 1999 22:34:54 -0800
Subject: sputter coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--IMA.Boundary.2444868190
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A colleague and I built a device for doing something similar when I was in
graduate school. It consisted of an ultrasonic nebulizer to produce the
aerosol at one end of a column, N2 carrier gas (low velocity) to move the
aerosol and external heaters to heat the column (along with a few other bells
and whistles). Samples were collected on grids at the exit end and the whole
thing sat in a hood. The path length was about 2m.

What I'd like to know is if you take any care to get a more uniform aerosol
size? Do you work at low enough concentrations to have mostly one (or fewer)
particles per drop?

|---------------------------------------------------------------|
| Opinions expressed are mine an not those of Rohm and Haas Co. |
|---------------------------------------------------------------|
| Dr. John R. Reffner | rsrj2r-at-rohmhaas.com |
| Rohm and Haas Co. | |
| 727 Norristown Road | voice:215-619-5283 |
| Spring House, PA 19477 | Fax: 215-619-1607 |
|---------------------------------------------------------------|



______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi

The best way I know of preparing pigments for TEM analysis is by blowing an
aerosol of the sample dispersed in alcohol/water solution over a hot plate
and collecting the sample on a grid placed at the far end of the hot plate.
The company I work for is concerned about the safety issues surrounding this
so does anybody know of any less hazardous sample preps. or a simple
containment facility for the aerosol spray? I thought about building a glass
box for containment but are there any commercially available
containment/sample prep. units?

Thanks

Brian Manzor
e-mail: brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com


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} From: Manzor Brian BP {brian.manzor-at-grmouth.zeneca.com}
To: "'microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com'" {microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}


I'm looking for a gold or graphite/carbon sputter coater for
bio specimen preparation.

If you have one to sell, pls let me know details and price.





Cheers,
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.

PGP Public key:
BDC9 8860 AA83 1FB2 66D3 01BB 9EB8 8E6D 671F BEB3





From: Kevin_H_Jennings-at-sbphrd.com
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 08:28:25 +0000
Subject: LM: video microscopy - use of DV?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm considering using digital video (DV) for time-lapse/real-time LM.
Broadcast/domestic DVcam magazines suggest that DV gives improved
resolution over analogue video (S-VHS etc). Added to this, it also seems
to give better quality frame by frame editing (+ stills output) when
recorded on DV tape (mini or standard) and managed with software like
Adobe Premier using Firewire ( aka i.link/IEEE1394) fast serial links.

If anyone has used this technology I'd be interested to hear more about
the pros and cons.

TIA

Kevin Jennings
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.
SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals
Analytical Sciences -Microscopy Group
New Frontiers Science Park
Harlow
Essex
UK
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.















From: Birgit Neubohn :      neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 10:20:59 +0100
Subject: LM: ImaGene Green Kit

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

has anyone used the ImaGene Green Kit from Molecular Probes for detection
of GUS reportergene in *organelles*, not only in the cytosol?

Thanks in advance

Birgit


-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----
Dr. Birgit Neubohn
Institut fuer Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung (IPK)
(Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research)
Corrensstr. 3
D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany

Phone.: (+49) 039482 5447
Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----=0D=9D







From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.itss.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 12:50:39 +0000
Subject: LM - polarisation/interference - skin iridophores

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List

On behalf of Lydia Mathger:

I am working on the light reflection of mainly squid iridophores.
Are there any groups, preferably in the UK, working with polarising
and/or interference microscopes who could give me some advice with
this matter?

Thank you very much,

Lydia


PS. Hello Daniele ... back to work !!!



Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Citadel Hill
Plymouth
Devon PL1 2PB
England

Tel. 0044 1752 633249 (International)
Tel. 01752 633294 (National)

Fax. 0044 1752 633102 (International)
Fax. 01752 633102 (National)

e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 99 09:14:26 -0500
Subject: Makers of sputter/carbon coaters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gary Gaugler, Ph.D. wrote:
===============================================
I'm looking for a gold or graphite/carbon sputter coater for bio specimen
preparation.

If you have one to sell, pls let me know details and price.
================================================
There are several very excellent data bases of information of who
manufactures what in the microscopy and microanalysis market. You might
want to consult some of those listings. Two that I myself make frequent use
of are the following:

Microscopy Vendors Data Base
http://207.137.96.185/mvd/vendors.html

Microworld Resources and New
http://www.mwrn.com/

SPI Supplies is one of the several leading manufacturers of this equipment
and all the information you would need our units can be found on our website
below.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: rice-at-mcc.com (Janet Rice)
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 08:38:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Text on EDS Mineralogy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I can recommend looking at www.bookfinder.com and www.bibliophile.com if
you are looking for a used copy of the text (assuming it isn't available
new or you are too poor/cheap to pay for it). These are services where you
do your own search over a number of used booksellers - I found a couple of
technical books I wanted this way and for quite reasonable prices.

Janet Rice
MCC
Senior Member Technical Staff
rice-at-mcc.com
512-338-3266







From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 09:48:16 -0600
Subject: Parts for Ultrotome III microtomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

Yet another lab in search of microtome parts. We have four Leica Ultrotome
III ultramicrotomes in very serviceable condition, but a couple need new
belts. A supply of spare tubes would also be handy. Is anyone aware of a
source for new or used parts for these venerable instruments?

Thanks in advance!

Randy Tindall
Electron Microscope Core
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri - Columbia
Phone: 573-882-8304






From: Dr P. Echlin :      pe13-at-cus.cam.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 16:46:56 +0000 (BST)
Subject: Re: sputter coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary:
I have a sputter coater for sale. Trouble is I am in Cambridge UK

Patrick Echlin
Director, Multi-Imaging Centre
School of Biological Sciences
Cambridge University

On Wed,
10 Feb 1999, Dr. Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I'm looking for a gold or graphite/carbon sputter coater for
} bio specimen preparation.
}
} If you have one to sell, pls let me know details and price.
}
}
}
}
}
} Cheers,
} Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.
}
} PGP Public key:
} BDC9 8860 AA83 1FB2 66D3 01BB 9EB8 8E6D 671F BEB3
}
}






From: sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu (Peggy Sherwood)
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 11:52:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Microtome Parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,
We actually have an old LKB Microtome we are getting rid of--you are
welcome to it, but we are in
Boston. If you want to make arrangements to have it shipped to you--it's yours!
Peggy Sherwood
MGH-Wellman Labs of Photomedicine 224
50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-3192 (fax)







From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 11:53:29 -0500
Subject: LM: Leitz Manuals?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dose anybody know where to purchase and/or have, a Service Manual and
Operator Manual for a Leitz Ortholux and a Labolux?

Originals and or photo copies?

Thank You
Joseph Passero
jp-at-spacelab.net





From: sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu (Peggy Sherwood)
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 12:09:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Print Processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Patricia,
I didn't see your original e-mail request, but saw the responses! We have
a Rapidoprint DD3700
Agfa-Gevaert in our lab for processing EM prints. It's very simple, but
like some other processors,
it has to be cleaned frequently, especially the water stations, depending
upon it's use.
Peggy Sherwood
MGH-Wellman Labs of Photomedicine







From: Kenneth JT Livi :      klivi-at-jhu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 12:33:28 -0400
Subject: Re: EDS Mineralogy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Frank,

Having worked with minerals of many types, I find that a freeware program
for the Mac has been extremely useful in predicting spectra of any mineral.
DTSA for either 68K or PPC can be obtained from NIST or possibly from the
MSA web site (maybe someone else can confirm this). The program can
generate synthetic spectra for just about any detector and will simulate
thin or thick specimens. It's a wonderful teaching and research tool that I
recommend highly.

Ciao for now,
Ken

Kenneth JT Livi
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
34th and Charles Streets
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland 21218 USA
Phone: (410) 516-8342
Fax: (410) 516-7933
e-mail: klivi-at-jhu.edu







From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 19:28:22 +0100
Subject: SEM sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

In our lab we need procedure (cutting, grinding and polishing) of
SEM sample with diamond particles in metal matrix. Any suggestions?.

Henrik

--
SEM-EDS Laboratory
Metal Ravne
Slovenia
http://www2.arnes.si/guest/sgszmera1/index.html





From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 15:15:42 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS Mineralogy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Having worked with minerals of many types, I find that a freeware program
} for the Mac has been extremely useful in predicting spectra of any mineral.
} DTSA for either 68K or PPC can be obtained from NIST or possibly from the
} MSA web site (maybe someone else can confirm this). The program can
} generate synthetic spectra for just about any detector and will simulate
} thin or thick specimens. It's a wonderful teaching and research tool that I
} recommend highly.
}

DTSA can be downloaded at http://micro.nist.gov/DTSA/dtsa.html .

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com






From: Sally Burns :      burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 1999 15:54:54 -0500
Subject: Summary: Tissue cultures and coverslips

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Summary and compilation: Tissue cultures and coverslips:
Thanks to everyone for the tremendous response to my query.
The majority of responses suggested the use of Thermonox coverslips.
These may be purchased sterile. One side is prepared for cell adhesion,
and is labeled. They are compatible with alcohol, acetone and propylene
oxide as solvents, and with Epon, Spurr's and araldite mixtures for
resin. These coverslips come in sizes which fit well into tissue culture
plates.
Other investigators have successfully used glass coverslips, membrane
inserts and plastic petri plates. Permanox plates were also recommended,
cells may be grown, fixed and embedded in the chambers.
Most people use a dip into liquid nitrogen to facilitate removal of the
coverslip after embedding. Other simply pull the coverslip off while
still warm from the embedding oven.
If the coverslip is not removed, it may still be sectioned with a
diamond knife, however, the coverslip may separate from the resin under
the electron beam.
If the coverslip if removed, various methods are suggested to position
the cells parallel or perpendicular to the bloc face.
A compilation of the responses follows, MANY helpful tricks will be
found on these pages.
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I use standard glass coverslips - round ones that fit in 24 and 12 well
culture dishes. I sterilize them sitting on a clean filter paper in
glass
petri dishes then transfer them to culture dishes and seed with cells.
I
fix and process in 20 ml glass scintillation vials, embed in epon (put
coverslip cell side up on a slide with a drop of epon, heat 4-8 hrs at
58 C
(timing is important), cross-hatch with a razor blade, slowly lower into
liquid nitrogen, and little squares of epon pop off with cells attached.
re-embed squares in flat molds and section as usual.
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D. tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu.

We have had good results with thermonox coverslips and even better with
aclar provided the cells will grow on it. Process as usual for TEM and
IEM.
Heat can curl the aclar sometimes.
Scott D. Whittaker sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu
http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
The home of " Tips & Tricks "
Dear Sally,
I too have used Thermanox coverslips for TEM of tissue culture cells,
but I
found they often pulled out from or wrinkled-up my sections. I had much
better luck using filter-membrane inserts. The insert fits into the
wells
(I used 24-well plates but they come in many sizes). You can even
polarize
the cell line if necessary by placing media with serum in the well under
the insert and without serum in the filter-membrane cup. The membrane
then
can be fixed and processed in the holder and just before embedding,
separate the filter, cut it into pieces, and embed. No wrinkles, no
pulling out of the resin (I've used both Spurrs and LR White). Granted,
they are more expensive, but. . .

"Tina Schwach" tschwach-at-tc.umn.edu


-----------------------------------------------------------
I have used Thermanox coverslips extensively for this purpose. (Check
your
supplier of Lux tissue culture products, as well as your EM suppliers.)
They are resistant to acetone (not sure about propylene oxide) and I've
used them with Epon, spurr's and an araldite/epon mixture.
They are supplied sterile, and peel off easily from a warm polymerised
block, leaving the cells embedded in the resin block. I used to UV
sterilise them in a laminar flow hood overnight before use. A word of
warning though, they are not suitable for light microscopy, and some
cells
don't adhere very well to them. As I recall, I have used vero cells and
other kidney derived epithelial cell lines on them successfully.
You can section thermanox, but I think a better result is obtained by
peeling it off, and polymerising some fresh resin over the cells.
Contact me with problems if you wish. I have no commercial interest in
this
product. I've just processed heaps of cultured cells.
Good luck,
Rosey van Driel
{Rosemary.van.driel-at-baker.edu.au}

---------------------
We use the Thermanox coverslips that you can buy from EMS. They
work really well you just have to be careful to keep the correct side up
(Thermanox has a sidedness to it and the cells only grow right on it).
ACLAR works well too, though lately the stuff we buy from Ted Pella
seems
to be thinner than it used to be & has a tendency to curl up when
polymerizing.
I you have any questions, please feel free to ask.
Paula :-)
Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML
---------------------------------------------------------
Besides the Lux coverslips you can also use membrane inserts made by
Falcon
or Costar. If you would like have the exact protocol let me know and I
can
send it to you. I have used them both for number of years now without
any
problems though I prefer costar inserts.
Neelima Shah.............. From: Neelima Shah shahn-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
http://www.MED.upenn.edu/morphlab/

----------------------------------------------------------
Visit the lab manual on
//con-sgi.microbio.emory.edu/eyes-of-the-eagle/index.html
For over ten years our lab has floated monolayers of epithelial
celllines
from the surface of common plastic culture ware with propylene oxide.
This
is far easier than trying to use coverslips. Call me at 404 727 3508 if
you
need some coaching on the technology.
Regards, Skip
} From: L R MELSEN lmelsen-at-emory.edu
http://www.MED.upenn.edu/morphlab/


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We routinely attach cells to thermanox coverslips (available from EMS).
These coverslips can be sterilized, are compatible with conventional
embedding methods and can be thin sectioned with a diamond knife. We
fix
in GA/FA, osmium, dehydrate and embedd in Spurr's with no problem.

If you must section the coverslip itself, try to arrange it diagonally
in
the block and pick up the sections on formvar, because the coverslip and
the resin tend to separate under the beam.

If you are sectioning parallel to the coverslip, embedd this way. Fill
a
beam capsule with resin and lay the coverslip, cell side down on top.
Polymerize; them immediately upon removing the blocks from the oven,
pull
the coverslip off. If you do this quickly while the blocks are still
warm,
the cells will remain on the block and you don't have to worry about
sectioning the coverslip.
Good Luck,
Michelle Peiffer
814-865-212 email:mlk101-at-psu.edu


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For TEM of cultured cells, we grow the cultures on
"Thermanox" tissue culture coverslips. From Nalge Nunc
INternational, 50 sterile coverslips, 13 mm in diameter is
catalog 174950. EMS also sells these thermanox cover
slips in a variety of sizes (see page 143 of their cat
XIII). The coverslips can be treated with all the same
chemistry as tissue including propylene oxide and Spurrs
epoxy, which are two components which solubilize
polystyrene. These thermanox coverslips can be sunk cell
side up in freshly made Spurrs, then following
polymerization the coverslips can be removed by first
sawing a small area of the epoxy/cell/substrate, then
immersing in liquid nitrogen for a few seconds, then prying
away the substrate. Now the embedded cells are immediate
on the epoxy. Re-embed two fragments of the culture face
to face for cross-sections, or cut the block parallel to the
face for tangential sections. We particularly like the
round 13 mm thermanox coverslips for immunocytochemistry of
cultured cells since they can be floated cell side down in
a drop of 100 microlitters antibody - gold conjugate,
conserving reagents.

If you would like to grow a larger culture, you could also
use "permanox" culture dishes, which are equally resistant
to chemicals common in TEM processing. These are also
available through EMS and other suppliers.

Douglas R. Keene
DRK-at-shcc.org





To process cell cultures for grown on round, 13 mm
Thermanox tissue culture cover slips for TEM, we use the
following hardware:

For fixation, we use porcelain multi-well dishes. These
are what most people refer as "staining dishes". They are
white, measure about 3.5 x 4.5" and have 12 depressions.
We use these for glutaraldehyde, buffer rinses and OsO4.
OsO4 can be completely rinsed from the dishes. Once in the
last buffer after OsO4 and prior to ethanols and propylene
oxide, we transfer the disks to 50 ml polypropylene culture
tubes, such as Fisher 05-539-7 (these are sterile, but
certainly it is not necessary to pay for sterile
containers). There is plenty of room to enter a pipette
for fluid exchange without touching the culture disks, and
the culture surface will not touch the walls of the
cylindrical tube so there is no worry that the cells will
be rubbed off. Given the depth of the tube, we do not
worry too much that the culture will dry out as fluids are
exchanged, since the atmosphere within the tubes is fairly
saturated with solvent vapor. Still, fluid exchange is
done quickly. The polypropylene tubes are resistant to
P.O. and Spurrs. Do not use tubes made from polystyrene as
they will dissolve. Once infiltrated with the last change
of epoxy, we fill a resin-resistant container with epoxy to
a minimum depth of 5 mm, sink the disk so that the cells
face up, then polymerize the epoxy. We steal the
polypropylene lids from wheaten snap-cap vials (Fisher
#0333520E) which are of the appropriate diameter for
embedding 13 mm coverslips. Wearing a dust mask, We use a
jewelers saw to free small blocks of embedded culture,
loosen the cover slip with liquid nitrogen, then remove the
disk which exposes the culture to the surface of the block.
We then either re-embedded (in some of the same batch of
media which was used to infiltrate the culture) face to
face for cross sections, or cut the blocks parallel to the
culture surface for tangential sections.

Good luck,

Doug Keene
EM Facility
Shriners Hospital for Children
DRK-at-shcc.org


----------------------------------
Here's a few comments to follow from Doug Keene's reply to you
celss on coverslips question.

You can process and section Thermanox quite easily with cells
grown on them.

Orientation problems can be overcome if you cut the coverslip to
fit a BEEM capsule before you innoculate with cells. I have seen
good results with various cell types, and if you taper the cut
coverslip to fit into the BEEM pot, trimming the block is pretty
quick too. If you need, you can also bend up the coverslip at the
non-tapered end to indicate which side the cells are growing.

Spurrs resin seems pretty good, but there can be some
delamination between the coverslip and resin, but not always!
Hope this helps.
P.Bond-at-plymouth.ac.uk


--------------------------------------------

Dear Sally,
The coverslips that everyone uses is my Thermanox plastic coverslips
which are
sterile and come in many different sizes depending on your need. They
may be
found wither in our hard copy catalog or on our website at
http://www.emsdiasum.com.
Go to our online catalog and click chapter 7. They are listed under
Thermanox. In our hard copy catalog XIII they may be found on page 143.
Please let me know if I may be of further assistance to you.

Sincerely,
Electron Microscopy Sciences
215-646-1566
} From: "SGKCCK-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

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I used to grow Vero Cells on thermanox cover slips. In Europe we buy
such
cover slips through our local distributor " Bioblock", but I am quite
sure
that you can find the same in the EMS catalog ( Nalg Nunc ref.174950 =
tissue coverslip, sterile, thermanox size 13 mm in diameter). In fact
the
thermanox cover slips are sold sterile and the surface treated for cell
culture is on the top (where the label is). I grow Vero cells (or
others),
infect them, fix them before labelling with gold-coupled antibodies. I
forgot to say that I put the cover slip on 24 wells (or 4 wells) adapted
plates (from Nunc or Falcon ...). Leaving the coverslip on the well, I
do
all the dehydration and epon embedding in the same plate. Before
polymerization I cut the /\ shape off the beem capsule (and put three
of
these capsules per well (the uncutted side directly over the specimen)
over
a thin layer of epon. I polymerize for a night and the next day I fill
the
beem capsules with epon and polymerize further on.
When the samples are polymerized you can just remove the capsules and
the
cells will be adherent on the epon. As usual you trim your block and cut
the
sections ( the first one will almost be good).
We published this method in EmboJournal 1998, 17, 3899-3908.

I hope that this helps,
Daniele Spehner From: "Daniele Spehner"
{daniele.spehner-at-etss.u-strasbg.fr}

-----------------------------------------------------------
Thermonox cover slips (sold by Fisher Scientific, pg. 1793 of the 98/99
catalog) are great for TEM and SEM applications. They are manufactured
by
Nunc, come in many different shapes and sizes, have one side textured
for
cell adhesion, and arrive sterile in packs of 50. They are resistant to
acetone, alcohol and can be sectioned using diamond kni